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Publication numberUS3357344 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 12, 1967
Filing dateJun 15, 1965
Priority dateJun 15, 1965
Publication numberUS 3357344 A, US 3357344A, US-A-3357344, US3357344 A, US3357344A
InventorsPate Sherman E
Original AssigneePate Sherman E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stacking and bundling device
US 3357344 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 12, 1967 s. E. PATE 3,357,344

STACKING AND BUNDLING DEVICE Filed June 15, 1965 :ffgz 5 2 Sheets-Sheet l /A/VEA/mz /EQMAA/ E PA TE 4/ rToleA/Eys Dec. 12, 1967 S. E. PATE 3,357,344

` STACKING AND BUNDLING DEVICE Filed June l5, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent O 3,357,344 STACKENG AND BUNDLING DEVICE Sherman E. Pate, 7901 N. Kildare Ave., Skokie, Ill. 60075 Filed .lune 15, 1965, Ser. No. 464,090 1 Claim. (Cl. 100-34) ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE Stacking and bundling device providing an easy means for stacking and tying in bundles old newspapers, magazines and the like, comprising a box form open at the top and front having a suitable cord opening and cord storage facilities so that when it is desired to tie the bundle it is merely necessary to pull the cord in place and tie the material.

The present invention relates to a stacking and bundling device and, more particularly, to a device for stacking and bundling old newspapers, magazines and the like.

With the increasing amount of newsprint and magazines which are distributed to the home owner, there is a need for a paper caddy or device to stack and bundle old newspapers, magazines and the like and to provide an easy means for tying the papers for their disposal. Heretofore it has been necessary to stack the newspapers and magazines in the home and thereafter to run a piece of twine or cord under the pile of stacked papers to provide for securing the stack. This has not been altogether convenient for the home owner, as the papers will tend to fall and slide during the bundling and tying thereof.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a stacking and bundling device for old newspapers, magazines and the like which overcomes the above-mentioned difliculties.

Yet a further object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved caddy for stacking and bundling old papers.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds, and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claim annexed to and forming a part of this specification.

In accordance with these and many other objects of the present invention, there is provided a new and improved device for stacking old papers, such as, newspapers, magazines and the like which will provide for the quick and easy tying and bundling thereof. The caddy includes a box form open at the top and front and having an elevated bottom wall or shelf adapted to receive a supply of cord or twine thereunder. The box form is provided with a suitable cord opening near the top of the back wall. The cord stored under the bottom is threaded through an opening in the back wall below the bottom wall, then along the outside of the back wall and through the cord opening to pass along the inner surface of the back wall and over the bottom w-all of the box form so that the papers and magazines may be stacked on top o-f the cord. When it is desired to tie the papers, it is merely necessary to pull the cord on through the cord opening on the top of the back wall, to cut the cord and then to tie the bundle of papers.

In a specific embodiment of the present invention, the paper caddy is formed of corrugated paperboard and includes a wall section of generally trapezoidal developed form which may be folded to provide double corrugated spaced side walls and an interconnecting back wall. The wall section has upwardly extending support flanges along its bottom edge overlying the inner lower surfaces to dene downwardly opening channels for receiving the bottom wall. The bottom wall is formed from a bottom sec- 3,357,344 Patented Dee. 12, les? ICC tion resting on the support `flanges and provided with downwardly extending flanges extending into the channels. Suitable tab means are provided for interlocking the sections. The back wall is provided with a cord opening near its top and cord cutting means extending to the opening. Cord may be stored below the elevated bottom wall and be threaded along the outside of the back wall and through the cord opening to provide for bundling and tying the stack of papers.

For a better understanding of the present invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a paper caddy according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a bottom perspective View of the paper caddy of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the paper caddy of FIG. 1 with the threaded cord shown in phantom;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary front view showing the cord opening and cord cutter in the paper caddy of FIG. 1, taken along line 4 4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the paper c-addy of FIG. 1, taken along line 5-5 of FIG 3;

FIG. 6 is a developed View of the wall section of the paper caddy of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a developed view of the bottom section of the paper caddy of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 8 is a bottom perspective exploded view of the paper caddy of FIG. 1.

Referring now to the drawings and, particularly, to the assembled stacking device or paper caddy 10, illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 5 of the drawings, the paper caddy 10 is of generally corrugated box form open at the top and front and defined by spaced side walls 11, 12 and a back Wall 13. The box form is provided with an elevated bottom wall 14 resting on suitable upwardly extending flanges 15 to provide space under the paper caddy for the storage of a. ball or spool of twine or cord 18.

To provide for tying a bundle of papers, the cord 18 passes through a suitable opening 19 in the lower back wal-l 13, up along the back of the back wall and through a suitable cord opening 20. The cord 18 then passes down the inner surface of the back wall and across the bottom 14. A suitable cord cutting knife extends downwardly into the cord opening 20. In the illustrated embodiment, the cord cutting knife is a conventional single edge razor blade 22, FIG. 4, with a cutting edge 22a thereof extending downwardly into the opening 20.

From the above description of the paper caddy 10, its use is believed clear. However, briefly, in using the paper caddy 10, the user would pile old newspapers, magazines and the like on the bottom wall with the cord extending down the inside of the back and across the bottom. After the papers have been stacked to the desired height iu the paper caddy 10, the user takes the cord, which is underneath the stack and around the back, and ties the paper into a bundle, using the cutting knife 22 to cut off the cord. The process can then be repeated for the next stack of papers by pulling the cord 18 down along the inside of the back wall and across the bottom of the paper caddy 10.

It is to be understood that the paper caddy 10 may be made of any suitable material, for example, of pressed Wood and held together with suitable screws, brackets and the like. However, in a preferred embodiment, the paper caddy 10 is made of folded corrugated paperboard. The developed form of the paper caddy is best illustrated in FIGS. 6, 7 and 8. The paper caddy 10 includes a first wall section 25 of generally trapezoidal developed form and including side wall elements 11a, 11b and 11C, and

12a, 12b and 12C, and back wall elements 13a and 13b. The back wall element 13b folds inwardly and downwardly over the back wall element 13a along the dotted lines, kand the upper triangular side wall elements 11b and 12b fold inwardly and downwardly along the dotted lines while the triangular wall elements 11C and 12e fold inwardly along the dotted lines to provide double thickness corrugated side and back walls to the paper caddy 10. Additionally, the wall section 25 includes theilanges 15 which are folded inwardly and upwardly along the two pairs of dotted `lines in FIG. 6 to provide channels 28, FIGS. and 8, for interlockingly receiving the bottom wall 14.

The paper caddy 10 additionally includes a bottom wall section 30 forming the bottom wall 14 and including the bottom wall elements 30a and 30h folded uponeach other to provide a double corrugated bottom wall and provided with back flanges 30C and side flanges 30d folded downwardly and positioned within the channels 28 formed by the upwardly extending flanges 15.

To interlock the bottom wall section 30 with the wall section 25, the side wall elements 11C and 12e each have a llap 11d, 12d cut therefrom connected to the wall elements 11a and 12a, respectively, and folded inwardly over the side flanges 30C and respective ones of the upwardly extending flanges and having upwardly extending projections 11e, 12e interlocked in respective ones of openings 30e in the bottom wall section 30. The flanges 15 are also provided with upwardly extending projections 15a interlocked through other ones of the openings 30e in the bottom wall section30. Additionally, the back Wall element 13a and the side wall elements 11a and 12a are provided with tabs 13j, 11f and 12j, respectively, which extend through suitable openings 11g, 12g in the side wall elements 11e` and 12C, through openings 30g in the flanges 30C` and 30d and openings 15b in the flanges 15 to interlock the bottom wall section to the side wall sectioiLThe back wall element 13b additionally is provided with an opening 13g aligning with the tab 13f for interlocking therewith.

To provide `the cord openingr 20, the cord opening includes a pair of triangular openings 20a, 20b in the respective back wall elements 13a and 13b which align` witheach otherwhen the back wall elements are folded over each other. The knife edge 22 may be fastened between the folded-over layers of back kWall elements in any suitable manner, as with glue or tape, as best illustrated in FIG. 6.

The opening 19 is defined by the opening left by tab 13j after the tab 13)' is folded over through its associated openings 13g, 15b and 30g.

From the :above description, the assem-bly of the paper caddy 10 according to the present invention is believed clear. However, briefly, it will be understood that the wall section 25 is formed by folding the respective elements along the dotted lines illustrated in FIG. 6 to provide a double corrugated wall form with the bottom wall elements 30a, 30b folded over themselves and provided with the downwardly extending flanges 30C and 30d which interlock within channels 2S formed by the upwardly extending flanges 15 along the bottom inner surface of the side and -back walls. The tabs 11i, 121 and 131 are projected through the respective aligned openings to interlock the assembly.

While there has been shown and described a particular embodiment of the presentfinvention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modications may be made without departing from the invention in its broader aspects, and it is, therefore, contemplated in the appended claim to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

A stacking device for newspapers and magazines and the like comprising a corrugated -box form including a wall section of generally trapezoidal developed form folded to provide double corrugated spaced side walls and interconnecting back wall, said ywall section additionally having upwardly extending support flanges alongy its bottom edges overlying the inner lower wall surfaces thereof to define downwardly opening channels, a bottom section resting on said;support flanges and having downwardly extending flanges extending into said channels, said back wall having a cord opening near its top, and cord cutting means extending into said opening.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,743,832 1/1930 Seligrnan 100--1 X 2,364,518 12/1944 Clouser 100-34 2,636,432 4/1953 Sherer 1D0-34 2,639,037 5/1953 Friend 100--34 X 3,()38,403 6-/1962 Orelind 100-34 LOUIS O. MAASSEL, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1743832 *Aug 26, 1929Jan 14, 1930Seligman Milton BPaper baler
US2364518 *Aug 24, 1943Dec 5, 1944Clouser Carl RBaler
US2636432 *Oct 15, 1947Apr 28, 1953Archie ShererUtility rack
US2639037 *Jul 3, 1950May 19, 1953Friend Benjamin RStorage and baler cabinet
US3038403 *Apr 8, 1957Jun 12, 1962Robert P OrelindBundle tying method and apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3591012 *Mar 16, 1970Jul 6, 1971Grady Maurice JRack, particularly for holding and tying newspapers
US3779152 *Aug 30, 1972Dec 18, 1973Smith DStorage receptacle-bundler assembly
US3903789 *Mar 29, 1974Sep 9, 1975Hoerner Waldorf CorpContainer for newspaper collection
US4084495 *Sep 29, 1976Apr 18, 1978Paul Roy AApparatus for collecting and handling recycleable paper
US4681032 *Apr 15, 1985Jul 21, 1987Mcdermott Eve CBundling device
US4993318 *May 15, 1989Feb 19, 1991Bollinger William GNewspaper bundler
US5129526 *Jul 31, 1991Jul 14, 1992Rubbermaid IncorporatedNewspaper container and bundler
US5586493 *Jan 3, 1996Dec 24, 1996Mcentee; Marjorie N.Paper recycling rack
US5690024 *Feb 20, 1996Nov 25, 1997Jaerund; OlleWaste paper collecting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification100/34, 229/122, 206/560, 108/135, 211/50, 229/104
International ClassificationB65B27/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65B27/083
European ClassificationB65B27/08C