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Publication numberUS3358355 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1967
Filing dateJun 2, 1966
Priority dateJun 2, 1966
Publication numberUS 3358355 A, US 3358355A, US-A-3358355, US3358355 A, US3358355A
InventorsHeck Eugene D, Youssi Dale J
Original AssigneeAlsco Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Siding panel and method of making same
US 3358355 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 19, 1967 D, J. YOUSSI ET AL 3 3 SIDING PANEL AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed June 2, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet l /4 INVENTORS 0445 J. 700.954 a'zuaan/e a. IL/66K Dec. 19, 1967 D. J. Ybussl ET AL 3,358,355

SIDING PANEL AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed June 2, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Dec. 19, 1967 D youss ET AL 3,358,355

SIDING PANEL AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed June 2, 1966 I 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS .0426 J Yea/554 fuse/v5 0. HCZK ArrapMqY;

Dec. 19, 1967 D. J. YOUSSI E L SIDING PANEL AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 2, 1966 INVENTORS 0,44: 1 5 0035/, 8 .raalsA/e' 0. #60

Y MZ/EA/A/X pa an/r044 #644944: #604906 United States Patent 3,358,355 SIDING PANEL AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Dale J. Youssi and Eugene D. Heck, Dover, Ohio, as-

signors to Alsco, Inc., Akron, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Filed June 2, 1966, Ser. No. 562,029 26 Claims. (Cl. 29-424) This is a contin-uation-in-part of our copending application, Ser. No. 526,591, filed Feb. 10, 1966, now abandoned. This invention relates generally to siding and more particularly to a novel and improved prefinished siding having a strippable protective coating thereon and to a method of manufacturing such siding.

An improved prefinished siding panel, incoporating this invention, is provided with a strippable protective coating which protects the exterior finish of the panel against damage and soiling during the packaging, shipment, and installation of the panel. The protective coating is arranged to permit its easy removal after the panel is installed and the danger of damage or soiling of the exterior finish is past.

The method of manufacture, incorporating this invention, provides for the application of the protective coating before the completion of the panel manufacturing operations to protect the finish While such operations are being performed.

Preferably the protective coating is applied to the exterior finish immediately after the exterior finish is applied so that a maximum protection is provided. In one illustrated embodiment of this invention a film of polyethylene is strippably bonded to the exterior finish withheat already required for the application of the exterior finish. Therefore, the cost of providing the protective coating is minimized. In another embodiment, a heated roll is used to bond the strippable coating and portions of the coating are left unbonded so that a loose gripping portion is provided to facilitate stripping.

It is an important object of this invention to provide a novel and improved prefinished siding panel having a strippable protective coating to protect such finish and to provide a novel and improved method of manufacturing such panels. a

It is another important object of this invention to provide a novel and improved prefinished siding adapted to be overlapped with similar adjacent panels during the installation thereof wherein a strippable protective coating covers a substantial portion of the exposed finish to protect such finish against damage or soiling during the panel installation.

It is another important object of this invention to provide a novel and improved prefinished siding panel including a strippable protective coating applied to only those portions of the exterior finish which are exposed when such panels are installed in an overlapping relationship with adjacent similar panels, so that such protective coating can be removed to expose the surface of the exterior finish after installation of the panels.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved siding panel, according tothe preceding objects, wherein the bond between the base material of the panel and the exterior finish is substantially stronger than the bond between the exterior finish and the protective coating.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved siding panel, according to any of the preceding objects, wherein the protective coating is a polyethylene film heat bonded to the exterior finish.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved siding panel, according to any of the preceding objects, wherein a loose portion is provided in the protective coating to facilitate its removal.

3,358,355 Patented Dec. 19, 1967 It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved method of manufacturing siding panels wherein an exterior finish is covered by a protective strippable coating applied thereto prior to the packaging of the panels.

It is another object of this invention to provide a method of manufacturing panels, according to the last preceding objects, wherein the exterior finish and protective coating are applied to the base material of the panels prior to a forming operation so that the exterior finish is protected by the coating during such forming operation.

It is another object of this invention to provide a method, according to the last preceding object, wherein the exterior finish and protective coating are applied to a strip of base material before such strip is coiled so that the exterior finish is protected against photographing while the strip is coiled.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a method, according to preceding objects, wherein the protective coating is heat bonded to the exterior finish.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a method according to the last preceding object wherein the base material and exterior finish are heated during the application of the exterior finish and at least part of the heat for bonding the protective coating is provided by the hot strip.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved method of manufacturing siding panels wherein a strippable polyethylene film is heat bond to the exterior finish.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novel and improved method of manufacture according to the last preceding object in which film is provided with a loose, unbonded portion.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the following description and drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a siding'panel incorporating the present invention with the protective coating partially stripped therefrom;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view illustrating the structure of the panel of FIGURE 1 and the installation thereof;

FIGURE 3 is a schematic illustration of one preferred method of applying a paint type exterior finish and protective coating to a strip of metal used to form siding panels;

FIGURE 4 is a schematic illustration of one preferred method of applying a film type exterior finish and protective coating;

FIGURE 5 is a schematic illustration of the forming and shearing operations for completing the manufacture of panels coated as illustrated in FIGURE 3 or FIG- URE 4;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary cross section of the final product when the external finish is a paint type coating covered by a protective coating;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view similar to FIGURE 6 but showing the product when the exterior finish is a film material bonded to the base metal by a heat activated adhesive;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating one method and apparatus for bonding the protective film with a longitudinal edge portion which is I loose to provide a section which is easily gripped;

FIGURE 9 is a cross section of the roller shown in FIGURE 8 and a schematic illustration of the system for heating the roller;

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary perspective view of another method and apparatus for bonding the protective coating;

FIGURE 11 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIGURE'Z'of a finished panel formed by the method and apparatus of FIGURE 8; and

FIGURE 12 is a view similar to FIGURE 11 illustrating a finished panel formed by the method and apparatus of FIGURE 10.

FIGURES 1 and 2' illustrate one typical form of metal siding panel ltlprovided with a central exposed face 11 and an exposed shadow leg 12. Edge portions 13- and 14 are shaped to interlock with associated edge portions of similar panels when the panels are installed, as illustrated in FIGURE 2. The particular form of interlock at the edge'portions 13 and 14 is similar to the structure illustrated in the United States Letters Patent to Sugar et al., No. 3,159,943, and is not critical to the present invention. It should be understood that the present invention can be incorporated in other types of panels and that this illustration of a particular siding panel configuration is not intended to limit our invention to such panel structure.

The panel 16 is prefinished to provide an exterior finish at? least. along the face portion 11 and shadow leg 12 so that after installation of the panel the entire exposed surface thereof is provided with an exterior or exposed finish applied during the manufacture of the panels. The exterior or exposed finish is normally very thin and has not been illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2 because of the scale of these drawings. However, the exterior finish should extend at least from the point 16 on the face portion 11 (as illustrated in FIGURE 2) around the corner 17 to the point 18 at the rearward edge of the shadow leg 12.

When the exterior finish is a paint type coating it is normally applied over a primer coating. Also, it is customary to apply a suitable corrosion resistant coating to the rearward or back surface. Since the rearward coating provides no aesthetic function it may be different than the exterior. finish coating. When the exterior finish is a film mtaerial, suchas Tedlar,.it .is customary to bond the film at least along the exposed. surfaces of the panel witha suitable adhesive. This is discussed in more detail below.

A strippable protective coating 19 is applied to the exterior finish at least along. a substantial portion of the exposed part of the panel. In the illustrated embodiment: of this invention the protective coating 19 of polyethylene film is heat. bonded to the exterior finish and extends from an upper edge 21 adjacent to the interlocking'portion of the panel, around the corner 17, and along the shadow leg 12 to an edge 22. The protective coating is removable, after the panels are installed, by merely gripping an edge and stripping the coating 19 away from the panel substantially as. illustrated in FIGURE 1. In the preferred embodiment of this invention the protective coating 19 does not extend into the interlocking zone between adjacent panels, so; it can be easily removed as a single piece.

Although the illustrated embodiment of this invention provides a polyethylene film heat bonded to the exterior finish, it should be understood that other types of coatings and coating materials may be utilized so long as they provide sufficient protection and are strippable, preferably in one piece. Also, the protectivecoating can be applied or secured to the exterior finish by any suitable method so long as sufficient adherence is provided to retain the coating in place, and so long as it permits easy stripping without damage to the exterior finish. For example, electrostatic bonding and strippable adhesives may he used in some instances. Similarly, a non-adhesive material which clings to the finish can sometimes be used. The bond between the' base material and the exterior finish is substantially strongerthan the bond between the exterior finish and protective coating. Also, the tensile strength of the protective coating, when compared to its bond, is sufiiciently great to permit removal of the protective coating as a single'sheet.

FIGURES 3 through 5 disclose methods of manufacturing siding panels incorporating the broader aspects of the present invention. Referring now to FIGURE 3, strip metal stock 26 is supplied from a coil 27 to a coating machine 28. The strip 26 entering the coating machine 28 may be. provided with av suitable primer coating and back coating as desired. The coating machine 28 is arranged to apply an exterior finish 29 to at least one surface of the strip 26. As the strip 26 passes through the machine 28 a paint-like finish 29' is applied and dried with heat so that. the strip emerging from the coating machine 28 at 31 is heated and provided with an exterior finish 29 at least along those portions of the strip which Will-ultimately be the exposed surfaces of the face portion 11 and shadow leg 12.

After emerging at 31 from the coating machine the strip 26 passes under a roller 32 which presses polyethylene film 33 from a supply roll 34'against the exterior finish 29 to heat bond the film to theexterior finish 29. The width of the fil'rn 33 is arranged so. that it covers only the section of the strip 26 which will ultimately be the exposed surfaces and the edges which ultimately form the interlock are free of the coating 19.

The apparatus is arranged so that the strip 26 passing under the roller 32 is at the correcttemperature to produce the desired bond between the film 33 and finish 29. In some instances it may be necessary to provide cooling to reduce the strip temperature before it passes under the roll. In the illustrated apparatus the strip 26 having the exterior finish 29 and protective coating 19 thereon is then coiled at 36 for storage. Generally, the strip 26 on the coil- 36 will already have a' back coating 37, as illustrated in FIGURE 6. The presence of the protective coating prevents photographing on the exterior finish 29 and eliminates the need of separator papers, or the like, in the coil to prevent such action; With this arrangement the surface of the exterior finish 29 is protected immediately after it is applied to the strip, so maximum protection is afforded.

FIGURE 4 illustrates avariation of the method of applying the exterior finish and protective coating In this method the strip 26 is supplied from the coil. 27 to a machine 38 which applies a heat activated'a'dhesive coating 46'along at least those portions of' the strip surface to becovered by an exterior finish. The strip 26 emerging at 39 from the coating machine 38 is at-an elevated temperature and is passed under a roll 41 which presses an exterior finish film material 42, such as Tedlar or the like, against the adhesive to ,form a permanent bond between the exterior finish and the strip. The film 42 is supplied from a roll'43. After the strip 26' passes under the roll 41 in this embodiment the strip-is carried past a second roller'44 which presses the protective coating film 33 against the still heated strip and heat'bonds the film 33 to the exterior finish. Here again, the film 33 may be supplied from a roller 34.

Referring noW to FIGURE 7, the strip 26 formed by the apparatus of FIGURE 4 has an adhesive coating 46, applied by the coating apparatus 38, bonding an exterior finish coating 47 to the strip material 26. The protective coating '19 overlies the exterior finish 47. The rearward surface is also providedwith a corrosion resistant coating 37. After passing the. roll 44 the strip :26 is coiled at 36 for storage in. the same manner as in FIGURE 3.

Either of the types of coils 36 from the apparatus of.

FIGURES 3 or 4 are then supplied to the apparatus of FIGURE SIThe coated strip 26 passes from the coil 36 through a forming machine schematically represented. at 51. This machine bends the strip 26 progressively as it passes through forming rolls 52 untilthe strip is provided with the desired cross section, for example the cross section illustrated in FIGURE 2. The strip then passes through a shear 53 arranged to automatically cut the strip to panel length completing the manufacture of the panels 10. The panels are then packaged without separators for shipment and installation.

' The bond or adhesion between the protective coating 19 and the exterior finish is sufiiciently strong so that the protective coating is not torn or loosened to any substantial degree as it passes through the forming machine 51 even though the coating covers a portion of the strip bent to form the corner 17.

It should be understood that the illustrated method of applying the coating 19 is particularly advantageous since the heat for bonding the coating to the exterior finish is already present in the strip when it leaves the machine for applying the exterior finish. However, other coating procedures may be utilized as mentioned above. It should also be understood that the manufacturing apparatus may be arranged so that the coated strip is supplied to the forming machine directly without intermediate coiling.

In the illustrated method of manufacture and installation the coating 19 performs four distinct functions. It prevents photographing on the exterior finish during the coiling at 36, it prevents polishing or damage to the exterior finish during the forming operations in the forming machine 51, it prevents damage to the exterior finish when a plurality of panels are packaged together without separators and it prevents damage or soiling of the exterior finish during the installation of the panels.

In one successful commercial run, the following specifications applied. An aluminum siding strip of .0225 inch thickness was coated with an adhesive formulated follows:

Parts by volume The adhesive coated siding was run through a 90-foot oven maintained at a temperature of about 400 F. at a line speed of 185 feet per minute. Approximately four or five feet from the outfeed end of the oven, at Tedlar 1th of .001 inch thickness was applied by pressure roll to the adhesive. As used herein, Tedlar refers to film sold under that name by DuPont to aluminum siding manufacturers for exterior siding applications, and is stated by them to be a polyvinylfiuoride material.

Slightly beyond the Tedlar applying step and at a point approximately six feet from the outfeed end of the oven, the strip temperature was measured and found to be about 385 F. to 390 F. At this point a polyethylene film of a thickness of .001 inch was applied by means of a pressure roll. The aluminum siding strip with its Tedlar exterior finish and applied polyethylene film was wound in a take-up roll in accordance with conventional manufacturing procedures. In the above process, Tedlar of a thickness of .0015 inch has been applied, and aluminum of a thickness of .018 inch has been used. Polyethylene of .002 inch has also been employed, and line speeds have varied from 170 to 200 feet per minute.

Two embodiments of another aspect of this invention are illustrated in FIGURES 8 through 12. In both of these embodiments the protective coating or film is provided with a loose portion so that it may be easily gripped to initiate stripping after the panels are installed.

Referring now to FIGURES 8, 9 and 11, the prefinished strip 61 is carried past a heated pressure roll 62 which presses a sheet of polyethylene 63 against the finished surface of the strip 61. To heat bond the protective sheet 63 to the finished surface of the strip 61 the pressure roll 62 in this embodiment is heated and is proportioned so that a longitudinal lip 64 of the sheet 63 is not pressed against the surface of the strip 61. Consequently this lip 64 is loose or unbonded to provide a portion throughout the length of each panel which may be gripped by the installer to initiate the stripping. Preferably, the lip 64 is about A; of an inch wide and is located 6 at the edge of the protective film or coating on the face of the finished panel, as illustrated in FIGURE 11. In this embodiment the pressure roll is formed with an end relief 66 adjacent to one end to provide the non-bonding of the lip 64. The depth of this relief is greatly exaggerated in the drawing.

Referring to FIGURE 9, preferably the pressure roll 62 is provided with a silicone rubber sleeve 67 approximately of an inch thick and formed with the relief 66 adjacent to one end thereof. The sleeve '67 is mounted on a hollow, metallic roller 68 provided with hollow support shafts 69 and 71 at opposite ends. The support shaft 69 and 71 are journaled in suitable bearings and are connected through swivel couplings 72 and 73, respectively, to a piping system schematically illustrated and including a pump 74, a heater 76 and a thermostat 77 connected to control the heater 76. The pump operates to pump oil from the coupling 73 through a line 7-8 to the heater 76, past the thermostat 77 and through a line 79 to the coupling 72. The oil then passes through the metallic roller 68 back to the coupling 73.

The heated oil passing through the roller heats the surface of the rubber sleeve 67 to the temperature required to insure a proper heat bonding of the polyethylene film 63 on the finished strip 61. The thermostat 77 automatically controls the temperature of the oil and in turn the temperature of the roller. This system may be used in conjunction with the heated strip to supply additional heat to the film or may be used in some instances with unheated strip. The silicone rubber is desirable since it provides a release from the polyethylene film so that the film does not tend to wrap around the roll. After the protective coating is applied the strip is passed through the forming rolls and a shear as illustrated in FIGURE 5 to form sliding panels as illustrated in FIGURE 11.

Another embodiment is illustrated in FIGURES 10 and 12, in this instance the prefinished strip 81 is passed under a pressure roll 82 formed with a plurality of symmetrically arranged V-shaped grooves 83. These grooves prevent pressure from being applied to V-s'haped sections of the polyethylene film 84 so that V-shaped sections 86 are unbonded providing a loose section for gripping to strip away the protective film.

Preferably, the grooves 83 are arranged so that their apexes 87 overlap or extend into the zone of the next adjacent groove as illustrated. With such an arrangement the apex 87 of one groove is located between a line connecting the extremities 88 of the next adjacent groove and the apex of such next adjacent groove. This arrangement insures there is an unbonded section at the end of the strip regardless of where the shearing occurs as well as along spaced points at the edges of the protective coating 84. In fact, in some instances there are four unbonded portions 89 at the end of the strip but never less than two. Also, there are relatively closely spaced unbonded portions 91 spaced along the length of the resulting panels at each edge of the protective coating.

After the strip with protective coating applied, as illustrated in FIGURE 10, is passed through the forming rolls and shear, as illustrated in FIGURE 5, a panel is produced as illustrated in FIGURE 12. Each panel has at least two unbonded portions 96 at its ends.

Although preferred embodiments of this invention are illustrated, it is to be understood that various modifications and rearrangements of parts may be resorted to without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A method of manufacturing siding panels having an iregular cross section with an exposed portion and an edge adapted to be overlapped by part of a similar panel comprising applying an exterior finish to a flat strip of sheet material at least along the section thereof which becomes the exposed portion, bonding a protective strippable coating to said exterior finish over at least a substantial? part of said section, and thereafter forming said cross section by bending said strip, said protective coating: being thereafter strippable after similar panels are overlapped to expose said exterior finish without marring itssurface. v

2. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein at least one bend is made in the portion of said strip covered by said protective coating without breaking said protective coating and'without. substantially loosening the protective coating from said exterior finish.

3. A method as set forth in claim 2 wherein said forming-is produced by passing said strip through a series of forming. rolls and said. protective coating prevents contact between portions of said exterior finish and said rolls thereby preventing damage to such portions of said exterior finish.

4.- A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein said strip iscoiled after the application of said protective coating and before formingsaid cross section, said protective coating preventing photographing of the protected part of said exterior finish while said strip is coiled.

5. A method asset forth in claim 1 whereinsaid strip is cut into panel lengths and a plurality of said panels having said protectivercoating thereon are packaged together for shipment without separators, said protective coating preventing damage to protected parts of said exteriorv finish while suchpanels are packaged-together.

6. A method according to'c-laim 1 wherein said edge is free of said. protective coating so that said protective coating is strippable' after the siding is installed with said edgecovered by an adjacent similar panel.

7. A method as set forth in claim 6 wherein said formingof saidcross section produced an interlock along each side ofsaid' exposedportion, each interlock being adapted to mate withone' interlock of an adjacent similar panel, and said interlocks being free of said protective coating.

8.- A method as set forth in claim-1 wherein said protective coatingis film material bonded to said exterior finish.

9; A.method as set forth-in claim 8 wherein said film isapplied with aportion of said film unbonded at least at spaced locationsalong a longitudinal edge thereof.

10. A method as set forth in claim 8 wherein said film is applied with a portion unbonded at each end of said panel. 11. A. method as set forth in claim -8 wherein said film is applied-so that at least one longitudinal edge of said film. is unbonded.

.1-2. A method as set forth in claim 8 wherein said exterior finish is' a. film material bonded to said strip with a substantially stronger bond than the bond between said exterior finish and said protective coating.

13'. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein said protective coating is. bonded to said exterior finish with heat.

14. A" method as set forth in claim 13wherein said strip isheated'before the protective coating is applied and supplies said heat for bonding.

15. A method as set forth in claim 14 wherein said 8 heating of said strip occurs during the application of said exterior finish. I

16. A method as set forth in claim 15 wherein said'protective coating is polyethylene.

17. A method as set forth in claim 13 whereina heated roll is used to bond saidprotective coating to said exterior finish.

18. A siding panel comprising a basematerial having an irregular cross section with an exposed portion and an edge adapted to be overlapped by a similar panel, an exterior finish covering at least said exposed portion, and a strippab-le protective coating on said exterior finish covering at least a substantial part of said exposedportion, said edge being free of said protective coating.

19. A siding panel as set forth in claim 18 wherein said panel is provided with-interlocks along opposite sides of said exposed portion, each interlock being adapted to mate with one interlock of an adjacent similar panel, and said interlocks being free of said protective coating.

20. A siding panel as set-forth-in claim 19 wherein-said central portion includes a planar face and a shadow leg joined at a corner, and said protective coating extends aroundsaid corner. 7

21. A siding panel as setforth in claim 20 wherein said exterior finish is bonded to'said base material with a stronger bond than the bond between said protective coating and said exterior finish, and the tensile strength of said protective coating is sufliciently high when compared to its bond with said exterior finish to permit stripping of said protective coating in one piece.

22. A siding panel as set forth in claim 21 wherein'said' protective coating is provided with loose unbonded portions at least along part of one longitudinal edge.

23. A siding panel as set forth in claim 22 wherein saidloose unbonded portion extends the length of said longitudinal edge and is on'the-face portion'of said panel.

24. A siding panel as set forth in claim 21' wherein said. protective coating is provided with a plurality of spaced'V-shaped unbonded portions wherein the apex of each V portion extends into the next adjacent V portion.

25. A siding panel as set forth in claim 21 wherein said protective coating is polyethylene.

26. A siding panel as set forth in claim 25 wherein saidpolyethylene is heat bonded to saidexterior finish." 5

References. Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,120,461 6/1938 Copeman 29' -423 2,173,774 9/1939 Birch'et al 5253'1 X 2,858,603 11/1958 Herrman 29'--4 24- 3,028,667 4/1962 Wintermute et al. 29 -529 3,077,059 2/1963 Stout 52 -127 X 3,147,546 9/ 1964 Bowman et al.- 29-424 3,159,943 12/1964 Sugar et al. 52'.53'l X THOMAS H. EAGER, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3726051 *Aug 24, 1970Apr 10, 1973Alsco Anaconda IncGutter with protective coating
US3744203 *Nov 5, 1971Jul 10, 1973Skass Ass LtdBumper guard for aluminum siding
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US3902942 *Dec 28, 1973Sep 2, 1975Revere Copper & Brass IncMethod of making finished metal sheet with removable protective covering
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US20100132275 *May 8, 2008Jun 3, 2010Colin Neil StangerRoof panel for roofing system and roof structure
US20100236179 *Mar 28, 2008Sep 23, 2010Kyu-Hue KimBuilding block, building structure and the method of bricking wall using the same
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Classifications
U.S. Classification29/424, 29/417, 52/531, 29/897.32, 52/127.1, 29/527.2, 29/453
International ClassificationB29C63/00, E04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationB29C63/0056, E04F13/0864
European ClassificationE04F13/08D, B29C63/00G