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Publication numberUS3360812 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1968
Filing dateJun 9, 1966
Priority dateJun 9, 1966
Publication numberUS 3360812 A, US 3360812A, US-A-3360812, US3360812 A, US3360812A
InventorsKluge Anthony M
Original AssigneeAnthony M. Kluge
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Binding for water skis
US 3360812 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 2, 1968 A. M. KLUG 3,360,812

BINDING FOR WATER SKIS Filed June 9, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 VIII/Iv INVENTOR ANTHONY M. KLUGE ATTORNE A. M. KLUGE 3,360,812

BINDING FOR WATER SKIS Jan. 2, 1968 Filed June 9, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 F/G.8.I I :FIGQ

"5 F 16. II.

PRIOR ART INVENTOR BY ANTHONV M. KLUGE ATTORNEY.

Jan. 2, 1968 AM. KLUGE BINDING FOR WATER SKIS 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 9, 1966 INVENTOR ANTHONY M. KLUGE ATTORNEY.

Jan. 2, 1968 A. M. KLUGE BINDING FOR WATER SKIS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 9, 1966 INVENTOR ANTHONY M. KLUGE ATTORNEY.

3,360,812 BINDING FDR WATER SKIS Anthony M. Kluge, 6224 78th St., Rego Park, N.Y. 11374 Filed June 9, 1966, Ser. No. 556,508 Claims. (Cl. 9310) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A binding for water skis, which comprises an elastic flexible vamp member, and a vamp strap loosely engaging and partly covering the vamp member, as well as a counter disposed behind the vamp member. A counter strap engages loosely and covers partly the counter, the vamp, the vamp strap, the counter and the counter strap are adapted to be mounted on a ski board. First clamping means secure the lateral edges of the vamp member and of the vamp strap to the ski board. Second clamp ing means secure the lower edges of the counter and of the counter strap to the ski board. The vamp strap has at its rear ends oppositely disposed tension projections adapted to engage the instep of the foot of the user. The ends of the tension projections are folded over. Clamping means secure the ends of the tension projections in the folded-over positions, and two ring members are secured to the folded-over tension projections, and non-resilient extension members are secured to the ring members and to the ski board, respectively.

The present invention relates to a binding for water skis and in particular to such binding which permits easy adjustment thereof to any foot length.

In applicants prior Patent No, 2,974,330, dated Mar. 14, 1961, a water ski is disclosed which comprises a ski board and a binding to be mounted on the ski board, the binding comprising an elastic, flexible vamp member, a counter, clamping means securing the lateral edges of the vamp member and of the counter of the ski board, a heel plate having two fork-like front portions and means securing the lateral sides of the counter to the heel plate.

In applicants prior Patent No. 3,143,750, dated Aug. 11, 1964, a water ski is disclosed which comprises an elastic flexible vamp member, a counter disposed behind the vamp member, first clamping means securing the lateral edges of the vamp member to the ski board, second clamping means securing the lower edges of the counter to a ski board, the vamp member having at its rear end an oppositely disposed tension projection and non-resilient cord means are adjustably secured to the rearrnost end of the tension projection and extending behind the counter.

While the binding for water skis described in said applicants prior patents, brings about advantages over the conventional bindings, it has been found that there is still a requirement for further improvement of several elements of the binding, which leads to an improved performance, as well as, to a reduction of possible accidents during the use of the bindings.

It is thus one object of the present invention to provide an adjustable water ski binding, in which the method of securing a non-resilient member, as a strap, to the tension member is improved in order to eliminate tearing of the material and still to provide easier adjustment means.

It is another object of the present invention to provide adjustable water skis and binding, wherein further means are provided in order to bring about a safer securing of the vamp to the ski board.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide an adjustable water ski binding, wherein the vamp comprises a two-piece structure.

It is also a further object of the present invention to provide an adjustable water ski binding, which is capable of accommodating to different heel configurations of respective users, as well as to different sizes thereof, bringing about a greater security, and wherein the counter comprises a two-piece structure.

With these and other objects in view which will become apparent in the following detailed description, the present invention will be clearly understood in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a top plan view of the water ski binding designed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the water ski binding shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevation of a strap member forming part of the vamp and designed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is an elevation of the strap member in combination with a clamp and securing rings;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation of the strap shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a section along the lines -66 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a section along the lines 77 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view of the securing means of the vamp to the ski board;

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic comparative showing of the forces working on the vamp in the conventional structure and the new structure of the vamp respectively;

FIGS. 10 and 11 are fragmentary diagrammatic showings to indicate the :forces on the known structure of the vamp and on the improved structure, designed in accordance with the present invention, respectively;

FIG. 12 is a side elevation of a complete ski binding, designed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 13 is a side elevation of the ski binding indicating the adjustment thereof from a large foot to a small foot;

FIGS. 14 and 15 show fragmentary side elevations of the counter indicating the adjustment from a large foot to a small foot; and

FIG. 16 is an elevation of a slalom board with a binder mounting thereon.

Referring now to the drawings and in particular to FIGS. 1-7, a ski board 1 has mounted on its top face a vamp 2 and a counter 3.

The vamp 2 is preferably made of a flexible, elastic rubber-like material which has a rear end portion 4.

The counter 3 is made of a sheet-like or rubber-like material, which constitutes the rear part of the binder in such manner, that it stands up from the surface of the ski board 1.

A vamp strap 2:: crosses loosely over the vamp 2 and has two integrally extending projections 5 on the opposite rear ends of the vamp strap 2a. The tension projections 5 are arranged at their extreme end such, as to have secured thereto a non-resilient cord or belt 6.

In the structure disclosed in applicants prior US. Patent No. 3,143,750, the lateral tension projections 5 are provided with a raised annular reinforcing ring surrounding concentrically the openings of the tension projections, which receive a non-resilient cord. It has been found that under certain extreme conditions, the openings provided in the tension projections did tear under extreme stress and the binding became useless.

It is therefore one feature of the present invention to improve the method of securing the non-resilient cord or belt 6 to the tension projections 5, in order to eliminate tearing and at the same time providing an easier adjustment means for the required length of the cord or belt 6. In order to bring about this improvement, the hole proposed in applicants prior patent has been eliminated and the end portion of the tension projections 5 is equipped with a portion of greater Width 6 at its extreme end than the remaining portion of the tension member 5, as clearly shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings.

The tension projections 5 are now folded over for about 180 and a roller 7, preferably of plastic or metal material, is inserted into the band of the tension projections 5. A D-ring 7a is inserted into the roller 7 and finally the tension projections 5 are equipped with a clamping loop 8, so that the roller 7 and the D-ring 7a are safely retained at the end of the tension projections 5. The loop clamp 8 clamps the folded-over tension projections 5 together to envelope the roller 8. Due to the provision of the roller 7 in the folded-over portions of the tension projections 5, the diameter of the folded-over portion is now greater than the width of the clamping loop 8, so that the folded-over portion with the roller 7 and the D-ring 7a cannot move in the direction of the arrow A (FIG. 5). Slippage of the clamping loop 8 is prevented, when a force is encountered in the opposite direction, namely in the direction of the arrow B (FIG. 5).

By the use of a roller 7 and a D-ring 7a of round crosssection, nosharp edges are provided and also a greater area of the roller 7 is now in engagement with the foldedover portion of the tension projections 5 throughout its axial length, whereby a tearing of the tension projections 5 is now for practical purposes completely eliminated.

As clearly shown in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6, not only a conventional D-ring 7a, but a second D-ring 7b, which has a projection 7c, can be provided, in order to provide gripping means for spreading apart the two D-rings 7a and 7b, which jointly constitute the adjustment device.

A non-resilient member, such as a belt 6 is now attached at one of its ends to the ski board 1 on either side of the counter 2 by any conventional means, such as a screw 9. The belt 6 may also be secured to the counter clamping plate, if so desired, in order to increase security. The belt 6 is secured at its other end to the tension projection 5, where it engages the adjustment device, namely the D-rings 7a and 7b for shortening or lengthening the belt 6.

The extension 7c of the D-ring 7b provides the gripping means for easier separation of the D-rings 7a and 7b, in order to release the clamping action on the belt 6. It will be recognized that the belt 6 and the D-rings 7a and 7b can be tensioned and are still capable of being easily released. The skier can release the tension merely by placing the finger on the extension 70 of the D-ring 7b, lifting it slightly, whereby the D-rings 7a and 7b are separated and thereby releasing the belt 6 to any desired position. On the other hand, if the free end of the belt 6 can be pulled rearwardly on the ski board 1, thus shortening the belt 6, a desired effect in the other direction can be obtained. The D-rings 7a and 7b can be replaced by any conventional means, as a slide buckle.

The provision of the loose vamp strap 2a across the instep provides a greater strength at an area, where greater forces are applied to the vamp 2.

A clamping plate 10 is disposed on each of the lateral sides of the vamp 2 and secures the latter to the ski board 1, while a substantially U-shaped clamping plate 11 secures the counter 3 to the ski board 1 in a similar manner.

It has been discovered, that under extreme conditions the vamp 2 tears at the rear end of the clamping plate 10. In order to eliminate this drawback, the rear end of the vamp 2 and the rear end of the vamp strap 2a are designed such that the vamp 2, as Well as the strap 2a define a recess 13. The vamp 2 and the vamp strap 2a are equipped with holes for receiving a plurality of screws 14 securing the clamping plates 10 and thereby also the vamp 2 and the vamp strap 2a to the board 1.

Referring now to FIG. 9 of the drawings, a diagrammatic showing is presented of the forces developing in connection with the vamp structure disclosed in US. Patent No. 3,143,750 in comparison with the forces developed in the structure of the present invention. It will be found that the upward force or pull at the point X in the previous structure is shown by the lines B and B, which critical point X has now been moved to the point Y by the structure of the present invention. In the area between the two rearmost screws 14, the clamping action of the bridge between the two screws 14 is much greater than the cantilevered section beyond the last screw on the known structures. The forces now applying on the vamp 2, in accordance with the present invention, are shown in the drawings by the lines A and A. The material now around the screw 14 is no more subject to tear. Also, in the known structures the constant working of the resilient material over the edge of the clamping means causes chafing at this point which contributes eventually to a tearing action.

Since the vamp 2 and the strap 2a are clamped down to the board 1 by the same plate 10, two thicknesses have to be clamped to the same plate 10, and as shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, the clamp plates 10 and 11 are set off in order to accommodate two thicknesses at the particular range thereof.

This new concept of the vamp structure and the means for securing the vamp to the ski board 1 eliminates the weak points of the known structures, which led to a tearing action, which is now completely eliminated with the arrangement designed in accordance with the present invention.

Referring now in this connection to FIGS. 10 and 11 of the drawings, FIG. 10 discloses the arrangement and also shows diagrammatically the effect upon the vamp due to the forces acting upon the vamp during use of the skis. FIG. 10, which discloses the prior art arrangement, shows the direction of the force F, in normal position, P the force exerted on the vamp 2 in the position in which the heel is raised, P in the position indicating the direction of the force, when the heel is raised still higher, while the situation of the corresponding positions of the forces indicated by P P and P shows such forces in an additional number of further heel positions.

Referring now to FIG. 11, the same forces are indicated as P P P and P P and P respectively. The respective shaded sections show an area, Where the forces are concentrated upon moving forward over a wider area, as the heel is raised still higher. Furthermore, it is to be recognized that an imaginary bridge is formed between the two rearmost screws 14 and the next screw, which indicates the maximum holding power in the bridge area between the screws 14 and that next screw.

Referring now again to the drawings and in particular to FIGS. 12 and 13, according to which the vamp structure comprises now two portions, namely a vamp 2 and a vamp strap 2a, the latter including the tension projections 5. The entir vamp strap 2a is placed over the vamp 2 loosely and in engagement therewith at the instep and the vamp 2 is secured on each side by the clamping means, namely the clamping plates 10 and 10', respectively, which secure the vamp 2 and the vamp strap 2a to the ski board 1. As. indicated in FIG. 13, the vamp strap 2a has side extensions, which serve the purpose of positioning the strap 2a without limiting its movement. The side extensions 2b are wider at the bottom and they are tapered to a smaller width in rearward direction, where they join the strap 2a, which provides the holding and adjustment features.

The vamp strap 2a is independent from the main vamp 2 and has more freedom to move up and down, forward or backward, thus providing a greater adjustment possibility and comfort than the arrangement known in the previous structure, where the integral strap did not permit the adjustment provided now. The an-gularity of the side extensions 2]) and the tapering thereof have the function to prevent displacement out of its proper position. While the vamp strap 2a is secured to the board 1 by olfset clamping plates, it may also be secured at the sides by means of independent clamping plates (not shown), that means, clamping plates which are independent from the clamping plate securing the vamp 2. In a variation of this arrangement, the side extensions can be eliminated completely and merely the tension projections 5 can be provided, as disclosed in FIG. 12.

Referring now again to the drawings and in particular to FIGS. 14 and 15, in accordance with the present invention, the counter 3 is likewise further developed in accordance with the present invention. The counter comprises now a main counter 3 cooperating with a separate counter strap 16 loosely engaging the main counter 3 and which adjusts to various sizes or to different curvatures of heels.

The counter strap 16 is secured at the sides by oifset clamping plates 11 and it extends upwardly over the heel at the Achilles tendon. The counter strap 16 permits a free movement independent from the counter 3. After the heel is inserted, the counter strap 16 can be pulled to a position where it remains engaged and conforms to the curvature of the heel of the individual user. The counter 3 has also forwardly extending projections.

While performing certain maneuvers with the skis, the heel is raised at times. The counter 3 folds under the heel, causing the skier to lose control of the skis. If the skier remains in the skiing position, he must reach down and pull up the counter to again obtain the original fit. This brings about a time loss which is important in trick runs which are timed.

In the present embodiment, the counter strap 16 permits the heel to be raised in a greater distance without causing the above-mentioned condition. This is achieved in such a manner that upon raising the heel, the counter strap 16 hugs the counter and heel tight enough to stretch the lower portion of the counter along with it. Now, as the heel is lowered, the stretched portion of the counter 3 recedes with it and thus cannot fold under, however, when the heel is raised excessively, as at the occasion of a fall complete release is obtained.

Referring now again to FIG. 13, the full line showing is an inoperative position of the vamp 2 and of the vamp strap 2a, while the dotted line showing indicates the operative position, namely when the non-resilient strap 6 is tightened, the vamp strap 2a finds its own position, due to its ability to float independently of the vamp portion 2.

Referring now again to FIGS. 14 and 15, it will be seen in FIG. 14 how the counter strap can be adjusted for a large foot and in FIG. 15 for a small foot.

Referring now to FIG. 16 an arrangement of a slalom ski is disclosed, in which one foot is inserted again into a vamp 2 and a counter. The vamp strap 2a and a counter strap 16 are also provided, as is the case in the use of two skis. Spaced apart on the ski board 1, however, is a vamp 2, into which the second foot can be inserted, the board 1 having secured thereto both the front vamp 2 and front counter 3, as well as the vamp 2 for the second foot.

While I have disclosed several embodiments of the present invention, it is to be understood that these embodiments are given by example only and not in a limiting sense, the scope of the present invention being determined by the objects and the claims.

I claim:

1. A binding for Water skis, comprising an elastic flexible vamp member, a vamp strap loosely engaging and partly covering said vamp member,

a counter disposed behind said vamp member,

a counter strap loosely engaging and partly covering said counter,

said vamp, said vamp strap, said counter and said counter strap being adapted to be mounted on a ski board,

first clamping means securing the lateral edges of said vamp member and of said vamp strap to said ski board,

second clamping means securing the lower edges of said counter and of said counter strap to said ski board,

said vamp strap having at its rear ends oppositely disposed tension projections adapted to engage the instep of the foot of the user,

the ends of said tension projections being folded over,

clamping means securing said ends of said tension projections in the folded-over positions,

two ring members secured to said folded-over tension projections, and

non-resilient extension members secured to said ring members and to said ski board, respectively.

2. The binding, as set forth in claim 1, which includes a roller inserted into said folded-over end of each of said tension projections, and

said [rings received in said roller.

3. The binding, as set forth in claim 1, which includes means for securing said extension members to said ski board.

4. The binding, as set forth in claim 1, wherein said vamp strap has in addition to said tension projections side extensions secured to said clamping means.

5. The binding for water skis, as set forth in claim 1,

wherein said vamp member has at its rear end a cut-out adjacent said clamping means, thereby preventing a tearing of the vamp member at the rear end of said clamping means.

6. The binding for water skis, as set forth in claim 1,

wherein said counter has at its forward end a cut-out adjacent said clamping means, thereby preventing a tearing of the counter at the forward end of said clamping means.

7. In a binding for water skis,

an elastic vamp member,

a vamp strap loosely engaging and partly covering said vamp member,

said vamp and said vamp strap being adapted to be mounted on a ski board,

clamping means securing the lateral edges of said vamp member and of said vamp strap to said ski board,

said vamp strap having at its rear ends oppositely disposed tension projections adapted to engage the instep of the foot of the user,

the ends of said tension projections being folded over,

clamping means securing said ends of said tension projections in the folded-over positions,

two ring members secured to said folded-over tension projections, and

non-resilient extension members, secured to said ring members and to said ski board, respectively.

8. The binding, as set forth in claim 7, wherein said vamp member has at its rear end a cut-out adjacent said clamping means, thereby preventing a tearing of the vamp member at the rear end of said clamping means.

9. In a binding for water skis,

a counter,

a counter-strap loosely engaging and displaceable on the outer surface of said counter, and partly covering said counter, in order to shift said counter strap to different levels, and

clamping means securing the lower edges of said counter References Cited and of said counter-strap to said ski board.

I: 10. The binding for water skis, as set forth in claim 9, UNITED STATES PATLNTS whmin 2,617,209 11/1952 Jackson 36 -7 3 said counter has at its forward end a cut-out adjacent 5 2,933,741 4/ 1960 Walter 9-310 said clamping means, thereby preventing a tearing of the counter at the forward end of said clamping MILTON BUCHLER P'mmry Exammermeans. P. E. SAUBERER, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2617209 *Aug 26, 1949Nov 11, 1952Tingley Reliance Rubber CorpRubber overshoe
US2933741 *Feb 7, 1958Apr 26, 1960Samuel LebowitzWater ski bindings
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4738646 *Feb 21, 1986Apr 19, 1988Connelly Skis, Inc.Water ski binding
US4758191 *Sep 24, 1986Jul 19, 1988Connelly Skis, Inc.Water ski binding
US4869697 *Mar 17, 1988Sep 26, 1989Connelly Skis, Inc.Water ski binding
US6017256 *Nov 10, 1998Jan 25, 2000Connelly Skis Inc.Hard-sided wake board and water ski binding
US6276697 *Jul 31, 2000Aug 21, 2001Henkel LinAdjustable roller skate
US6419242 *Jun 2, 2000Jul 16, 2002Peter P. BauerSnowboard front foot snow shield
US7134928Aug 16, 2005Nov 14, 2006Connelly Skis, Inc.Binding for water sports boards
US8192244Sep 1, 2009Jun 5, 2012Connelly Skis, Inc.Water sports binding assembly
EP0028801A1 *Nov 4, 1980May 20, 1981Mistral Windsurfing AGFoot-strap on a surfboard
Classifications
U.S. Classification441/70, D21/773
International ClassificationB63B35/81, B63B35/73
Cooperative ClassificationB63B35/812
European ClassificationB63B35/81C