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Publication numberUS3365137 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1968
Filing dateMay 9, 1966
Priority dateMay 9, 1966
Also published asDE1575032B1, DE1775892A1
Publication numberUS 3365137 A, US 3365137A, US-A-3365137, US3365137 A, US3365137A
InventorsDouglas F Corsette
Original AssigneeDiamond Int Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid dispenser head which develops a fan-like spray
US 3365137 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 23, 1968 D. F. CORSETTE LIQUID DISPENSER HEAD WHICH DEVBLOPS A FAN-LIKE SPRAY 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 9, 1966 //V VENTOE, 00061 43 E (a/(557M United States Patent 3,365,137 LIQUID DISPENSER HEAD WHICH DEVELOPS A FAN-LIKE SPRAY Douglas F. Corsette, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor, by

mesne assignments, to Diamond International Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 9, 1966, Ser. No. 548,515 12 Claims. (Cl. 239520) This invention relates to improvements in spray heads for liquid dispensers.

It has for some time been the practice to vend various liquid products, such as insecticides, paints, etc. in containers equipped with expendable liquid dispensers including spray heads. The dispensers or dispensing devices may comprise, for instance, reciprocating pumps, aerosol valves, or the like; and in view of their expendable nature, it is important that the spray heads thus employed be both efiicient in operation and capable of extremely economical production. With this in mind, various plastic unitary spray heads have become available. However, as exemplified in the Us. Patent to Steward et al., No. 2,974,880, prior such spray heads have been adapted to produce generally conical spray patterns.

For use in various fields, for instance in the spray coating of surfaces with various liquids such as paint or insecticides, it is desirable to employ a spray head which forms a generally-flat fan-like spray pattern adapted to intersect the surface throughout a narrow elongated area generally-approximating a straight line. The concentration of the spray within such an area facilitates the application thereof in a uniform coating, by sweeping said spray across the surface to be coated in a direction transverse to the flat spray pattern.

With this in mind, it is an important object of the present invention to provide a spray head capable of producing such a flat spray pattern in which the spray head is especially adapted for economical formation by conventional plastic molding methods and may comprise an integral unitary structure of homogenous material.

In accordance with the invention, such a spray head comprises a unitary body which is formed with a recess open to the atmosphere. The bottom of the recess is formed to define a ridge extending across the recess with its sloping sides disposed in forwardly-converging relation to define a discharge edge. The sloping sides of the ridge function as deflecting surfaces respectively associated with orifices opening into the recess through its opposite sides. These orifices are oriented to direct streams of fluid in generally-opposite directions for impingement against the respective deflecting surfaces at acute angles thereto, so that the jets of fluid are deflected and caused to spread outwardly over the surfaces.

In the event the surfaces are of smooth uninterrupted formation, the resulting sheets of fluid, upon being discharged over the forwardly-converging discharge edges of the respective surfaces, impinge angularly against each other to effect an atomizing and dispersing action in addition to that which will have been caused by the impingement of the respective jets against the surfaces; and the resulting discharge will be in a generally thin sheet or fan-like form.

It is a further object of the invention to provide such a spray head which is readily adapted for modification to broaden the resulting spray pattern so that its intersection with a surface being sprayed may define a band of appreciable width. For this purpose, the surfaces may be provided with guide ridges arranged to define fluid grooves or channels intersecting the discharge edge 3,355,137 Patented Jan. 23, 1968 of each surface and extending therefrom toward the respective orifices. The guide ridges and channels on the two different surfaces are in relatively staggered relation so that the guide ridges which define the channels on one surface respectively intersect the discharge edge at locations which register with the respective channels of the other surface to shield each jet from a given surface from impact by fluid discharged from the other surface. The resulting series of jets are discharged in relativelyintersecting planes but are relatively interdigitated to avoid interference with each other, or if desired, the relative positions of the channels may be adjusted or varied to achieve quite wide variations in the resulting spray patterns and characteristics.

Preferred embodiments of the invention for achieving the foregoing as well as other incidental objects and advantages are illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevation of a spray head of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of the recessed portion of the spray head by which the spray is formed and discharged;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged sectional view on the line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view similar to FIGURE 2 showing a modification of the invention; and

FIGURES 5 and 6 respectively are perspective views similar to FIGURE 4 but showing still further modifications.

In the detailed description of the drawings which follows, the invention and its various components will be described in rather specific terminology, but without any intention of restricting the scope of the invention other than as required by the terms of the appended claims. It will be readily apparent that the invention is capable of other and different embodiments such as will be obvious to persons of ordinary skill in the art.

Referring now in detail to the accompanying drawings, the spray head there illustrated as adapted for formation by usual plastic molding process in the'form of a unitary homogenous plastic body 10 which, in the form shown, is adapted for use either as the actuating button and discharge head for an aerosol dispenser or as the actuating means and discharge head for a conventional dispensing pump. To this end, the illustrated spray head may be conveniently formed to provide an upwardly-presented surface in the form of a finger piece 11 adapted for actuation by finger pressure. As is customary, the body 10 is formed to provide a blind socket 12 opening thereinto through its lower end and adapted for snug fluid-tight frictional reception of a conduit such as 13 through which fluid from a suitable container is delivered into the socket for subsequent discharge through the discharge opening or recess 14. As above indicated, the conduit 13 may exemplify either the upper end of a hollow pump plunger of a conventional dispensing pump or the tubular valve stem of an aerosol valve.

The discharge opening or recess 14 is closed at its inner end and communicates with the atmosphere exteriorly of the spray head through its open end or mouth.

The closed inner end or bottom of the recess is formed to define a ridge generally designated 15, defined by oppositely-inclined or sloping deflecting surfaces 15a and 15b converging outwardly toward the mouth of the recess.

-The apex of the ridge 15 defined by the converging surfaces forms a preferably-rectilinear discharge edge 15c.

Preferably the surfaces 15a and 15b are disposed symmetrically to a plane of symmetry which, in the preferred embodiment, vertically bisects the recess 14, midway between fluid discharge orifices 16a, 16b respectively, opening into the recess 14 through its opposite side walls. These orifices are located and oriented to discharge jets of pressurized fluid in generally-opposite directions into the recess and against the respective deflecting surfaces 15a and 15b at locations on these surfaces remote from the discharge edge 15c. Preferably the orifices 16a and 16b are in the form of narrow vertical slits, each coextensive with the adjacent end of its associated deflecting surface, and said surface in turn defines one of the elon gated edges of the slit-like orifice.

Preferably the orientation of the orifices 16a and 16b with respect to the surfaces 15a and 15b is such that the jets of fluid impact or impinge against the respective surfaces at acute angles in locations closely adjacent the respective orifices so that the jets of fluid thus tend to fan out over the respective surfaces while at the same time being subdivided or atomized by their impact. The resulting sheet-like streams of spray then move outwardly and are discharged over the discharge edge 150. The respective surfaces 150: and 15b are preferably concavely curved about axes of curvature generally parallel to the edge 15c and are intersected substantially tangentially by the fluid jets or streams so that the resulting centrifugal action will continue the vertical spreading or fanning of the streams on these surfaces until they are discharged over the discharge edge 150.

The deflecting surfaces 15a and 15b preferably are formed as depressed fan-shaped areas in the bottom or inner end of recess 14, and each such surface is bounded on opposite sides by opposed walls 17-17, which diverge outwardly from the orifices 16a and 16b to their intersections with the discharge edge 15c and confine the streams of liquid between them. These streams, by virtue of intersecting each other at an angle, Will be caused further to disintegrate into still smaller particles and to merge as a generally-flat fan-like stream projected outwardly and forwardly of the recess in the plane of symmetry of the ridge or mixer 15.

For supplying pressurized fluid to the orifices or nozzles 16a and 161), these orifices constitute the discharge ends of passages which communicate with the socket 12 so that fluid delivered into the socket through the supply tube 13 will be delivered simultaneously into the orifices 16a and 16b. In the illustrated arrangement, such passages include grooves 16 formed in the inner wall of the socket 12 for conducting fluid from the blind upper end of the socket downwardly and externally of the tube 12 to the inner ends of the respective orifices.

In the use of the spray head, it will thus be readily apparent that, by virtue of the convergent and symmetrical relation of the deflecting surfaces 15a and 15b, the streams of liquid issuing from the orifices 16a and 16b will be caused to spread out in fan-like fiat sheets moving at high velocity over the surfaces and will intersect each other at the time of discharge from ridge 15 approximating a sheet-like form, such as to facilitate its application in the form of a coating to a selected surface by sweeping the resulting sheet of spray over the surface transversely to its line of intersection with the surface.

In the preferred embodiment thus described, the concentration of the spray particles in a relatively-thin sheet may not always be desired. On the contrary, it may be desirable in some instances to provide a spray pattern which is still capable of providing a generally-elongated spray pattern, but which may have a substantially-greater thickness, as for instance where it is desired to apply the spray at a greater volumetric rate, all as shown in FIG- URE 4.

In order to adapt the invention for this purpose, the respective surfaces 150a and 1501) may each be provided with multiple grooves or ribs 153a and 1531) of inverted V cross section defining fluid channels 151. The grooves or channels of each such surface are formed to intersect the discharge edge 1500 of the ridge 140 and to extend inwardly therefrom in generally-parallel relation toward the respective orifices 160a and 1601;. Although the channels in each surface are thus generally described as substantially parallel, it will be appreciated that, in the embodiment illustrated, they preferably tend to curve outwardly in substantially a fan shape, the curvature increasing from the center of the leading edge 15% outwardly toward the ends thereof so that the grooves may positively guide the fluid in its outwardly-fanning or spreading action while forming same into a series or" separate jets which are discharged over the edge 1500.

The two series of channels 151 are relatively offset so that the channels of each surface intersect the edge 15tlc at locations between the channels of the other surface. The discharge mouths of the channels of each surface will be in registry with the ribs of the other surface. Thus the guide ribs 153:: and 1531) will divert the fluid from each surface to avoid interference with the fluid discharged from the other surface. Thus, the offset relationship of the channels and guide ribs will cause each jet discharged from one surface to pass between relatively-adjoining jets issuing from the other surf-ace, the entire discharge thus being in the form of interdigitated fiuid jets diverging in a pattern generally corresponding to the angle of divergence of surfaces a and 15%, adjacent the discharge edge of the mixer or ridge 150. If desired, in order to retain at least a portion of the atomizing action resulting from impact of two relatively angularly-discharged sheets of fluid, the channels and ribs may be applied only along selected portions or segments of the deflector surfaces, while the intervening portions thereof may be formed of smooth configuration.

Furthermore, it will be apparent that the relationships of the channels and guide ribs of the opposite charges of the ridge 15f) may be slightly shifted or varied from the non-intersecting relation shown in FIGURE 4 to either wholly or partially intersecting relation for achieving variations in the desired characteristics of the spray.

Thus, for instance in FIGURE 5, there is shown a modified disposition of the channels, here designated 151]), in which the outlet ends or discharge ends of the respective channels of each surface of the ridge 150 are in complete registry with and thus intersect those of the other surface. Thus, the streams of liquid discharged from these channels will be arranged in relatively-intersecting pairs for atomizing each other.

In the further modification shown in FIGURE 6, the arrangement is generally similar to that of FIGURES 4 and 5 except that the grooves or channels, here designated 151e, on opposite sides of the ridge 150 are arranged with their discharge ends in but partially-registering or intersecting relation; so that a part only of the stream of fluid discharged from each channel of one face of the ridge will intersect part only of the stream from a channel on the other face or surface. The remaining or non-intersecting portions of the respective streams will remain somewhat concentrated, while the intersecting portions thereof will be atomized; and by adjusting the relative proportions of the intersecting and non-intersecting stream portions, it will be possible to achieve wide variations in the density, distribution and other characteristics of the resulting spray.

While the foregoing specification and drawings disclose but a limited number of modifications of the invention, it will be apparent that the invention is subject to still further variations comprehended within the scope of the accompanying claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A spray head comprising a body formed with a blind socket of circular cross section for snug fluid-tight reception of a supply conduit for delivering pressurized fluid into said socket, and with a recess having a closed inner end and a mouth opening outwardly to the exterior of the body, said inner end of the recess defining a ridge directed outwardly toward the mouth of the recess and including oppositely-sloping deflecting surfaces, each said surface intersecting a side wall of said recess at a location spaced inwardly from the mouth thereof, said body being formed with relatively-spaced orifices opening into said recess from opposite sides thereof at the respective intersections of said surfaces with the side walls of the recess, said orifices communicating with said socket to receive pressurized fluid therefrom and being oriented to discharge jets of pressurized fluid in generally-opposite directions against the respective said surface.

2. A spray head as defined in claim 1, in which said recess has marginal walls extending from each said orifice to the opposite ends of said ridge on opposite sides of the respective surfaces.

3. A spray head as defined in claim 2, in which said deflecting surfaces and orifices are arranged symmetrically to a plane of symmetry which bisects said recess.

4. A spray head as defined in claim 2, in which said orifices respectively open into said socket at locations therein remote from the blind end of said socket, and constitute portions of passages which also include grooves formed in the inner wall of said socket and which extend from said orifices respectively toward said blind end.

5. A spray head as defined in claim 3, in which said deflecting surfaces intersect each other in said plane of symmetry to define a forwardly-directed discharge edge for fluid directed across said deflecting surfaces from the respective orifices, said plane of symmetry being equidistantly spaced from the said orifices and disposed normally to an imaginary line interconnecting the same.

6. A spray head as defined in claim 3, in which the relatively-remote ends of said deflecting surfaces are disposed at locations inwardly of the recess from the respective orifices, and said surfaces are similarly concavely curved outwardly from their inner ends, with the outer ends of the respective surfaces converging toward each other at an acute angle.

7. A spray head as defined in claim 1, in which each of said deflecting surfaces is formed with a series of fluid guide ribs extending substantially from the outwardlydirected extremities of said surfaces toward the orifices associated with the respective surfaces and defining between said ribs of each surface a series of fluidguide channels, said channels of each surface having their outwardly-directed ends in registry with the ridges of the other said surface to discharge the fiuid from each of the deflecting surfaces in a series of jets which pass between the jets issuing from the other deflecting surface.

8. A spray head as defined in claim 7, in which said ribs and passages respectively are of V shape in cross section.

9. A spray head as defined in claim 1, in which each of said deflecting surfaces is formed with a series of fluid guide ribs extending substantially from the outwardlydirected extremities of said surfaces toward the orifices associated With the respective surfaces and defining between said ribs of each surface a series of fluid guide channels, said channels of each surface having their outwardlydirected ends in registry with the channels of the other said surface to discharge the fluid from each of the deflecting surfaces in a series of jets which intersect the jets issuing from the other deflecting surface.

10. A spray head as defined in claim 1, in which each of said deflecting surfaces is formed with'a series of fluid guide ribs extending substantially from the outwardly-directed extremities of said surfaces toward the orifices associated with the respective surfaces and defining between said ribs of each surface a series of fluid guide channels, said channels of each surface having portions only of their outwardly-directed ends in registry with the ridges of the other said surface to discharge the fluid from each of the deflecting surfaces in a series of jets, portions of which intersect and other portions of which pass between the jets issuing from the other deflecting surface.

11. An integrally-constructed unitary spray head, comprising a body of homogeneous material formed to define a blind socket of circular cross section for snug fluidtight reception of a supply conduit for delivering pressurized fluid into the socket, said body further being formed with a recess having a mouth open to the exterior of the body and a closed inner end, a portion of said closed inner end sloping inwardly of the recess from its mouth and intersecting a side wall of said recess at a location spaced inwardly from the mouth thereof, said body being formed with a passage establishing communication between said socket and said recess, one end of said passage comprising a slit-like fluid discharge orifice opening into said recess at said intersection, said portion of the inner end defining an edge of said orifice and said orifice being oriented to discharge pressurized fluid at an acute angle onto said portion for outward deflection by said portion.

12. A spray head as defined in claim 11, in which said portion of the closed inner end of the recess is concave in a plane which includes said orifice, and said orifice is oriented to discharge fluid generally tangentially onto said portion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,874,848 8/1932 Babb 239-601 X 2,508,722 4/1950 Gothard 239543 X 2,789,012 4/1957 Bretz 239-573 2,989,251 6/1961 A'bplanalp et al. 239-573 X FOREIGN PATENTS 577,048 5/ 1933 Germany.

M. HENSON WOOD, JR., Primary Examiner. VAN C. WILKS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1874848 *Jun 15, 1931Aug 30, 1932Babb Walter AAtomizing oil burner
US2503722 *Nov 16, 1943Apr 11, 1950Richard WunnFog nozzle
US2789012 *Apr 7, 1955Apr 16, 1957Delta Dynamics IncValve mechanism for dispensing apparatus
US2989251 *Jul 5, 1957Jun 20, 1961Precision Valve CorpCombined valve stem and operating button for pressure packed materials
DE577048C *Jan 10, 1932May 24, 1933Alfred HellDuese fuer Filtermaterial-Strahlwaescher
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3603537 *Sep 2, 1969Sep 7, 1971Lissaman Peter B SInduced air displacement control of flying objects
US4177927 *Dec 14, 1977Dec 11, 1979Simmons Thomas RApparatus for shaping and positioning fluid dispersal patterns
US4823409 *Jan 13, 1987Apr 25, 1989Kohler Co.Waterflow
US4886210 *May 25, 1988Dec 12, 1989Kohler Co.Sheet flow spout
US5094884 *Apr 24, 1990Mar 10, 1992Machine Technology, Inc.Photoresist
WO2013139810A1 *Mar 19, 2013Sep 26, 2013Fmp Technology Gmbh Fluid Measurements & ProjectsDevice and method for spray coating an object with a hot-melt adhesive
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/520, 239/523, 239/521, 239/543, 239/601, 239/590.5
International ClassificationB05B1/26, B65D83/16, B05B1/04, B65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/26, B65D83/20, B05B1/04, B65D83/7535
European ClassificationB65D83/20, B65D83/7535, B05B1/26
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 6, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: CALMAR, INC., 333 SOUTHL TURNBULL CANYON ROAD, CIT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:DIAMOND INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004199/0053
Effective date: 19831118
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DIAMOND INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004199/0053