Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3355106 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1967
Filing dateOct 21, 1965
Priority dateApr 30, 1964
Publication numberUS 3355106 A, US 3355106A, US-A-3355106, US3355106 A, US3355106A
InventorsWard A Graham
Original AssigneeStratford Eng Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mixing atomizing rotor
US 3355106 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1967 w. A. GRAHAM 3,355,106

I MIXING ATOMiZING ROTOR Original Filed April 30, 1964 -4-- 6,45, Z/QU/D 0.6 POM DEE INVENTOR BY I Z 645, 1/00/13 I of POM/0E: ATTORNEYfi Nov. 28, 1967 W. A. GRAHAM MIXING ATOMI ZING ROTOR Original Filed April 30, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1 $5 @IM-wm gillllll/ I //////IIIIIIII: :IIIl

INVENTOR V/a/z/ A? 6/4/74? ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 28, 1967 3 Claims. (Cl. 239-9) This is a divisional application of Ser. No. 366,217, filed Apr. 30, 1964, now abandoned, entitled Mixing Atomizing Rotor. This apparatus and invention, as well as process, are continuations-in-part of my application Ser. No. 112,270 filed May 24, 1961, now abandoned, entitled Gas Atomization Method and Apparatus and my application Ser. No. 254,215 filed J an. 28, 1963, now abandoned, entitled Multiple Orifice Atomizing Evaporator, as well as my application Ser. No. 290,758 filed June 26, 1963, now abandoned, entitled Multiple Orifice Atomizing Evaporator.

This invention relates to both apparatus for dehydrating and degasifying liquids (flash evaporation rotors) and also mixing and chemical reaction devices and refers more particularly to such apparatus wherein one or more liquids, gases, fine solids and mixtures thereof are introduced into a unique spray device in which same are mixed and from which same are discharged at high velocity in the form of greatly energized mist particles of microdimensions.

This invention is an improvement over the apparatus of Herbert W. Stratford Patent 2,990,011 issued June 27, 1961 Flash Evaporator Rotor and the apparatus of Charles W. Stratford Patent 2,368,049 issued Jan. 23, 1945 Atomizing Evaporator.

The above-described patents and applications relate to what is known in the art as flash evaporators or atomizing rotors. However, in all instances to date, such rotors have been designed for a single homogeneous liquid feed. The general principle of these prior art devices has resided in the imparting of higher rotative velocity or energy to a liquid or fluid mixture by means of an atomizing rotor, generally consisting of a liquid accelerating disc and a shrouding disc spaced apart to form a narrow annular space therebetween. The liquid or fluid mixture to be separated, flash evaporated dehydrated, deaerated or the like, has been introduced to the annular space between the discs and projected at high velocity from its periphery. Separation of constituents of any mixture is effected by imparting sufiicient energy to atomize the mixed fluid, in. such a manner as to present a relatively maximum surface per unit volume of the fluid. Such atomization takes the form of a continuous horizontal screen of minute particles extending from the rim of the energizing-rotorto the inside wall of the enclosing vessel. The above applications also indicate improvements of atomizing through a multiplicity of orifices to obtain greater volume through a single rotor and gas atomization thereafter by use of a peripheral gas blast spaced immediately peripheral of the rotor itself.

The improvements presently described include process and apparatus for feeding, mixing and atomizing two or more totally dissimilar feeds, which may be liquid-liquid, liquid-gas, liquid-fine solids, gas-gas, and even gas-fine solids. Solid materials charged for mixing would have to be reduced to a fine state prior to charging as will be apparent in the following description.

The basic improvement and point of novelty in the instant disclosure comprises the provision of a rotor hav-- ing the known liquid accelerating lower plate and known upper shrouding plate (or discs) the latter two conventional plates, however, spaced vertically relative to and including therebetween a novel central circular plate of lesser diameter than the discs themselves. Such inner plate is typically fastened to the rotor drive shaft and the preferably equal diameter rotor discs themselves then fastened to said central circular plate which thus may be considered both as a drive and a disc separating plate. Such drive plate may be varied as to diameter. Materials to be mixed and atomized are fed to the rotor from both above and below the drive plate. The acceleration of the separately input lower and upper feeds out to the periphery of the rotor by the use of vaned members above and below the drive plate is also contemplated. Thus, feeds introduced into the rotor are maintained totally and completely separate from one another until they have traversed the distance to the outer edge of the drive plate. At this point, the separate feeds, being accelerated to, typically, velocities in the range of 100 to 500 feet per second, are mixed in the extremely short time required to traverse the distance from the outer edge of the drive plate to the discharge gap of the actual rotor (defined by the peripheral edges of upper and lower discs thereof). Various other stnlctural modifications include aids to increasing turbulence in the mixing zone outside of the drive plate yet Within the rotor proper, feeding a multiplicity of substances into the single rotor from one side of the drive plate and providing a plurality ofdrive plates between the rotor discs whereby to feed more than two substances into the'rotor and mix more than two substances Within the rotor before discharge therefrom.

The basic object of the invention, therefore, is to provide an atomizing and mixing rotor which will receive two or more material feed flows separately therewithin, mix same within the rotor in a controlled space and within a controlled time to discharge same in an atomizing manner whereby to achieve a maximum degree of mixing and dispersion of the multiple feeds into one another.

Another object of the invention is to provide various types of im roved mxing-and atomizing rotors operative to accomplish a plurality of goals and objects with respect to the separate feeding of a multiplicity of separate substances into such rotors, mixing same with respect to one another in the rotors and atomizing the mixture! from the rotor.

Another object of the invention is to provide improvements in the structures of andprocess of using atomizing.

rotors wherein both mixing offeeds incontrolled manner in the rotor and multiple separate feed flows thereto all heretofore uncontemplated are achieved with many novel and valuable results.

(Another object of the invention is to provide a stable, simple, powerful new atomizing rotor construction which also incorporates mixing and differential feeding capacities therewithin whereby to accomplish many and varied new results.

Another object of the invention is to provide a mixing" and atomizing rotor which permits the accomplishment therewithin of many mixing and reacting. processes, which processes also desirably may utilize the extreme dispersion and atomization characteristics of the known rotors.

embodiments of the invention are shown and, in the various views, like numerals are employed to indicate like parts.

FIG. 1 is a side view with parts cut away and in section showing a vessel for employment with the subject atomizing and mixing rotor.

FIG. 2 is a cross-section through a first form of the subject atomizing and mixing rotor as mounted on a vessel as seen in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a view taken along the line 33 of FIG. 4 in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional detail of one side of the rotor of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a side-sectional view of a first modified form of the subject mixing and atomizing rotor.

FIG. 6 is a side-sectional view of a second modified form of atomizing rotor embodying the instant invention.

FIG. 7 is a side-sectional view of a third modified form of atomizing rotor embodying the subject invention.

Referring to the drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, at 10 is indicated the side wall of a vessel having an upper portion 10a thereof inclined both upwardly and inwardly relative to the interior of the vessel, and a lower wall portion 10b inclined both downwardly and inwardly relative to the interior of the vessel. On top of vessel 10 is motor mounting 11 which supports motor 12. Referring particularly to FIG. 2, opening 13 is formed in the top center portion of vessel 10 and mounting plate receiving rim 14 is fastened thereto by welds or other suitable attachment 1'5'. Mounting plate 16 is fixed within rim 14 by bolts 17. Motor mounting 11 is welded or otherwise fixedly attached to mounting plate 1-6 by suitable attaching means or welds 18. Shaft 19 is a continuation of or fixed to the drive shaft (not seen) of motor 12 and is driven in rotation thereby. Plate 16 has opening 20 centrally thereof. Support tube 21 is fixed to plate 16 by bolts 22, extends therethrough, and has fitting 23 extending from one upper side portion thereof aswell as outwardly extending rotor seal portions 24 at the lower end thereof. Pipe 25 is supported by bolt 26' relative to support tube 21 and surrounds shaft 19 with sleeve bearing 27 fixed to the inside surface thereof to maintain shaft 19 in proper rotational position relative thereto. Feed annulus 28; between the outer side of pipe 25 and the inner surface of tube 21, connectsat' its upper end with the bore of fitting 23' to permit feed therethrough of one fluid to be treated the rotor to be described.

Drive plate 29 having central hub 30 is connected to the lower end of shaft 19 by means of an opening 31 positioned centrally of hub 30. Key 32 fits into slots in shaft- 19 and hub- 30 whereby to rigidly fix' hub 30 and plate 29 with respect to shaft 1 9 in rotation of the latter. The lower cnch of shaft 1'9, below the zone thereof encircled by hub 30, is externally threaded whereby' to receivenut, 34 thereon whereby to secure hub 30 in verticalposition: on shaft- 1 9; the upper portion thereof abuttingagainst the. lower surface. of bearing 27;, Bearing 27 makes a slidingfriction. fit on the top; of hub. 30' whereby to seal: annulus 2,8:v at. the: lower end thereof, in the inner portion. thereof. A plurality of accelerating vanes. 35 are prefer ably (but not necessarily)! fixed no: the: lower surface: of drive plate, 29,, while a like. plurality of accelerating; vanes: 3.6'arepneferably fixedv to the. upper surface; thereof. as: is seen. in- FIG. 3.v The; connection one. between: drive plate 29 and hub 30 preferably comprises a smooth fillet curve both. on the upper and: lower portions thereof, as. shown, and vanes. 35 and 36 preferably extend. from closely adjacent, the termination of this fillet. connection curve out to closely adjacent the periphery 29a. of. plate 29 where the. upper and lower surfaces thereof. are bevelled and taper essentially. to a knife edge.

Upper shrou-ding disc 37 is provided having an inner upwardly extending portion 37a with shelf 371) formed therein to receive the outer extremity of seal lip 24 of support tube 21. The peripheral portion 37b of shroudingdisc 37 extends downwardly and has a planed off lower edge 37d resulting in a substantial knife edge lip 37e. Shrouding disc 37 rests on the tops of vanes 36 and also has openings 37 therethrough to receive bolts 38. Lower disc 39, which would be called an accelerating disc in an old ty-pe rotor of the structure seen in the Stratford patents, supra, has downwardly extending vertical portion 390 internally thereof with shelf 39b formed therein adapted to receive the outwardly flanged lip 41 of feed pipe 40 below the rotor. The outermost peripheral portion 390 of disc 39 extends upwardly and has planed-off upper surface portion 39d whereby to produce knife edge orifice lip 392. Bolt holes 39) are formed through disc 39 whereby to receive bolts 38 which have engaging nuts 38a on externally threaded ends thereof. The extension of reduced thickness zone 29a of drive plate 29 is spaced within the two beveled disc ends 37d and 39d whereby a pair of circumferential wedging passages are provided up to the mixing zone immediately short of the knife edges 37a and 392 where zone 29a terminates. Drive plate 29 also has bolt holes 29b therethrough whereby to receive bolts 38.

In operation of the rotor of FIG. 2, a first fluid substance, gas, liquid or finely divided solid, is passed through fitting 23 into annulus Z8 and thence into zone 42 defined between drive plate 29 and shrouding disc 37 at their inward ends. This fluid then passes between the accelerating vanes 36 and is accelerated by them outwardly to the termination of the vanes from whence the fluid passes into the wedging passageway defined between surfaces 37d and the upper surface of zone 29a of drive plate 29. A second fluid substance, gas, liquid or finely divided solid, is passed in through feed tube 40 from any suitable source and passes upwardly into zone 43 defined between the lower inner surface of drive plate 29 and the inner portion 39a of disc 39'. From there this fluid passes between accelerating vanes 35 which accelerates the liquid or fluid outwardly to the termination of the vanes from whence same passes into the wedging passageway defined by bevel 39d and the lower surface of zone 29a of drive plate 29. Until the fluids pass off the knife edge'end of zone 29a of drive plate 29, there is absolutely no contact or mixing therebetween as they are completely sealed off from one another in the rotor. Violent mixing and turbulent dispersal then follow as they pass out of the atomizing rotor through the atomizing orifice thereof. Preferably, 'such orifice is sized in the range seen in the H. W. Stratford Patent 2,990,011 for maximum atomization and mixing. Additional atomization may be achieved by use of processes as disclosed in my application S'er. No. 112,270, supra. Neither support tube 21 nor feed tube 40" rotate with the rotor and, thus, fluid sliding seals are required on the shelves 37b and 39b with flanges 24 and 41.

While drive plate 29 may be terminated at any point between discs 37 and' 39, or therepast, to permit" early or late mixingv within or without the rotor, the form shown is optimal for mixing at the latest instant possible in the rotor, essentially simultaneously with dispersal through the atomizing orfice. Additionally, the wedging effect into the mixing and dispersal zone by use of inclined surfaces on drive plate 29 and discs 37 and 39 is" optimal for greatest mixing pressures and forces; Unless the zone 29atapers to essentially aknife' edge, as is also the case with the edges 37a and 39e, itis difficult to obtain the latest possible mixing together" with finest gap orifice in combination. Zone 29a, however, may be entirely absent fromdrive: plate 29 whereby all the wedging will be provided by surfaces 37d and 39d with still good results but additional mixing time provided in the rotor; This may not be desirable, or yet may be optimal for certain purposes. In an intermediate situation, the peripheral end of zone 29a of drive plate 29 may be rounded off or edge terminated any place in the wedging zone created by wedging surfaces 37d and 39d. Such variations operate to give intermediate times and zone spaces of mixing prior to atomization. Variable times of chemical reaction may be thus obtained within the rotor by varying the extension of plate 29 and its edge zone 29a. If substantially all of the chemical reaction is desired to take place externally of the rotor, the form illustrated is optimal.

Referring back to FIG 1, pipe 44 connected to opening 45 in the upper zone of vessel may alternatively serve as a vacuum connection or as an input pipe for various substances such as steam or other gas. Such an input pipe may provide a neutralizing or cooling step in the vessel external to the rotor, wherein the discharge of the rotor is into a steam atmosphere, a chemically neutralizing atmosphere, or an evaporative cooling atmosphere, as examples. At any rate, the atomized discharge or discharges from the rotor orifice impact on the inner surface of wall portion 10a, then pass down wall 10 into the inwardly inclined wall portion 10b. An opening is provided in the center lowermost portion of wall 10b to which is connected withdrawal pipe 46 which has pump 47 thereon. The product of the mixing andatomizing dispersion is thus passed from the vessel into any suitable collection point, not shown.

' Referring to FIG 5, therein is shown a modified form of the subject mixing and atomizing rotor. The accessory drive and feed equipment is not shown and will not be described with respect to this rotor as it is identical with that shown and already described with respect to FIG 2. Referring then, to FIG. 5, an upper, shrouding rotor disc 50 is provided having an upwardly turned centralportion 50a with shelf 50b formed therein. Bolt holes 50c are provided there through to receive bolts 51. Theoutermost portion 50d thereof is downwardly turned and has and outwardly and downwardly tapered wedging surface 5 0e thereon which aids in forming and defining an atomizing orifiice, preferably of'the type and dimensions described in the H. W. Stratford Patent, p -Q The? lower disc 52 has central downwardly turned portion, 52ain which it formed shelf 52b. The outermost-portion .52b or disc 52 turns upwardly and has upwardly tapered wedging surface 52c thereon which cooperates with surface Site to define the orifice already mentioned. Bolt holes 52c are formed through disc 52 to receive portions of bolts 51 and bolt engaging nuts 53. Drive 'plate 54 has rounded off outer end 54a terminatingfwellshortof the orifice defined by surfaces Site and 52e andis connected centrally by faired hub portion 54b to central hub 55 having passage 56 centrally thereof 'to receive the drive shaft of suitable power source, .said opening or passage 56 also typicaly having key slot 57 extending outwardly therefrom.

," 'l'Fixed "to the'under surface of upper shrouding disc 50' are a pairof preferably vertical, circular flanges 58 and'59, the former of greater downward length than the latter due to the downward taper of disc 50. Flanges 58 and 59 are preferably continuous and preferably extend-downwardly a distance equal to a distance which will take, them to the level of the lip of wedging surface 522 "on disc 52 ortherebelow'. Connected to the upper surface of disc 52 inwardly of the periphery thereof and extending upwardly between flanges 58 and 59 is preferably vertical circular'flange 60, also preferaby continuous and preferably extending upwardly a sufficient distance to extend to the level of or above the lowermost portion of wedging surface 502. Suitable shims 61 encircling bolts 51 space discs 50 and 52 a certain vertical distance from drive plate 54 whereby to adjust the relationships immediately described. Alternatively and preferably, accelerating vanes (not seen) may be provided on the upper and lower surfaces of drive plate 54 against which the discs abut to space them a desired vertical distance from drive plate 54.

Inoperation of the rotor of FIG 5, it is assumed that fluid rotating seals are made at shelves 50b and 52b from feed pipes of the type previously described with respect to FIG. 2 and that hub is connected by any suitable means to a drive shaft of a power source. A first fluid, either liquid, gas or fluidized solid, is fed into annulus 62 between the upper surface of plate 54 and the under surface of disc 50. A second fluid, liquid, gas or fluidized solid, is fed into the lower annulus 63 between the under surface of plate 54 and the upper surface of disc 52. These fluids, in the structure shown, mix well prior to their passage outwardly through the orifice defined here by the peripheries of upper and lower discs 50 and 52, alone. Immediately after such mixing (following passage beyond zone 54a of drive plate 54) the mixed fluids undergo increase of turbulence and mixing due to their wedging impaction upon and outward travel around successive flanges 58, and 59. Following this wedging, increased turbulence and mixing, the mixed fluids pass into a final wedging zone defined by wedge surfaces 50a and 52e. As noted, the two fluids are wedged toward one another in their entire passage through the rotor as discs 50 and 52 preferably converge toward one another on the inner surfaces thereon. The use of a rotor as constructed in FIG. 5 is thus indicated for fluids in which early and considerable mixing in the rotor is desired prior to atomization from the orifice defined by the rotor discs.

Turning to FIG. 6, therein is shown a third form of the subject mixing and atomizing rotor. Drive plate 64 has peripheral zone 64a and central base zone 6412, the latter faired into hub 65. Drive shaft 66 is rigidly connected into hub whereby to drive same in rotation with key 67 optimally making up part of said connection. Lower disc 68 has peripheral atomizing orifice forming zone 68a and three sets of bolt holes 6812, 68c and 68d therethrough. Central inward portion 68a of disc 68 is downwardly formed and has shelf 68 formed therein to receive a feed pipe terminus of the nature of feed pipe 40 in FIG. 2. A plurality of curved wedging rings 69, 70 and 71 are provided mounted on disc 68 having sets of bolt holes therethrough through which bolts 72, 73 and 74, spaced by shims 75, 76 and 77, connect same to the upper surface of disc 68. It should be noted that shims space upper ring 69 from the upper surface of drive plate 64, while lower shims 75 space drive plate 64 from lower disc 68. The outer or peripheral undersurfaces of rings 69, 70 and 71 very closely approach the upper surface of disc 68 whereby to provide two extra, separate atomizing orifice gaps (the orifices are exaggerated here for ilustration purposes) prior to the final orifice gap of the rotor. Feed pipes 78, 79 and 80 are respectively positioned between hub 65 and the inwardportion of ring 69, rings 69 and 70 and rings 70 and 71 whereby to fee-d separate fluid inputs into the wedging annuli therebetween.

In operation of the rotor of FIG. 6, feed from below comes up into annulus 81 defined'between hub 65 and disc portion 68a and is first wedged into the reducing annulus defined between peripheral drive plate portion 64a and the upper surface of disc 68. Simultaneously, feed from pipe 78 passes into annulus 82 defined between the upper surface of drive plate 64 and the undersurface of ring 69. This fluid mixes with fluid from annulus 81 prior to final wedging into the first orifice gap. The atomized mixture then passes out from the first orifice gap into annulus 83 into which optional y a third fluid quan tity has also been fed by pipe 79. This last feed may be an additional quantity of the fluid fed through pipe 78, an additional quantity of the fluid fed into annulus 81 originally or a completely diflerent third fluid. The original mixture and the new addition then mix prior to wedging into the second orifice gap which is defined between the peripheral edge of ring 70 and the upper side of disc 68. The double mixture, then, emerges atomized or filmed from this orifice gap into annulus 84 where it is optionally joined by a further fluid input from pipe 80. This may be a fourth new fluid, or any other fluid previously added to the mixture. The entire quantity, then, passes to the final orifice gap and is wedged thereinto between the peripheral edge of ring 71 and the peripheral upper surface of disc 68 at 68a.

Referring to FIG. 7, therein is shown a fourth form of the subject mixing and atomizing rotor. Drive shaft 85 is seized or fixed to hub 86 by conventional means optionally including key 87. Hub 86 has opening 8-8 therethrough to receive shaft 85 and has fixed peripherally thereto first drive plate 89. Drive plate 89 has peripheral portion 89a thereof and inward faired connecting portion 8% connecting same to hub 86. Additionally, drive plate 89 has bolt holes 890 therethrough adapted to receive bolts 90 therein. Upper shrouding disc 91 has peripheral downwardly turned portion 91a, the latter having outwardly and downwardly beveled wedging surface 91b inwardly thereof defining one-haf of an atomizing orifice. Bolt holes 910 receive bolts 90 therethrough and central upwardly turned portion 91d has feed tube sealing shelf 91e formed therein. Lower disc 92 has peripheral up- Wardly turned portion 92a with upwardly and outwardly beveled wedging surface 92b therein cooperating with wedging surface 91b to define an atomizing orifice of the type previously described, preferably like that shown in the H. W. Stratford patent, supra. Bolt holes 920 are formed through disc 92 to receive the lower portions of bolt 90 and nuts 900, while inwadly, downwardly turned portion 92d has shelf portion 92e formed therein to receive a feed tube flange in the manner shown in FIG. 2. A second plate 93 having central hub 94 and peripheral zone 93a is provided, optionally or preferably of substantially the same radius and peripheral form as drive plate 89. Plate 93 is spaced vertically below plate 89 and has central opening 95 through hub 94. Bearing 96 is received in opening 95 encircling secondary feed tube 97. The latter may have horizontal upper flange 98 at the upper end thereof overlying the upper surface of hub 94. Suitable shims 99 (between upper disc 91 and drive plate 89), 100 (between plates '89 and 93) and 101 (between lower plate 93 and lower disc 92), all encircling bolts 90, respectively, space the previously described parts from one another whereby to provide three separate feed an'nuli 102 (between upper disc 91 and drive plate 89), 103 (between upper plate 89 and lower plate 93) and 104 (between lower plate 93 and lower disc 92).

In operation of the rotor of FIG. 7, it is assumed that feed t-ubes shelve at 91c and 92e as in FIG. 2. Drive shaft 85 rotates drive plate 8 9 and thereby lower plate 93 and discs 91 and 92 by virtue of the bolt connections 90. Feed tube 97 does not rotate, but has a friction sliding fit via bearing 96. A first fluid is fed into annulus 104, a second fluid into annulus 103 via feed tube 97 and a third fluid into annulus 102. None of these fluids mix or meet until they pass the peripheral edges of plates 89 and 93 whereby same can mix prior to atomization out through the orifice defined by the wedging surfaces 91b and 92b. It should be noted that additional lower plates analogous to 93 may be multiplied therebelo-w between same and lower disc 92 by providing feed tubes concentric within one another communicating to the separate plates stacked below drive p'ate 89.

With respect to all forms shown, it should be appreciated that the rotor shell may be driven in rotation, while the divider plate or plates may remain static. This requires only that the drive shaft for the rotor be decoupled from the dividers and coupled with the rotor shell elements, while a static mount be provided for the dividers with suitable rotation seals.

From the foregoing it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to attain all of the ends and objects hereinabove set forth together with other advantages which are obvious and which are inherent to the structure.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. The process of mixing and atomizing fluids comprising feeding a first fluid to be mixed and atomized in a first separate sealed passageway verticaly from above into a first separate upper zone of an atomizing rotor, simultaneously feeding a second fluid to be mixed and atomized in a second separate sealed passageway vertically from below into a second separate lower zone of said atomizing rotor,

simultaneously accelerating said fluids in said separate upper and lower rotor zones outwardly toward a common mixing zone in the peripheral portion of the rotor,

simultaneously wedging and compressing each of said unmixed fluids in a separate fluid wedging and compressing zone immediately prior to contact thereof in said common mixing zone,

simultaneously contacting and mixing said wedged and compressed fluids in said common mixing zone immediately prior to discharge from a fluid atomizing orifice in said rotor,

and thereafter discharging said mixed fluids from said rotor through a common fluid atomizing orifice.

2. The process of mixing and atomizing fluids comprising feeding a first fluid to be mixed and atomized in a first separate sealed passageway vertically-from above into a first separate upper zone of an atomizing rotor,

simultaneously feeding a second fluid to be mixed and atomized in a second separate sealed passageway vertically from below into a second separate lower zone of said atomizing rotor, simultaneously accelerating said fluids in said separate upper and lower rotor zones outwardly toward a common mixing zone in the peripheral portion of the rotor,

simultaneously contacting and mixing said fluids in said common mixing zone prior to discharge of said mixed fluids from a fluid atomizing orifice in the periphery of said rotor,

simultaneously wedging and compressing said contacted and mixed fluids in a fluid wedging and compressing zone immediately prior to discharge of said mixed, wedged and compressed fluids from said atomizing orifice and thereafter discharging said mixed, wedged and compressed fluids through a common fluid atomizing orifice in the periphery of said rotor. 3. The process of mixing. and atomizing fluids comprising feeding a first fluid to be mixed and atomized in a first separate sealed passageway vertically from above in to a first separate upper zone of an atomizingrotor,

simultaneously feeding a second fluid to be mixed and atomized in a second separate sealed passageway vertically from below into a second separate lower zone of said atomizing rotor,

simultaneously feeding a third fluid to be mixed and atomized in a third separate sealed passageway verticaly from one of above and below into a separate third central zone of said rotor,

simultaneously accelerating said fluids in said separate upper, lower and central rotor zones outwardly toward a common mixing zone in the peripheral portion of the rotor,

9 10 simultaneously contacting and mixing said three fluids References Cited in a common mixing zone prior to discharge of said UNITED STATES PATENTS mixed fluids from a fluid atomizinrg orifice in the periphery of said rotor Martln simultaneously wedging and compressing said contacted 5 FOREIGN PATENTS and mixed three fluids in a separate fluid wedging and compressing zone immediately prior to dis- 703 282 3/1941 Germany. charge of said mlxed, wedged and compressed fluids from said atomizin-g orifice and 6663 41 2/1952 Great Bntam' thereafter dihargmg said mixed i l 10 NORMAN YUDKOFF, Primary Examiner.

pressed fluids through a common fluid atomrzln-g or1- fice in the periphery of said rotor. J. SOFER, Assistant Examiner.

481,786 3/1952 Canada.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3147957 *May 31, 1960Sep 8, 1964W J CooperLiquid mixing device
CA481786A *Mar 18, 1952John Ernst NyropLiquid atomizer
DE703282C *Mar 10, 1939Mar 5, 1941Bader & HalbigMischkreisel
GB666341A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3481546 *Nov 29, 1967Dec 2, 1969Niro Atomizer AsAtomizer wheel for simultaneously atomizing two components
US3584840 *Sep 26, 1968Jun 15, 1971Laval Separator Co DeMixing device for introducing additives into a liquid
US3744765 *Oct 28, 1971Jul 10, 1973M BardTurbine mixer
US3887133 *Dec 17, 1973Jun 3, 1975Niro Atomizer AsAtomizer wheel for the atomization of slurries
US4018859 *Sep 15, 1975Apr 19, 1977Mueller HansArrangement for aerating of liquids
US4117047 *Oct 21, 1977Sep 26, 1978Robert Stephan HannecartSewage treatment
US4155959 *Nov 1, 1976May 22, 1979Albert BlumApparatus for the removal of gases, especially air, in fluids
US4282172 *Sep 11, 1980Aug 4, 1981Howe-Baker Engineers, Inc.Static, for use within water tank of ozonator
US4313898 *Mar 31, 1980Feb 2, 1982Schuerch ErnstRadial injector for aspiration of gases
US4329066 *Sep 22, 1980May 11, 1982Nemo IvarsonMethod and apparatus for continuously mixing a liquid and powder
US4390285 *Aug 12, 1981Jun 28, 1983Draiswerke GmbhMethod and apparatus for mixing solids with liquids, in particular for gluing wood chips
US5085513 *Aug 15, 1989Feb 4, 1992Nemo IvarsonArrangement for mixing powder with liquid
US5156336 *Apr 12, 1991Oct 20, 1992Xerox CorporationMultiple fluid injection nozzle array for rotary atomizer
US5219690 *Apr 12, 1991Jun 15, 1993Xerox CorporationDelivering separate fluid streams to atomizer, atomizing and mixing homogeneously, depositing layer on substrate
US5904419 *Jul 29, 1997May 18, 1999Arribau; Jorge O.Blender method and apparatus
US5947136 *Sep 10, 1996Sep 7, 1999Silicon Valley Group Inc.Catch cup cleaning system
US6402361 *May 19, 2000Jun 11, 2002Pfaudler-Werke GmbhCharging assembly for mixing vessel
EP0046569A2 *Aug 19, 1981Mar 3, 1982Draiswerke GmbHProcess and apparatus for mixing solids with liquids
EP1319434A1 *Feb 1, 1997Jun 18, 2003Biomixer CorporationApparatus and method for mixing gas into a body of liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/9, 159/DIG.900, 159/4.2, 239/223, 366/155.1, 366/162.1, 261/93, 239/222, 366/167.2, 366/172.2, 159/48.2, 159/4.1, 261/84
International ClassificationB01F7/16
Cooperative ClassificationB01F7/1625, Y10S159/09
European ClassificationB01F7/16F
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 14, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: GRAHAM ENGINEERING CORPORATION,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PLAZA BANK & TRUST COMPANY OF KANSAS CITY;REEL/FRAME:004193/0688
Effective date: 19770215
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PLAZA BANK & TRUST COMPANY OF KANSAS CITY;REEL/FRAME:004193/0688
Owner name: GRAHAM ENGINEERING CORPORATION, PENNSYLVANIA