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Publication numberUS3363643 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1968
Filing dateOct 5, 1965
Priority dateOct 5, 1965
Publication numberUS 3363643 A, US 3363643A, US-A-3363643, US3363643 A, US3363643A
InventorsSkulski Louis J
Original AssigneeLouis J. Skulski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Float operated valve
US 3363643 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 16, 196s L. J, SKULSKI 3,363,643

FLOAT OPERATED VALVE Imm l l am Filed Oct.

United States Patent O 3,363,643 FLOAT OPERATED VALVE Louis J. Skulski, 4744 N. Laramie, Chicago, Ill. 60640 Filed Oct. 5, 1965, Ser. No. 493,002 12 Claims. (Cl. 137-445) This invention relates to a ball-cock for controlling the iiuid inlet to a tank and particularly to a water closet iiush tank.

In conventional mechanisms for use in water closet flush tanks, for example, a float controlled valve controls the admission of water into the tank. The oat is so connected to the valve that when the tank is full the tioat rests on the surface of the water and in that position holds the valve closed. As the water empties from the tank during a flushing operation the float moves to the bottom of the tan-k with the water level and during its descent opens the valve to admit water from a water supply source to refill the tank. Then as the water level rises and the iioat with it, the valve gradually closes. One of the main difiiculties with these valves arises when the tank is nearly refilled. At that point the valve is not quite closed and is moving slowly toward its fully closed position. In other words, the valve does not close positively being dependent solely on the position of t-he ioat.

Toward the end of the filling cycle the valve is barely open thus increasing the time for filling the tank to the desired level. In addition, the slow admission of Water through the nearly closed valve during this latter part of the cycle often causes a whining or wheezing sound for a prolonged period of time which is highly objectionable. Furthermore, water seeping in through a partially closed valve has a tendency to wear and cut the valve seat.

The desirable goal sought to be attained is a valve which will remain fully open or nearly fully open till the tank is completely filled and then close positively.

Accordingly, it is a principal object of this invention to provide a valve mechanism for use in iiush tanks, for example, which will remain fully or neary fully open till the tank is iilled to the desired level and then close positively.

A further object is to provide a spring-'biased oatoperated valve mechanism which will remain substantially fully open during filling of the water tank and will positively close when the desired level of filling has been reached.

A further object is to provide a cani-operated latch mechanism in connection with a spring-biased float controlled valve for maintaining the valve in a substantially fully open position to assure rapid filling of the tank with which it is associated and a rapid and positive closing of the valve when the desired level of filling has been reached.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a valve in accordance with the above stated objects wherein the spring-biasing means is adjustable so that rapid and positive closing may be attained even wit-h varying fluid supply pressures.

The above and other objects and advantages of the invention will be more readily apparent when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE l is an elevation view partially in section illustrating the position of the oat and the associated valve mechanism when the tank is full of Water and the valve is closed;

FIGURE 2 is a plan View of the iloat rod and the lever mechanism taken along the line 2--2 of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 3 is an elevation view showing the position of the oat rod and the cam mechanism during the falling of the water level Iwhen the float rod begins to lift the valve from its seat;

ICC

FIGURE 4 is an elevation view showing the position of the float rod and the cam mechanism when the water level has reached its low point in the tank, the valve now being in a fully open position; and

FIGURE 5 is an elevation view showing the position of the oat rod and the cam mechanism when the tank has refilled to the point where theV cam mechanism is about to release the lever and permit positive closing of the valve.

Referring now to the drawings 10 designates a supply pipe or stand pipe secured in the bottom wall 12 of a flush tank by means of an adaptor 14 positioned in opening 16 and a securing nut 18. The supply pipe communicates with a water supply source through a water supply line 20.

A ball cock mechanism 22 is attached to the upper end of the supply pipe 10 and comprises a valve body 24, an inlet valve 26, biasing means 28 for holding the valve in a closed position, actuating means 30 for opening the valve and means 32 for holding the valve in an open position or permitting it to close as determined by the position of a oat operated lever.

The valve body 24 which may be made from a suitable metal casting or a molded plastic body defines a cavity 34 which has disposed therein a central portion 36 which is integral with the valve body and is attached thereto by a ported web 38, which may be cross-shaped. The valve body together with the central portion 36 define an inlet chamber 40 and an outlet chamber 42. A plurality of ports 44 are formed in the web 38 to establish communication between the inlet and outlet chambers 40 and 42. The central portion 36 comprises a boss 46 having formed therein a threaded bore 4S for receiving the upper portion of the supply pipe 10. A longitudinally extending passageway S0 is formed in the central portion 36 and establishes flow communication between the supply pipe 10 and the inlet chamber 40. A valve seat 52 is formed on the central portion 36. A threaded bore 54 is formed in the lower end of the valve body 24 and is adapted to receive a discharge pipe S6 which is in flow communication with the outlet chamber l42.

The threaded bore 54 is substantially coaxial with the threaded bore 48 but is larger than the bore 48. It will be observed that the discharge pipe 56 is positioned coaxially with respect to the supply pipe 1.0 so that water iiowing from the outlet chamber 42 through the discharge pipe fiows around the supply pipe 10. The discharge pipe 56 extends nearly to the bottom of the tank so that water will be discharged with a minimum of noise and without splashing.

On the upper part of the valve body 24 there is formed an extended portion 5S which defines a cylindrical bore 60 adapted to receive a valve piston.

The inlet valve 26 comprises a reciprocable valve piston `62 which includes an upper cylindrical portion 64 of a relatively large diameter and a lower cylindrical portion 66 of a relatively small diameter. The lower portion 66 extends through an opening 68 and defines at its lower end a valve surface 70 which is adapted to seat on valve seat 52.

When this mechanism is used in connection with a water closet flush tank a length of copper tubing 59 is connected to the inlet chamber 40 by suitable means and is directed into a tank overtiow tube (not shown) which leads to the toilet bowl. It is well known that the purpose of this is to till the toilet bowl with water to a certain level to protect against the possibility thatlsewer gases will back up into the toilet and cause unpleasant odors.

In connection with other tank filling applications the tubing 59' is not necessary.

The opening 68 is delined by a radialiy inwardly extending flange 69 formed at the juncture of the main portion of the valve body 24 and the extended portion S. The valve surface 7d may be that of a suitable washer or gasket which is titted into the lower end of piston 62. The upper portion 64 of t-he valve piston `62, of course, is slidably disposed in the bore 6G, and is fitted with a sealing means 72 such as a suitable leather gasket or O-ring seal, for example, disposed in groove 73.

The purpose of the ange 69 is to hold back the water pressure. On occasion when the main water supply, such as a city main, has been shut. otl, and the water is then turned on this water under high pressure carries with it dirt and grit. The flange 69 prevents this dirt and grit from getting up in the vicinity of the gasket 72 and causing undue wear of the gasket. Wear of the gasket would permit water to eventually creep up around the cylindrical portion 64 and spray out through the top of the bore titl.

A boss 74 is formed at the upper end of the piston 62 and has formed therein a diametrically extending slot 76 for receiving a valve actuating member to be more fully described.

A substantially U-shaped bracket '78 is attached to the portion 58 of the valve body or may form an integral part of the valve body, the base portion Si) of the bracket 78 being the portion so attached. The two upstanding legs 82 and 84 of the bracket 78 are disposed on opposite sides of the valve body substantially 180 degrees from each other. Each of the legs 82 and 84 as seen in FIGURE 2 are bifurcated and comprise respectively leg portions 82a, 32h and 84a, 84h.

An inverted substantially U-shaped second bracket S6 comprising a base portion 88 and depending legs 9o and 92 is attached to the bracket 7S, by suitable means such, for example, as screws 94 and 96, the legs 90 and 92 being positioned between the biturcated portions of legs 82 and 84 respectively. The base portion 88 has formed therein a threaded opening 98 for receiving a spring pressure adjusting screw 99' the latter having a bore therethrough for slidingly receiving a valve stem or guide pin 100 which may be attached to the boss 74 of a valve piston 62. The valve stem 100 extends through and supports the compression spring 2S which normally holds the Valve 62 in a closed position seated on the seat 52. Thus the base 88 of the bracket 8'6 connes spring 28 and functions as a reaction member for the spring 28.

The actuating means 30 for opening the valve comprises a valve operating member 102 in the form of a lift bar which may be connected to the valve piston 62. As here illustrated the lift bar 102 extends through the slot 76 in the boss 74. While I have provided a slot in boss 74 for connecting the lift bar 102 to the valve piston 62, other suitable means could provide this connection. The lift bar 102 is pivotally mounted at one side of the bracket 7S in the bifurcated leg 32 by suitable means such as a pintle 104. At the opposite end of the lift bar there is formed on the underside of the lift bar a notch 11E-6. The depth of the notch 106 is such that it is adapted to accommodate a projection formed on an associated link member when the valve 26 is in its closed position.

The ball cock mechanism 22 also comprises a oat rod 108 which has a oat 110 attached at one end thereof and a bifurcated U-shaped member 112 at the other end, the latter comprising legs 114 and 116'. The float rod 108 is pivotally mounted on leg 84 of the bracket 78 by means of a pintle 118. A cross-bar member 120 here illustrated in the form `of a pin is attached to and spans the two leg portions of the member 112 at the outer end thereof. Another cross-bar member 122 also in the form of a pin spans the two leg portions at the inner end of the member 112.

An intermediate tlat link member or tripping tinger 124 is loosely journaled on pin 118` for pivotal movement thereon and is positioned between the bifurcated portions or arms 84a and S41) of leg 84. An arcuate cam surface 126 is formed on one end of the member 124. This cam surface is essentially an arc which may be described by a radius having its center at the pivot 118. The cam surface is interrupted or cut back at one point to form a shoulder 128 which is adapted to be received in notch 106` of the lift bar 102 when the valve 26 is in its fully closed position. The cam surface 126 is adapted to contact the surface 167 at the outer end of the lift bar 162 adjacent notch lila during a portion of the tank lling cycle. A recess 130 is formed at the other end of the link member 124 and defines abutments 132 and 1134 which are adapted to be contacted by cross-bar 122 during the swinging movement of the float rod about the pivot 118.

The intermediate member or tripping nger 124 is so constructed and mounted on the pivot 118 that the major' portion of the mass of the member 124 lies to the right ot the pivot as viewed in FIGURE 4, for example. Thus when the member 124 is unrestrained it will tend to pivot by gravity in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE 4. Should the tripping finger 124 tend to stick, the crossbar member 122 will contact the abutment 132 during downward movement of the oat and urge the member 124 in a clockwise direction.

The abutment 132 is so positioned that contact with it is made by the cross-bar 122 only after the lift bar is lifted out of the way, so that there is no possibility of the shoulder 12S of the tripping member sticking in the notch 106.

Because different water pressures exist in different geographical areas a compression spring adjustment nut 99 is provided in association with the spring 2S to increase or decrease the pressure on the spring as desired.

Operation FIGURE l shows the valve 26 in its normal *closed position and the iloat rod 1118 and oat 110 in their nor-v mal position when the tank, with which the mechanism is associated, is full. When a llush valve (not shown) on the tank is opened permitting water to ilow out of the tank, the iioat moves downwardly with the water level; In doing so the float rod pivots about its fulcrum 118 and after a predetermined water level has been reached the cross-bar 121i strikes the underside of the valve operating member, litt bar 162 (FIGURE 3) and commences litting the lift bar about its pivot 104. The lift bar being con; nected to the boss 74 on the valve piston 62 commences to lift the latter from the seat 52 against the pressure of spring 28. This permits the entry of water under pressure from the supply line through passageway 50 into the inlet chamber 4t). The water then flows through ports 44, into the outlet chamber 42 and out through the discharge pipe S6 into the bottom of the tank.

When the flush valve (not shown) is opened the water level in the tank, of course, will drop very fast so that the Atloat rod quickly assumes the position shown in FIG- URE 4. As the loat rod 108 moves downwardly in a clockwise motion the cross-bar 122 moves away from the abutment 134 on the link member 124, but the latter is still held in a position substantially as seen in FIGURE 3 because the shoulder 128 is still positioned in the notch 165, but has fallen into contact with shoulder of the notch 105. Then as the float drops further with the water level, the litt bar 102 finally is urged upwardly to the position shown in FIGURE 4, freeing the intermediate member 124 to move further in a clockwise direction. As the tank lls, the oat rises, and the compression spring 2S forces the valve piston 52 in a downward direction as the cross-bar slowly moves away from the lift bar 102.

The valve piston 62 moves downwardly till the surface 107 of the lift bar 102 contacts the cam surface 126` of the intermediate member or tripping linger 124. When this contact is made, the valve piston 62 still is a substantial distance from its scat S2, approximately 4,24%1 of an inch. As the tloat continues to rise with the water level,

the cross-bar 122 presses against abutment 134 to move the tripping finger in a counterclockwise direction, and the surface 7 of the lift bar 102 rides on the cam surface 126 of the tripping linger. During this latter movement the inlet valve 26 is still substantially fully open to permit fast filling of the tank. When the tank is just `about filled to the desired water level the float lever 108 and tripping finger 124 are at the positions shown in FIG- URE 5, and the tripping finger 124 is just about to trip. An additional increment of counterclockwise angular movement of the tripping finger due to the further rise of the float 110 allows the cam surface 126 to disengage from the surface 107 of the lift bar. Thus the lift bar is released from its spring restraining position and the compression spring 28 snaps the valve piston 62 down onto the seat 52. This positively closes the valve 26, and the spring 28 is the only force acting to hold the valve in a closed position. Once the latter has occured, the iioat exerts no force in maintaining the inlet valve in a closed position.

The cooperating cam surfaces 126 and 107 are so designed that during the filling cycle, while surfaces 126 and 107 are in contact, the valve piston 62 is maintained a minimum distance from its seat 52. It has been found that a distance of approximately 1/32%4 of an inch permits an adequate filling rate and yet is not so great as to produce an undesirable hammer knock when the valve finally seats.

It is important that the cooperating configurations between the shoulder 123 on the tripping member 124 and the notch 106 be so designed that once the cam surface 126 is disengaged from the surface 107, there be no obstruction to the downward movement of the lift bar 102. In other words, the notch 106 must be deep enough and present adequate clearance to accommodate the shoulder 128.

While my invention and its operation have been described herein as associated with a water closet liush tank it will be understood that it could be used with valves controlling the admission of fluid to other types of tanks.

Thus l have been able to devise a ball cock mechanism which will permit the inlet valve to stay substantially fully open during the complete tank filling cycle and yet close in a positive manner when the filling has been completed. This device does away with the whining and wheezing sounds which often result in valves which toward the end of a filling cycle remain just slightly open and permit a long continuing trickle of water. This positive closing is also effective to reduce wear and cutting of the valve seat which often results from the trickling of a fiuid under high pressure through a valve which is not tightly closed.

Furthermore, my device is of a relatively simple construction. -For example, the lift bar 102 and the link member 124 may be made as stampings of flat metal such as stainless steel or bronze making both parts inexpensive to manufacture and replace. Because wear may occur on the cam surface 126 and the lower surface 107 of the lift bar, these parts preferably are hardened or the surfaces treated to prevent wear.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been specifically disclosed, it is understood that the invention is not limited thereto as variations will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art and the invention is to given its fullest possible interpretation within the terms of the following claims.`

I claim:

1. In a ball cock mechanism for controlling the admission of fluid to a tank the combination comprising:

a valve body having an inlet and an outlet;

valve means for controlling the fiow of tiuid through said valve body;

spring means for normally holding said valve means in a closed position;

a valve operating member associated with said valve means for opening said valve means;

lever means operatively associated with said operating member to directly engage and actuate said operating member to open said valve means against the force of said spring means, said lever means being adapted to have a float member attached thereto;

an intermediate tripping member disposed between said lever means and said operating member;

cam means formed on said intermediate tripping member, said cam means being adapted to engage said operating member to hold said operating member in a spring restraining position to thereby hold said valve means in an open position;

and means for disengaging said cam means from said operating member to permit said spring means to close said valve means.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein said means for disengaging said cam means from said operating member comprises cooperating means on said lever means and said intermediate member whereby said cam means is disengaged from said operating member at a predetermined position of said lever means.

3. The device of claim 1 further including first and second upstanding leg portions connected to said valve body and disposed approximately degrees from each other,

said operating member being pivotally mounted on one of said leg portions, and

said lever means being pivotally mounted on the other of said leg portions.

4. The device of claim 3` wherein said intermediate member is also pivotally mounted on the other of said leg portions.

5. The device of claim 3 wherein said intermediate member is coaXially pivotally mounted with said lever means.

6. The device of claim 1 wherein said lever means has a fioat member attached thereto and said cam means is adapted to be disengaged in response to the position of said fioat member.

7. The device of claim 1 wherein said valve means comprises a reciprocable valve piston which closes against the pressure of fluid passing through said valve means, and further includes means for adjusting the force of said spring means to accommodate variable fiuid inlet pressures.

8. The device of claim 1 wherein said cam means is formed at one end of said intermediate member, and

said means for disengaging said cam means includes means formed on the other end of said intermediate member for operative engagement with said lever means.

9. In a ball cock mechanism for controlling the admission of fluid to a tank the combination comprising:

a valve body having an inlet and an outlet;

valve means for controlling the ow of fluid through said valve body;

a substantially U-shaped supporting bracket secured to said valve body and comprising two leg portions;

a valve operating member operatively associated with said valve means, said operating member being pivotally mounted on one leg of said bracket;

compression spring means for holding said valve means in a normally closed position;

lever means pivotally mounted on the other leg of said bracket and operatively associated with said operating member for opening said valve means against the force of said spring means, said lever means being adapted to have a oat member secured thereto;

an intermediate tripping member disposed between said operating member and said lever means;

cam means formed on said intermediate tripping member and adapted to engage said operating member to hold said operating member in a spring restraining position to thereby hold said valve means in an open position; and means operatively associating said lever means with said intermediate member so that such intermediate member may be actuated by said lever means to release said cam means from engagement with said operating member when said lever means reaches a predetermined position thereby permitting said spring means to exert a closing force on said valve means. 1t). The device of claim 9 wherein said valve means comprises a reciprocable valve piston, and said operating member comprises an elongated bar which is pivoted at one end, is adapted to be engaged by said cam means at the other end and is connected to said valve piston intermediate said two ends.

i. The device of claim 9 wherein said operating member, said lever means and said intermediate tripping means all are pivotable in substantially parallel planes.

12. In a valve mechanism for controlling the admission of fluid to a tank the combination comprising:

a valve body having an inlet and an outlet; valve means for controlling the flow of fluid through said valve body; supporting means attached to said valve body; spring means for urging said valve means to a closed position; valve lift bar means substantially normally disposed to the axis of movement of said valve means, one end of said lift bar means being pivotally mounted on said supporting means, and said lift bar being connected to said valve means intermediate the ends of said lift bar;

lever means pivotally mounted on said supporting means adjacent the other end of said lift bar for lifting said other end of said lift bar and thereby said valve means from its seating position;

an intermediate cam tripping member adapted to maintain said lift bar in a spring restraining position to preclude closure of said valve means; and

cooperating means on said lever means and said intermediate cam tripping member whereby said tripping member may be actuated by said lever means to release said lift bar and permit said springmeans to close said valve means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1932 Scovel 137-418 9/1935 Reinhardt 137-445 X 9/1942 Miller 251-74 X

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1850159 *Jan 19, 1931Mar 22, 1932Richard R PostonAutomatic water control
US2013188 *Jul 13, 1931Sep 3, 1935Reinhardt William AFloat valve
US2296219 *Mar 27, 1941Sep 15, 1942Badger Meter Mfg CoSnap action float valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3554482 *Apr 18, 1969Jan 12, 1971Remington Arms Co IncPneumatic dump valve
US4192341 *May 18, 1978Mar 11, 1980Sarco Company, Inc.Drain trap valve mechanism
US4431025 *Jan 21, 1982Feb 14, 1984Edwards Lawrence HBack flow prevention valve
US5232011 *Jan 31, 1992Aug 3, 1993Waterguard, Inc.Flush valve leakage prevention and detection device
US5327931 *Aug 2, 1993Jul 12, 1994Waterguard, Inc.Flush valve leakage prevention and detection device
US5540256 *Feb 21, 1995Jul 30, 1996Kuo; Chao-TzungWater level locking device for water tanks
US5682919 *Apr 1, 1996Nov 4, 1997American Containment, Inc.Float controlled valve shut-off assembly
US6325095Jun 5, 2000Dec 4, 2001Ted KimMulti-point float valve
US6679286Jul 24, 2002Jan 20, 2004Yoshitake Inc.Ball tap with a water level switch
US6783330 *Aug 12, 2002Aug 31, 2004Pioneer Pump, Inc.Self-priming centrifugal pump
US7757708Feb 25, 2008Jul 20, 2010nth SolutionsToilet bowl overflow prevention and water conservation system and method
US8166996Jun 8, 2010May 1, 2012Nth Solutions, LlcToilet bowl overflow prevention and water conservation system and method
US8310369Mar 29, 2010Nov 13, 2012Nth Solutions, LlcDetecting unintended flush toilet water flow
US20030039555 *Aug 12, 2002Feb 27, 2003Pioneer Pump Inc.Self-priming centrifugal pump
US20100242160 *Jun 8, 2010Sep 30, 2010Canfield Eric LToilet bowl overflow prevention and water conservation system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/445, 251/74, 137/421, 251/232, 137/446
International ClassificationF16K31/18, F16K31/26
Cooperative ClassificationF16K31/265
European ClassificationF16K31/26B