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Publication numberUS3359715 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1967
Filing dateSep 8, 1964
Priority dateSep 11, 1963
Also published asDE1510749A1
Publication numberUS 3359715 A, US 3359715A, US-A-3359715, US3359715 A, US3359715A
InventorsJohn K P Mackie
Original AssigneeMackie & Sons Ltd J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Twisting machine
US 3359715 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. K. P. MACKIE,

TWISTING MACHINE Dec. 26, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 8, 1964 LARGE END y JHM.

Inventor 7Q Wml fi 3rd? O MID POIN SMALL END Dec. 26, 1967 J; 1 3,359,715

TWISTING MACHINE Filed Sept. 8, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 EFG 5% (e) I Invenlor Dec. 26, 1967 J. K. P. MACKIE TWISTING MACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 8, 1964 Dec. 26, 1967 l J. K. P. MACKIE 3,359,715

TWISTING MACHINE Filed Sept. 8, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Home United States Patent 3,359,715 TWISTHNG MACHINE John K. P. Maclde, Belfast, Northern Ireland, assignor to James Mackie & Sons Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland Filed ept. 8, 1964, Ser. No. 394,851 Claims priority, application Great Britain, Sept. 11, 1963, 35,885/63 7 Claims. (Cl. 57-58.65)

This invention relates to machines for twisting textile yarn. More specifically it relates to machines of the so-called two-for-one type in which the yarn being twisted is ballooned by a flyer between let-off and take-up packages around a carrier bracket which supports the takeup package when the machine is of the inflow type, and the let-01f package or packages when the machine is of the out-flow type. The carrier is rotatably mounted on the flyer spindle and is maintained stationary within the balloon despite the rotation of the flyer. Suitable driven yarn feeding means such, for example, as loaded rollers or haul pulleys are provided to drag the yarn through the balloon from the let-off package or packages and feed it at a constant rate to a traversing device which lays the yarn evenly on the take-up package.

When the let-off point of the driven yarn feeding means is located between the ends of the take-up package, the length of the direct path between either end of the package and the let-off point will differ from the length of the direct path between the centre of the package and the let-off point. Consequently the tension of the yarn being laid on the take-up package by the traversing device varies during each complete traverse cycle leading to an increased risk of yarn breakage and undesirable twist variation. (This variation will be referred to hereafter as are variation.) This is particularly the case with an in-flow type machine where the take-up package and the let-off point of the yarn feeding means have to be mounted close to each other on the carrier bracket so as to minimise the size of the balloon.

It has also been found that when the take-up package is a cross wound conical package driven at constant speed then further yarn tension variation can occur during winding due to the conical shape of the package, the speed of rotation of the surface of the package (controlling the rate of take-up of the yarn) being greater at the larger end of the package than at the smaller end. If the package is driven through a slip clutch device then the difference in take-up speed can be compensated for by clutch slippage but there is inevitably a lag between the increase of tension and the decrease in speed of the package and vice versa, due to momentum effect. This leads to yarn looping and tension variation. The problem is particularly acute when the package is precision wound due to the high traverse speed and is further accentuated if the machine is of the in-flow type.

In a two-for-one twisting machine for delivering yarn on to a cross wound conical package in accordance with the invention the length of the yarn path between the letoif point of the driven yarn feeding means and the point of lay of the yarn on the package is varied during each traverse cycle of the package by compensating means including a cam, so designed that the path length variation introduced substantially compensates for the path length change occasioned by arc variation (as hereinbefore defined) and for at least some degree of variation in the rate of yarn take-up occasioned by the conical shape of the take-up package. Thus yarn tension variation during take-up is substantially reduced leading to yarn having a more regular twist and to less yarn breakage during winding.

The compensating device preferably includes a guide arm which engages the yarn between the let-off point and the laying point and which is moved in accordance with the cam shape so as appropriately to cause the yarn path to approach more or less closely to the direct path between the let-off point and the point of laying at any moment. Preferably the guide arm moves in a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the take-up package.

The cam may be either a rotary cam or the cam surface may be arranged to extend longtudinally. In the latter case, which is preferred, it is convenient to cause the cam follower, or a runner carried thereby, to engage in the groove of a traverse scroll which also controls the reciprocation of the traverser, the cam follower engaging the scroll at a position 90 out of cycle with the traverse follower, so that the cam follower is reciprocated in a horizontal plane as is the traverse follower but lags the traverse arm laying the yarn on the take-up package by a distance of half the length of the package. The cam member is preferably mounted for pivotal movement in a vertical plane, so that it moves up and down in accordance with the shape of its cam surface engaged by the reciprocating follower which moves in a fixed horizontal line. The movement of the cam is transmitted to the yarn between the let-oif point of the yarn feeding means and the laying point of the yarn on take-up package through the guide arm which is carried by the cam and acts to increase or decrease the length of the yarn path.

If the machine is of the in-flow type i.e. the take-up package and yarn feeding means being carried by the stationary carrier bracket within the balloon, then it is preferred that the take-up package axis be perpendicular to the flyer spindle axis and that the guide arm eye be located mid-way between the ends of the take-up package. The yarn feeding rollers or haul pulleys are preferably arranged so that the yarn passes to them directly in line with the axis of the flyer spindle so that the yarn path within the balloon is kept as short as possible with the result that the yarn tension is kept as low as possible.

The invention will now be further described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a diagram illustrating the variation in the length of the yarn path between the yarn feeding means of a twisting machine, and the ends and centre of the take-up package;

FIGURE 2 is a graph illustrating the variation in yarn path length which is produced by are variation and package conicity eifect during each traverse cycle;

FIGURE 3 is a diagram showing one form of rotary cam to compensate for the variations in yarn path length illustrated in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4(a) shows diagrammatically the form. of longitudinal cam which corresponds to the rotary cam shown in FIGURE 3 and FIGS. 4(b), 4(a), 4(d) and 4(2) show four positions of the cam, cam follower, and traverse eye during a complete traverse cycle;

FIGURE 5 shows somewhat diagrammatically and by way of example, one embodiment for a two-for-one twisting machine of the in-flow type in accordance with the invention; and

FIGURE 6 is a view in the direction of the arrow VI in FIGURE 5 with certain parts removed for clarity.

Referring to FIGURE 1 a precision cross wound conical take-up package generally indicated at 2 is being supplied with twisted yarn from a driven yarn feeding means in the form of a pair of haul pulleys 4, the yarn passing from the haul pulleys through an eye 6 to a traversing device (not shown) which operates to lay yarn on the surface of the conical take-up package which is driven at a constant speed. As will readily be seen, the direct yarn path AB between the eye 6 and either end of the package is longer than the direct yarn path AC between the eye 6 and the centre or mid-point of the package. Thus the length of the yarn path is constantly varying during each traverse cycle resulting in variation in the tension of the yarn if the take-up package and the haul pulleys are driven at a constant speed. In fact the maximum variation in the yarn path is represented by the distance CD which is the difference between the arc BB and an are having the nadius AC. This variation, which will hereafter be called arc variation and which leads to the variation in tension of the yarn, can result in irregular twist and in an increased number of yarn breakages.

As will also be apparent from examination of FIG- URE 1 the surface speed of the large end 8 of the conical take-up package 2 is greater than the surface speed of the small and for a constant speed of rotation of the package. Thus the tension in the yarn when it is being laid on the larger half of the package will the greater than that when the yarn is being laid on the smaller half of the package. This tension variation which is caused by the conical shape of the package, will hereafter be referred to as conicity effect.

When the yarn is being laid at the mid-point C of the conical package at the start of a traverse cycle it will be assumed that the path length is at its zero position as can be seen on the graph illustrated in FIGURE 2. As the traverser moves towards the smaller end of the package the compensation required for arc variation increases, in the negative direction (i.e. the compensator should act to reduce the path length relatively to the zero position) as the path AB is longer than the path AC, to a maximum at the small end of the package. At the same time a constant degree of compensation for the conicity effect has to be supplied but in this case the speed of take-up is progressively diminishing due to the smaller diameter of the package at the smaller and than at the mid-point so that the compensation required for conicity is positive as compared with the negative amount needed to compensate for are variation. Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3 and assuming that the package before Winding commences, has a small end diameter of 2%", a large end diameter of 3 /2, a length of 10 and that its mid-point C is located at a distance of 8 /2" from the let-off point of the yarn feeding means, the compensation needed for are variation is l% units (in this case 1 unit=1") and the conicity compensation needed is /4 unit so that the yarn path length has to be reduced by /2 unit between the mid-point and the small end of the package.

When the yarn is being laid between the small end and the mid-point the arc variation diminishes from .a maximum at the small end of the package to zero at the midpoint whereas compensation for the conicity effect has still got to be provided for at the same rate as during the traverse between the mid-point and the small end. Thus the compensation required for are variation is +1 4 and the compensation for conicity is again equivalent to as can be seen from examination of FIGURE 2. Hence the compensator has to act to increase the yarn path length by an amount equivalent to 2 units during traverse from the small end to the mid-point resulting in a figure of +1 /2 from the Zero position when at the mid-point.

During traverse from the mid-point to the large end the arc variation again increases from zero to a maximum of -1 t units. As yarn is now being laid over the larger half of the package the compensation required for the conicity effect can be expressed as units so that the total compensation required during this quarter cycle can be expressed as -2 leading to .a movement of the compensator to give a path length change of /2 units from the zero position, at the large end.

During the last quarter cycle of traverse from the large end to the midpoint of the package the arc variation diminishes from 1% units to zero so the compensation required can be expressed as +1% and again the conicity effect has to be compensated for by an amount of units leading to a total compensation or change in path length of /z units from the position at the end of the previous quarter cycle so that the path length again reaches its zero position or length.

The shape of the rotary cam needed to provide the variation in path length to compensate for the arc variation and conicity effect during the complete traverse cycle is shown in dash lines at 12 in FIGURE 3... During rotation of the earn a yarn guide arm 14 pivoted at one end at 16 and having guide eye 18 at its outer end engages the cam surface through a cam follower roller 20, is moved so that its guide eye 18 acts to increase and decrease the length of the path of yarn passing through the eye, during each rotation of the cam. Thus as the yarn is laid from the mid-point to the small end of the package the guide eye 18 is moved upwardly by an amount corresponding to /2 unit so as to shorten the yarn path length by an amount equal to the increase in the yarn path length due to are variation and conicity effect. During the next quarter cycle the guide eye 18 would be moved downwardly to increase the length of the yarn path to compensate in the decrease in the path length resulting from the arc variation and conicity effect during the traverse from the small and to the mid-point. During the next quarter cycle the yarn path length would be decreased by movement of the eye 18 and increased again during the last quarter cycle.

As can be seen from FIGURE 3 the rotary cam is symmetrical about the centre line passing through the two points representing the mid-point of the package during the cycle. Thus the equivalent longitudinal cam which is indicated at 22 in FIGS. 4(1)), 4(0), 4(d) and 4(e) should be actuated by cam follower which is or one quarter cycle, out of phase with the point of lay of the yarn on to the package.

Assuming that the cam follower 24 is reciprocated in unison with the traverse guide eye 26 (see FIGURE 4) then when the cam follower is at the centre of the longitudinal cam 22 the traverse guide is laying yarn at the large end of the take-up package (FIGURE 4(a)). As the traverse guide moves back towards the mid-point of the package the cam follower moves to the right along the cam causing the cam to be forced downwardly, or the follower to rise, this movement of the cam or cam follower being transmitted to a guide arm of the compensating device so that the yarn path is relatively increased to compensate for the decrease in the path caused by a combination of arc variation and conicity effect as explained herebefore. When the traverse guide moves from the mid-point to the small end (FIGURE 4(e)) the cam follower moves from the right hand end of the cam to the mid-point thereof allowing the cam to rise relatively to the follower or vice versa causing the guide arm of the compensating device relatively to decrease the path length. On movement of the traverse guide from the small end to the midpoint the cam follower moves from the mid-point to the left hand end of the cam to the position shown in FIGURE 4(d) causing the maximum downward movement of the cam, or upward movement of the follower, to increase the path length by the maximum amount. On movement of the traverse guide from the mid-point to the right hand or large end of the package the cam follower moves from the left hand end of the cam to the mid-point thereof allowing the cam to move upwardly by the maximum amount or the cam follower to move downwardly by the maximum amount to the position in which the path length variation introduced by the compensating device reaches its smallest figure.

The cam illustrated in FIGURES 4(a)4(e) is shown in FIGURES 5 and 6 embodided in a two-for-one twisting machine of the in-fiow type. In this machine, yarn generally indicated at 28 is led from a number of supply packages such as cops (not shown) through a tensioning device (also not shown) through a stationary guide eye 30, attached to the machine frame to the eye 32 of a rotating fiyer 34. From the flyer the yarn passes through an entrance passage 36 around a roller 38 to and up a passage 40 extending co-axially with the flyer directly to the first groove 42 of a pair of driven haul pulleys 44, constituting the yarn feeding means.

The yarn is laid on a conical take-up package 46 carried on a spindle 48 extending at right angles to the flyer axis, by a traversing device including a rotated traverse scroll 50, and traverse arm 52. The traverse arm 52 is pivotally mounted at 56 to a block 58 slidably mounted in an opening in a bracket 60 carrying the traverse scroll, and having a follower 62 which engages in the groove in the scroll so that the traverse arm is reciprocated on rotation of the scroll.

The eye 54 of the traverse arm has a curved nose which engages against the side of the take-up package 46 and which is held thereagainst by means, not shown, biasing the arm 52 in the clockwise direction as shown in FIG- URE 5. As the diameter of the package 46 increases due to yarn being laid on it the eye 54, and hence the arm 52, can move outwardly against the bias, which bias however still maintains the eye in close contact with the surface of the package so that the yarn can be laid on the package very precisely throughout the formation of the package.

The haul pulleys 44, package spindle 48, and the traversing device are all mounted on the common carrier bracket 60 which is rotatably mounted on the flyer spindle and which is maintained stationary despite the rotation of the flyer by, for example, a magnetic holding device (not shown) such as that disclosed in our US. Letters Patent No. 3,264,813 issued Aug. 9, 1966, or, if the flyer axis is horizontal, by the inertia of its own weight.

Rotation of the flyer causes the length of yarn between the fiyer eye 32 and the eye 30 or strictly speaking, the traversing device to billow into a ballon and be whirled around the package 46 between inner and outer balloon guide rings 64, 66. The balloon is caused to take the shape shown in the drawings by a guide ring 68 located between the inner guide ring 64 and the eye 30;

For each revolution of the flyer two turns of twist are given to the yarn, one turn being inserted between the flyer eye 32 and the tensioning device (or eye 30) and the other between the eye 32 and the haul pulleys 44.

The haul pulleys 44 are driven from the flyer spindle through a drive chain comprising .pulley 70 on the flyer spindle within the balloon and pulley 72 on a shaft 74 carried by the bracket, the two pulleys being connected by a non-slip belt 76. The traverse scroll is driven from the shaft 74 through a gear chain (not shown) carried on the bracket 60 and terminating in a skew gear 78. The spindle 48 of the package 46 is also driven from the gear chain by, for example, a chain drive (not shown) through a slipping clutch.

The machine incorporates a compensating device to allow for are variation and conicity effect and which comprises the cam 22 described with reference to FIGS. 4(a), 4(b), 4(e), 4(d) and 4(e) and guide arm 80 attached to the cam and being provided at its outer end with an eye 82 through which the yarn passes in its path between the let-off point of the haul pulleys 44 and the eye 54 of the traverse. The longitudinal cam 22 is pivotally mounted about a horizontal pivot 84, extending parallel to the spindle of the package 44, through two arms 86, a spring 87 being provided to bias the cam into contact with its follower. The roller 24 forming the cam follower, is 1'0- tatably mounted on a shaft 88 carried by a slide block 90 which engages in a slot in the bracket 60 and which is provided with a follower or runner 92 engaging in the groove of the traverse scroll 50, 90 out of phase with the traverse follower 62.

Thus on rotation of the scroll 50, not only is the traverse eye 54 caused to traverse along the length of the package 46 but the cam follower 24 is reciprocated in a horizontal plane parallel to the traverse follower. As the follower 24 is reciprocated the cam member 22 is caused to pivot in a vertical plane about its pivot axis 84 causing a corresponding pivotal movement of the guide eye 82 of the compensating device. As the eye 82 moves in a vertical plane the length of the direct yarn path between the haul pulleys 44 and the eye 54 of the traversing arm 52 is varied as explained herebefore with reference to FIGURE 4, to provide compensation for are variation and conicity effect during each traverse cycle.

In practice the cam shape will be such as to provide for substantially all of the. arc variation and the conicity effect produced by a typical conical package (slight deviation from the theoretical cam shape may be necessary to achieve smoothness of motion of the follower). Conical packages having a somewhat different taper angle will be able to be wound on the machine which will, in this case, not provide complete compensation for the conicity effect. However a sufficient compensation for this effect will be given to reduce the yarn tension variation to an acceptable level.

I claim:

1. A two-for-one yarn twisting machine comprising driven yarn feeding means, a traverse mechanism which lays the yarn in cross wind on a conical package, and compensating means to vary the length of the yarn path between the let-off point of the driven yarn feeding means and the point where the yarn is laid on the package, said let-off point of the feeding means being fixed and located in a plane perpendicular to the package axis approximately midway between the ends of the package, and the traverse mechanism including a yarn guide movable longitudinally of and parallel to the longitudinal axis of the package which arrangement would normally produce arc variation, said compensating means including a cam so designed that the path length variation introduced during each traverse cycle compensates substantially for the path length change occasioned by said arc variation and for at least some degree of variation in the rate of yarn take-up package, the compensating means including a guide arm positioned to engage the yarn between the letoff point of the yarn feeding means and the laying point on the package and which is moved in accordance with the shape of the ca m so as appropriately to cause the yarn path to approach more or less closely to the direct path between the let-off point and the laying point.

2. A yarn twisting machine as claimed in claim 1 in which the guide arm moves in a plane which is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the take-up package.

3. A yarn twisting machine as claimed in claim 2 which is of the in-flow type including a flyer having a spindle, the take-up package axis being perpendicular to the axis of the flyer and the eye of the guide arm, being located substantially mid-way between the ends of the take-up package.

4. A yarn twisting machine as claimed in claim 3 in which the driven yarn feeding means is so arranged that the yarn passes to it directly in line with the axis of the flyer spindle.

5. A two-for-one yarn twisting machine comprising driven yarn feeding means, a traverse mechanism which lays the yarn in cross wind on a conical package, and compensating means to vary the length of the yarn path between the let-off point of the driven yarn feeding means and the point where the yarn is laid on the package, said let-off point of the feeding :means being fixed and located in a plane perpendicular to the package axis approximately midway between the ends of the package, and the traverse mechanism including a yarn guide movable longitudinally of and parallel to the longitudinal axis of the package which arrangement would normally produce arc variation, said compensating means including a cam, a second yarn guide connected with the cam and engaging said yarn adjacent the let-off point of the driven yarn feeding means, and means for operating said cam for causing movement of said second guide whereby the path length variation introduced during each traverse cycle compensates substantially for the path length change occasioned by said are variation and for at least some degree of variation in the rate of yarn take-u occasioned by the conical shape of the take-up package.

6. A two-for-one yarn twisting machine comprising driven yarn feeding means, a traverse mechanism which lays the yarn in cross wind on a conical package, and compensating means to vary the length of the yarn path between the let-ofi point of the driven yarn feeding means and the point where the yarn is laid on the package, said let-off point of the feeding means being fixed and located in a plane perpendicular to the package axis approximately midway between the ends of the package, and the traverse mechanism including a yarn guide movable longitudinally of and parallel to the longitudinal axis of the package which arrangement would normally produce arc variation, said compensating means including a cam and movable means engaging the yarn and actuated by the cam whereby the path length variation introduced during each traverse cycle compensates substantially for the path length change occasioned by said arc variation and for at least some degree of variation in the rate of yarn take-up occasioned by the conical shape of the take-up package, said cam having a longitudinal cam surface arranged so that it extends in a direction parallel to that of the axis of the take-up package, said compensating means including a follower for said cam, said follower engaging in the groove of a rotatable traverse scroll controlling the reciprocation of traverse means acting to lay the yarn take-up package so that it moves up and down in accord-,

ance with the shape of its cam surface on movement of the reciprocating cam follower which movement takes place in the fixed line parallel to the package axis, a guide anm carried by the cam, the movement of the cam being transmitted to the yarn through said guide arm. 1

References Cited 7 UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,858,205 5/1932 Ferier 5758.5 6 2,505,050 4/1950 Kimball 5758.65 X 2,773,344 12/1956 Van Hook 5758.65 X 2,834,178 5/1958 Klein 5758.65 X 2,914,904 12/1959 Brown 5758.65 3,006,472 12/1962 Klein 5758.65 X 3,106,055 10/1963 Mackie 5758.7 X

STANLEY N. GILREATH, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1858205 *Apr 29, 1931May 10, 1932Bianchini Ferier SncDouble twist flyer spinning machine
US2505050 *Sep 7, 1948Apr 25, 1950Cellucord CorpApparatus for making paper cord
US2773344 *Apr 12, 1951Dec 11, 1956Hook Charles F VanVertical twisting machine
US2834178 *Apr 20, 1954May 13, 1958Deering Milliken Res CorpStrand handling machine
US2914904 *Dec 10, 1956Dec 1, 1959Clemson Agricultural College OCord twister and winder
US3006472 *Nov 12, 1957Oct 31, 1961Clute CorpMagnetic separator and method of separating materials
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3640477 *Aug 14, 1969Feb 8, 1972Reiners WalterCoil winding machine
US4002306 *Nov 20, 1975Jan 11, 1977W. Schlafhorst & Co.Method and apparatus for winding conical cross-wound coils or bobbins with constant thread-feeding velocity
US4113193 *Nov 20, 1975Sep 12, 1978W. Schlafhorst & Co.Method and apparatus for winding conical coils or cheeses at constant thread-feeding velocity
US4149678 *Mar 16, 1977Apr 17, 1979Kabushiki Kaisha Toyoda Jidoshokki SeisakushoOpen-end spinning machine
US4819422 *Oct 8, 1987Apr 11, 1989Fritz StahleckerArrangement for winding a double yarn onto a cross-wound spool
US4850543 *Dec 21, 1987Jul 25, 1989W. Schlafhorst & Co.Reciprocating device for a lifter rod of an open-end spinning machine
US6682011 *Feb 21, 2002Jan 27, 2004Savio Macchine Tessili S.P.A.Device for collecting yarns on conical reels with compensation of the fluctuations of the yarn take-up speed
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/58.65, 242/476.7, 57/58.52
International ClassificationB65H59/00, D01H1/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2701/31, D01H1/101, B65H59/005
European ClassificationB65H59/00B, D01H1/10B