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Publication numberUS3365228 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1968
Filing dateMay 13, 1965
Priority dateMay 13, 1965
Publication numberUS 3365228 A, US 3365228A, US-A-3365228, US3365228 A, US3365228A
InventorsHay George L
Original AssigneeGeorge L. Hay
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container holder
US 3365228 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 23, 1968 G HAY CONTAINER HOLDER Filed May 13, 1965 United States Patent 3,365,228 CQNTAINER HOLDER George L. Hay, 10517 Wyatt St., Dallas County, Tex. 75218 Filed May 13, 1965, Ser. No. 455,381 10 Claims. (Cl. 29431.2)

The present invention relates to receptacle holders. In a more specific aspect the present invention relates to holders for releasably holding generally-cylindrical containers and the like.

In the prior art it has been customary to provide receptacle holders which are permanently fixed to the container or at least require tools, such as screwdrivers or pliers to effect attachment. In those few devices where the receptacle is releasably held rather than fixedly attached the clamping or holding power of the holder is dependent primarily on the force which the operator utilizes when applying the holder. Moreover, when the pressure of application is released in such devices the holder usually holds the receptacle with less force than that applied. This, of course, often results in the holder slipping off the receptacle accidentally particularly when more weight is added. Finally, such prior art devices are either of a character such that the receptacle is held at a fixed location or such that the receptacle can be transported but none are readily adapted to both modes of use.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved receptacle holder.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved holder for generally-cylindrical containers.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved receptacle holder adapted to be releasably attached to the receptacle.

Another and further object of the present invention is to provide an improved receptacle holder which is easily attached to the receptacle.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide an improved receptacle holder which is adapted to easy and ready attachment and detachment at plural locations.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved receptacle holder which is adapted to use at a fixed location or to transport the receptacle with equal facility.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved receptacle holder Whose holding power is increased when the weight of the receptacle bears on the holder.

A yet further object of the present invention is to provide an improved receptacle holder whose holding power increases as the weight of the contents of the receptacle is increased.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is atop plan view of one form of receptacle holder in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the holder of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a bottom view of the holder of FIG- URE 1;

FIGURE 4 is an exploded plan View of the clamping means of the holder of the present invention;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevational View of a modified form of the holder of the present invention;

FIGURE 6 is a front elevational view of a pair of still another modified form of the holders of the present invention in use as a receptacle carrier;

FIGURE 7 is a side elevational view of the carrier of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a front elevational view of a modified handle for the carrier of FIGURE 6; and

FIGURE 9 is still another version of the holders of the present invention assembled for use as a receptacle carrier.

The device of the present invention is made up of two basic components, namely, the clamping means or ring 10 and the hook means or bracket 12. At least part of ring 10 is made of a material having a limited ability to stretch and then return to its original size. It may therefore be made of a plastic having a limited elasticity. In FIGURES 1 through 3, inclusive, bracket 12 is shown attached to a board or other support 14. It is quite obvious, however, that bracket 12 may be attached to a wall by screws or other appropriate fastening means. As shown in the figures, bracket 12 is attached to support 14 by means of appropriate bolts and nuts '16 and 18, respectively. Bracket 12 comprises a main upright section 20, which is generally of a flat broad configuration. Near the top of upright section 20, or at least above the center of the bracket is a horizontally-disposed, semi-circular depression or channel 22. Channel 22 is formed in the back side of upright 20. The purpose of this channel will be pointed out hereinafter. The top of bracket 20 extends generally horizontally from upright portion 20 and outwardly from support 14 to form horizontal top portion 24. The free end of horizontal top portion 24 is bent up- Wardly to form broad, horizontally-disposed lip 26. Lip 26, for reasons which will be pointed out hereinafter, is bent inwardly toward support 14 to thereby form an acute angle with planes passing through upright plate 20 and support 14. In any event, horizontal top portion 24 and lip 26 form a broad, horizontally-disposed hook extending outwardly from upright 20. Bottom section 28 of bracket 12 also extends outwardly from support 14 and in a generally horizontal direction. In a preferred arrangement bottom section 28 is inclined downwardly a slight amount. Formed on the top surface of base portion 28 is a stop or boss 30. Stop 30 may be punched out of the base, stamped from the base, welded to the base as a separate element or formed in any other manner on the base portion. Elastic ring 10, as particularly shown in FIGURE 4 of the drawings, is made up of a plastic tube 32 or other material having the ability to stretch slightly. The ends of tube 32, being flexible and otherwise adapted to conform to any configuration either of the can or of the bracket is held together at its ends by means of wire 34 which has an outwardly projecting olfset 36 generally of a shape and a size to fit loosely over lip 26 of bracket 12. Tubing 32 thus being resilient and flexible fits over the ends of wire 34 to thereby form a closed loop 10 with an exteriorly projecting offset or channel 36. The tubing 32 may be attached to wire 34 by adhesive and preferably the butted ends of tubing 32 are held together by adhesive. The means of attaching the tube 32 to the wire 34 may also be by frictional engagement or by spines forms on the wire. Although preferred, the means of forming oifset 36 need not be a wire and the elastic ring 32 need not form the entire ring. As a matter of fact, the ring can be a non-elastic material so long as it will frictionally engage the container to be held. As is shown, in FIGURES 1 through 3, loop 10 fits about the periphery of a can or other cylindrical device shown in outline form as 38 in FIGURE 2. In actual use, loop 10 is slightly smaller than can 38. Because of its resiliency or ability to stretch slightly a tight frictional engagement of loop 10 about can 38 is obtained. The loop 16) is placed on the can at or above its center, although the loop could be placed below the center of the can if the center of gravity of the can and its contents are below the center of the can or below the spot where the loop is attached to the can. Thus it is to be seen that an easily replaced or attachable holder can be placed upon a can or other receptacle without the necessity of utilizing tools or any other type of attaching devices. The can 38 with loop 10 attached thereto is then hooked over lip 26 of bracket 12 by inserting lip 26 through offset channel 36 of loop 10. The fact that lip 26 has an interior bend therein simply permits the loop 10 to hold onto the lip more securely and prevent accidental dislodgement when manipulating the container. However, this inward bending of lip 26 also forms an outwardly protruding bump or detent 40. When loop 10 is placed over lip 26 the weight of can 38 tends to pull the top of the can 38 and loop 10 away from the top of bracket 12, in other words, the can turns on a center of rotation at channel 36 and the bottom of the can is rotate-d toward support 14 about detent 40 thereby tightening loop 10 about the can and the hook portion. This tightening of loop 10 about can 338 is in addition to the frictional engagement caused by the sliding of a slightly smaller loop 10 over a can 38 and also increases as the weight in the can increases. Generally, if can 38 were free to move at its bottom, it would rotate all the way to contact with support 14. However, because of the existence of horizontal bottom section 28, the bottom of can 38 swings into and rests on bottom 28 and against stop 30. Stop 36, being comparatively shallow although adequate to hold the can upright, permits one to raise the can slightly so that its bottom clears the stop and then swing the can inwardly against upright 20. This tilting of the can thus permits one to observe the contents of the can and permits easier access to the can. The fact that lip 26 is bent toward upright serves to prevent loop 10 from becoming unhooked during the tilting and righting operations. Thus, it is obvious that a simple and efi'icient way of attaching a can or other receptacle to a bracket has been provided in which relatively few and inexpensive parts are necessary and which requires no tools or other means for attachment of the can.

While FIGURES 1 through 3 show bracket '12 to be made of sheet metal, it is quite obvious that the brackets shown in FIGURES 1 through 3 could be made of a suitable rigid, or semi-rigid plastic material. FIGURE 5 of the drawings illustrates a molded plastic bracket 42. Bracket 42 has an upright body section 44, a channel or horizontally-disposed semi-circular groove 46, and holes 48 and 50, respectively, bored, punched or otherwise formed in the back section 44 for attachment of the bracket to the wall or otherwise. Protruding outwardly from back section 44 is generally-horizontal top portion 52. Projecting upwardly from top portion 52 is horizontally-disposed, broad lip 54. Lip 54 has formed. on its front or outward surface detent or bulge 56 which is generally horizontal and generally of the same shape as would be produced by bending a lip such as lip 28 of FIGURES 1 through 3 back toward the back plate 44. It is also to be observed that lip 54 can have a substantially vertical or straight backside 58 with a horizontal channel formed therein to serve essentially the same purpose as the bend of lip 26. Accordingly, so long as detent 56 permits the can or other receptacle held on the bracket to rotate over detent 56 the back 58 may be straight or inclined inwardly toward the back plate 44 or be straight and have a channel formed therein. The bottom of bracket 42 comprises a generally-horizontal bottom 60. Horizontal bottom 60 may have a curved cutout formed on its free protruding edge to accommodate the round outside surface of a container, as will be explained in more detail later, and in addition to this cutout or in place of the cutout it may have a stop 62 formed inwardly from the edge of bottom 60 and extending above the top surface of bottom section 60. Stop 62 provides a stop against which the can or other receptacle rests thereby permitting the bottom of the can or other receptacle to rest upon the fiat top surface of bottom section 60.

The primary purpose of the stop element 62 shown in the drawings is better illustrated by FIGURES 6 and 7 where the brackets are utilized as a carrier for cans or other receptacles. In accordance with FIGURES 6 and 7, two brackets 64 and 66, respectively, are shown. Brackets 64 and 66 are made up of upright back portions 68 and 70, respectively. Upright 68 has formed near its upper end a channel or a depression 72 and upright 76 has a similar channel '74 formed in its back surface. Channels 72 and 74 thus form a complete circle when brackets 64 and 66 are placed back to back and bolted together by means of bolts 76 and 78. Other channel configurations are also possible and roughening to form a gripping surface can be resorted to. Before completing the bolting together of back sections 68 and 70, a generally U-shaped or half trapezoid handle section 80 is clamped between brackets 64 and 66 and held in place by the pressure applied by bolts '76 and 78. Handle 80 is made up of a generally-horizontal bottom leg 82, a generally-vertical upright section 84 and a generally-horizontal second leg or section 86. Passing over leg 86 to facilitate the carrying and holding of handle 80 is tubular plastic hand-hold 88. Hand-hold 88 may be of substantially the same character and of the same material as loop 32 but is preferably a more rigid plastic. Brackets 64 and 66 have their upper ends bent outwardly horizontally to form horizontal top elements 90 and 92, respectively. At the ends of top elements 96 and 92 are upwardly protruding lips 94 and 96, respectively. Lips 94 and 96 are bent inwardly to form an acute angle with back plates 68 and 70 to thereby form detents or protuberances 98 and 100 respectively. Brackets 64 and 66 have outwardly projecting horizontal bottom sections 102 and 104, respectively. Punched out of bottomsections 102 and 104, and pro jecting upwardly therefrom at a point which is preferably inside the outer free edge of bottoms 102 and 104,-are stop elements 106 and 108. It is quite obvious by observing FIGURE 7 that by placing two brackets 64 and 66 back to back, inserting handle 80 and then hanging a pair of cans and 112 on brackets 64 and 66, respectively, by means of rings (not shown), the brackets 64 and 66 can be utilized as a carrier for cans 110 and 112. When using brackets 64 and 66 as a carrier for a can or a receptacle, stops 106 and 108 serve as a stop to hold cans 110 and 112 in a generally vertical position. These stops would not be necessary if the material being transported did not have a tendency to spill from the can since cans 106 and 108 would simply hang at an angle with the bottom outer edges of the cans against the back plates 68 and 70. Also, where brackets 64 and 66 are to be used as a carrier, the bottoms 102 and 104 serve as a support with bottoms of the cans 110 and 112.

FIGURE 8 of the drawings illustrates another form of handle which is actually made up of two sections of the handle 89 of FIGURES 6 and 7. In accordance with FIG- URE 8, the handle is made up of U-section 114 and U- section 116, respectively, forming a trapezoidal configuration. U-sections 114 and 116 comprise horizontal bottom legs 118 and 120, respectively, generally-horizontal bases 122 and 124 and generally-horizontal upper legs 126 and 128. Legs 118 and are held together by a tubular plastic sleeve 130 and legs 126 and 128 are held together by sleeve 132. After U-shaped sections 114 and 116 are put together to form a generally rectangular handle, this handle is clamped between four back to back brackets, in substantially the same manner as the half handle shown in FIGURES 6 and 7, to thereby act as a carrier for four cans. The two brackets on each side of the handle could, of course, be a single unit with two hooks.

FIGURE 9 shows a modified version of the brackets of the present invention which are adapted to be used as a carrier in a slightly different arrangement. In accordance with FIGURE 9, four brackets 134, 136, 138 and 140 are formed. These brackets are of substantially the same vertical profile as bracket 12 of FIGURE 2. Thus, they comprise base elements 142, 144, 146 and 148, respectively. Extending upwardly from the base elements is upright 150, 152, 154 and 156. The uprights terminate at their upper ends in horizontal sections 158, 160, 162 and 154, respectively. Projecting upwardly from the horizontal upper sections are lips 166, 168, 170 and 172. Brackets 134 and 136 are clamped back to back by bolts 174 and 176. Brackets 138 and 140 are then clamped against the sides of brackets 134 and 136 and clamped together by means of bolts 178 and 180. Thus, four subtantially equivalent brackets may be clamped back to back in such a manner as to act as a carrier for four cans. In order to accommodate the handle the brackets shown in FIGURE 9 have vertically-disposed depressions or channels of semi-circular nature formed in their backs so as to form a circle 182. Within circle 182 one may clamp a vertically-disposed round rod which terminates at its upper end in an appropriate T, loop or other hand-hold configuration. Brackets 134, 136, 138 and 140 show in plan view the concave or cutout edges of the bases which were mentioned in connection with FIGURE 5. These cutouts can be formed on any of the brackets described and simply serve to receive the outside surface of a can or the like if it is not desired that the bottom of the can rest on the base of the bracket. The cutouts may be in place of or in addition to the stops, thus making the brackets usable in either fashion.

It should be recognized that numerous other arrangements of multiple brackets, of the character shown in FIGURE 9, may be provided. For example a center core structure of square, hexagonal, octagonal or other configuration can be used for the attachment of a plurality of brackets in a generally back-to-back association. In addition, the handle can be mounted in the core or otherwise mounted and can rotate. The handle or an appropriate suspending element may be hung from a fixed element and the can holding brackets rotated in Lazy Susan fashion. Likewise, a rotatable base may be formed on the bottom of the core to serve the same purpose when the unit is sitting on or attached to a horizontal surface.

While specific structures have been described and specific variations suggested, it is to be recognized that these have been cited by way of example only. Accordingly, the present invention is to be limited only by the appended claims.

Iclaim:

ii. A holder for releasably holding a generally-cylindrical container comprising:

(a) bracket means; including, a generally-flat rectangular upright portion whose upper end is generally narrower than its bottom end, said upright having a semicircular channel formed in the back thereof at a transverse location above the center of said upright, said upright also having a pair of holes formed therethrough above and below said channel and adapted to permit a fastening means to pass therethrough; a hook portion diverging forwardly from said upper end of said upright and curving upwardly and thence rearwardly toward said upright portion, thereby forming a transverse forwardly projecting first protuberance on the forwardmost surface of said hook portion and a generally upstanding tab section; a base portion flaring forwardly from said bottom end of said upright and terminating in a concave edge adapted to generally conform to the outer surface of said container; and a second protuberance formed on the upper surface of said base portion having a generally-straight, vertical front edge and located slightly closer to said upright than the forwardmost extension of said first protuberance; and

(b) clamp means; including, a flexible tube having a limited degree of elasticity and of a predetermined length; and a junction wire, having a diameter slightly smaller than the bore through said tube, whereby the ends of said tube may he slid over the ends of said wire and held together by said wire to form a generally-circular loop, said wire also having a broad channel formed therein on the interior of said loop which is slightly larger than the breadth of said tab section of said hook portion;

(-0) said loop formed by said wire and said tube being slightly smaller than said container whereby forcibly passing said loop over said container causes said loop to frictionally and elastically engage said oontainer and passing said tab through said channel in said loop frictionally and elastically engages said tab between the inner surface of said channel and the outer surface of said container due to the weight of said container;

(d) said base portion being spaced from said hook portion a distance suflicient to permit the bottom of said container to rest on said base with the side of said container in contact with said vertical portion of said second protuberance when said loop is in a first position on said container and to permit said concave edge of said base portion to contact and support the side of said container when said loop is in a second higher position on said container.

2. A holder-carrier for releasably holding and carrying generally-cylindrical containers comprising:

(a) a plurality of bracket means; each including, a

generally-flat rectangular upright portion whose upper end is generally wider than its bottom end, said upright having a semicircular channel formed in the back thereof at a transverse location above the center of said upright, said upright also having a pair of holes formed therethrough above and below said channel and adapted to permit a fastening means to pass therethrough; a hook portion diverging for- Wardly from said upper end of said upright and curving upwardly and thence rearwardly toward said upright portion, thereby forming a transverse forwardly projecting first protuberance on the forwardmost surface of said hook portion and a generally upstanding tab section; a base portion flaring forwardly from said bottom end of said upright and terminating in a concave edge adapted to generally conform to the outer surface of said container; and a second protuberance formed on the upper surface of said base portion having a generally-straight, vertical front edge and located slightly closer to said upright than the forwardrnost extension of said first protuberance;

(b) a plurality of clamp means equal in number to the number of bracket means; each including, a flexible tube having a limited degree of elasticity and of a predetermined length; and a junction wire, having a diameter slightly smaller than the bore through said tube, whereby the ends of said tube may he slid over the ends of said wire and friction-ally held together by said wire to form a generally-circular loop, said Wire also having a broad channel formed therein on the interior of said loop which is slightly larger than the breadth of said tab section of said hook portion;

(0) said loop formed by said wire and said tube being slightly smaller than said container whereby forcibly passing said loop over said container causes said loop to frictionally and elastically engage said container and passing said tab through said channel in said loo-p frictionally and elastically engages said tab between the inner surface of said channel and the outer surface of said container due to the weight of said container;

(d) said base portion being spaced from said hook portion a distance sufficient to permit the bottom of said container to rest on said base with the side of said container in contact with said vertical portion or" said second protuberance when said loop is in a first position on said container and to permit said concave edge of said base portion to contact and support the side of said container when said loop is in a second higher position on said container;

(e) a pair of horizontally-disposed, generally U-shaped handle elements having top leg portions and bottom leg portions joined by upright portions;

(f) a top tubular element passing over the free ends of said top legs and holding said legs in end to end engagement to form a hand hold;

(g) a bottom tube element passing over the free ends of the said bottom legs, holding said legs in end to end engagement and adapted to fit within said channels in the backs of said brackets; and

(h) bolt means passing through said brackets and joining said brackets in back to back relationship with at least two of said brackets frictionally clamping said bottom tube within said channels in the backs of said at least two brackets.

3. A holder-carrier for releasably holding and carrying generally-cylindrical containers comprising:

(a) a plurality of bracket means; each including a genorally-flat rectangular upright portion whose upper end is generally wider than its bottom end, said upright having a semicircular channel formed in the back thereof at a transverse location above the center of said upright, said upright also having a pair of holes formed therethrough above and below said channel and adapted to permit a fastening means to pass therethrough; a hook portion diverging forwardly from said upper end of said upright and curving upwardly and thence rearwardly toward said upright portion, thereby forming a transverse forwardly projecting first protuberance on the forwardmost surface of said hook portion and a generally upstanding tab section; a base portion flaring forwardly from said bottom end of said upright and terminating in a concave edge adapted to generally conform to the outer surface of said container; and a second protuberance formed on the upper surface of said base portion having a generally-straight, vertical front edge and located slightly closer to said upright than the forwardmost extension of said first protuberance;

(b) a plurality of clamp means equal in number to the number of bracket means; each including, a flexible tube having a limited degree of elasticity and of a predetermined length; and a junction wire, having a diameter slightly smaller than the bore through said tube, whereby the ends of said tube may he slid over the ends of said wire and held together by said wire to form a generally-circular loop, said wire also having a broad channel formed therein on the interior of said loop which is slightly larger than the breadth of said tab section of said hook portion;

(c) said loop formed by said wire and said tube being slightly smaller than said container whereby forcibly passing said loop over said container causes said loop to frictionally and elastically engage said container and passing said tab through said channel in said loop frictionally and elastically engages said tab between the inner surface of said channel and the outer surface of said container due to the weight of said container;

(d) said base portion being spaced from said hook portion a distance sufficient to permit the bottom of said container to rest on said base with the side of said container in contact with said vertical portion of said second protuberance when said loop is in a first position on said container and to permit said concave edge of said base portion to contact and support the side of said container when said loop is in a second higher position on said container;

(e) a horizontally-disposed, generally U-shaped handle element having a long top leg portion and a short bottom leg portion joined by an upright portion;

(f) a top tubular element frictionally passing over the free end of said top leg to form a hand hold;

(g) a bottom tubular element passing over the free end of said bottom leg and adapted to fit within said channels in the backs of said brackets; and

(h) bolt means passing through said brackets and joining said brackets in back to back relationship with at least two of said brackets frictionally clamping said bottom tube within said channels in the backs of said at least two brackets.

4. A holder-carrier for releasably holding and carrying a generally-cylindrical container comprising:

(a) plurality of bracket means; each including, a generally-flat rectangular upright portion whose upper end is generally wider than its bottom end, said upright having a vertically-disposed, semicircular channel formed in the upper end of the back thereof; said upright also having a pair of holes formed therethrough above and below said channel and adapted to permit a fastening means to pass therethrough; a hook portion diverging forwardly from said upper end of said upright and curving upwardly and thence rearwardly toward said upright portion, thereby forming a transverse forwardly projecting first protuberance on the forwardrnost surface of said hook portion and a generally upstanding tab section; a base portion flaring forwardly from said bottom end of said upright and terminating in a concave edge adapted to generally conform to the outer surface of said container; and a second protuberance formed on the upper surface of said base portion having a generally-straight, vertical front edge and located slightly closer to said upright than the forwardmost extension of said first protuberance;

(b) a plurality of clamp means equal in number to the number of bracket means; each including, a flexible tube having a limited degree of elasticity and of a predetermined length; and a junction wire, having a diameter slightly smaller than the bore through said tube, whereby the ends of said tube may he slid over the ends of said wire and held together by said wire to form a generally-circular loop; said wire also having a broad channel formed therein on the interior of said loop which is slightly larger than the breadth of said tab section of said hook portion;

(c) said loop formed by said wire and said tube being slightly smaller than said container whereby forcibly passing said loop over said container causes said loop to frictionally and elastically engage said container and passing said tab through said channel in said loop frictionally and elastically engages said tab between the inner surface of said channel and the outer surface of said container due to the weight of said container;

(d) said base portion being spaced from said hook portion a distance sufiicient to permit the bottom of said container to rest on said base with the side of said container in contact with said vertical portion of said second protuberance when said loop is in a first position on said container and to permit said concave edge of said base portion to contact and support the side of said container when said loop is in a second higher position on said container;

(e) handle means; including, a hand hold portion, and a straight cylindrical end portion spaced from said hand hold portion and adapted to fit within said channels in the backs of said brackets; and

(f) bolt means passing through said brackets and joining said brackets in back to back relationship with at least two of said brackets frictionally clamping said straight end portion of said handle means within 9 said channels in the backs of said at least two brackets.

5. A holder for releasably holding a container comprising:

(a) a single elastic clamp means adapted to frictionally and elastically engage the outer surface of said container comprising a flexible tube having a limited degree of elasticity with its ends joined by a wire passing into the bore of said tube, and

(b) bracket means having a forwardly projecting hook portion adapted to have said clamp means passed over said hook portion and said hook portion to pass between said clamp means and said container and be frictionally and elastically held therebetween.

6. A holder for releasably holding a container, comprising;

(a) bracket means comprising a vertically-disposed upright portion, a horizontally-disposed portion projecting outwardly from the lower end of said upright portion and having a flat upper surface to receive a straight-sided container, and a forwardly projecting protuberance extending outwardly from the upper end of said upright portion and adapted to hold the straight side of a container away from said upright portion; and

(b) a single elastic clamp means, adapted to frictionally and elastically engage the outer surface of a container, mounted on said bracket at a point slightly above said protuberance;

(c) said protuberance and a container cooperating to rock a container being held about said protuberance, thereby swinging the lower end thereof inwardly toward said upright portion and tightening said elastic clamp means.

7. A holder in accordance with claim 6 wherein a plurality of said holders are arranged in back-to-back relationship and the combination additionally includes fastening means adapted to join said brackets together in back-to-back relationship and handle means mounted on said plurality of joined brackets.

8. A holder in accordance with claim 6 wherein the base portion has formed on its upper surface, at a point slightly closer to the back of the bracket than the forwardmost extension of said hook portion, a protuberance having a generally-vertical forward edge.

9'. A holder in accordance with claim 6 wherein the clamp means includes a flexible tube having a limited degree of elasticity.

10. A holder in accordance with claim 5 wherein the Wire has formed therein a broad channel, slightly larger than the breadth of the hook means, formed adjacent and center; and, when said wire joins the ends of said tube to form a loop, a similar channel is formed in the interior of said loop.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,406,334 8/1946 Keller 3483l1 2,613,860 10/1952 Hellman 224--45.4 3,073,493 1/1963 Pfafenberger 294-31.2 X 3,202,309 8/1965 Simpson 29432 X GERALD M. FORLENZA, Primary Examiner.

HUGO O. SCHULZ, Examiner.

G. F. ABRAHAM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2406334 *Jun 21, 1944Aug 27, 1946Cons Vultee Aircraft CorpBracket for supporting oxygen bottles or the like
US2613860 *Jan 22, 1951Oct 14, 1952Hoffman Frank AHolder and carrier for containers
US3073493 *May 18, 1960Jan 15, 1963Edward PfaffenbergerHolder for containers
US3202309 *Mar 23, 1964Aug 24, 1965Simpson Walter MCarrying device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3884439 *Nov 26, 1973May 20, 1975Atlantic Prod CorpGolf bag cradle-bracket
US4032031 *Oct 12, 1976Jun 28, 1977K And M Rubber CompanyPlastic drum with lift ring
US4993611 *Oct 28, 1988Feb 19, 1991Rocco LongoBeverage container support
US5139222 *Sep 9, 1991Aug 18, 1992Douglas KooreyBeverage container holding apparatus
US5163648 *Oct 18, 1990Nov 17, 1992Schneider Michael GFishing bait bucket holder
US5328143 *Jun 8, 1993Jul 12, 1994Douglas KooreyBeverage container holding apparatus with promotional display
US6422400 *Jul 3, 2000Jul 23, 2002Kirk M. HallamBrimmed cap storage and display device
US7156353 *Jul 25, 2003Jan 2, 2007News America Marketing Properties LlcProduct display device
US8403156 *Dec 10, 2010Mar 26, 2013Ryan K. BooneCanister organizer
WO1993004618A1 *Jun 15, 1992Mar 18, 1993Douglas KooreyBeverage container holding apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification294/31.2, 294/162, 248/311.2, 294/32, 220/23.4, 211/75
International ClassificationA47J47/16, B65B67/00, B65B67/12, A47J47/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B67/12, A47J47/16
European ClassificationA47J47/16, B65B67/12