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Publication numberUS3359747 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1967
Filing dateJun 15, 1966
Priority dateJun 24, 1965
Publication numberUS 3359747 A, US 3359747A, US-A-3359747, US3359747 A, US3359747A
InventorsWilliam J Linstromberg
Original AssigneeWhirlpool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ice cube maker control
US 3359747 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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ICE CUBE MAKER CONTROL Original Filed June 24, 1965 6 SheetsSheet 2 6 sheets -Sheet :s

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ICE CUBE MAKER CONTROL 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Original Filed June 24, 1965 MNN www Dec. 26, 1967 w. J. LINSTROMBERG 3,359,747

ICE CUBE MAKER CONTROL Original Filed June 24, 1965 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 United States Patent 3,359,747 ICE CUBE MAKER CONTROL William J. Linstromberg, Evansville, Ind., assignor to Whirlpool Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Original application June 24, 1965, Ser. No. 477,060, now

Patent No. 3,276,225. Divided and this application June 15, 1966, Ser. No. 557,674

15 Claims. (Cl. 62135) This application comprises a division of my copending application Ser. No. 477,060, filed June 24, 1965, which comprises a continuation-in-part of my now abandoned application Ser. No. 237,010, filed Nov. 13, 1962.

This invention relates to refrigeration apparatus, and in particular to apparatus for making ice bodies and the like.

In one well known form of ice maker, ice bodies are formed in a suitable mold having a plurality of upwardly opening cavities and are ejected from the mold by suitable means including ejector blades which are caused to move through the cavities in which the ice bodies are formed to force the ice bodies therefrom for delivery to a suitable collecting space. The present invention is concerned with such ice body makers and in particular with the means for controlling the ejection of the ice bodies from the mold.

Thus, a principal feature of the present invention is the provision of new and improved ice maker apparatus.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of such apparatus having new and improved means for ejecting ice bodies from a mold upon completion of the freezing of the ice bodies therein.

A yet further feature of the invention is the provision of such an ice maker apparatus having new and improved means for controlling the ejection cycle.

Still another feature of the invention is the provision of such apparatus having new and improved control means wherein a single thermostat is arranged to control both the initiation of the ejection cycle and to prevent overheating of the mold heater means.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a refrigeration apparatus having an ice maker embodying the invention, portions being broken away for facilitating illustration of the apparatus;

FIGURE 2 is a schematic electrical wiring diagram illustrating the circuitry of the ice maker apparatus;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged partial perspective view of the control of the ice maker;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a portion of the control, illustrating the arrangement of the thermostat therein, and with the mold and ejector blade structure extending rearwardly therefrom;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary plan view of the mold and ejector blade;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary vertical section taken substantially along the line 66 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary vertical transverse section taken substantially along the line 77 of FIGURE 5 illustrating the ejection of the ice body from the mold;

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of an ice body as formed in the ice maker apparatus;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of a refrigeration apparatus having a modified form of ice maker embodying the invention, portions being broken away for facilitating illustration of the apparatus;

FIGURE 10 is a schematic electrical wiring diagram illustrating the circuitry of a modified ice maker of FIG- URE 9;

FIGURE 11 is a front view of the control of the ice "ice maker with the cover broken away to illustrate in elevation the elements disposed forwardly of a front mounting plate of the control;

FIGURE 12 is a plan view of the ice maker;

FIGURE 13 is a vertical section taken substantially along the line 1313 of FIGURE 12;

FIGURE 14 is a transverse vertical section taken substantially along the line 1414 of FIGURE 12;

FIGURE 15 is a vertical section of the control taken substantially along the line 15-15 of FIGURE 13;

FIGURE 16 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line 1616 of FIGURE 12;

FIGURE 17 is a fragmentary horizontal section taken substantially along the line 17--17 of FIGURE 16; and

FIGURE 18 is a fragmentary horizontal section similar to that of FIGURE 17 but with the gear in an axially rearwardly displaced position.

In the exemplary embodiment of the invention as disclosed in FIGURES 1 through 8 of the drawing, a refrigeration apparatus generally designated 10 is shown to include an insulated cabinet 11 defining a chamber 12 having a front opening 13 selectively closed by a door 14. In the illustrated embodiment, the cabinet 11 further defines a second chamber 15 having a front opening 16 selectively closed by a second door 17. An ice body maker generally designated 18 is disposed within the chamber 12 for forming ice bodies and delivering them to a subjacent collecting bin 19 also disposed within the chamber 12. Chambers 12 and 15 are refrigerated by a suitable evaporator 20 disposed within the walls of the cabinet 11. The evaporator herein forms a portion of a conventional refrigeration circuit including a compressor 21, a condenser 22, a capillary 23, and conduits 24 and 25 for delivering the refrigerant to and from the evaporator 20.

The ice maker apparatus 18 includes a mold 26 in which the ice bodies I are formed, water being delivered to the mold by an inlet 27 connected to a solenoid operated valve 28 by a delivery tube 29. The solenoid valve 28 may be connected to a suitable source of water under pressure (not shown). The ice maker apparatus 18 further includes a control 30 disposed at the front end of the mold 26 and arranged to operate an ejector blade 31 which upon completion of the freezing of the ice bodies in the mold 26 removes the ice bodies I from the mold to the subjacent collecting bin 19.

Mold

' As discussed briefly above, the present invention comprehends an improved ice maker apparatus providing facilitated removal of the ice bodies from the mold and providing ice bodies having a novel improved configuration. Reference now being had more specifically to FIG- URES 4 through 8, the mold 26 is shown to comprise a tray structure having a plurality of partition walls 32 extending transversely across the mold to define a plurality of cavities 33 in which a corresponding plurality of ice bodies are formed. Each cavity 33 is partially divided by a partial transverse wall 34. The partition walls 32 are provided with recessed portions 35 defining weirs between the respective cavities 33 to permit water to flow from cavity to cavity during the filling operation. The partial dividing walls 3 4, as best seen in FIGURE 7, include an upper portion 36 extending to above the top 37 of the mold 26 and arranged to efiFect positive stripping of the ice bodies I from the ejector blade 31, as will be described more fully in the description of the operation of the apparatus.

In the illustrated embodiment, the mold is refrigerated by means of a refrigeration shelf 38 which carries the mold; however, any suitable means for effecting the freezing of the ice bodies may be employed within the scope of the invention. The removal of the ice bodies I from the mold cavities 33 is facilitated by means of a heater wire 39 extending through the mold 26, as shown in FIG- URE 7. Heater 39 warms the mold sufiiciently to melt the surface of the ice bodies engaging the walls of the mold cavities and thereby frees the ice bodies for ejection from the cavities by the ejector blade 31.

As shown in FIGURE 8, the ice body I formed by the novel mold 26 comprises a generally semi-cylindrical body having a slot 40 extending arcuately therein to define a pair of spaced portions 41-42. The slot extends substantially into the semi-cylindrical configuration of the ice body so as to permit facilitated breaking of the ice body into two complete discrete portions by manipulation of the two portions 41 and 42 toward each other as by squeezing between the user's fingers. Thus, the ice bodies may be utilized as delivered from the ice maker 18 or as a pair of ice bodies each comprising one-half of the ice body I shown in FIGURE 8.

The dividing wall 34 is preferably formed of a thermal conductive material, such as metal, so as to provide improved expedited freezing of the ice bodies in the cavities 33 by virtue of the increased heat transfer surface provided.

Control Referring now more specifically to FIGURES 3, 4 and 5, control 30 includes a thermostat 43 in thermal transfer association with mold 26. The thermostat includes a switch 44 which, as best seen in FIGURE 2, comprises a single throw switch having a moving contact 45 and a fixed contact 46. Control 36 further includes a motor 64 which rotates a shaft 65 (see FIGURE 4) carrying the ejector blade 31 and a tripartite cam 47. A rear cam surface 47a of cam 47 cooperates with a pivotally mounted shut-off plate 48 for controlling a sensing arm 49 extending downwardly from control 30 to the collecting bin 19 for selective movement into and from bin 19 to sense the level Of ice bodies collected therein. Plate 48 further engages an actuator 50 of a shut-off switch generally designated 51 having a movable contact 52 and a pair of fixed contacts 53 and 54. Switch 51 is biased to engage its moving contact 52 with fixed contact 53 when the control 30 is arranged, as shown in FIGURE 3.

Control 36 further includes a holding switch 55 having a moving contact 56 selectively engageable with a first fixed contact 57 and a second fixed contact 58. Switch 55 includes an actuator 59 which rides on cam surface 47b of cam 47, as shown in FIGURE 3.

A third switch 60 of control 30 comprises a water valve switch having a movable contact 61 and a fixed contact 62. Switch 6% includes an actuator 63 which engages a third cam surface 470 of cam 47, as shown in FIGURE 3.

Operation The operation of control 30 is as follows. Assuming that the mold contains a quantity of water in the process of being frozen to form the ice bodies I in the cavities 33 and the level of the ice bodies in collecting bin 19 is below the preselected full level, the mold thermostat 43 senses a relatively warm condition whereby the switch 44 is in the open arrangement, as shown in FIGURE 2. Further, the shut-off switch 51 has moving contact 52 thereof closed with fixed contact 53, holding switch 55 has moving contact 56 thereof closed with fixed contact 57 and water valve switch 60 has its moving contact 61 spaced from fixed contact 62. Thus, the control 30 is in a de-energized condition between the power supply leads L and L In the illustrated embodiment, the thermostat 43 is arranged to have a cut-in temperature of 9 F., and a reset or cut-out temperature of 45 F. Thus, when the water in the mold cavities 33 becomes completely frozen and the temperature thereof drops to 9 F., the thermostat switch 44 is operated to close contact 45 with contact 46, thereby establishing a circuit from power supply lead L through contacts 53-52 of switch 51, contacts 45-46 of switch 44, and through heater 39 to lead L At the same time, control motor 64 is energized from contact 46 through contacts 57-56 of holding switch 55. This causes the cam 47 to rotate, whereupon, after a few degrees of rotation, cam surface 471: actuates switch 55 to switch moving contact 56 from fixed contact 57 to fixed contact 58 thereby establishing a holding circuit from lead L through contacts 58-56 to motor 64, whereby the motor is energized regardless of the condition of thermostat switch 44.

Upon a small additional amount of rotation of cam 47, cam surface 47a causes shut-off plate 48 to p1vot in a clockwise direction, thereby swinging the sensing arm 49 upwardly from the collecting bin 19. At the same time, shut-oft plate 48 permits actuator 50 to throw moving contact 52 of switch 51 from fixed contact 53 into engagement with fixed contact 54. This establishes a circuit to heater 39 from lead L through contacts 58-56 of holding switch 55, contacts 54-52 of shut-off switch 51, and contacts 45- 46 of thermostat switch 44. Thus, the control motor 64 is energized independently of thermostat switch 44, while heater 39 is energized under the control of thermostat switch 44 at this time.

The operation of motor 64 causes rotation of shaft 65 until the ejector blade 31 engages the ice bodies I within the mold cavities 33. In the event that the ice bodies have not been freed from the mold walls, the motor 64 stalls until such time as mold heater 39 melts the bodies free. The motor then continues rotation of ejector blade 31, moving the ice bodies from the cavities 33. At the same time, shutoff plate 48 is pivoted by cam 47a to lower the .sensing arm 49 into the collecting bin 19. If the level of the ice bodies collected in bin 19 is below the preselected level, the arm moves downwardly into bin 19 and allows the plate 48 to pivot sufiiciently to permit switch 51 to become repositioned, as shown in FIGURE 3, with contact 52 spaced from fixed contact 54 and now engaging fixed contact 53,

After 270 degrees of rotation of cam 47, the cam surface 47c operates actuator 63 of switch 60 to close moving contact 61 with fixed contact 62. However, as thermostat swtich 44 remains closed at this time, the short circuit from lead L through contacts 53-52 of switch 51 and contacts 45-46 of switch 44, in parallel with the circuit from lead L through water valve solenoid 28 and nowclosed switch 60, prevents energization of solenoid 28 at this time.

The motor 64 continues to operate to rotate ejector blade 31 until the ice bodies become inverted and rest on the ejector blade and upper portion 36 of the partial walls 34. Concurrently, cam 47 becomes positioned so as to cause surface 47b to permit holding switch moving contact 56 to move from fixed contact 58 to fixed contact 57. Although the holding circuit through contacts 58-56 is now broken, the energization of motor 64 is continued at this time from lead L through contacts 53-52 of switch 51, contacts 45-46 of switch 44, and contacts 57- 56 of switch 55.

The motor 64 continues to rotate to swing ejector blade 31 downwardly through cavities 33 a second time, the ice bodies I having been positively removed from the ejector blade by the engagement thereof with the stripping portion 36 of the partial walls 34, positively precluding the ice bodies from re-entering the mold cavities and jamming the ice maker. As a result of the heating of the mold by heater 39, some melting of the ice bodies may occur prior to the complete removal of the ice bodies from adjacent the mold to the bin 19. A trough 66 is provided in the partial walls 34 to permit this melt to pass back into the cavities 33 and prevent the melt from passing down the exterior of the mold into the collecting bin 19. The continued rotation of motor 64 now again closes moving contact 56 of holding switch 55 with fixed contact 58 thereof to re-establish the holding circuit to control motor 64.

Shut-off switch 51 is again actuated by cam 47a as discussed above to close moving contact 52 with fixed confact 54 and open the circuit between contact 52 and contact 53. Sufficient heat will have been delivered to the mold 26 shortly after the second closing of the holding switch contact 56 with the fixed contact 58 to cause thermostat 43 to move contact 45 of switch 44 away from fixed contact 46. As indicated above, the thermostat may be arranged to effect this transfer at a sensed temperature of approximately 45 F. This opening of switch 44 de-energizes the mold heater 39, as it breaks the circuit from switch 51. However, as holding switch 55 is arranged with contact 56 closed with contact 58 thereof the control motor 64 continues to operate to reclose the contact 61 of water valve switch 60 with contact 62 thereof. As swtich 44 is now open, the solenoid 28 will not be short circuit at this time (as it was during the first closing of switch 60) but rather will now become energized to admit water through inlet 27 to the mold cavities 33 for forming a subsequent group of ice bodies I in mold 26. After a preselected time, cam surface 470 permits switch 60 to reopen, thereby terminating the flow of water to the mold cavities. The completion of the control cycle occurs upon a small additional operation of motor 64 whereby cam surface 47b permits holding switch 55 to move contact 56 from contact 58 to contact 57. The control 30 is now fully 'de-energized as at the beginning of the operation cycle as discussed above, whereby a subsequent cycle will become initiated by the completed freezing of the ice bodies in the mold as discussed above.

When a sufficient number of ice bodies have been delivered to collecting bin 19 so as to cause the level therein to rise to the preselected full level, the operation of the control 30 as discussed above will be interrupted by preventing the shut-off plate 48 from returning to the position of FIGURE 3. Thus, moving contact 52 remains in engagement with fixed contact 54 and the circuit remains broken between contacts 53 and 52. This condition will remain until such time as the level of ice bodies in bin 19 is lowered as by removing some or all of the ice bodies therein. When this occurs the release of sensing arm 49 permits the return of shut-off plate 48 to the position of FIGURE 3, thereby allowing the switch 51 to close moving contact 52 with fixed contact 53 and permitting subsequent operation of the control 30, as discussed above. It should be noted that this termination of operation of control 30 may occur during either one of the two rotations of the cam 47 in the complete cycle of operation of control 30.

Thusly, control 30 utilizes a single thermostat 43 to control both the mold heater 39 and the control motor 64. The control is arranged to prevent overheating by the mold heater 39 such as might occur if the control motor 64 or the holding switch fails or the ejector blade 31 becomes jammed, such as by interference with the mold walls. By virtue of the continued control of the heater 39 by the thermostat switch 44, the temperature of the mold will be maintained between the upper and lower limits of the thermotsat, herein 45 F. and 9 F., respectively.

Modified ice maker Referring now to FIGURES 9 through 16, a modified form of ice maker embodying the invention is shown to comprise an ice maker 113 provided in a refrigeration apparatus generally designated 110 similar to the above described ice maker 18 and refrigeration apparatus 10. As shown in FIGURE 9, ice maker 118 is disposed within a chamber 112 defined by an insulated cabinet 111 having a front opening 113 selectively closed by a door 14. The refrigeration apparatus 110 may further include a subjacent above-freezing chamber 115 having a front opening 116 selectively closed by a door 117. Chambers 112 and 115 are suitably refrigerated as by forced air or refrigerated plate conductive heat transfer means, herein they are refrigerated by a suitable evaporator 120 disposed within the walls of the cabinet 111. The evaporator herein forms a portion of a conventional refrigeration circuit including a compressor 121, a condenser 122, a capillary 123, and conduits 124 and 125 for delivering refrigerant to and from the evaporator 120.

The ice maker 118, as shown in FIGURE 9, includes a mold 126 in which the ice bodies are formed and from which the ice bodies are ejected to a subjacent collecting bin 119 (FIGURE 9) by means of an ejector 131 which sweeps through the mold during the ejection cycle. The ejector member swings the ice bodies out of the mold and against a stripper member 208 (FIGURE 14) which effectively positively strips the ice bodies from the ejector 131 and causes them to fall downwardly into the collectin g bin 119. Cyclical operation of the ejector 131 is automatically effected by a control disposed at the forward end of the mold 126 (FIGURE 9). In addition to cycling the ejector 131, control 130 further automatically provides for refilling of the mold for subsequent further ice body formation therein, in the event that the level of ice bodies in the collecting bin 119 is below a preselected full level. Toward this end, control 130 is provided with a sensing arm 261 which periodically senses the level of ice bodies (i.e. during each ejection cycle) and suitably affects the operation of the control 130 to discontinue the ice forming cycling discussed above when the level of ice bodies in collecting bin 119 reaches the preselected level.

Mold 126 defines a plurality of upwardly opening cavities 133 in which the ice bodies are formed. The water from which the ice bodies are formed is delivered to the mold 126 by means of an inlet 127 connected to a solenoid operated valve 128 by a delivery tube 129. Valve 128 may be connected to a suitable source of water under pressure (not shown).

Modified mold Referring to FIGURES 12 and 14, mold 126 herein more specifically comprises a tray structure having a bottom wall 170, side walls 171 and 172, rear end wall 173, and a front end wall 174. A plurality of partition walls 132 extend transversely across the mold to define, with the above indicated tray walls, the cavities 133 in which the respective ice bodies are formed. Herein, each cavity 133 is partially divided by a partial dividing wall 134 which extends transversely across the cavity, as best seen in FIGURE 14. Each of the partition walls and dividing walls is provided with a recessed upper edge portion through which the water fiows from the end cavity 133a successively forwardly to the respective cavities until all cavities are filled to the level L, as shown in FIGURE 14.

As shown in FIGURE 12, the partial dividing wall 134 herein is disposed substantially at the center of cavity 133 so as to divide the cavity symmetrically into two halves. Each of the partition and partial dividing walls is formed integrally with the bottom wall and the side walls of the mold. The mold is preferably formed of a material having high thermal conductivity and, thus, the partial dividing walls 134 provide an improved fast freezing of the ice body as it projects upwardly into the center of the forming ice bodies to conduct heat readily from this midportion of the water delivered to the cavity 133, which normally is the last portion to be frozen. Thus, ice maker 118 provides a substantially increased rate of ice body production providing improved efiiciency in the operation of apparatus 110.

Modified thermostat The refrigeration of the water in the mold 126 is herein effected by the cold air within chamber 112; although as will be obvious to those skilled in the art, other suitable means may be employed for refrigerating the mold within the scope of the invention. Control 130, as indicated above, includes a thermostat 254, herein of the bimetallic type, which senses the temperature of the mold 126 to 7 determine the completion of freezing of the ice bodies and as a result thereof automatically initiate the ejection cycle. As best seen in FIGURE 16, the thermostat includes a sensing portion 255 projecting rearwardly through the housing wall 199 into thermal transfer contact with the rear wall 174 of the mold.

Herein, the completion of the ice body formation is indicated when the temperature of the mold is reduced to approximately 23 F. Heretofore, without the provision of a thermally conductive partialdividing wall such as dividing wall 134 herein, the temperature of the mold upon complete freezing of the ice bodies therein has had to be approximately 13 F. or below. By removing heat energy directly from a midportion of the cavity 133, the ice bodies are formed with substantially less refrigeration than heretofore required where the refrigerating surfaces of the mold cavities were limited to the peripheral boundaries thereof. As a result of the improved efiiciency of ref-rigeration, thermostat means 254 herein may comprise an inexpensive relatively wide tolerance thermostat thereby substantially reducing the cost of control 130 as compared to the known controls requiring the use of more expensive thermostats having narrower operating tolerances. More specifically, herein thermostat 254 comprises a thermostat having an operational tolerance of plus or minus 5 F. Thus, the thermostat may comprise a thermostat nominally rated to operate at a low temperature of 18 F. As the actual operating temperature of the thermostat may be 23 F. (i.e. 18 +5=23 where the specific thermostat is one at the upper end of the tolerance range), the ejection cycle as controlled by the thermostat will be initiated at the time the temperature of the mold as sensed by the thermostat is reduced to 23 F. Where the specific thermostat is one which actually operates at the lower end of the tolerance range, i.e. at 13 F., the refrigeration of the mold will be continued beyond the point where the ice bodies are fully formed and until the portion of the mold sensed by the thermostat reaches the 13 F. point. This entire range of operation, however, is above the range of operation of the thermostats previously employed which were required to sense a mold temperature at 13 F. or below. As the temperature of the refrigerating means is conventionally approximately R, if 21 F. tolerance thermostat were to be used Where this lower temperature range is required, one would have to select thermostats nominally rated at 8 F. so that at the upper end of the tolerance range '13 F. operation would be obtained and at the lower end of the range the thermostats would operate at only 3 F. The lowering of the mold to approximately 3 F. by refrigerating means which is at approximately 0 F. is substantially impractical because of the small temperature differential and, thus, the use of relatively expensive narrow tolerance thermostats such as thermostats having tolerances of plus or minus 3 F. only have heretofore been the commercial practice. Thus, it has been conventional to employ thermostats nominally rated at 10 F. with a plus or minus 3 F. tolerance so that such thermostats operate in the range of 7 F. to 13 F. tothereby provide the necessary differential above the 0 F. refrigeration temperature to permit satisfactory operation. Such narrow tolerance thermostats, however, are substantially more expensive than the above-described wide tolerance 5 F. temperature differential thermostat employed in the present invention and, thus, control 130 provides a substantial reduction in the cost thereof as compared to the conventional controls requiring such narrow tolerance thermostats.

Thus, ice maker 118 is arranged so that the completion of the freezing of the ice bodies is caused to occur while the temperature of the mold portion sensed by the thermostat means 254 is relatively high, i.e., closer to the water freezing temperature of 32 F. than to the refrigeration temperature herein of 0 F. Herein, this indicative mold temperature is 23 F. The substantial differential between such a relatively high thermostat operating temperature and the relatively low 0 F. refrigeration temperature permits the highly desirable use of the above described low cost thermostat means 254. To further reduce the cost of the thermostat 254, it is desirable to utilize a relatively high reset temperature. In the illustrated embodiment, the reset temperature of the thermostat 254 is approximately 50 F. and, thus, thermostat 254 may be a relatively low cost thermostat having a differential of over 30 F. between the nominal actuation 18 F. and the reset 50 F. temperatures thereof.

Modified ejector-stripper As indicated briefly above, the ejection of the ice bodies from the mold cavities 133 is effected herein by an ejector 131 comprising a plurality of fingers 188 carried by a shaft 189. As best seen in FIGURES 13 and 14, the inlet 127 comprises a plastic cup member pro vided with a depending annular bearing 190 secured to wall 173 by a pair of bosses 131 and 192 upstanding from the rear end of the mold. Inlet 127, as seen in FIGURE 12, defines a well 193 for receiving water from the conduit 123 (FIGURE 9) and a chute 124 for conducting the water from the well 193 through an opening 195 into the rear cavity 133a of the mold.

Referring to FIGURE 13, the rear end 196 of the ejector shaft 189 is journalled in the bearing 190. The forward end 197 of the shaft 18% is journalled in a bearing portion 198 of the rear wall 199' of a housing 200 of control and is provided with a flatted connecting portion 201 received in a corresponding recess 202 of a shaft 203 which as will be explained more fully hereinafter is driven by a motor 204 of the control 130. As seen in FIGURE 14, each finger 188 is provided with a fiat, ice body-engaging, ejector surface 205 and tapers from a substantially pentagonal cross-section adjacent shaft 189 to a substantially triangular crosssection at an outer tip 205. The ejector 131 may be formed of a suitable plastic material (e.g. acetyl resin, nylon, etc.) having sufficient strength to apply the necessary ejection forces to the ice bodies in the cavities 133.

The motor 204 rotates ejector 131 about the axis of the shaft 189 in a clockwise direction as seen in FIG- URE 14, whereby the surfaces 205 of the pair of fingers 188 aligned with each cavity 133 bear against the upper surface of the ice body at level L and carry it in an arc about the axis of the shaft 189 to above the cavity 133 and to laterally beyond the wall 171 of the mold to fall into the subjacent collecting bin 119, as shown in FIGURE 9. A sheathed resistance heater 207 is disposed in the mold wall for delivering heat to the mold so as to melt the surface of the ice body confronting the mold wall and thereby facilitate the freeing of the ice body from the mold when the ejector fingers 188 are brought thereagainst.

To strip the ice body positively from the ejector fingers 188 when the ice body reaches a position overlying right-hand wall 171, a stripper member 208 is mounted on the mold having a plurality of fingers 209a and 10% which overlie respectively the partial dividing walls 134 and the partition walls 132. As best seen in FIGURE 14, the stripper member 208 includes an apron 210 having a recessed connecting portion 211 carried on an outturned flange 2 12 at the upper end of the mold side wall 171. The stripper member herein comprises a molded member having the fingers formed integrally with the apron 210. The fingers 209a and 2091) are arranged to rest on the upper edges of the dividing and partition Walls. The flatwise extent of the fingers 209a and 2091') is perpendicular to the spacing between the fingers, or parallel to the flatwise extent of the dividing and partition walls and, thus, the fingers effectively define upper wall extensions of the dividing and partition walls. As best seen in FIGURE 14, the fingers narrow toward their distal ends so that the spacing between adjoining portions of the fingers overlying mold side wall 171 is less than the spacing between the distal ends of the fingers adjacent ejector shaft 189.

The fingers 209a effectively define stripper fingers which are disposed in overlying relationship to the space S (and cavity 133) mid-way between the front and rear ends of the cavity defined by the partition walls 132. Thus, the stripper finger 209a effectively positively block re-entry of the ejected ice body back into the cavity 133 as it is swung about the axis of the shaft 189 by the ejector fingers 188. As best seen in FIG- URES 12 and 14, the upper surface 213 of each finger 209a and 2091: is inclined downwardly toward apron 210 so as to guide the stripped ice body downwardly around the right side wall 171 and into the subjacent collecting bin 119.

Fingers 209']; are substantially similar to fingers 209a but are arranged to overlie the partition walls 132 defining the ends of the cavities 133. Thus, fingers 209b effectively comprise guide fingers which effectively preclude cooking of the ice bodies as they are stripped from the ejector between stripper fingers and, thus, cooperate with the stripper fingers 209a in effectively blocking re-entry of the ejected ice bodies into the cavities 133. The spacing between the guide fingers 20% is slightly less than the width of the ice bodies (the fore and aft dimension thereof perpendicular to the planes of the partition walls 132) and, thus, each of the opposite ends of the ice body engages the corresponding guide fingers during the stripping operation to be guided thereby as discussed above. The inclined upper surfaces 213 of the guide fingers similarly direct the stripped ice bodies over the side wall 171 and apron 210 to fall into the collecting bin, whereby the impact forces resulting from this free fall of the ice bodies effectively separate the respective ice bodies.

The stripper member 208, comprising the stripper fingers 209a, the guide fingers 20%, and the apron 210, is preferably a one-piece molding formed of an insulating plastic so as to minimize melting of the ice bodies when in engagement therewith. The insulating fingers 209a and 2091) preclude engagement of the ice bodies with the metal mold walls and the insulating apron 210 precludes engagement thereof with the exterior of side wall 171 during transfer of the ice bodies to the collecting bin.

Modified motor-drive The control 130, as indicated above, includes a motor 204 which provides the necessary eject-ion force to the ejector 131. The motor 204 is provided with an output shaft 214 shown in FIGURE 11 extending forwardly from the motor through a front mounting plate 215 in housing 200 and carrying forwardly of the plate 215 a drive gear 216 meshing with a larger gear 217 carried on the forward end 218 of the shaft 203 driving the ejector 131. Shaft end 218 is journalled in an opening 219 in plate 215 and includes a forward cam portion 220 immediately rearwardly of the plate 215 (see FIGURE 16). As best seen in FIGURE 15, cam portion 220 is provided with a pair of camming recesses 221 and 222 which are spaced apart approximately 90 degress to control operation of a pair of snap acting switches 223 and 224 having plungers 225 and 226, respectively.

Not only must motor 204 provide the necessary torque for ejecting the ice bodies from the mold cavities, but also must provide accurate timing of the control cycle. For example, the water fill control means of control 130 is arranged to open the water supply valve 128 for a preselected period of time proper for delivering a quantity of water to the mold 126 for accurately filling the cavities 13-3 to the level L. Undesirable variations in the timing as may result from undesira ble variations in the speed of the drive motor may cause the water delivery to vary during successive cycles and thereby cause the ice bodies to vary undesirably in size and in the frangible nature of the connections between the ice bodies and ice body portions. Herein, motor 204 is an hysteresis type synchronous motor which operates at a substantially constant speed at all times. In the illustrated embodiment, motor 204 develops approximately 40 inch ounces of starting torque and 70 inch ounces of stalling torque at rated voltage. The gearing is preferably arranged to operate the ejector at less than approximately one r.p.m. and herein operates the ejector at approximately one-third rpm. and with less than approximately 15 inch-pounds of torque, herein the motor and gearing are preselected to operate the ejector with approximately 13 inch-pounds of torque. The use of the hysteresis synchronous motor provides the highly desirable advantages herein of low cost, small size, low weight, accurate repetitive timing, and reduced stalling torque permitting the use of the molded plastic (e.g. acetyl resin, nylon, etc.) ejector and eliminating the need for door switches and the like heretofore required to prevent operation of the eje'ctor when the ice maker was ex posed to the user. Further, synchronous motor 204 provides a small coasting which effectively precludes dead breaking of the double throw switch 223. More specifically, double throw switch 223 is arranged to energize the motor 204 when in either of its fully thrown positions, as shown in FIGURE 10. During the movement of the moving contacts 223]) thereof, however, between the fully thrown positions, the motor 204 is effectively de-energized. It is desirable, therefore, that the motor coast sufficient-1y so as to cause cam surface 222 to effect fully throwing of the switch and prevent a condition wherein the moving contact 22312 is held somewhere intermediate its fully thrown positions with the motor maintained tie-energized.

It is further desirable in control to provide a unidirectional drive which will permit simplified manual reverse movement as during adjustment of the control. As the hysteresis motor 204 provides a unidirectional operation without ratchets and the like necessary to provide unidirectional operation with induction motors, simplified adjustment and testing is obtained. Further, as the mechanism to provide unidirectional operation is eliminated by means of hysteresis motor 204, a much quieter operation is obtained during the stalled condition as hunting is effectively eliminated. At the same time, the possibility of gear damage is effectively precluded.

Modified water fill control Switch 223 is fixedly secured to the rear of the plate 215 by means of a pair of screws 227 extending through the switch and a spacer block 228 and threaded through the plate 215 (FIGURE 16). Switch 224 is secured to a support bar 229 by a pair of screws 230 and 231. AS seen in FIGURE 11, the lower screw 231 extends through a small threaded opening 232 in the plate 215 to pivotally mount the support 229 on the plate 215. The screw 230 extends through a large opening 233 in the plate 215 which permits arcuate movement of screw 230 about the axis of screw 231 and thereby permits switch 224 carried by the support 229 to move arcuately about the axis of screw 232 (FIGURE 11) toward and from the cam 220, as best seen in FIGURE 15. The pivotal disposition of the support 229 is controlled by a screw 234 which extends through a turned tab 235 formed on the upper end of the support 229 and projecting through a rectangular opening 236 in the plate 215 (see FIGURE 11). The plate is provided with an upset tab 237 having a threaded opening 238 through which the screw 234 is threaded. A compression spring 239 is disposed between the tabs 235 and 237 to urge the tab 235 against the head 240 of the screw 234. Thus, by adjusting screw 234, the pivotal position of support 229 may be varied selectively in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, as seen in FIG- URE 11, to bring the switch 224 selectively away from and toward the cam 220 (FIGURE 15). A suitable ind-icia means 241 may be provided on the plate 215 for indicating the sense of control effected by the screw adjustment.

The bodily movement of the switch 224 effects an adjusta'ble positioning of the actuator 226 thereof relative to the camming recess 221, which as best seen in FIGURE 15, includes an inwardly sloped leading cam surface 242 and an outwardly sloped trailing cam surface 243. The actuator 226 is spring biased outwardly against the cam so that by pivoting the switch 224 in a counterclockwise direction from the position shown in FIGURE 15, the switch will be operated with a lesser movement of the actuator along the surface 242 into the recess 221 and will require more times for actuator 226 to be restored to its normal position as the surface 243 moves thereagainst. Alternatively, by repositioning the switch in a clockwise direction from the position of FIGURE 15, the actuator must move further along the surface 242 into the recess 22 1 before actuation of the switch and will more quickly restore the switch to the normal condition. Thus, a counterclockwise repositioning of the switch causes the switch to be operated for a longer period of time, whereas a clockwise repositioning causes the switch to be actuated for a lesser period of time with the control of the operational time being infinitely adjustable over a preselected range by means of screw 234.

Operation of modified ice maker Operation of ice maker 118 may best be understood with reference to the schematic wiring diagram of FIG- URE 10. As shown therein, switch 224 is provided with a moving contact 2241) and a fixed contact 224a. The fixed contact 224a is connected to the solenoid 128a of solenoid valve 128 (FIGURE 9) which in turn is connected to one side L of the power supply, which may comprise the conventional single phase, 120-volt alternating house current power supply. The moving contact 22% is connected to a first fixed contact 223a of switch 223 and to a fixed contact 254a of thermostat switch 254-. The switch 223 as indicated above further includes a moving contact 2231) which is connected to the motor 204 which in turn is connected to the other side L of the power supply and to one end of the mold heater 207, the other end of the mold heater being connected to contact 254a of thermostat 254. Moving contact 22312 of switch 22.3 is further connected to a fixed contact 290a of switch 290. The thermostat 254 includes a moving contact 25417 which is connected to a moving contact 29% of switch 290. Switch. 290 further includes a second fixed contact 2900 which is connected to side L of the power supply. Switch 223 further includes a second fixed contact 2230' which is also connected to side L of the power supply.

Assuming that mold 126 contains a quantity of water previously delivered thereto from the water supply and which is in the process of being frozen in the cavities 133 to form the ice bodies, and the level of ice bodies in collecting bin 119 is below the preselected level, the functioning of ice maker 118 is as follows. Mold thermostat 254 senses the relatively warm temperature of the mold indicating the incomplete freezing of the ice bodies. Thus, contact 2541: of thermostat 254. is spaced from contact 254a breaking the circuit from power supply side L to control motor 204. Further, switch 290 is in the position shown in FIGURE with its moving contact 29% engaging fixed contact 2900, and switch 223 is in the position shown in FIGURE 10 with its moving Contact 223b engaging its fixed contact 223a. The switch 224 is in the open position having its moving contact 22411 spaced from fixed contact 224a, thereby de-energizing the solenoid 128a. Thus, as shown in FIGURE 10, the control is in a de-energized condition wherein none of the motor 204, heater 207, or solenoid 128a is energized.

As discussed above, when the temperature sensed by thermostat 254 drops a small amount below freezing, such as to approximately 23 F., the thermostat contact 25% moves into engagement with fixed contact 2540 thus establishing a circuit from power supply side L through switch 290 and switch 223 to the motor 204. At

the same time, the heater 207 is energized by the closing of thermostat switch 254. In the shut-off position, the fingers 188 of the ejector 131 are in the position of FIG- URE l4. Energization of motor 204 causes a rotation of shaft 189 to bring the fingers around in a clockwise direction, as seen in FIGURE 14, to engage the right-hand upper surface of the ice bodies in the cavities 133. During this rotation, the mold is being heated by the heater 207 to free the ice bodies from the mold. During the initial portion of this rotation, cam 220 firstly actuates switch 223 to throw the moving contact 2231) from fixed contact 223a into engagement with fixed contact 2230, thereby providing a holding circuit from power supply side L directly to the motor 204 and thereby maintaining the motor energized irrespective of the condition of thermostat switch 254 during the remainder of the ejection cycle. A small additional amount of rotation of motor 204 causes cam section 285 to pivot crank 283 in a clockwise direction, as seen in FIGURE 15, and thereby raise the sensing arm 261 upwardly from the collecting bin 119. Concurrently moving contact 29012 of switch 290 is moved from fixed contact 290:: and into engagement wit-h fixed Contact 290a. Thus, heater 207 is energized through switches 223 and 290 in series with thermostat switch 254 so as to maintain the heater under the control of the thermostat switch while allowing the motor 204 to be independent thereof.

In the event that the ice bodies have not been sufficiently freed from the mold walls through energization of heater 207 such as to permit the ejector fingers 188 to force the ice bodies outwardly from the cavities when the fingers engage the ice bodies, the motor 204 stalls. When the heater sufiiciently frees the ice bodies from the mold walls to permit the ejector fingers to force the ice bodies outwardly therefrom, rotation of motor 204 recommences. As the fingers sweep through the cavities in a clockwise direction, as seen in FIGURE 14, the sensing arm 261 moves downwardly into the collecting bin 119. Assuming that the level of ice bodies therein is below the preselected upper level, the arm moves unimpededly to its lowermost position. In this position switch 290 is arranged with moving contact 29% in engagement with fixed contact 2900.

After approximately 330 degrees of rotation, recess 221 of cam portion 220 moves into alignment with actuator 226 of switch 224 (FIGURE 15), thereby permitting the bias of switch 224 to close moving contact 22417 with fixed contact 224a. However, as contact 254a is connected to power supply side L through switches 254 and 290, the solenoid 128a is shunted out and no energization of the solenoid is effected at this time.

Motor 204 continues to rotate, driving the ejector fingers upwardly from the mold cavities 133 and bringing the ice bodies outwardly from the cavities onto the stripper fingers 209 inan inverted position thereon. The cam 220 now moves moving contact 22317 of switch 223 from contact 223a into engagement with contact 223a. The motor is now energized from power supply side L through switches 290, 254 and 223 and, thus, continues to rotate. The continued movement of the fingers 188 of the ejector 131 causes the ice bodies to move downwardly over the upper surfaces 213 of the stripper fingers into the collecting bin 119. As discussed above, the ice bodies are positively stripped from the fingers by the improved construction of the ejector fingers, providing the ice bodies for delivery to the collecting bin.

After the ice bodies are stripped and conducted away from the mold to the collecting bin, the ejector fingers continue to move in a clockwise direction as shown in FIGURE 14 to once again sweep through the cavities 133. During this second movement of the fingers through the cavities, the cam 220 repositions the moving contact 223/J of switch 223 in engagement with fixed contact 2230, thereby re-establishing the holding circuit to motor 204. By utilizing the second rotational cycle of the 13 ice maker, a sufficient time delay is obtained to permit the thermostat 254 to reset notwithstanding the relatively high reset temperature requirement thereof. The resetting of the thermostat is facilitated by the now complete removal of ice bodies from the mold permitting the heat energy from electrical heater 207 to raise the temperature of the rear mold wall 174 as sensed by thermostat 254 to the reset temperature, herein approximately 50 F.

As the motor 204 recycles cam 220, switch 290 is again operated by the cam to throw its moving contact 29% from contact 2900 into engagement with contact 290a. As indicated above, at this time, sulficient heat from the heater 207 will have been delivered to the mold wall 174 to cause the temperature sensed by thermostat sensor 255 to cause moving contact 254b to become spaced from fixed contact 254a. This transfer of the thermostat switch may be effected, for example, at a temperature of approximately 50 F.1- F. Thus, mold heater 207 is deenergized at this time. Continued operation of motor 204 by means of the holding circuit through switch 223 causes the cam 220 to rotate once again to the position wherein moving contact 22417 of switch 224 closes with fixed contact 224a thereof. At this time, however, thermostat switch 254 is open and, thus, the solenoid 128a is not shunted out when switch 224 closes but rather is energized through switch 224 and mold heater 207 to open valve 128 and deliver water from the water supply through the inlet 127 into the mold as discussed above.

Further, as discussed above, the adjustment of the position of switch 224 by means of the adjustment of support 229 permits an accurate control of the time during which the switch 224 is closed. As indicated briefly above, if the quantity of water delivered to the mold during the originally set time controlled by the adjustment of screw 234 is too short to provide the necessary quantity of water to the mold cavities, suitable adjustment of the screw may be effected to adjust the position of switch 224 to permit the closing of the switch 224 for a longer period of time. Reversely, if the quantity of water is too great, adjustment of screw 234 may be effected in a reverse direction to shorten the water delivery time. The indicia means 241, as shown in FIGURE 11, indicates the direction of adjustment necessary to increase or decrease the quantity of water.

The continued rotation of motor 204 and, thus, of cam 220 subsequent to the reopening of switch 224 causes moving contact 22311 of switch 223 to move from Contact 223:: to contact 223a, thereby breaking the holding circuit to motor 204 and de-energizing the control 130 until the next quantity of ice bodies are formed in the cavities 133 to initiate another cycle as described above.

When the level of ice bodies in the collecting bin 119 is sufficient to preclude the free movement of the sensing arm 261'downwardly into the collecting bin, the operation of control 130 is interrupted because contact 29% of switch 290 cannot move from fixed contact 290a. Thus, the portion of the cycle wherein motor 204 is energized through switches 290 and 254 cannot be effected, and the ice maker remains inoperative until such time as the level of ice bodies in the collecting bin is lowered sufficiently to permit the sensing arm to drop and throw moving contact 2091) into engagement with fixed contact 290C.

It should be noted that the interruption of the operation of the ice maker by the blocking of sensing arm 261 may be effected during either of the two 360 degree movement of the ejector fingers 188 through the cavities 133. Thus, when a fresh group of ice bodies is delivered to the collecting bin and raises the level thereof above the preselected level, this condition is sensed during the immediately following second 360 degree rotation of the ejector whereupon the ice maker is de-energized and prevented from recycling after the holding switch 223 opens.

Ice maker 118 is extremely simple and economical of construction while providing long trouble-free life. It is of minimum size and weight for facilitated installation in freezers and the like Where minimum size is a desideratum. .T he positive stripping of the ice bodies from the ejector and the provision of the ice bodies in bifurcated form for facilitated selective use as single or double size ice bodies provides a highly desirable feature.

While I have shown and described certain embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Changes, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. In an ice maker, apparatus comprising:

a mold in which water is frozen to form an ice body;

an electric motor;

means for ejecting the ice body from the mold operated by said electric motor;

an electric heater in thermal transfer association with the mold for freeing the ice body from the mold prior to said ejecting; and

control circuit means including a thermostat responsive to the temperature of water in the mold, first switch means controlled by the thermostat to initiate operation of said motor for ejecting the ice body upon complete freezing thereof and concurrently to energize said heater, an electrical circuit including said first switch means and said motor, and second switch means controlled by the operation of said motor to maintain energization of said motor independently of said first switch means and cause said first switch means to control the further energization of said heater to preclude overheating thereof.

2. The ice maker apparatus of claim 1 wherein said second switch means is electrically connected to said first switch means, motor, and heater.

3. The ice maker apparatus of claim 1 wherein said second switch means includes a first portion controlled by the operation of said motor to maintain energization of said motor independently of said first switch means, and a second portion controlled by the operation of said motor to cause said first switch means to control the further energization of said heater to preclude overheating thereof.

4. The ice maker apparatus of claim 1 wherein said control circuit means further includes a power supply, said first switch means is arranged to reopen when the temperature of the mold rises to a preselected temperature, and said second switch means selectively connects said motor in series with said first switch means to initiate operation of the motor when the freezing of the ice body is completed and upon such initiation reconnects said motor directly across the power supply to maintain operation thereof independently of the condition of said first switch means.

5. In an ice maker, apparatus comprising:

a mold in which water is frozen to form an ice body;

means for heating the mold to free the ice body from the mold for subsequent ejection therefrom;

means for ejecting ice bodies from the mold; and

means for controlling the heating means including a thermostat switch responsive to the formation of ice in said mold, an electrically operated cam device for operating said ejecting means, and means for connecting the cam device and heater in parallel with each other and in series with said thermostat switch for joint energization upon a closing of said thermostat switch as a result of completion of formation of said ice bodies in said mold, and for reconnecting said cam device subsequently in parallel with the series connection of said heater and thermostat switch whereby further energization of said cam device is independent of the operation of said thermostat switch and the energization of said heater continues to be controlled by said thermostat switch.

6. The ice maker apparatus of claim 5 further including means for delivering Water to the mold subsequent to the ejection of ice bodies therefrom, said water delivering means being controlled by an electrically operated device connected in parallel with said thermostat switch whereby said electrically operated device may operate to cause water to be delivered to the mold only when said thermostat switch is open.

7. In an ice maker, apparatus comprising:

a mold in which water is frozen to form an ice body;

an electric motor;

means for ejecting the ice body from the mold operated by said electric motor;

an electric heater in thermal transfer association with the mold for freeing the ice body from the mold prior to said ejecting; and control circuit means including a thermostat responsive to the temperature of water in the mold, first switch means controlled by the thermostat and electrically connected to said heater to preclude at all times undesired energization thereof which would overheat the mold, and second switch means electrically connected to said motor and said first switch means to energize said motor and permit said first switch means to selectively energize said heater.

8. In an ice maker, structure comprising:

' means defining a mold cavity for holding a quantity of water; refrigeration means having a refrigerating temperature substantially below 32 F. and in thermal transfer association with said mold cavity means and Water therein for freezing said water to form an ice body;

means for ejecting the formed ice body from said mold cavity; and

means for sensing the temperature of a portion of said mold cavity means and causing the ejecting means to eject the formed ice body when the temperature of said portion is lowered to a temperature within 5 of a preselected low temperature, said sensed temperature being indicative of the completion of the forming of the ice body, said refrigerating means comprising means for removing heat energy from said water to cause completion of the forming of the ice body while said temperature sensed by said temperature sensing means is closer to 32 F. than to said refrigerating temperature.

9. In an ice maker, structure comprising:

means defining a mold cavity for holding a quantity of water;

refrigerating means having a refrigerating temperature and in thermal transfer association with said mold cavity means and water therein for freezing said water to form an ice body;

means for ejecting the formed ice body from said mold cavity;

means for sensing the temperature of a portion of said mold cavity means and causing the ejecting means to eject the formed ice body when the temperature of said portion is lowered to a low temperature indicative of the completion of the forming of the ice body; and

a heat transfer element extending from a mid-portion of said cavity to outwardly thereof to have heat transfer association with said refrigerating means, said element being of sufficient size for transferring heat energy from a mid-portion of the Water in said mold cavity to said refrigerating means at a rate sufficient to cause completion of the forming of the ice body while said temperature of the mold sensed by said temperature sensing means is less than 10 F. below 32 F., said element extending sufficiently less than fully across said cavity whereby the ice body may remain intact during ejection thereof from said cavity by said ejecting means.

10. The ice maker structure of claim 9 wherein said temperature sensing means comprises means for causing the ejecting means to eject the formed ice body within a temperature range of not less than 10 F.

11. In an ice maker having a mold,

means for delivering water to said mold,

means for refrigerating water in said mold to form an ice body therein,

means for sensing the temperature of the mold, and

means for ejecting the ice body from the mold,

control means for automatically seriatim operating said ejecting means and water delivering means, comprising mechanism arranged to cycle through first and second steps, said mechanism including means for operating said ejecting means when the temperature sensed by said sensing means reaches a preselected low temperature during said first step, and operating said water delivering means to refill said mold in the event that the temperature sensed by said sensing means is at least a preselected high temperature during said second step, said mechanism further including means for repeating said first step seriatim until said sensed temperature is at least said preselected high temperature in the event the sensed temperature is below said preselected high temperature at the end of each such first steps.

12. The ice maker of claim 11 wherein said mechanism is arranged to actuate the Water delivering means only after the ejector means has operated to remove the ice body fully from the mold.

13. The ice maker of claim 11 wherein said mechanism causes the ejector means to be similarly operated in each of said first and second steps.

14. The ice maker of claim 11 including means for heating the mold during said first step.

15. In an ice maker having a mold, means for delivering water to said mold, means for refrigerating water in said mold to form an ice body therein, means for sensing the temperature of the mold, and means for ejecting the formed ice body from the mold, control means for automatically seriatim operating said ejecting means and water delivering means, comprising mechanism arranged to cycle through a plurality of steps, said mechanism including means for operating said ejecting means when the temperature sensed by said sensing means reaches a preselected low temperature to initiate a first one of said plurality of steps, and for operating said water delivering means to refill said mold during a subsequent one of said plurality of steps only in the event that the temperature sensed by said sensing means is at least a preselected high temperature.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,717,497 9/1955 Knerr 62-353 X 2,717,501 9/1955 Anderson 62353 X 3,025,679 3/1962 Keighley 62-71 3,028,733 4/1962 Mateski 62353 3,154,929 11/1964 Little 62-135 3,163,018 12/1964 Shaw 62353 X 3,182,464 5/1965 Archer 62353 X 0 ROBERT A. OLEARY, Primary Examiner.

W. E. WAYNER, Assistant Exan ziner,

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Referenced by
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US3803862 *Dec 13, 1972Apr 16, 1974Gen ElectricRefrigerator including automatic ice maker
US4756165 *Aug 3, 1987Jul 12, 1988Whirlpool CorporationSingle revolution ice maker
US5160094 *Feb 24, 1992Nov 3, 1992Whirlpool CorporationRecoverable domestic ice maker
US5596182 *Jan 28, 1994Jan 21, 1997France/Scott Fetzer CompanyIcemaker
US5718121 *Sep 24, 1996Feb 17, 1998France/Scott Fetzer CompanyIcemaker
US5889243 *Jun 20, 1997Mar 30, 1999France/Scott Fetzer CompanyTime switch with clutch mechanism and cam operated contacts
US7437885Oct 26, 2004Oct 21, 2008Whirlpool CorporationWater spillage management for in the door ice maker
US7628031Mar 26, 2008Dec 8, 2009Whirlpool CorporationWater spillage management for in the door ice maker
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US7913510Oct 28, 2009Mar 29, 2011Whirlpool CorporationWater spillage management for in the door ice maker
US7913514Oct 28, 2009Mar 29, 2011Whirlpool CorporationWater spillage management for in the door ice maker
US7946125Oct 28, 2009May 24, 2011Whirlpool CorporationWater spillage management for in the door ice maker
US8096142Oct 28, 2009Jan 17, 2012Whirlpool CorporationWater spillage management for in the door ice maker
US8405002 *Dec 19, 2008Mar 26, 2013The Trustees Of Dartmouth CollegePulse electrothermal mold release icemaker with safety baffles for refrigerator
US20090235682 *Dec 19, 2008Sep 24, 2009The Trustees Of Dartmouth CollegePulse Electrothermal Mold Release Icemaker With Safety Baffles For Refrigerator
US20120285187 *May 2, 2012Nov 15, 2012Nidec Servo CorporationAutomatic ice maker
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/135, 62/353
International ClassificationF25C1/04
Cooperative ClassificationF25C2600/04, F25C1/04
European ClassificationF25C1/04