Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3355047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1967
Filing dateMar 10, 1966
Priority dateMar 10, 1966
Publication numberUS 3355047 A, US 3355047A, US-A-3355047, US3355047 A, US3355047A
InventorsDe Sole Daniel E
Original AssigneeDe Sole Daniel E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure equalization means for baby bottle
US 3355047 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1967 D. E DE SOLE 3,355,047

PRESSURE EQUALIZATION MEANS FOR BABY BOTTLE Filed March 10, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 2

I I 7 I Q l\ I I 3 II I r' ,137 I I 49 as 55 -35 33 F I G. 5. F G 5 INVENTOR DANIEL E. DESOLE BY Nov. 28, 1967 D. E. DE sou-z 3,355,047

PRESSURE EQUALIZATION MEANS FOR BABY BOTTLE Filed March 10, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet FIG. 6.

I NVENTOR.

DANIEL E DE SOLE United States Patent "ice 3,355,047 PRESSURE EQUALIZATION MEANS FOR BABY BOTTLE Daniel E. De Sole, 29 S. Manning Blvd., Albany, NY. 12203 Filed Mar. 10, 1966, Ser. No. 533,275 4 Claims. (Cl. 21511) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Pressure equalization means for use with a baby bottle by which air is automatically admitted interiorly of the bottle to equalize interior bottle pressure with the atmosphere by means of discrete openings in the embodiments of a tube mounted by a truncated nipple, a straw-like member mounted by a truncated nipple, a balloon-like member mounted by a truncated nipple and a tube with an out-turned flange, severally disposed in the bottle by interposition between the bottles reduced, externally threaded lower portion and an internally threaded lower retaining cap.

This invention relates to the art of pressure equalization means for a baby bottle.

A conventional baby bottle or nursing bottle consists of a substantially cylindrical container having one end open, and referred to as the bottle, a nipple and an internally threaded, retaining cap. The nipple has an out-turned flange portion whose bottom is seated upon the flat open end of the bottle. The externally-threaded, open end of the bottle is suitably engaged by the threaded portion of the retaining cap to maintain the nipple in its seated position with respect to the bottle. The tip area of the nipple with its perforations or holes formed therein is disposed in the babys mouth, and sucking action on the part of the baby causes the formula or milk in the bottle to be drawn through the perforations or holes in the nipple tip into the babys mouth. This sucking action on the part of the baby causes the creation of a partial vacuum or negative pressure interiorly of the bottle. This partial vacuum or negative pressure is less than atmospheric pressure with the result that the baby is physically unable to withdraw any more formula or milk from the bottle by his sucking action. However, the baby continues his sucking action on the nipple tip. The mid region of the nipple collapses and occludes to prevent any more formula or milk to be withdrawn from the bottle. Sustenance is close at hand, but the baby is not able to obtain this sustenance from his bottle. The baby continues to suck because a baby does not have physiologic and cognitive development to know that by releasing the nipple he will allow air to enter through the perforations or holes in the nipple tip and thereby allow air admission to relieve the partial vacuum created and to equalize the interior bottle'pres sure with the atmosphere. A baby under approximately twelve months does not possess sufficient physiologic and cognitive development to perform this intentional act of such air admission for such pressure equalization. Moreover, during the time of this occlusion of the mid region of the nipple, the baby in the course of his continued sucking on the collapsed and occluded nipple will draw some air into his stomach. This factor of the baby drawing air into his stomach has been medically attributed to be a contributing cause of colic. Contributing cause of colic or not, the air in the babys stomach must be removed by burping the baby; otherwise, the baby may vomit the contents of his stomach to get rid of this air in his stomach. Upon such occlusion of the mid region of the nipple, his mother will take the bottle away from her baby to unscrew the retaining cap to allow the negative 3,355,047 Patented Nov. 28, 1967 pressure in the bottle to equalize with atmospheric. Nevertheless, his mother sometimes must go one step further and remove the nipple in order that she can manipulate the nipple sufliciently to thereby constrain the collapsed and occluded nipple to resume its original configuration.

Another problem in the art often occurs in the sterilization of the bottle with its prepared formula or milk. With the prepared formula or milk in the bottle, the nipple is disposed in inverted position on the bottle and the retaining cap is loosely screwed on. The bottle is then placed in a sterilizer. The sterilizer conventionally is a container with a cover. The container has a wire container which will hold several bottles. Water is put into the container and boiled for twenty to twenty-five minutes. Thereafter the bottles are removed from the sterilizer, the retaining caps are screwed down, and the bottles are placed in the refrigerator. When his mother fetches her baby a bottle for his feeding, she must first unscrew the retaining cap, dispose the nipple in its upright position and then screw down the retaining cap. However, while the bottle is in the refrigerator cooling, often a partial vacuum or negative pressure of sufiicient magnitude has been created interiorly of the bottle that when the mother unscrews the retaining cap to dispose the nipple in its upright position preparatory to feeding her baby the nipple will be sucked in the bottle with attendant ditficulty in the removal of the nipple, with mess from such removal and with possible bacterial contamination of the nipple, bottle and the formula or milk contained in the bottle Accordingly, the problem of the art to which this invention apertains is the need for pressure equalization means whereby the partial vacuum or negative pressure created in the interior of the bottle in the initial sterilization of the bottle and through the sucking action of the baby in his feeding can be relieved and equalized with atmospheric pressure.

In solving this problem of the art, certain conditions have been considered necessary and have been observed. One condition is that the pressure equalization device must be foolproof and must work.

Another condition is that the pressure equalization device must not affect the construction, operation, use and function of the conventional nipple. In this condition it should be mentioned that in the past attempts have been made unsuccessfully to incorporate with the nipple a pressure equalization function. Such unsuccessful attempts have resulted in nipples lacking their necessary softness and flexibility, in nipples that are very diflicult to clean and sterilize, and in nipples whose incorporated pressure equalization function quickly malfunctions. A further condition is that the pressure equalization device must lend itself to utter simplicity in thorough cleaning and sterilization. In the past, pressure equalization devices have not altogether observed this condition; and those pressure equalization devices rendered difficult the cleaning of the accumulation, deposite and build-up of formula, and with resulting malfunctions and bacterial contaminations.

Another condition is that the pressure equalization device must be of simple but durable construction, and must be inexpensive to manufacture. Of course, simplicity and durability of construction contribute to the factor of inexpensiveness in manufacture.

Along with simplicity and durability of construction is the condition that the assembly of the pressure equalization device for its intended use and function must be easily understood by, and should be self-evident quickly to, the average mother. If the assembly, function and use of a pressure equalization device is easily understood by the average mother, she will be most susceptible to employing the device in feeding her baby.

Accordingly, the object of this invention is to provide a pressure equalization device which will solve the problem of the art and observe the conditions set forth with reference to such solution.

This object and other objects of the invention should be discerned and appreciated by reference to the detailed specification taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein like reference numeralsrefer to similar parts throughout the several views, in which:

FIG. 1 is a view partly in section, of one embodiment of the invention, and which further depicts the sub-assembly of the male-female adapter with a tube;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the embodiment in FIG. 1, but which sectional view excludes the bottle, nipple and upper-retaining cap of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view of the sub-assembly of the male-female adapter with a straw-like tube;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view of FIG. 3 in the direction of arrow 4;

FIG. 5 is a view of the sub-assembly of the male-female adapter with a balloon-like member;

FIG. 6 is a view, partly in section, of another embodiment of the invention showing a flanged tube;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the flanged tube shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view of FIG. 6 in the direction of the arrow 10.

Shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings is a baby bottle 1, substantially of open-cylindrical configuration, having reduced upper and lower portions 3 and 5 which are externally threaded. A nipple 7 is of conventional construction and configuration in that same has an outturned flange (not shown), a toroidal-like head 9 formed on its surface, a mid region 11 and a tip 13 which has suitable perforations or holes therethrough. The nipple 7, in its emplaced disposition, extends through the center hole of conventional upper-retaining cap 15. Cap 15 is internally threaded. And sulficient mutual engagement of the internally threaded cap 15 with the externally threaded upper portion 3 provides securement of nipple 7 in its emplaced disposition as shown.

Similarly disposed in secured relationship is the con ventional lower-retaining cap 17 which has its internally threaded portion sufliciently engaged with the externally threaded portion of lower portion 5. As viewed in FIGS. 1 and 2, disposed in ascending order between the annular inner portion 19 of cap 17 and the bottom of lower portion 5 are lower end cap 21, truncated nipple 23 and washer-like, sealing gasket 25. Truncated nipple 23 is disposed in inverted position with respect to lower portion 5.

Lower end cap 21 is shown to be of solid, disk-like configuration. However, it is within the concept of this invention to have formed through this described type of end cap an air-ingress hole covered and sealed by a handremovable, adhesive-like tab. In this type of modification described end cap 21 can be of suitable plastic material or of waxed cardboard. And it is further within the concept of this invention for the end cap 21 to be of material and structure that same will be a finger-puncturable, Waterproof, sealing membrane.

Truncated nipple 23 is similar to nipple 7 with its tip 13 removed. Outturned flange 27 of nipple 23 is disposed in abutting relationship between the annular inner portion 19 of cap 17 and gasket 25. The toroidal-like head 29 of nipple 23 abuts gasket and retains same in the disposition as shown.

Disposed in the mid region 31 of nipple 23 is the malefemale adapter 33. Adapter 33 is retained in such disposition in the mid region 31 by the interfering engagement of the shoulder 35 of adapter 33 by reason of the fact that the external diameter of shoulder 35 is slightly greater than the internal diameter of mid region 31.

Aadapter 33 has a neck portion 37. Externally, neck portion 37 is utilized for penetrating, retentive engagement with the modifications shown in FIGS. 3 and 5. Internally, neck portion 37 is configured as a truncated, right-circular cone. Tube 39 has a bottom 41 and a top 43. Bottom 41 is configured complemental to, but slightly larger than, the internal neck portion 37 of adapter 33. Hence, upon sufiicient insertion of tube 39 interiorly of neck portion 37, its bottom 41 will interferringly engage and be retained in such disposition by the internal neck portion 37. Tube 39 is sufiicient length such that its top 43 will project above the liquid line of the formula or milk in the bottle 1.

Tube 39 has its internal diameter restricted to that range of internal diameters small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula and milk, but large enough in diameter to allow the passage of air in sufficient quantity to allow of practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere.

In conjunction with the utility explanation of the device shown and described with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, it assumed that either the solid, disk-like, lower end cap 21 has first been removed, or that in the modification of the end cap which has an air-ingress hole the sealing tab has been been removed, or that in the modication of the sealing membrane a hole has been fingerpunctured therethrough. With formula or milk in the bottle and with the liquid level below the top 43 of tube 39, the bottle is ready to be fed to the baby. As the baby sucks upon nipple 7 and as the partial vacuum commences to be created interiorly of bottle 1, air is drawn interiorly of bottle 1 through center hole 45 of cap 21 and thence internally through truncated nipple 23, adapter 33 and tube 39 to the extent that the air being admitted interiorly of bottle 1 will equalize with the atmospheric pressure. Inasmuch as this process of pressure equalization will be practically automatic, there will be no restraint upon the flow of formula or milk to the tip 13 of nipple 7. Hence, the sucking action of the baby will result in his receiving uninterruptedly the formula or milk contained in the bottle. The only time the baby will be able to suck air into his stomach is after he has emptied the contents of his bottle.

FIGS. 3 and 4 depict a straw-like tube 47 having a bottom 49 and a top 51. Tube 47 is carried on adapter 33 by the insertion of neck portion 37 in the bottom 49 of tube 47, as shown. Since the external diameter of neck portion 37 is slightly greater than the internal diameter of tube 47, there will be sufficient interfering engagement for retention of tube 47 on neck portion 37. The top 51 of tube 47 is pre-pinched in the configuration, as shown, to restrict the internal opening thereat to within that range of internal openings small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula and milk, but large enough in opening to allow the passage of air in sufiicient quantity to allow of practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere. Tube 47 is of suflicient length such that its top 51 will project above the liquid line of the formula or milk in the bottle 1. The utility explanation of FIGS. 3 and 4 is the same as was described with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 5 depicts a balloon-like member 53 of rubber or suitable plastic material. Member 53 has its bottom 55 a rolled over ring to facilitate mounting and removal of member 53 with respect to the neck portion 37 of adapter 33. Since the external diameter of neck portion 37 is. slightly greater than the internal diameter of ring 55,

there will be sufiicient interfering engagement for retention of member 53 on neck portion 37. Member 53- has at its top 57 an opening formed therethrough that is within that range of openings small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula and milk, but large enough in opening to allow the passage of air in sufficient quantity to allow of practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere. Member 53 is of sufiicient length such that its top 57 will project above the liquid line of the formula or milk in the bottle 1. At any liquid level in the bottle 1, the top 57 of member 53 will float at that liquid level and will project itself above such-liquid level. The pressure of the liquid in the bottle 1 collapses and occludes the walls of member 53 to prevent any formula or milk from leaking through member 53. Of course, the top 57 of member 53 floats in unoccluded condition above the liquid line. And as is the case with respect to FIGS. 1-4, as the baby sucks upon nipple 7 and as the partial vacuum or negative pressure less than atmospheric pressure commences to be created interiorly of bottle 1, air at atmosheric pressure which is greater than the pressure interior of bottle 1 is drawn internally through member 53 and is admitted interiorly of bottle 1 to equalize the interior negative pressure with the atmospheric pressure. Since the atmospheric pressure is greater than the interior bottle pressure, the atmospheric pressure will open up the occluded walls of member 53 on its passage to the top 57 of member 53 and subsequent admission interiorly of bottle 1.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6 of the drawings, bottle 79 is similar in configuration to bottle 1, and mounts a nipple and cap for like purpose, use and function. The reduced lower portion 81 is similarly threaded externally to receive by engagement therewith the internally threaded portion of lower retaining cap 83. Cap 83 has a centrally disposed hole 85 and an annular inner portion 87. As viewed in FIG. 6, disposed in ascending order between the annular inner portion 87 of cap =83 and the bottom of lower portion 81 are lower end cap 89 and the outturned flange 91 of tube 93. Tube 93 is of suflicient length such that its top 95 will project above the liquid line of the formula or milk in the bottle 79. The internal diameter of tube 93 is restricted to that range of internal diameter small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula and milk, but large enough in diameter to allow the passage of air in sufiicient quantity to allow practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere. Lower end cap 89 is a finger-puncturable waterproof, sealing membrane; however, in place of lower end cap 89, a lower end cap similar to lower end cap 21 can be utilized, or a lower end cap can be utilized in accordance with the modifications that were described with reference to lower end cap 21. With an opening punctured through end cap 89, the embodiment shown and described with reference to FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 functions in the manner similar to the embodiments previously described to allow practically automatic equalization of the air pressure interiorly of bottle 79 with the atmosphere.

Of paramount importance in this breakthrough in this art is the fact that tube 39, tube 47, member 53, tube 69 and tube 93 are each one-time use, disposable items. A great amount of ingenuity, time and effort has been expended in the effort in achieving the ameliorative result in comparison to the prior art by the structural design of each of the disposable items 39, 47, 53, 69 and 93 so that these enumerated items have cooperative and correlative, arrangement and association with their respective structure such that each one of the embodiments with their modifications is fool-proof and works in elfectuating pressure equalization, and that the enumerated items can be mass-produced at minimal expense. Hence, this factor of the enumerated items being produced and manufactured in mass quantity at minimal expense opens the doors .to other ameliorative results in comparison to the prior art.

With respect to the use by the mother of one of the enumerated items, for example, such as enumerated item 47tube 47 can be produced and sold in quantity for pennies. This factor of production expense allows tube 47 to be used only once and then thrown away. The only element of the embodiment of FIG. 3 that can malfunction in pressure equalization is tube 47 which is used only once and replaced by another tube 47 on the succeeding occasion the baby is given the bottle 1. Even assuming a defect in manufacture causes tube 47 to malfunction, the fact of the minimal expense for tube 47 allows another tube 47 to be substituted.

With respect to the embodiments herein shown and described, the conventional nipple 7 is utilized; and the embodiments of the pressure equalization device do not affect the construction, operation, use and function of the conventional nipple 7 utilized with the embodiments.

Resuming the explanation with respect to the exemplary tube 47 of FIG. 3, it should be apparent and manifest that the only parts that need cleaning and sterilization are bottle 1, nipples 7 and 23, caps 15 and 17, end cap 21, gasket 25 and adapter 33. These parts can be easily and quickly cleaned and then sterilized.

Furthermore, it should be self-evident that these parts 1, 7, 23, 15, 17, 21, 25, 33 and 39 are of simple and durable construction, and that the assembly of same is easy to understand and to perform by the average mother.

With respect to the use by the mother of another of the enumerated items, for example, such as enumerated item 93--tube 93 can be produced and sold in quantity for pennies. This factor of production expense allows tube 93 to be used only once at each feeding of the baby and then thrown away. Lower end cap 89 as a finger-puncturable, waterproof, sealing membrane is likewise used only once at each feeding of the baby and is then thrown away. Since tube 93 and lower end cap 89 would be used for only one feeding of the baby and then thrown away, the only parts requiring cleaning and sterilization would be bottle 79, nipple 7, cap 15 and cap 83; and these parts can be easily and quickly cleaned and then sterilized.

The choice of material for bottles 1 and 79 is either glass or suitable plastic. The nipples 7 and 23 are of soft rubber or suitable plastic. Member 53 is made of soft rubber. And the other elements shown and described herein are made of suitable plastic, including hard rubber, unless otherwise specified.

With respect to the problem of partial vacuum or negative pressure being created interiorly of the bottle upon sterilization after preparation of the formula or milk, it should be appreciated from the descriptions of the embodiments and modifications of the air pressure equalization devices and their respective utility explanations that the air pressure interiorly of any bottle will be equalized practically automatically with the atmosphere in a similar manner provided there is communication from the atmosphere through the pressure equalization device to the interior of the bottle.

Having thusly described my invention, I claim:

1. Pressure equalization means for use with a baby bottle for the admission of air interiorly of the bottle to equalize the interior bottle pressure with the atmosphere; said pressure equalization means including an opening within that range small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula or milk, but large enough to allow the passage of air in sufficient quantity to allow of practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere, said pressure equalization means including a truncated nipple, a male female adapter and a tube having said opening, said truncated nipple carrying said adapter, and said adapter carrying said tube.

2. Pressure equalization means for use with a baby bottle for the admission of air interiorly of the bottle to equalize the interior bottle pressure with the atmosphere; said pressure equalization means including an opening within that range small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula or milk, but large enough to allow the passage of air in sufiicient quantity to allow of practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere, said pressure equalization means including a truncated nipple, a malefemale adapter and .a straw-like tube having said opening, said truncated nipple carrying said adapter and :said adapter .carrying said straw-like tube.

3. Pressure equalization means for use with a baby bottle for the admission of air interiorly of the bottle to equalize the interior bottle pressure with the atmosphere; said pressure equalization means including an opening within that range small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula or milk, but large enough to allow the passage of air in suflicient quantity to allow of practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere, said pressure equalization means including a truncated nipple, a malefemale adapter and a balloon-like member having said opening, said truncated nipple carrying said adapter and said adapter carrying said balloon-like member.

4. Pressure equalization means for use with a baby bottle for the admission of air interiorly of the bottle to equalize the interior bottle pressure with the atmosphere; said pressure equalization means including an opening within that range small enough to minimize and retard the flow therethrough of formula or milk, but large enough to allow the passage of air in sulficient quantity to allow of practically automatic equalization of the air pressure in the bottle with the atmosphere, said pressure equalization means including a tube and an internally threaded, lower-retaining cap, said tube having an outturned flange and said opening, said bottle having an externally threaded, reduced lower portion, said reduced lower portion having a bottom, said outturned flange being .disposed between said lower-retaining cap and said bottom of said reduced lower portion, and being retained in such .disposition by .mutual engagement of the threaded portions of said reduced lower portion and said lowerretaining cap, said bottle having a reduced upper portion, said reduced .upper portion having a lowermost portion, said tube opening projecting above said lowermost portion. ,3

References Cited W UNITED STATES PATENTS 362,554 5/1887 Suydam 21511 1,037,309 9/1912 Poore 21511 1,080,070 12/1913 Mambour-g 21511 1,441,406 1/1923 Dales 21511 2,094,721 10/1937 Puetz 21511 2,456,337 12/ 1948 Soper 21511 2,825,479 3/ 1958 Litzie 21511 3,134,495 5/1964 Carbonel 21511 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

DONALD F. NORTON, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US362554 *May 10, 1887 James suydam
US1037309 *Apr 18, 1911Sep 3, 1912John C PooreNursing-bottle.
US1080070 *Feb 2, 1912Dec 2, 1913Sanitary Nursing Bottle CompanyNursing-bottle.
US1441406 *Jan 18, 1921Jan 9, 1923William R DalesInfant's nursing device
US2094721 *Nov 22, 1935Oct 5, 1937Anthony PuetzNursing bottle
US2456337 *Apr 19, 1946Dec 14, 1948Soper Roy MSanitary nursing bottle
US2825479 *Jun 15, 1954Mar 4, 1958Samuel L LitzieBaby bottle
US3134495 *Sep 14, 1962May 26, 1964Carbonel Richard JosephVented nursing bottle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3467270 *Aug 3, 1967Sep 16, 1969Hall Robert MCap
US4828126 *Sep 17, 1987May 9, 1989Vincinguerra Mark TBaby bottle having an air inlet valve
US5328043 *Aug 20, 1993Jul 12, 1994Sharon RayBaby bottle with sealing disk holder
US5431290 *Jul 19, 1994Jul 11, 1995Vinciguerra; Mark T.Baby bottle for improved flow
US5542670 *Jul 17, 1995Aug 6, 1996Playtex Products, Inc.Flow control element and covered drinking cup
US5692627 *Jul 9, 1996Dec 2, 1997Feng; Le-JangNursing bottle with an air vent of the bottom thereof
US5932262 *May 27, 1997Aug 3, 1999Little; Misty L.Method of flavoring a baby bottle nipple device and nipple device having flavor incorporated therein
US6068147 *Nov 24, 1998May 30, 2000Sheu; Miin-ShiouAir intake aiding plate for nipples of feeding bottles
US6422415Feb 4, 2000Jul 23, 2002Playtex Products, Inc.Leak-proof cup assembly with flow control element
US7828165Dec 17, 2007Nov 9, 2010New Vent Designs, IncFully vented wide rim nursing bottle with contoured vent tube
US7896180 *Aug 4, 2008Mar 1, 2011Michael KenneyLiquid container with additive dispenser
US7992735 *Jun 5, 2008Aug 9, 2011Brian L. BullardApparatus and method for the separate storage and mixing of substances
US8025168 *May 12, 2009Sep 27, 2011Brian L. BullardApparatus and method for the separate storage and mixing of substances
US8146759Jan 21, 2009Apr 3, 2012New Vent Designs, Inc.Fully vented wide rim nursing bottle with canted vent tube
US8579130Aug 26, 2010Nov 12, 2013New Vent Designs, Inc.Fully vented wide rim nursing bottle with single piece vent insert
US8757406Oct 22, 2010Jun 24, 2014New Vent Designs, Inc.Fully vented wide rim nursing bottle
US20040118801 *Oct 30, 2002Jun 24, 2004Brown Craig E.Fully vented wide rim nursing bottle
US20050258124 *Jun 14, 2005Nov 24, 2005Brown Craig EFully vented wide rim nursing bottle with contoured vent tube
US20060043048 *Oct 26, 2005Mar 2, 2006Brown Craig EFully vented wide rim nursing bottle
US20080093323 *Dec 17, 2007Apr 24, 2008Brown Craig EFully vented wide rim nursing bottle with contoured vent tube
US20080173608 *Jan 24, 2007Jul 24, 2008Johnson Avery CFeeding container venting apparatus and methods
US20080217282 *Feb 26, 2008Sep 11, 2008Brown Craig EFully vented wide rim nursing bottle
US20080223478 *Mar 18, 2008Sep 18, 2008Eerik Torm HantsooMethod of and apparatus for the bottom-up filling of beverage containers
US20090301904 *Jun 5, 2008Dec 10, 2009Brian L. BullardApparatus and method for the separate storage and mixing of substances
US20090301905 *May 12, 2009Dec 10, 2009Brian L. BullardApparatus and method for the separate storage and mixing of substances
US20100025350 *Aug 4, 2008Feb 4, 2010Michael KenneyLiquid container with additive dispenser
US20100181276 *Jan 21, 2009Jul 22, 2010Brown Craig EFully vented wide rim nursing bottle with canted vent tube
US20110000868 *Aug 26, 2010Jan 6, 2011Brown Craig EFully vented wide rim nursing bottle with contoured vent tube
US20110068078 *Oct 22, 2010Mar 24, 2011Brown Craig EFully vented wide rim nursing bottle
US20110079570 *Jan 16, 2010Apr 7, 2011Brown Craig EFully continuously vented drinking cup for infants and children
US20110180508 *Jan 25, 2010Jul 28, 2011Chin-Long FongDual opening nursing bottle
US20150290086 *Aug 22, 2012Oct 15, 2015Ruth PrenticeBottom-vented baby bottle
USRE37016 *Aug 6, 1998Jan 16, 2001Playtex Products, Inc.Flow control element and covered drinking cup
WO1996002222A1 *Mar 6, 1995Feb 1, 1996Vinciguerra Mark TBaby bottle for improved flow
WO1999029433A1 *Dec 7, 1998Jun 17, 1999SivelDevice for packaging and dispensing a product, with manual pump and air intake filter
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/11.1, 137/587
International ClassificationA61J9/04, A61J9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61J9/04
European ClassificationA61J9/04