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Publication numberUS3360235 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1967
Filing dateMar 5, 1965
Priority dateMar 5, 1965
Publication numberUS 3360235 A, US 3360235A, US-A-3360235, US3360235 A, US3360235A
InventorsMyers William D
Original AssigneeBaker Oil Tools Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Subsurface tubular flow control apparatus
US 3360235 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26, 1967 w. D. MYERS :SUBSURFACE TUBULAR FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 5, 1965 IN ve/vroe 5mm] PULL/AM D. Mraes ,QTTOP/VEY.

Dec. 26, 1967 w. D. MYERS 3, ,2

SUBSURFACE TUBULAR FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS I Filed March 5, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 mum/14 D. M2625 Dec. 26, 1967 w. D. MYERS SUBSURFACE TUBULAR FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS Filed ML .021 5, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 FULL/4M D- M r52: [An/5N roe.

W. D. MYERS SUBSURFACE TUBULAR FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS Dec. 26, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 WLL/AM D, Myees INVENTOE 3y 5 f flrrae/vsx 9 I [11 l 4 DJ.

m I A a p i A VA 1 6% 25w a F m t w a mm a F United States Patent 3,360,235 SUBSURFACE TUBULAR FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS William D. Myers, Houston, Tex., assignor to Baker Oil Tools, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Mar. 5, 1965, Ser. No. 437,374 12 Claims. (Cl. 25195) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention relates to subsurface well bore apparatus, and more particularly to apparatus adapted to be incorporated in a tubular string disposed in a well bore for controlling the flow of fluid therewithin.

An object of the invention is to provide subsurface flow control apparatus adapted for connection in a tubular string disposed in a well bore and shiftable between open and closed positions, the apparatus, when in open condition, having a full axial opening or passage through which other equipment and substances can be moved readily, such as pressure recorders, casing perforators, cement slurry, and the like, the outside diameter of the apparatus being held to a minimum despite the large axial passage therethrough.

Another object of the invention is to provide subsurface flow control apparatus to be connected in a tubular string, and capable of functioning as a formation tester in the performance of single of multiple dry tests in the well bore, the apparatus having an axial passage of large size corresponding to the inside diameter of the tubular string, which can be fully opened and reclosed as many times as desired.

A further object of the invention is to provide subsurface flow control apparatus of the character above indicated, which allows the tubular string to be pressured from both sides of the apparatus, either from above or below, in a relatively easy manner.

An additional object of the invention is provide subsurface flow control apparatus to be connected in a tubular string, which is of strong and vsturdy construction, and which can safely withstand very high pressure differentials.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of a form in which it may be embodied. This form is shown in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. It will now be described in detail, for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURES 1 and la together constitue a longitudinal section, with parts shown in side elevation, of a valve apparatus disposed in a well casing located in a well bore, in which the axial passage through the valve apparatus is closed, and the entire apparatus is in position to prevent fluid flow in both directions, FIG. 1a being a lower continuation of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 2 and 2a are views similar to FIGS. 1 and 1a, in which the axial passage through the apparatus is still closed, but in which the apparatus has been opened for the flow of fluid therethrough, FIG. 2a being a lower continuation of FIG. 2;

FIGS. 3 and 3a are views corresponding to FIGS. 1 to 2a, in which the apparatus has been conditioned for opening the passage therethrough, FIG. 3a being a lower continuation of FIG. 3;

FIG. 4 is a longitudinal section taken along the line 4-4 on FIG. 3a;

FIG. 5 is a view of the portion of the apparatus disclosed in FIG. 3a, with the valve mechanism shifted to a position in which its axial passage is fully opened;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross-section taken along the line 66 on FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a cross-section taken along the line 77 on FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is an end view of the spherical valve member forming part of the apparatus for closing or opening the axial passage through the equipment.

The flow control apparatus A disclosed in the drawings is adapted to be incorporated in a tubular string B extending to the top of the well bore, and connected to a lower well packer (not shown) capable of being anchored in packed-off condition in a well casing C. The specific embodiment of invention illustrated has been designed to function as a formation tester valve for making a single or multiple test in the well bore with a single run of the equipment therewithin. The apparatus itself can also be placed in a condition in which it has a fully open passage therethrough that enables other equipment to be moved through the open passage, when desired. Such passage can be closed at any time while the apparatus is still disposed in the well bore. The well packer, for example, can be of the type illustrated in United States Patent No. 2,802,534.

The apparatus includes an outer housing or body structure 10 in which a control mandrel 11 is telescopically positioned. The upper end of the control mandrel can be constituted as a threaded pin 12 threadedly attached to a coupling 13, which is, in turn, threadedly secured to the lower end of the tubular string B extending to the top of the well bore. The outer valve housing or body 10 includes an upper housing section 14 having an upper inwardly directed flange 15 slidable along the periphery of the control mandrel, there being suitable seal ring 16, or the like, mounted in the flange for slidably sealing against the periphery of the mandrel. The lower end of the upper section 14 is threadedly secured to an upper housing connection 17, the lower end of the latter being threadedly attached to the upper end of an intermediate housing section 18, the lower end of which is threadedly attached to the upper portion of a lower housing connector 19. The lower end of this latter member is threadedly attached to the upper end of a lower housing section 20, the lower end of which is threadedly secured to a housing sub 21 that may have a threaded box 22 adapted to be threadedly secured to the upper end of a tubing string section 23 or body portion of the lower well packer. The tubing string section 23 may be connected directly or indirectly to the well packer (not shown).

The passage 24 through the tubular control mandrel 11 preferably has an inside diameter no less than the inside diameter through the tubular string B thereabove, and the lower end of this mandrel pass-age can be closed, or it can be fully opened. As shown, a lower valve housing or body 25, which actually forms part of the control mandrel, is threadedly secured to the lower end of the latter and depends therefrom. A suitable lock nut 26 is threaded on the mandrel and can be jammed against the upper end of the valve housing or body 25 to prevent its inadvertent unthreading from the mandrel. The body has a downwardly opening counterbore 27 (FIGS. 3 to in which a seat sleeve 28 is mounted, the lower seat 29 of the sleeve depending below the body 25 and being formed as a portion of a spherical surface. The spherical seat 29 is adapted to be engaged by a spherical sector portion 30 of a valve head or member 31, which is pivotally carried by the body 28 through the intermediary of other elements.

As specifically disclosed, the valve head 31 includes the spherical sector portion 30, opposed parts of which are integral with spaced sector arms 32, 33, one only of which 33 is a gear sector having peripheral gear teeth 34 thereon (FIG. 4). These arms are pivotally mounted on opposed and aligned pivot pins or trunnions 35 mounted within a pair of links or struts 36 received Within external grooves 37 in the valve body 25, and having upper inwardly directed hooks or flanges 38 disposed above and engageable with an upwardly facing valve body shoulder 39. A helical compression spring 40 is disposed Within the valve body 25, its upper end bearing against a seat 41 in the body, and its lower end bearing against a shoulder 42 of the seat sleeve 28, so as to urge the seat sleeve downwardly and engage its seat 29 with the spherical sector portion 30 of the valve head, in order to hold the two parts 28, 30 against one another in leakproof relation. The downward force of the spring is transmitted from the valve head 31 through the trunnions 35 to the links or struts 36, the downward movement of the latter with respect to the valve body being limited by engagement of the upper hooks 38 with the body shoulder 39. However, the valve head 31, struts 36, and seat sleeve 38 can shift upwardly to a limited extent as a unit against the force of the spring 40, these parts, in eflect, being yieldably carried by the valve body portion 25 of the mandrel 11.

The valve head may initially occupy a position closing the passage 24 through the seat sleeve and the mandrel 11, as disclosed in FIGS. 1a, 2a, 3a, and 4. When so disposed, leakage of fluid between the seat sleeve and valve head is prevented "by a suitable seal ring 45 mounted in the lower end of the seat sleeve 28 and sealingly engaging the spherical head 30. The head can be pivoted about the axis of its trunnions 35 90 degrees to the position illustrated in FIG. 5, in which the spherical sector 30 slides around the valve seat member and is removed completely from its passage 24, the valve head having an opening or passage 46 therethrough defined between its sector arms 32, 33 and spherical sector portion 30, which does not obstruct the passage 24 through the mandrel and seat sleeve.

The closed and open positions of the valve head 31 are definitely determined by engagement of a stop surface 47 on the arm sectors 32, 33 with one side 48 of each link or strut 36, or by engagement of another side 49 of the arm sectors with the opposed side 50 of each of the struts, the stop surfaces 47, 49 on the arm sectors being disposed at 90 degrees to one another, and these stop surfaces merging into an arcuate surface 51 which has the same radius of curvature as the lower semi-cylindrical surface 52 on each of the struts 36. When one side 49 of each arm sector engages one side 50 of its companion link or strut, the valve is in the closed position. When the valve head 31 has been rotated 90 degrees about the axis of its trunnions 35, the other stop surfaces 47 on the arm sectors will engage the opposed sides 48 of the struts, in which the valve head 31 is in its fully open position.

The valve head 31 can be turned between its passage opening and closing positions by a gear mechanism, and as a result of rotating the mandrel 11 in one direction or the other. Disposed below the valve head or spherical valve member 31 is a circular rack gear 53 threadedly or otherwise suitably attached to a sleeve 54, the circular rack gear and sleeve being shiftable longitudinally to a limited extent within the housing 10, the sleeve 54 being slidable in the lower sub 21. Rotation of the sleeve 54 and circular rack gear 53 is prevented by a radial pin 55 threaded in the sub 21 and disposed in a longitudinal slot 56 in the sleeve. The gear 53 is urged in an upward direction by a helical compression spring 57 encircling the sleeve 54, the lower end of the spring engaging the sub and its upper end engaging the gear, the upward movement of the sleeve and gear being limited by engagement of a lower sleeve flange 58 with a downwardly facing shoulder 59 on the sub.

For the purpose of rotating the valve head 31 about its trunnion axis, and thereby locate it in either a passage opening or closing position, the gear sector 34, which is on one of the arms 33 only, can be shifted downwardly upon downward movement of the mandrel 11 within the housing 10 to bring such gear 34 into mesh with the gear teeth 60 of the non-rotatable circular rack gear. The mandrel 11 may, in fact, shift downwardly to a greater extent than to bring the gear teeth 34, 60 into mesh with one another, the circular rack gear 53 merely yielding a slight distance in a downward direction within the valve housing.

Assuming the valve head 31 to be in its closed position, such as disclosed in FIGS. la, 3a and 4, the mandrel 11 is turned to the right, which will cause the gear sector 34 to move around on the non-rotatable rack gear 53, and in so doing the valve head 31 will be shifted degrees to the fully opened position, such as illustrated in FIG. 5, the extent of turning of the valve head about its trunnion axis being limited by engagement of the stop surfaces 47 with the sides 48 of the struts 36. When in this position, there is a fully open passage through the mandrel, seat sleeve and the valve head. In the event it is desired to close the axial passage 24, the mandrel need merely be turned in the opposite direction, or to the left, which will cause the gear sector 34 to roll around the circular rack gear 53, and reshift the valve head 31 through an angle of 90 degrees back to a position in which the solid sector 30 is again disposed fully across the valve seat 29, as disclosed in FIGS. 20, 3a, and 4. Here again, the extent of return motion of the valve head is limited by engagement of its stop surfaces 49 against the opposite side 50 of the struts or links 36.

In the specific apparatus A illustrated, it is possible to lower it in the well casing C with the well packer disposed therebelow, and with the central passage 24 through the mandrel closed, so that the well bore fluid cannot enter the mandrel 11. When the setting location in the well bore is reached, the well packer is anchored in packedoff condition in the casing, in a known manner, after which the valve apparatus A is opened. However, it is not desired to open the central passage 24 extending fully through the mandrel. Instead, a plurality of choke beans 65 are provided in the mandrel which are initially in a closed position when the mandrel is in an upward position within the housing 10, and such choke beans are shifted downwardly upon downward movement of the mandrel within the housing to dispose them in an open condition, such as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 211, so that the formation fluid can then pass upwardly through the tubing 23 and into the housing sub 21, then flowing upwardly through the rack sector gear 53 and into the housing 10 thereabove, the fluid then flowing upwardly through opposed longitudinal passages 66 in the valve housing or body 25, displaced arcuately from the struts 36, and into the annular space 67 between the mandrel 11 and housing 10, such fluid then flowing inwardly through the choke beans or orifices 65 into the mandrel for continued upward passage therethrough and through the tubular string B toward the top of the well bore.

Initially, the choke beans 65 are releasably retained in a closed position with the mandrel in an upward position within the housing, the choke beans then being disposed within the lower housing connector 19, and with a mandrel seal ring 68 sealing against the cylindrical wall or seat 69 of such connector. Leakage of fluid between the mandrel and lower housing connection upwardly of the choke elements is prevented by a suitable side seal ring 70 in the lower housing connector slidably and sealingly engaging the periphery of the mandrel 11. The mandrel is retained in the upper position by a releasable control latch or lock sleeve 72 disposed around the mandrel and having upper circumferentially spaced slots 73 providing spring-like upper arms 74 integral with externally threaded head portions 75 having buttress type threads 76 threadedly engaging companion internal buttress type threads 77 in the upper portion of the upper housing connector 17. The upper sides 78 of the head threads are inclined in a downward and outward direction, and are engageable with similarly sloped lower sides 79 of the internal housing threads.

The intermediate portion 80 of the sleeve is circumferentially continuous, and such sleeve has lower circumferentially spaced slots 81 extending through its lower end providing lower spring-like legs 82 terminating in latch feet 83 having inner portions 84 adapted to be disposed under a downwardly facing mandrel shoulder 85 to prevent downward movement of the mandrel 11 within the housing 10. Such inner latch feet portions are held in their locked position under the shoulder 85 by outwardly extending portions 86 of the latch feet engaging a lower restricted portion 87 of a retaining sleeve 88 held in the housing by virtue of its lower end engaging a shoulder 89 on the intermediate housing section 18 and its upper end engaging the lower end of the upper housing connector 17 The internal diameter 90 of the intermediate housing section below the retaining sleeve 88 is greater than the lower restricted portion 87 of the retaining sleeve, so that upon downward sliding of the latch feet 83 out of engagement with the lower restricted portion 87, the latch feet can expand outwardly to remove their inner locking portions 84 from under the mandrel shoulder 85, whereupon the mandrel 11 can shift downwardly within the housing 10. Such downward shifting of the latch feet 83 and of the entire control latch or lock sleeve 72 results from rotation of the control sleeve by the mandrel 11, the rotary motion of the mandrel being transmitted through a key 91 fixed thereto and disposed in a keyway or slot 73 in the control sleeve.

The apparatus A is disclosed in its closed position in FIGS. 1 and la, in which the threaded heads 75 are fully threadedly engaged with the internal threads 77 of the upper housing connector 17, the latch feet 83 being held inwardly under the mandrel shoulder 85 by the lower restricted portion 87 of the retaining sleeve 88. In this position, the choke beans or orifices 65 are disposed fully within the lower housing connector 19, and are, therefore, closed against flow of fluid therethrough. Upon rotation of the tubular string B and mandrel 11, as to the right, the control sleeve 72 is threaded downwardly within the internally threaded portion 77 of the housing, shifting the latch feet 83 downwardly out of the retaining sleeve, the latch feet then expanding outwardly and freeing the mandrel 11 from the sleeve 72. The mandrel 11 can then shift downwardly within the housing to place the choke beans 65 below the lower end of the lower housing connector 19, which will then permit fluid to flow therethrough into the mandrel.

The extent of downward movement of the mandrel 11 is limited by engagement of a collet type of ratchet or clutch sleeve 92, which is threadedly secured to the mandrel 11, with the upper end of the lower housing connector 19. As disclosed, the ratchet or clutch sleeve 92 has a circumferentially continuous upper portion 93 slidable along the inner wall of the intermediate housing section 18, and spring-like legs 94 terminating in internally right-hand threaded feet 95 that threadedly mesh with external threads 96 on the mandrel. The lower ends of the threaded feet have axial clutch or saw teeth 97 which are adapted to mesh with companion upwardly extending clutch teeth 98 on the lower housing connector 6 19, the threaded connection 95, 96 between the threaded feet and the mandrel being of a ratchet or buttress type, with the upper sides 99 of the mandrel teeth inclined in a downward and outward direction and engaging companion lower sides 100 of the foot threads.

Initially, the threaded feet 95 are threadedly engaged with the lower portion of the mandrel threads 96, and when so engaged the downward movement of the mandrel 11 within the housing 10, following release of the control latch sleeve 72, is limited by engagement of the clutch teeth 97, 98 with one another, which will place the choke orifices 65 below the lower housing connector 19, as disclosed in FIGS. 2 and 2a, but in which the spherical valve member 31 is still disposed above the circular rack gear 53 and out of engagement therewith. It is only desired to lower the mandrel to mesh the gear sector 34 with the circular rack gear 53 when the spherical valve member 31 is to be turned about its trunnion axis for the purpose of fully opening or fully closing the axial passage 24 through the mandrel.

Assuming the spherical valve member 31 to be in the closed position illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 2a, and if it is desirable to reclose the choke orifices 65, it is merely necessary to elevate the tubular string B and mandrel 11, the latter shifting upwardly in the housing 10, and a shoulder 101 on the mandrel engaging a companion shoulder 102 on the upper arms 74 of the lock sleeve to shift the sleeve upwardly, the threaded heads 75 ratcheting along the companion buttress threads 77 of the upper housing connector being permitted to deflect inwardly by virtue of a recess 103, of smaller diameter portion, on the mandrel 11 which is opposite the heads '75 when the shoulders 101, 102 are engaged with one another. The mandrel 11 can shift upwardly and move the sleeve 72 upwardly until a shoulder 104 on the latter engages a companion stop shoulder 105 on the upper housing connector 17, at which time the latch feet 83 will have moved upwardly along the lower portion 87 of the retaining sleeve 88 and have been shifted inwardly to dispose the inner portions 84 of the latch feet under the mandrel shoulder 85, thereby releasably relockin-g the mandrel in its upper position, such as disclosed in FIGS. 1 and 1a, in which the choke beans or orifices 65 are again in their closed position.

In the event it is desired to turn the spherical valve member 31, the mandrel 11 is first rotated Within the housing 10 (which is held stationary by virtue of the fact that the packer therebelow has been anchored in a packedoff condition in the well casing) to thread the heads 75 downwardly along the upper housing connector threads 77 and to lower the latch feet 83 from engagement with the lower portion 87 of the retaining sleeve, allowing such feet to expand outwardly. The mandrel 11 is then shifted downwardly to the extent limited by engagement of the clutch sleeve teeth 97 with the clutch teeth 98 of the lower housing connector, the parts then being disposed in the position illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 2a. The mandrel 11 is then rotated to a further extent which will cause it to thread downwardly within the ratchet or clutch sleeve 92 to bring the gear sector 34 into engagement with the circular rack gear 53, the latter being depressed to a small extent against the force of the compression spring 57 therebelow, the mandrel body 25 being shifted downwardly to a slight extent along the seat sleeve 28 to insure yieldable but firm engagement between the gear sector teeth 34 and the teeth 60 of the circular rack gear.

The extent of downward shifting of the mandrel is limited by engagement of a thrust bearing structure thereon with the upper end or thrust shoulder 111 on the upper housing connector 17. This thrust bearing includes a split ring 112 mounted in a mandrel groove 113, there being a lower thrust washer 114 thereon adapted to engage the housing shoulder 111 which engages an intermediate thrust washer 115 that bears against the split ring 112. A snap split retaining ring 116 is disposed below the lower washer 114 and encompasses the lower portion of the split ring 112 within the mandrel groove 113 to retain the parts in assembled relation on the mandrel. The engagement of the thrust bearing structure 110 with the shoulder 111 facilitates turning of the mandrel 11 within the housing 10 after downward movement of the mandrel within the housing has been limited.

The mandrel 11 is rotated a partial revolution and will cause the gear sector 34 to roll around the stationary circular rack 53, and thereby shift the spherical valve member 31 from its closed position, as disclosed in FIG. 3a, to its fully opened position, as illustrated in FIG. 5. During such turning the mandrel cannot feed downwardly within the housing 10 and the ratchet or clutch sleeve 92 to any further extent. However, the inclined or saw teeth 97 of the latter will climb up the companion inclined faces of the clutch teeth 98 on the lower housing connector as it threads relatively upwardly of the mandrel, so as to avoid interfering with the rotation of the mandrel 11 and the spherical valve member 31.

With the spherical valve device in its fully opened position, as disclosed in FIG. 5, the passage 46, 24 through the apparatus A is fully open, and other devices can be moved readily through the apparatus. In fact, the open ing 24 is unrestricted in that its minimum diameter is substantially the same as the internal diameter through the tubular string B itself.

As pointed out above, if the spherical valve member 31 is to be returned to its closed position, it is merely necessary to turn the tubular string B and mandrel 11 to the left, the gear sector 34 then rolling around the circular rack gear 53 in a counter-clockwise direction, and, in so doing, being pivoted about the trunnion axis back to its closed position illustrated in FIGS. 30 and 4.

The orifices 65, which have been in open position when the gear sector 34 is in mesh with the circular rack gear 53, can be reclosed by taking an upward pull on the tubular string B and the mandrel 11. The control latch or lock sleeve 72 will be returned to its initial position, in which its threaded head portions 75 are again in full threaded engagement with the internal thread 77 of the upper housing connector 17, and the upper end of the clutch sleeve 92 will have engaged the lower end of the retaining sleeve 88, whereupon the buttress threads 96 of the mandrel can ratchet upwardly freely through the threaded clutch feet 95, since the latter can expand outwardly, in view of the fact that the internal diameter 120 of the intermediate housing section 18 is much greater than the external diameter of the latch feet and of the spring-like legs 94 attached thereto. The parts have then been returned to their initial position illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 1a.

The spherical valve member 31 can be used in conjunction with the circular rack gear 53 to effect an opening and closing of the central passage 24 in the absence of the choke beans or orifices 65. However, in connection with formation testing, it may be desirable to avoid a sudden full opening of the passage, and for that reason the choke beans would be employed to secure a restricted flow of the formation fluid through and into the apparatus for continued upward passage through the mandrel 11 into the tubular string B thereabove.

The apparatus has a variety of uses. When in closed position, it can withstand pressure in the tubular string B from either above or below the valve head 31, and in view of its strong and sturdy construction it is capable of holding very high pressure differentials. There is very little chance of other tools hanging up in the apparatus when the passage 24, 46 is in the open position, in view of the fully opened passage therethrough. Such other tools can pass freely in both directions through the apparatus. The fully open passage will also facilitate the pumping of fluent substances, such as cement slurry, through the apparatus in the event of a squeeze cementing operation is to be performed. Following completion of such operation, the spherical valve member 31 can again be placed in closed osition, and the mandrel 11 elevated to place the choke beans 65 in their closed position, the tubular string B then being swabbed, or placed in a dry or partially dry condition, for the performance of another formation test, if such a test is required.

I claim:

1. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member and having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; said members having attachment means for securing said members to adjacent tubular devices adapted to extend from said members; said members being rotatable with respect to each other; one of said members having a valve seat; a valve head; means pivotally mounting said valve head on said one member for movement relative to said seat; first gear means on said valve head; and second gear means on said other of said members meshable with said first gear means to shift said head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat in response to relative rotation between said members; said tubular member being shiftable longitudinally relative to and within said housing member to effect selective meshing or disengagement between said first gear means and second gear means.

2. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member and having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; said members having attachment means for securing said members to adjacent tubular devices adapted to extend from said members; said members being rotatable with respect to each other; said tubular member having a valve seat; a valve head; means pivotally mounting said valve head on said tubular member for movement along said seat; first gear means on said valve head; and second gear means on said housing member meshable with said first gear means to shift said head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat in response to relative rotation between said members.

3. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member and having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; said members having attachment means for securing said members to adjacent tubular devices adapted to extend from said members; said members being rotatable with respect to each other; one of said members having a valve seat; a valve head including a spherical sector portion and a gear sector portion, said head having a passage therethrough to one side of said spherical sector portion; means pivotally mounting said head in said one member for movement of its spherical sector portion along said seat; and a gear on said other of said members meshable with said gear sector and responsive to relative rotation between said members to shift said spherical sector portion along said seat between a position closing direct communication between said member passages and a position aligning said head passage with said member passages; said tubular member being shiftable longitudinally relative to and within said housing member to effect selective meshing or disengagement between said gear and gear sector.

4. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member and having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; said members having attachment means for securing said members to adjacent tubular devices adapted to extend from said members; said members being rotatable with respect to each other; said tubular member having a valve seat; a valve head including a spherical sector portion and a gear sector portion, said head having a passage therethrough to one side of said spherical sector portion; means pivotally mounting said head on said tubular member for movement of its spherical sector portion along said seat; and a gear on said housing member meshable with said gear sector and responsive to relative rotation between said members to shift said spherical sector portion along said seat between a position closing direct communication between said member passages and a position aligning said head passage with said member passages.

5. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member movable longitudinally and rotationally with respect thereto, said tubular member having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; a valve seat in said tubular member; a valve head; means pivotally mounting said valve head on said tubular member for movement along said seat; means yieldably forcing said seat against said head; first gear means on said valve head; second gear means on said housing member meshable with said first gear means; means yieldably urging said second gear means axially toward said first gear means; and means for shifting said tubular member longitudinally of said housing member to mesh said first gear means with said second gear means and for rotating said tubular member within said housing member to shift said head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat.

6. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member movable longitudinally and rotationally with respect thereto, said tubular member having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; a valve seat in said tubular member; a valve head including a spherical sector portion and a gear sector portion, said head having a passage therethrough to one side of said spherical sector portion; means pivotally mounting said head on said tubular member for movement of its spherical sector portion along said seat; means yieldably forcing said seat against said spherical sector portion; a gear on said housing member meshable with said gear sector portion; means yieldably urging said gear axially toward said gear sector portion; and means for shifting said tubular member longitudinally of said housing member to mesh said gear sector portion with said gear and for rotating said tubular member within said housing member to shift said head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat.

7. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member and having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; said members being rotatable with respect to each other; said tubular member having a valve seat; a valve head; means pivotally mounting said valve head on said tubular member for movement along said seat; first gear means on said valve head; second gear means on said housing member meshable with said first gear means to shift said head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat in response to relative rotation between said members; said tubular member having another fluid passage; means on said housing member closing said another fluid passage when said tubular member is disposed in one position within said housing member, said tubular member being shiftable in said housing member to another position opening said another fluid passage.

8. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member movable longitudinally and rotationally with respect thereto, said tubular member having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; a valve seat on said tubular member; a valve head; means pivotally mounting said valve head on said tubular member for movement along said seat; first gear means on said valve head; sec ond gear means on said housing member meshable with said first gear means; means for shifting said tubular member longitudinally of said housing member to mesh said first gear means with said second gear means and for rotating said tubular member within said housing member to shift said head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat; said tubular member having another fluid passage; means on said housing member closing said another fluid passage when said tubular member is disposed in one position within said housing member, said tubular member being shiftable in said housing member to another position opening said another fluid passage.

9. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member movable longitudinally and rotationally with respect thereto, said tubular member having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; a valve seat on said tubular member; a valve head; means pivotally mounting said valve head on said tubular member for movement along said seat; first gear means on said valve head; second gear means on said housing member meshable with said first gear means; means for shifting said tubular member longitudinally of said housing member to mesh said first gear means with said second gear means and for rotating said tubular member within said housing member to shift said head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat; said tubular member having another fluid passage; means on said housing member closing said another fluid passage when said tubular member is disposed in one position within said housing member, said tubular member being shiftable in said housing member to another position opening said another fluid passage; first stop means on said housing member; second stop means threadedly mounted on said tubular member and engaging said first stop means to limit movement of said tubular member in said housing member to said another position and with said first gear means out of mesh with said second gear means; said tubular member being rotatable within said second stop means and shiftable longitudinally on said housing member to bring said first gear means into mesh with said second gear means.

10. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member movable longitudinally and rotationally with respect thereto, said tublular member having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; a valve seat on said tubular member; a valve head; means pivotally mounting said valve head on said tubular member for movement along said seat; first gear means on said valve head; second gear means on said housing member meshable with said first gear means and disposed therebelow; said tubular member having another fluid passage communicating with said tubular member fluid passage; means on said housing member closing said another fluid passage when said tubular member is disposed in an upper position in said housing member and with said first gear means out of mesh with said second gear means; first stop means on said housing member; second stop means threadedly mounted on said tubular member and disposed above and spaced from said first stop means when said another passage is closed; said second stop means engaging said first stop means upon downward shifting of said tubular member in said housing member to open said another fluid passage, whereupon such tubular member is rotatable within said second stop means to feed said tubular member downwardly in said housing member and mesh said first gear means with said second gear means whereby rotation of said tubular member can eifect shifting of said valve head along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat.

11. In valve apparatus as defined in claim 10; wherein said first stop means comprises clutching teeth, and said second stop means comprises clutching teeth meshable with said other clutching teeth to prevent rotation of said second stop means.

12. In valve apparatus: a housing member having a fluid passage; a tubular member in said housing member movable longitudinally and rotationally with respect thereto, said tubular member having a fluid passage communicable with said housing member passage; a valve seat on said tubular member; a valve head including a spherical sector portion and a gear sector portion, said head having a passage therethrough to one side of Said spherical sector portion; means pivotally mounting said head on said tubular member for movement of its spherical sector portion along said seat; means yieldably forcing said seat against said spherical sector portion; a gear on said housing member meshable with said gear sector portion and disposed therebelow; means yieldably urging said gear axially toward said gear sector portion; said tubular member having another fluid passage communicating with its other fluid passage; means on said housing member closing said another fluid passage member when said tubular member is disposed in an upper position in said housing member and with said gear sector portion out of mesh with said gear; first stop means on said housing member; second stop means threadedly mounted on said tubular member and disposed above and spaced from said first stop means when said another passage is closed; said second stop means engaging said first stop means upon downward shifting of said tubular member in said housing member to open said another fluid passage, whereupon said tubular member is rotatable on said second stop means to feed said tubular member downwardly in said housing and 11?. mesh said gear sector portion with said gear whereby rotation of said tubular member can effect pivoting of said valve head and shifting of its spherical sector portion along said seat between open and closed relation to said seat.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 156,300 10/1874 McConnell 251-352 X 1,964,264 6/1934 Mack 25l341 2,145,844 2/1939 Brown 25l-248 XR 2,458,631 1/1949 Parks 166226 X 2,948,553 8/1960 Gill et al. 137614.02 2,998,077 8/1961 Keithahn 251-341 X 3,096,823 7/1963 CroWe 166226 X 3,136,525 6/1964 Creasser 25 l-250.5 X 3,189,316 6/1965 Preston 251-341 X FOREIGN PATENTS 27,014 2/1933 Netherlands.

M. CARY NELSON, Primary Examiner.

S. SCOTT, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3743015 *Sep 7, 1971Jul 3, 1973Hydril CoMud saver valve
US4368871 *May 21, 1979Jan 18, 1983Schlumberger Technology CorporationLubricator valve apparatus
US4378931 *Jun 3, 1980Apr 5, 1983Otis Engineering CorporationValve and actuator therefor
US4807700 *Sep 18, 1987Feb 28, 1989Cameron Iron Works Usa, Inc.Wireline downhole annulus valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/95, 251/341
International ClassificationE21B34/12, E21B34/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B34/12, E21B2034/002
European ClassificationE21B34/12