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Publication numberUS3361212 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1968
Filing dateSep 3, 1965
Priority dateSep 3, 1965
Publication numberUS 3361212 A, US 3361212A, US-A-3361212, US3361212 A, US3361212A
InventorsPage Jr John S
Original AssigneeJohn S. Page Jr.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
String fluid controlled sleeve valve
US 3361212 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 2, '1968 J. s. PAGE, JR

STRING FLUID CONTROLLED SLEEVE VALVE Filed Sept. 5, 1965 fm/slvrae. Jay/v 5. P465, C72.

7 /7 7 5i? finlfl wwvvu A V E J a w M j United States Patent Ofilice 3,361,212 STRING FLUID CONTROLLED SLEEVE VALVE John S. Page, Jr., 2301 Snowden Ave., Long Beach, Calif. 90815 Filed Sept. 3, 1965, Ser. No. 434,811 7 Claims. (Cl. 166-224) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The disclosure concerns a sub-surface well valve of sleeve type, for controlling upward flow of well fluid in tubing and to the tubing exterior in response to changes in control fluid pressure transmitted downwardly in the tubing string. The sleeve remains downwardly open and centrally unobstructed, and sealing means seals off against leakage of well fluid from the sleeve interior to the string exterior in up position of the sleeve.

This invention relates generally to sub-surface well valves usable to control the flow of fluid in pipe or tubing. More particularly, the invention concerns improvernent embodied in a sub-surface Well valve that is controllable in response to changing the pressure of control fluid in the tubing string above the valve.

It is a major object of the invention to provide an improved sub-surface well valve of unusually advantageous construction and mode of operation, not found in prior valves of which I am aware. Basically, the valve apparatus is connectible in a string of tubing and comprises tubular means having side porting through which well fluid is flowable between the interior and exterior of the tubular means; structure movable within and lengthwise of the tubular means for controlling the flow of well fluid through the porting in response to a change in downward pressure transmission by control fluid within the string interior, the structure having a first surface exposed to such downward pressure application as well as a second surface out of communication with the first surface to be exposed to upward pressure application exerted by well fluid flowable through the porting; and the structure including a sleeve movable lengthwise of the tubular means to control the well fluid flow through the porting. Typically, the movable structure plugs the tubular means above the level of the porting, the sleeve is tubular to pass the flow unobstructedly and upwardly within the sleeve interior and through a sleeve side port toward the side porting in the tubular means when the sleeve is in down position, and the sleeve side port is out of flow passing communication with side porting in the tubular means when the sleeve is in up position. As a result, an unusual degree of advantageous simplicity is achieved, with the upward flow being generally unobstructed as it approaches the porting; :at the same time, the valve is advantageously controllable by changing the downward pressure exertion of control fluid standing in the string above the valve structure.

It is another object of the invention to provide sealing rings carried to seal off between the movable structure and the tubular means above and below the level of the side porting in the latter when the sleeve is in a down position allowing well fluid flow only through the porting, and also when the sleeve is in an up position blocking upward flow of well fluid. Typically, the sealing rings sealing off between the movable structure and tubular means in sleeve down position are confined against direct exposure to the well fluid flow, so that they remain protected against erosion by abrasive materials in the flow. In addition, the tubular means has sealing bores protected in sleeve down position from direct exposure to the well fluid flow, to block erosion of those bores.

3,361,212 Patented Jan. 2, 1968 These and other objects and advantages of the invention, as well as the details of illustrative embodiments, will be more fully understood from the following detailed description of the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertical section of a typical valve apparatus connected in a tubing string and installed in a well, the valve movable structure including the sleeve being in down or open position; and

FIG. 2 shows the FIG. 1 Valve structure in up or closed position.

In accordance with the invention, tubular means is provided to have side porting through which well fluid is flowable between the interior and exterior thereof. As one example of this, the tubular means may include a body 10 connectible at 11 and 12 in a tubing string 13, and having side ports 14.

Further in accordance with the invention, structure is provided for movement within and lengthwise of the tubular means for controlling the flow of well fluid through the porting in response to a change in downward pressure transmission by control fluid within the string interior. Typical of such movable structure is that indicated generally at 15, having first surfaces 16a and 16b exposed to receive downward pressure application of control fluid in the string interior 17, and a second surface 18 out of communication with surface 17 to be exposed to upward pressure application exerted by well fluid the upward flow of which is indicated by arrows 19 in FIG. 1. Surface 18 is defined by body 20 having a stem 21 to which a support member 22 is coaxially attached at 23.

The invention also contemplates that the movable structure includes a sleeve unit or assembly, as for example is seen at 24, movable lengthwise of the tubular means 10 to control the well fluid through the side porting 14. Typically, the sleeve is tubular to pass the well flow unobstructedly and upwardly within the sleeve interior 70, and it has a side port or ports 25 to pass the well flow from within the sleeve toward the side porting 14 when the sleeve is in a down position as seen in FIG. 1. In this regard, the flow is not obstructed by any valve plug contained centrally of the body 10.

Sealing rings or ring assemblies indicated generally at 27 and 28 are carried to seal off between the structure 15 and the tubular means 10 above and below the level of the porting 14 when the sleeve is in a down position, allowing well fluid flow through the porting, as is clear from FIG. 1. Ring 28 and an additional sealing ring 29 seal oil between structure 15 and means 10 above and below the level of porting 14 when the sleeve is in an up position blocking well fluid flow through the porting. The ring assemblies 27, 28 and 29 are alike, their construction being illustrated by that of assembly 27 comprising a sandwich formed by non-metallic plastic or elastomer ring 30 between and bonded to two metal rings 31 and 32. Ring assembly 27 is retained on body 20 by stop ring 33, and an annular spacer 34 comprising part of the sleeve 24 locates the ring assemblies 28 and 29 in spaced relation on sleeve core 35. A nut 36 is threaded at 37 to the core to retain the lower ring assembly 29 in position. Note that the bore 37 of the sleeve is open and unobstructed.

It is a further feature of the invention that the plastic or elastomer sealing rings such :as 30 in each of the assemblies 27 and 29 are confined against direct exposure to the well fluid flow, as is clear from FIG. 1. Also, the tubular body 10 has sealing bores 38 and 39 protected by the rings 27 and 29 in sleeve down position against direct exposure to the well fluid flow, which carries abrasive particles such as sand. Accordingly, erosion of these parts is forestalled to prevent leakage and malfunction of the valve. The bore of body It is enlarged at 40 between the sealing ring assemblies in FIG. 1, to reduce obstruction to the flow at the porting locus.

A collet 50 is releasably retained in the body and supports structure for vertical movement, the collet and structure having telescopic interconnection at 51. In the example, a flange 52 on part 22 pilots in the collet bore as the structure 15 shifts vertically. Thus when downward control pressure on surfaces 16a and 16b is reduced sufficiently in relation to upward pressure on surface 18, the structure shifts upwardly to FIG. 2 position. Engagement of the flange 52 with collet flange 54 limits downward shifting whereas engagement of ring 33 with collet flange 54 limits upward shifting. Collet 50 has cantilever arms 55 spring urged outwardly to seat the lugs 56 in groove 57 formed in the bore 53 of the body 10, thereby locating the collet axially of the body. A suitable wire line tool is operable to latch onto the upper terminals 59 of the collet fingers for urging them inwardly to release the collet for upward retrieval of the valve apparatus. A shoulder 60 in body 10 lands the collet when run into the body 10.

An annular deflector 62 has attachment to the body 10 at 63 and is spaced outwardly from side porting 14 to receive impingement of the outward and upward flow of abrasive Well fluid. Accordingly, the well casing 65 is protected from abrasive erosion at the valve location.

Numeral 80 indicates a means to effect control of fluid pressure standing in the string above the valve. Such means may for example include surface pumping apparatus.

I claim:

1. Apparatus connectible in a string of tubing in a Well, comprising tubular means having side porting through which well fluid is flowable between the interior and exterior of said tubular means, structure movable Within and lengthwise of said means for controlling the flow of well fluid through said porting in response to a change in downward pressure transmission by control fluid within the string interior :and above the level of said means, the structure having a first surface exposed to receive downward pressure application of control fluid and a second surface out of communication with said first surface to be exposed to upward pressure application exerted by well fluid flowable upwardly and through said porting, and said structure including a sleeve movable lengthwise of said means to control the well fluid flow through said porting, said structure plugging said tubular means above the level of said tubular means side porting, said sleeve being downwardly open and centrally unobstructed in all sleeve positions to pass the well flow unobstructedly upwardly into the sleeve interior, said sleeve having a side port to pass the well flow from within the sleeve interior toward said tubular means side porting when the sleeve is in a down position, and sealing means carried to extend about the sleeve for sealing oil between the sleeve and tubular means and both up and down positions of the sleeve and both above and below the level of said tubular means side porting, said sealing means sealing off against leakage of well fluid from the sleeve interior to the tubular means porting in up position of the sleeve.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said sealing means includes sealing rings sealing off between the structure and tubular means in sleeve down position during which the rings are confined against direct exposure to the well fluid flow.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 3 in which the tubular means has sealing bores protected by said rings in sleeve down position from direct exposure to the Well fluid flow.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including a collet releasably retained in said tubular means and supporting said structure for vertical movement.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 in which said collet and structure have telescopic interconnection.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including a well tubing string supporting said tubular means in a Well.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including a well fluid flow deflector spaced directly outwardly of said side porting and carried by said tubular means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,633,916 4/1953 Barker et al. 16622.4 3,054,415 9/1962 Barker et al. 166-224 3,156,300 11/1964 Barker et al. 166-224 3,294,174 12/1966 Vincent 1 66-224 JAMES A. LEPPINK, Primary Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent 3,361,212 January 2, 1968 John S. Page, Jr.

It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Colomn 4, line 12, "and", second occurrence, should read 1n Signed and sealed this 9th day of September 1969.

"Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents :J M. Fletcher, Jr. WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2633916 *Jan 12, 1948Apr 7, 1953Baker Oil Tools IncSide ported cementing apparatus
US3054415 *Aug 3, 1959Sep 18, 1962Baker Oil Tools IncSleeve valve apparatus
US3156300 *Aug 14, 1963Nov 10, 1964Page John SMethod and apparatus for protecting wells
US3294174 *Jun 16, 1964Dec 27, 1966Pan American Petroleum CorpFluid operated valve device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3426848 *Dec 5, 1966Feb 11, 1969Rockwell Mfg CoRemote hanger
US3580332 *Mar 2, 1970May 25, 1971Baker Oil Tools IncApparatus for controlling fluid flow from gas storage wells and reservoirs
US3638724 *Apr 27, 1970Feb 1, 1972Baker Oil Tools IncSafety shutoff valve for controlling fluid flow from gas storage wells and reservoirs
US3702634 *Jun 10, 1970Nov 14, 1972Halliburton CoRetrievable packer apparatus for use in a well bore and method of prolonging its operating life
US3754597 *Oct 14, 1971Aug 28, 1973Brown Oil ToolsSafety valve assembly
US3850250 *Sep 11, 1972Nov 26, 1974Halliburton CoWellbore circulating valve
US3930540 *Oct 10, 1974Jan 6, 1976Halliburton CompanyWellbore circulating valve
US3948318 *Oct 9, 1974Apr 6, 1976Page John S JrFlow controlling safety valve
US4005751 *Mar 11, 1975Feb 1, 1977Page John S JrDeep well safety valve
US4069871 *Dec 13, 1976Jan 24, 1978Page John S JrDeep well safety valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/322, 251/210, 137/628
International ClassificationE21B34/00, E21B34/10
Cooperative ClassificationE21B34/105
European ClassificationE21B34/10R