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Publication numberUS3358890 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1967
Filing dateJun 15, 1966
Priority dateJun 15, 1966
Publication numberUS 3358890 A, US 3358890A, US-A-3358890, US3358890 A, US3358890A
InventorsDalfo Guy J
Original AssigneeDalfo Guy J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispenser device for flowable material
US 3358890 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 19, 1967 G J. DALFO 3,358,890

DISPENSER DEVICE FOR FLOWABLE MATERIAL Filed June 15, 1966 IINVENTVOR puv JOHN DALFO ATTORNEY I United States Patent 3,358,890 DISPENSER DEVICE FOR FLOWABLE MATERIAL Guy J. Dalfo, 2927 Crafton Drive, Cornwells Heights, Pa. 19020 Filed June 15, 1966, Ser. No. 557,699 Claims. (Cl. 222507) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A dispenser device includes a base member for securing to a container which holds flowable material. An upper member movably engages with the base member, and a spout member is slidably disposed in the base member. The spout member has a first aperture therein. Second aperture means are disposed in the base member to be aligned with the first aperture when the spout membar is moved to a predetermined position, and provides an opening to the container. Motion translation means are disposed in the upper member and slidably coupled to the spout member to translate the movement of the upper member into a movement of the spout member.

This invention relates to a capping and dispensing means for containers holding flowable material.

Containers which hold flowable material such as liquids, pastes, granular aggregates, and the like are characterized by certain common problems when repeatedly used. For instance, such containers provide a means for the outflow of the flowable material and this outflow means must be provided with a suitable stopper to prevent loss of the flowable material as a result of the container being accidentally tipped; as a result of evaporation for certain materials; as a result of chemical reactions with air, and the like. 7

In addition, the material held by such containers is very often material that should be carefully measured out, such as medicines, chemicals, spices, etc. and the containers and/or the stoppers do not provide a means for readily measuring out the material when dispensing it.

Often it is the case that the stopper is not an integral part of the container and accordingly is lost or misplaced so that all of the undesirable aspects of such a container arrangement are present.

There has been some attempt in the prior art to provide containers and/or stoppers for flowable material which prevent loss of the stopper per se, which prevent loss by evaporation or tipping, and which provide a means for readily measuring out the material. However, in each such instance the innovation for the solution of any one of the above problems has been lacking in consideration of other aspects of the problems. Accordingly, each attempt has only been partially satisfactory.

The present invention features a capping and dispensing means, for a container holding flowable material, which will prevent loss thereof, from accidentally tipping, from evaporation, from hardening in the flow path by chemical reaction with the atmosphere, and from a stopper loss per se. In addition, the present invention provides a means for readily measuring the flowable material as well as a means for creating a flow condition and alternatively a non-flow condition with a minimum of physical effort.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved capping and dispensing means for a container which is adapted to hold a flowable material.

The present invention can be better understood by con- 3,358,890 Patented Dec. 19, 1967 sidering the following text in accordance with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic pictorial of a container to hold flowable material and the present capping and dispensing means mounted integrally therewith;

FIG. 2 is a schematic pictorial of part of the container of FIG. 1 with the present capping and dispensing means fixed in a dispensing mode;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view through the capping and dispensing means of FIG. 1 as indicated;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 3 excepting that the capping and dispensing means is in a dispensing mode;

FIGS. 5A and 5B are respectively top plan views of the configurations shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. 1

Referring to FIGURE 1, it can be seen that the capping and dispensing device 11 engages the container 13 which is adapted to hold flowable material. It should be noted that the present invention can be advantageously used with a container holding liquid, paste, granular aggregates and the like, as stated earlier, but for clarity of description will be described with a liquid container and a liquid as the flowable material, except where the feature is better illustrated by mentioning some other flowable material.

Assume then that container 13 is a bottle holding a liquid. The cap-dispenser 11 is shown in FIG. 1 in its non-flow arrangement. The housing means in the preferred embodiment is plastic but obviously could be any one of a number of rigid materials.

Bearing in mind that in the preferred embodiment the housing means of the cap-dispenser 11 is made of plastic, and in FIG. 1 a transparent plastic, certain features of the cap-dispenser 11 can be seen.

The cap-dispenser 11 is made of a base 15 and a rotatable turret member 17. As will be further explained hereinafter the turret 17 can be rotated around an elongation 19 of the base (which can be better seen in FIG. 4).

Further in FIG. 1 the spout 21 can be seen through the turret 17. It will be noted that when the cap-dispenser is in the non-flow mode, the spout 21 is sealed off from the ambient atmosphere due to the spout 21 being forced against the inner wall (the non-cut-out portion) of the turret 17. Such a feature is especially important if the present cap-dispenser is used with a paste material, for instance tooth paste or glue. It is only too well known that tooth paste will harden when exposed to air for a period of time. The sealing off of the spout keeps such paste material soft so that when the material from the container is used again it will flow out readily.

In addition, in FIG. 1 there is shown an air pressure opening 23. As will become more apparent hereinafter, when thhe turret is rotated to extend the spout into an outflow mode, the air pressure hole is lined up with a breather hole in the base (which ultimately opens into itihe container) to provide air pressure for the material to FIG. 2 shows the turret 17 rotated clockwise to the full extent of its excursion. As will be more fully described later, when the turret is rotated clockwise the spout 21 is pushed from the housing means and an aperture in its underside is aligned with an aperture in base 15. The aperture in base 15 opens into the container 13 and henceliquid can flow from the container, through the apertures and out of the spout 21. 1

The foregoing becomes more meaningful as FIG. 3 is examined. In FIG. 3 there is shown the base 15 in operable engagement with the turret 17. The annular groove 35 in the turret 17 locks over the embossed ring 37 to effect the rotational engagement of the turret 17 with the base 15. As can be further seen in FIG. 3, there is depicted an aperture 26 in the base and an aperture 25 in the spout.

Attached to the end of the spout 21 is a pin 27. The upper end of the pin 27 fits into the groove of an annular member 29. The ring 29 is secured to the turret member 17 so that when the turret 17 is rotated the ring 29 moves therewith to create an eccentric device with respect to pin 27. In other words, the circular movement of the ring 29 imparts a reciprocating motion to the pin 27 and accordingly to the spout 21.

As can be better seen in FIGS. 5A and 5B the pin 27 is constrained to move in a groove 22 in the base protrusion 19. Accordingly, the pin 27 slides in the ring 29 as it is rotated and slides in the groove 22 to eifect a translation of cyclic movement to straight line movement.

In FIGS. 3 and 4 the air pressure aperture 24 in the base can be seen. In FIG. 4 it will be noted that when the spout 21 has been moved out by rotating the turret, the air pressure hole 23 in the turret provides an opening from the ambient atmosphere, through the base aperture 31 (into which the spout 21 fits), through the aperture 24 to container 13. Accordingly, there is an air pressure condition created to enable the liquid in container 13 to flow from the container through the aperture 26 and the spout aperture and out of the spout 21.

In FIGS. 3 and 4 it will be noted that the base 15 has an internally threaded hole for securing the cap-dispenser 11 to the container. While a threaded embodiment is shown, it is to be understood that a friction fit or a press fit could be used effectively.

In FIGS. 5A and 5B the eccentric movement becomes apparent. As the turret 17 is rotated clockwise, the spout 21 first moves a short distance to the left, out of its forced engagement with the inner wall of the turret 17. As the ring 29 moves around with the turret, the pin 27 is forced to the right in the groove 22. Since the pin 27 is secured to the spout, the spout 21 is forced to move to the right and protrude from the housing.

Now it should be recognized that when the capdispenser 11 is fixed in the flow mode (as shown in FIGS. 2, 4 and 5B) liquid can only be poured therefrom by tilting the cap-dispenser 11 to the right. If the capdispenser is tilted any other way, no liquid will pour out.

Further if the bottle should fall over on the spout 21, it will be pushed into the housing thereby automatically sealing off aperture 26. Hence, no liquid pours out.

The bottle can be locked closed from its open position shown in FIG. 5B by rotating the turret 17 in the counterclockwise direction, the spout 21 retracting inwardly (to the left as viewed). Rotating the turret 17 to the position illustrated in FIG. 5A causes the spout to be moved a short distance to the right, into forced engagement with the inner wall (the non-cut-out portion) of the turret 17.

Thus, the drive track ring 29 serves a dual purpose:

(1) It extends and retracts the spout.

(2) It serves as a self-locking feature.

When the spout is retracted to its innermost position (i.e., to the extreme left as viewed in the drawing), the pin 27 is at the extreme left in engagement with the ring 29. Further counter-clockwise rotation of the turret 17 causes the spout 21 to force itself against the inner wall of the turret 17, thus causing a locking action due to frictional engagement of the spout 21 with the turret 17. This locked position is shown in FIG. 5A. There, as shown, continued counter-clockwise motion imparted to the turret 17 would tend to cause the drive track 29 to force the spout 21 into its extended position, but for the restriction of the non-cut-out portion of the turret 17.

The aforementioned self-locking action makes the spout 27 self-sealing, and hence eliminates the problems of hardening and drying of flowable material remaining in the spout which exists in prior art devices.

As a further advance, it can be readily seen that when the bottle is to be opened" or closed, the user need only rotate the turret less than one-half turn. In addition, the cap-dispenser is secured to the bottle so that it is never lost. It should be noted that while the spout 21 is depicted as moving horizontally in and out of the turret 17, the spout could move in and out angularly or from the top of the turret by simply designing the motion translation means to accommodate the desired movement of the turret.

As another advantage, good control and therefore good accuracy can be realized in pouring medicines from the spout because there is provided only a limited jet of fluid. The hy-gienics value of the cap-dispenser cannot be overlooked. Such hygienic value is realized because the liquid is. sealed when not in flow condition (even that which remains in the spout).

Various modifications and improvements can be made herein without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention. For example, the ends of the spout can be shaped with respect to inner wall of the turret 17 to insure an airtight fit.

While I have described above the principles of my invention in connection with specific apparatus, it is to be clearly understood that this description is made only by way of example and not as a limitation to the scope of my invention as set forth in the objects thereof and in the accompanying claims.

What I claim is:

1. A capping and dispensing means to be used with a container which holds flowable material comprising in combination:

(a) a base member adapted to be secured to said container;

(b) an upper member movably engaged with said base member;

(0) a spout member slidably disposed in linear reciprocating relationship with said base member, and having a first aperture therein;

(d) second aperture means disposed in said base member to be aligned with said first aperture when said spout member is moved to a predetermined position and to provide an opening to said container;

(e) motion translation means disposed in said upper member and slidably coupled to said spout member to translate the movement of said upper member into a movement of said spout member so as to cause said spout member to extend and retract from said base member in response to said movement.

2. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 1 wherein said upper member is turret-like shaped and is mounted to rotate axially around the upper portion of said base member.

3. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 2 wherein said turret member has a cut out portion through which said spout member passes when it is extended and wherein the non-cut-out portion is disposed to seal said spout member when said spout member is retracted.

4. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 1 wherein a third aperture is formed in said base member and into which said spout member is slidably fitted and wherein said spout member has a pin secured to one end thereof, said third aperture having a groove disposed axially therealong and said pin located in said groove so that the movement of the pin and hence the movement of said spout member is constrained by said groove.

5. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 4 wherein said motion translation means comprises a ring member having a groove therein which is slidably coupled to said pin.

6. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 1 wherein there is further included an air pressure aperture means in said base member and said upper member to provide atmospheric pressure to the inner portion of said container to enable any flowable material therein to readily flow therefrom.

7. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 6 wherein said air pressure aperture means comprises a third aperture in said base member into which said spout member is slidably fitted, a fourth aperture in said base member disposed to connect said third aperture and the inner portion of said container, and a fifth aperture disposed in said upper member to connect the atmosphere with said third aperture at a predetermined location when said spout member is extended.

8. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 1 wherein said first aperture is formed in the underside of said spout member.

9. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 8 wherein the portion of the underside of said spout member which does not form said first aperture is formed to seal oif said second aperture when said spout member is retracted.

10. A capping and dispensing means according to claim 1 wherein said upper member is turret shaped and is mounted to rotate axially around the upper portion of said base member, said turret member having a cut-out portion through which said spout member passes when it is extended and wherein the non-cut-out portion is disposed to seal said spout member when said spout member is retracted; wherein a third aperture is formed in said base member and into which said spout member is slidably fitted and wherein said spout member has a pin secured to one end thereof, said third aperture having a groove disposed axially therealong and said pin located in said groove so that the movement of the pin and hence the movement of said spout member is constrained by said groove; wherein said motion translation means comprises a ring member having a groove therein which is slidably coupled to said pin.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 5/1961 Mask 222442 6/1963 Hunter 222-442

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2985343 *Mar 16, 1959May 23, 1961Mask JeromeMeasuring and dispensing device
US3094255 *Feb 3, 1958Jun 18, 1963Hunter Clayton MDispensing caps for containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4096974 *Mar 11, 1977Jun 27, 1978Haber Terry MCover assembly for spray cans
US4892234 *Jul 21, 1988Jan 9, 1990Gott CorporationCombined closure and pouring spout
US4969455 *May 30, 1989Nov 13, 1990Somova S.P.A.Inhalator for aerosol containers
US5085347 *Jan 24, 1991Feb 4, 1992Anchor Hocking CorporationPressurized dispenser package
US5203841 *Apr 25, 1987Apr 20, 1993Seiichi KitabayashiDispensing head having a cap guard
WO2012012097A2 *Jun 24, 2011Jan 26, 2012Inspire Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Medicine dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/507, D09/450, 222/538
International ClassificationB65D47/04, B65D47/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/2012
European ClassificationB65D47/20D