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Publication numberUS3366118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1968
Filing dateAug 29, 1966
Priority dateAug 29, 1966
Publication numberUS 3366118 A, US 3366118A, US-A-3366118, US3366118 A, US3366118A
InventorsBeyer Lewis R
Original AssigneeLewis R. Beyer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sheet lifter
US 3366118 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 30, 19.68 v y L. R. BEYER 3,366,118

SHEET LIFTER Filed Aug. 29, 1966 l v 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig. '4 IO 29 j INVENTOR. LEWIS R; BEYER ATTORNEYS Jan. 30, 1968 L. R. BEYER 3,366,118

SHEET LIFTER Filed Aug. 29, 1966 2 Sheets-Shee 2 INVENTOR. LEWIS R. BEYER m ww ATTORNEYS United States Patent Ofiice 3,366,118 SHEET LIFTER Lewis R. Beyer, 1853 Huningtou Circle, Brunswick, Ohio 44212 Filed Aug. 29, 1966, Ser. No. 575,825 4 Claims. ((11. 129-4 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A sheet lifter for use with a loose-leaf binder, having apertures for rings along a back edge, a gradually inclined surface extending transversely of the lifter adjacent the back edge and with an abutment at the back edge lower than the top of the inclined surface.

Disclosure This invention relates to the loose-leaf binder art, and more particularly to sheet lifters or followers, which are used to facilitate the closing of loose-leaf binders.

In loose-leaf binders, a sheet lifter is secured to the rings of the binder adjacent each cover. The sheets held by the binder rings are positioned between the two sheet lifters. The function of the sheet lifters is to help move the sheets along the rings when the covers of an open binder are closed. This prevents the sheets from being caught at the base of rings, between the rings and the covers, which tears the apertures and makes it difficult to close the covers.

Many sheet followers or lifters do not perform the intended function correctly and consistently. This is especially true where the lifter is designed so that it can be used with a plurality of different diameter rings, which in standard sizes include 1 /2, 2 and 2 /2 inch diameters. The difficulties experienced with known sheet lifters are accentuated when the binder rings become tarnished, increasing the frictional resistance against sliding of the sheets andlifter to an upper position on the rings when the binder covers are closed.

Typically, sheet lifters are constructed of a fiat blade or body portion with a plurality of apertures along a back edge. These apertures receive the rings of the binder. The back edge of the lifter often includes an offset portion above the blade to provide an abutment surface which acts against the inside surface of the binder ring. In addition, the apertures are usually elongated, extending from adjacent the back edge a short distance across the blade toward the opposite or front edge, and in front of the difset portion. The elongated aperture provides a substantial distance between the offset abutment surface and the far end of the aperture. These two portions are intended to provide pressure points, respectively, against the inside and outside of the associated ring, when the lifters are pivoted upward as the covers are closed. These two pressure points must span a substantial curvature of the ring to assure that the lifter will move about the ring and carry the sheets upward in response to the closing of the binder covers. If the lifter is to be used with different diameter rings, the aperture length must be sufficient to work with the binder ring of largest diameter contemplated.

Several problems have been experienced in using the typical sheet lifter or follower. One problem is that the elongated apertures or slots permit the inside ends of the lifters to overlap, in the area within the rings. As a result, the lifters often interlock or jam centrally of the rings and interfere with the closing of the covers.

A more important but less obvious problem with the known sheet lifters is that they are often not able to effectively use the length of the elongated apertures to span the necessary ring curvature, and therefore fail to function as intended. The reason for this is that the holes of the 3,366,1 l8 Patented Jan. 30, 1968 sheets adjacent the lifters, rather than the far ends of the lifter apertures, actually establish the pressure points on the outside of the rings. Thus, the position of these holes defines the effective distance from the abutting surface of the sheet lifter on the inside of the ring. In the initial open position, the holes in the sheets are relatively close to the back edge of the sheet lifter, at the base of the rings. The sheets block the lifter from pivoting to the degree necessary to bring the upper or outer edge of the aperture into contact with the outer surface of the ring to span a large part of the ring circumference. As a result, the lifter pivots very little, Moreover, the effective distance spanned between the inside pressure point on the back edge of the lifter and the outside pressure point at the holes of the paper is too small to cause the lifter and sheets to move about the ring. The sheets are then pinched between the rings and covers if the covers are forced closed. This, of course, tears the sheets above the holes as the cover is forced toward the ring. Only after the sheets are torn do the apertures of the sheet lifter orthe now elongated holes of the paper span a large enough curvature to travel along the ring. This problem is intensified when the binder rings become tarnished because of the significant increase in friction between the rings and sheets, which further retards movement of the sheets about the ring to a proper position.

The present invention overcomes the disadvantages of the prior sheet lifting devices by an arrangement that moves the sheets about the binder rings and outward along the apertures of the sheet lifter in response to the initial pivoting of the lifter as the binder covers are closed. That is, the sheet lifter of the present invention initially slides the sheets to a position farther along each ring and moves the sheets outward along the lifter. As a result, the holes of the sheets are farther from the back edge of the lifter. Thus, the pressure points on the rings become separated to an extent that they span a curvature suflicient to allow the lifter and sheets to travel along the ring in response to further closing of the covers. The exact distance that the sheets are moved relative to the lifter before the lifter moves along the rings depends upon the curvature of the rings and the coefiicient of friction between the rings, the sheets and the lifter, as will be explained in more detail subsequently.

Briefly, the sheet lifter of this invention is formed of an elongated body having a back edge adapted to be located adjacent the rings of a ring binder and front edge that is spaced from the rings and adapted to lie adjacent a cover of the ring binder. The lifter has an elongated fiat portion along the front edge and aplurality of apertures along the back edge. The apertures are elongated tranversely of the elongated body of the lifter. An inclined surface extends from the elongated fiat portion of the lifter and rearward along a major portion of the apertures. This surface contacts the lower edges of sheets in the binder as the sheet lifter is pivoted about the binder rings when the binder covers are closed. The lower edges of the sheets slide transversely across the sheet lifter along this surface and move about the rings. This continues until the distance from (a) the location where the lifter contacts the inside surface of a ring to (b) the location of the associated holes in the sheets encircling the ring adjacent the lifter, spans a curvature of the ring suificient to cause the lifter to slide up the ring in response to further closing of the covers of the binder. With this construction, a single sheet lifter functions in the intended manner with binder rings having a large variation in diameter, including the standard rings of 1 /2, 2 and 2 /2 inch diameter. In addition, the lifters function well even with severely tarnished rings.

An offset back edgeis provided in the lifter of the present invention and a downwardly opening channel positions an abutment surface in proper location to co- 3 operate with the inner surface of the ring to establish the inside pressure point. A rib is provided within this channel to prevent the adjacent lifters within the ring from interlocking with each other. As a result, the lifters cannot become interengaged so as to obstruct closing of the binder covers.

The back edge of the sheet lifter includes recessed portions between adjacent apertures. These recessed portions extend toward the front end of the lifter to a location at least as far forward as the elongated apertures extend. These recesses accommodate additional rings of the binder. As a result, a sheet lifter with three apertures placed to accommodate the standard three ring spacing can also be used with a five ring or seven ring binder. The need for a large number of apertures along the back edge of the lifter is eliminated. Such apertures detract from the overall appearance. Also, a large number of unused holes indicates that the lifter was not designed for the particular binder, although it may be used with it. On the other hand, with three apertures, all of which are used, and recesses to accommodate the additional rings, a lifter is provided which is less obviously adapted for various binders and which is more attractive in appearance.

In addition to the above features, the front edge of the sheet lifter is preferably bevelled in an upward and outward direction, so that a bevelled surface contacts and rides flat against the inside surface of the binder covers. This significantly reduces any tendency of the binder edge from scraping the inside of the covers and reduces the resistance of such contact so that covers may more easily be closed.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved sheet lifter to effectively move the sheets in a ring binder about the rings during closing of the binder covers.

This and other objects, as well as the various features and advantages of this invention will become better understood by reference to the following detailed description, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary end view of a loose leaf binder, showing the position of the sheets and sheet lifter of the present invention when the binder is opened;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary end view of a loose leaf binder showing the positions of the sheets and sheet lifters of the present invention when the binder is closed;

FIGURE 3 is a top plan view of the sheet lifter of the present invention;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse sectional view of the sheet lifter of FIGURE 3, taken along the line 4-4 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURES 5, 6 and 7 are diagrammatic fragmentary end views of three different standard sizes of binder rings, diagrammatically illustrating the manner in which the sheet lifters of the present invention function; and

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary perspective view of a binder, showing one cover in closed position and one cover in opened position, indicating the location of the sheet lifters and associated sheets in each position.

Referring now to the drawings, in particular to FIG- URES l to 4, a preferred embodiment of the sheet lifter of this invention is indicated generally by the reference numeral 10. A loose leaf binder is shown at 12 in FIG- URES 1 and 2. The two sheet lifters shown in FIG- URES 1 and 2 are identical and are provided to lift the sheets of paper 14 that lie against both covers of the binder.

The binder 12 is conventional and includes a backing or spine 16 to which two cover leaves 17, 18 are hinged, as at 19, 20. The binder 12 further includes two or more binder rings 22 (only one of which is shown), each of which comprises two arcuate segments with uppermost portions that mate when the rings are in closed position. The lowermost portions of the rings are connected to a spring mechanism (not shown) to provide the conventional snap-action ring operation. The spring mechanism is housed by a longitudinal cover plate 24 securely attached to the inside surface of the binder backing 16. The cover plate 24 has an outer surface 25 through which the binder rings 22 project. The paper sheets 14 include holes 25 (FIGURE 8) through which the binder rings extend.

As shown in FIGURE 1, when the loose leaf binder is open, the sheet lifters 10 extend outward along the inside surface of the covers 17, 18, beneath the sheets of paper 14. As shown in FIGURE 2, when the loose leaf binder 12 is closed, the sheet lifters extend upward from the backing 16, still along the covers 17, 18, with the paper sheets 14 moved to the upper portion of the rings 22. In FIGURE 2 the sheet lifters 10 have moved about the ring 22 and are spaced above the upper surface 25 of the cover plate 24.

The construction of the sheet lifter 10 is best shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. The lifter 10 is an elongated, unitary member, preferably molded of plastic, such as polypropylene, or the like. The lifter 10 includes a flat, blade-like, body portion 26, and has a front edge 28, a back edge 29, a top surface 30, and a bottom surface 31. The thickness of the front edge 28 is tapered upwardly and outward, as best shown in FIGURE 4. The back edge 29 extends parallel to the front edge 28. Spaced recesses are formed by inset edges 32 along the back of the lifter. The recesses extend inward toward the front edge. The back edge 29, except for the recesses formed by edges 32, includes a double bend formed by curved portions 34, 36, as best shown in FIGURE 4. The curved portion 34 results in an upwardly extending back portion 38 that extends at an obtuse angle from the flat body portion 26. The curved portion 36 establishes a downwardly opening channel 40 between the back edge 29 and the upwardly extending surface 38. This double bend locates the back edge 29 beneath the curved portion 36 and above the curved portion 34, so that it is somewhat above the plane of the fiat body portion 26. A plurality of webs 42 extend within and across the downwardly opening channel 40 between the back edge 29 and the curved portion 34.

Three elongated apertures 42 are provided in front of the back edge 29, extending transversely of the body 26, on each side of the recessed edges 32. The apertures are spaced to receive the three rings of a standard three-ring binder. They will also receive three rings of a standard five ring or seven ring binder, as well. Each aperture 42 extends partially along the flat body portion 26 and partially along the curved portion 34 and upwardly extending surface 38. A rear edge 44 of each aperture 42 terminates beneath the uppermost portion of the curved part 36, which represents the highest portion of the sheet lifter. By way of example, in the embodiment shown, the sheet lifter is 3 inches wide and 10 inches long. The apertures 42 are 1 inch long as projected in the plane of the body portion 26 and a front edge 45 of each aperture is located 1 4 inches from the front edge 28 of the sheet lifter 10. The upper curved portion 36 terminates of an inch above the lower surface 31 of the fiat body portion 26 and the back edge 29 is of an inch above the lower surface 31.

Narrow tracks 50 extend upward from the top surface 30 of the sheet lifter 10 along opposite sides of each elongated aperture 42. Each track 50 has an upper inclined surface 52 that extends between the fiat body portion 26 and the curved portion 36, being highest adjacent the curved portion 36. The inclined portion is at least as high as the back surface 29 above the body 26 and preferably is as high as the top of the curved portion 36 at the back of the lifter. In the preferred embodiment shown, the lower forward end of each inclined surface 52 is located slightly to the rear of the front edge 45 of the adjacent elongated aperture 42. A continuation 54 of each track 50 extends from the end of the inclined surface 52 outward toward the front edge 28 of the lifter body, and projects a slight distance above the top surface 30. The continuations 54 are optional and serve only as stiffening elements.

In operation, the purpose of the sheet lifters is to lift the inner edges of the sheets of paper 14 from a position adjacent the bottom of the rings 22 to a position adjacent the upper central portion of the rings when the covers 17, 18 are closed. Known sheet lifters of proper specific dimensions (i.e., specific aperture length and specific height between the flat body portion and an offset back edge, for use with one specific diameter of binder rings) will travel along the binder rings 22 and raise the sheets when the rings are not tarnished. However, an important feature of this invention is the provision of a sheet lifter that works regardless of the condition of the rings and that can be used with the several standard size loose-leaf ring binders so that separate lifters need not be stocked for each notebook size. Thus, the lifters of the present invention are constructed so that a minimum size lifter for a binder ring of 2 /2 or 3 inches in diameter can be used with rings of 2 inch and 1 /2 inch diameter. This is illustrated in FIGURES 5, 6 and 7, showing rings 22a, b, c of 2 /2 inch, 2 inch and 1 /2 inch diameters, respectively.

When the sheet lifters 10 are pivoted from a fiat open position as shown in FIGURE 1 to an inclined position as illustrated by the right-hand sheet lifter in each of FIG- URES 5, 6 and 7, two pressure points are established with respect to the binder ring 22. A first pressure point P1 is established at the back edge 29 of the sheet lifter, where it contacts the inside surface of the ring 22. This back edge provides an abutment about which the sheet lifter pivots as the front edge 28 is moved upward by contact with the cover of the binder. The second pressure point P2 is initially established by the location of the holes 25 of the sheets 14 lifted by the sheet lifter 10. As can perhaps best be appreciated from FIGURE 8, when the cover of the binder is lifted only slightly, the distance is short between the pressure point P1 along the back edge of the sheet lifter and the pressure point P2 at the holes of the paper. That is, the lower edges of the sheets 14 are relatively close to the back edge of the sheet lifter. If the holes of the sheet remain in this close position, the sheets will not be lifted around the binder ring 22. Rather, they will be caught in the bight between the cover and the binder ring and pinched so as to prevent closing of the cover.

Before the sheets 14 and the sheet lifter 10 will move about the ring 22, the distance between the two pressure points P1, P2 must span a sufiicient curvature of the ring. If too little curvature is spanned, there will be no movement about the ring. This is demonstrated in the familiar use of the washer found on the rod of conventional aircylinder storm door closers. This washer slides on the rod and is used to hold the door open when it is positioned askew against the end of the cylinder. It works because when the washer is tilted at a slight angle to the piston rod there is no relative sliding. Rather, the washer grips the piston rod (which may be considered of infinite curvature) and prevents relative movement. Yet, if a similar washer is placed on a thin ring of small diameter, the washer slides. This is because the distance across the aperture (i.e., the distance between the two opposite pressure points) spans sufficient curvature so that the washer merely follows the ring rather than binding against the two opposite surfaces.

FIGURES 5, 6 and 7 indicate by the dotted radial lines L1, L2 the amount of curvature necessary to be spanned on rings of 2 /2 inch, 2 inch, and 1 inch diameter, for a stack of sheets and follower to travel along the rings. In each case, the angle between the two lines L1, L2 is identical, but the chord length between the intersections of the lines with the rings varies. It is not necessary to span as great a chord length in connection with a 1 /2 inch ring as with a 2 /2 inch ring to span the same proportion of the curvature. It should be understood that the actual angle between lines L1, L2 will depend upon the friction between the rings, sheets and binder, and FIGURES 5, 6 and 7 represent instances where these factors are the same.

The general principle has been recognized that the length of the elongated slot 42 must be suflicient to span the distance between the lines L1 and L2 on the largest ring with which it is to be used. It is for this reason that sheet lifters have elongated apertures rather than circular apertures- The important point that has been ignored heretofore is that the outer or front edge 45 of the elongated aperture, if located to contact the outside surface of a 2 /2 inch ring where the line L2 intersects, will be far beyond the location of the intersection of line L2 with a 2 inch or 1 /2 inch diameter ring. Compare FIGURES 5, 6 and 7. These figures demonstrate that the front edge 45 of the aperture does not function to carry the sheet lifters about the ring in smaller diameter ring binders if it is located to accommodate the 2 /2 inch ring. This demonstrates why the conventional sheet lifters tear the paper sheets above the perforated holes. If the sheets are not moved out along the rings as the sheet lifter continues to pivot, then sheets will be caught and pinched between the elongated aperture of the lifter and the ring. The outer ring surface tears its way through the paper sheet until the sheet lifter has been pivoted to where the torn apertures or the front edge 45 of the aperture contacts the ring surface at the intersection of line L2, Then the lifter rides about the ring.

The manner in which the tracks 50 of the present sheet lifter function to overcome the disadvantages of known lifters can be best understood from FIGURES 5 to 7 and 8. As illustrated in FIGURE 8, the cover on the righthand side has just started to be closed. The lower edges of the sheets 14 are relatively close to the back edge 29 of the sheet lifter 10. The left-hand cover is shown in a closed position. The sheet lifter 10 on the left side has moved upward about the ring 22 and the lower edges of the sheets of paper 14 have been moved a substantial distance away from the back edge 29 of the sheet lifter. This final position is also diagrammatically shown in each of FIGURES 5, 6 and 7 on the left-hand side of each. The sheet lifter 10 on the right-hand side of each of FIG- URES 5, 6 and 7 shows the sheet lifter and sheets of paper in an intermediate position between the right-hand position of FIGURE 8 and a fully closed position of the cover. In each of FIGURES 5 to 7 the sheet lifter 10 on the right side is shown at a position where it has moved the sheets 14 to the location where the pressure points P1 and P2 span the required length of the rings to cause the sheet lifters to thereafter move about the rings and follow the sheets upward. With the small diameter ring of FIGURE 7 the sheets are already sufiiciently high that the sheet lifter normally moves very little about the ring and mostly pivots to a more vertical position.

FIGURE 6 in particular illustrates that once the sheets 14 have been moved from the back edge of the sheet lifter 10 a distance such that the holes of the sheets are located along the line L2, the sheet lifter and sheets will then move upward about the ring, notwithstanding the fact that the upper or outer edge 45 of the elongated aperture 42 has not contacted the outer edge of the ring 2212. This illustrates that it is the holes of the paper sheets that act against the outside edge of the rings 22 and establish the pressure point P2 when the elongated aperture 45 is not specifically tailored to the precise diameter of the ring, but rather is oversize.

The inner edges of the sheets 14 are moved from the location adjacent the inner edge of the sheet lifter as shown on the right-hand side of the FIGURE 8, to a spaced position as shown in FIGURES 5, 6 and 7, by the inclinedsurfaces 52 of the narrow tracks 50. This occurs as the sheet lifters 10 are initially pivoted. As surfaces 52 slide the sheets 14 outward, by a camming action, the distance between the two pressure points P1, P2 formed by the back edge 29 and the holes of the sheets 14 gradually increases and the sheets are pushed along the rings. Once this increased distance encompasses the angle between the lines L1 and L2, the lifter itself begins to move about the ring, as illustrated on the left-hand side of FIGURES and 6 and the left-hand side of FIGURE 8.

The reason for this functioning is that it is initially easier for the sheets to slide up the incline 52 than for the lifter to move up the ring. However, once the distance between the pressure points increases to encompass a sufficient are along the ring, it becomes easier for the lifter to move about the ring than it is for the inclined su face 52 to push the paper farther upward. Both the curvature of the ring and the friction between the ring, lifter and paper affect the distance between the points P1 and P2 at which the lifter moves about the ring. Thus, as mentioned, the relationships shown in FIGURES 6 and 7 assume common conditions. In a nutshell, the sheets are moved outwardly along the sheet lifter and along the rings in response to the camming action of the incline, until they encompass enough ring curvature between the pressure point P1 and the location of the holes in the paper so that lifter and paper will travel upward about the ring.

Another important feature to the proper functioning of the sheet lifter 10 is the webs 42 in the channel 40. Due to the length of the elongated apertures 42, the back or inner edges 29 can interfere with each other when the sheet lifters are used with the smaller diameter ring binders. In many instances, the inner or back edges tend to overlap or overlie each other. In the past, offset portions formed at the rear of the lifters would interlock and jam, preventing the sheet lifters from pivoting. With the present construction, the webs 42 prevent the downwardly opening channels 40 from interlocking with the top curved surface 36 of the opposite sheet lifter. They also provide rigidity to the back edge 29.

The upwardly and outwardly bevelled front edge surface provides an additional advantage in the construction shown. This bevel is constructed to provide a relatively flat edge angled to ride against the inside surface of the adjacent cover as the cover closes. This minimizes any tendency of the front edge 28 to catch on the adjacent cover as it slides relative to the cover during the closing action of the notebook.

The location of the inner edges 32 of the recesses aligned with the front edges of the apertures 42, and extending parallel to the front edge 28, is of functional significance when the lifter is used with binders having more than three rings and having the largest diameter rings for which the lifter is designed. With such rings, the inner edges 32 will ride along the outer surface of any binder rings that lie between the three rings that are in the apertures 42. This provides pressure points on the outer surface of the additional rings and aids in causing the sheet lifter 10 to ride upward about the rings.

While a preferred embodiment of this invention has been described with particularity, it will be readily appreciated that various modifications and alterations can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as set forth in the appended claims. For example, while narrow tracks 50 have been provided and are advantageous from the standpoint of reducing the friction between the inclined surfaces 52 and the paper,

the tracks need not be narrow. In fact, the body of the sheet lifter itself may be formed essentially of two planar members, one corresponding to the flat body portion 26 and the other extending therefrom at an obtuse angle corresponding with the upper inclined surface 52 of the tracks 50. The apertures 42 can be formed directly in this inclined surface. Moreover, while it is advantageous to locate the inclined surfaces 52 adjacent the apertures 42 so that they act on the sheets on opposite sides of each ring, where the forces are applied, a single track 5!] at each ring is sufficient, and if desired the cumming surface can be spaced from the apertures. It must also be recognized, that while the preferred inclined surface is straight, a surface slightly concave or slightly convex will also function in a similar manner "to accomplish substantially the same result. The straight surface is preferred because a convex surface occupies more space between the rings, when the notebook is closed, and a concave surface does not move the sheets as effectively as the distance increases from the back edge of the sheet lifter.

What is claimed is:

1. A sheet lifter for use with a loose-leaf ring binder having front and back covers, a back member, rings extending from the back member, and sheets bound in the binder by the rings, which pass through spaced holes in the sheets, said lifter including an elongated body having a back edge, a front edge and a top surface that is located to face sheets in a binder when in use, apertures in the body adjacent the back edge, gradually inclined surface areas, i.e., surface areas greater in length across the lifter body than in height above the top surface of the body, adjacent the apertures and extending in a direction transversely of the body, said apertures being wide enough to accommodate rings of a binder and extending across the elongated body a distance sufficient to permit (a) substantial transverse movement of the body relative to rings that pass through the apertures, (b) substantial pivoting of the lifter relative to rings of a binder about an axis that is remote from the apertures and substantially eccentric of binder rings which pass through the apertures and (c) an accompanying substantial change in angular relationship of the inclined surface relative to ring perimeters, and an abutment on the lifter body behind, i.e., displaced toward the back edge from, the inclined surface, lower than the highest portion of the inclined surface and located to engage the back member of a binder at a location adjacent a base portion of rings passing through said apertures when the lifter is pivoted during use by movement of an adjacent binder cover from an open to a closed position and to thereafter engage an inner surface of said rings in response to further closing movement of the binder cover, said abutment forming a pivot axis about which the lifter pivots relative to the binder.

2. A sheet lifter as set forth in claim 1 wherein the apertures are elongated transversely of the sheet lifter body.

3. A sheet lifter as set forth in claim 1 wherein the back edge is formed in a portion of the body offset from the elongated flat portion and which forms a downwardly opening channel along the back edge above the elongated flat portion and behind at least one aperture.

4. A sheet lifter as set forth in claim 3 including a rib having a downwardly and forwardly inclined bottom edge extending across and within the said channel to prevent the interlocking of adjacent lifters when located in a binder with the binder covers in an open position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,682,108 8/1928 Berans l294 1,663,017 3/1920 Martin 1291 1,747,263 2/l930 Reynolds 129-4 2,179,757 11/1939 Schade 1294 2,276,987 3/1942 Kengott l294 2,159,612 5/1939 Barrett.

JEROME SCHNALL, Primary Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,366,118 January 30, 1968 Lewis R. Beyer It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 8, after line 61, insert 5. A sheet lifter as set forth in claim 1 wherein the said inclined surface areas are in the form of narrow, straight, body portions that extend alongside the apertures transversely of the lifter body.

in the heading to the printed specification, line 6, for "4 Claims" read 5 Claims Signed and sealed this 22nd day of April 1969.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD J. BRENNER Commissioner of Patents Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1663017 *Jul 6, 1926Mar 20, 1928Martin Alfred MPartition sheet for loose-leaf devices
US1682108 *Sep 11, 1926Aug 28, 1928IrvingLoose-leap binder
US1747263 *Oct 13, 1928Feb 18, 1930Mcmillan Book CompanyLeaf flipper
US2159612 *Jun 29, 1938May 23, 1939Barrett Bindery CoPortable displayer
US2179757 *Jan 4, 1939Nov 14, 1939Nat Blank Book CoFlyleaf construction for ring binders
US2276987 *Nov 20, 1940Mar 17, 1942Kengott Raymond JSheet-lifting device for loose-leaf binders
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3493310 *Dec 29, 1967Feb 3, 1970Stationers Loose Leaf CoSheet lifter for looseleaf ring binder
US3591300 *Aug 15, 1968Jul 6, 1971Lewis R BeyerUniversal sheet lifter
US5106222 *Jun 27, 1990Apr 21, 1992Acco World CorporationEmbossed cover for ring binder mechanism
US5503489 *Jun 20, 1994Apr 2, 1996Maudal; IngeDouble aperture paper lifter
US5549406 *Nov 21, 1994Aug 27, 1996Cohen; Abner B.No-bind page lifter clip
US5695294 *Oct 2, 1995Dec 9, 1997Mark A. BedolStorage apparatus for ringed notebook or ringed binder
US5984560 *Sep 26, 1997Nov 16, 1999Mark A. BedolStorage apparatus for ringed notebook or ringed binder
US6004060 *Nov 16, 1998Dec 21, 1999Bedol; Mark A.Organizer assembly for removable attachment to a ringed notebook or ringed binder
US6102600 *Dec 8, 1998Aug 15, 2000Bedol; Mark A.Glue stick assembly for use with a storage apparatus for a ringed notebook or ringed binder
US6132127 *Nov 23, 1998Oct 17, 2000Bedol; Mark A.Storage apparatus for a book
US6200058 *May 3, 1999Mar 13, 2001Inge MaudalSegmented paper lifter with multiple and variable length lever arms
US6558064Sep 18, 2000May 6, 2003Specialty Loose Leaf, Inc.Ring binder sheet positioner
DE3146392A1 *Nov 23, 1981Jun 9, 1983Soennecken BueroorganisationLetter file mechanism
WO1999016628A1 *Dec 8, 1997Apr 8, 1999Bedol, Mark, A.Storage apparatus for ringed notebook or ringed binder
Classifications
U.S. Classification402/80.00L, 402/24, D19/27, 402/68, 402/26
International ClassificationB42F13/00, B42F13/40
Cooperative ClassificationB42F13/408
European ClassificationB42F13/40E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 8, 1987AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: BEYER, LEWIS, R.,
Effective date: 19870420
Owner name: LEWART COMPANY, 3562 WEST 69TH STREET, CLEVELAND,
Jul 8, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: LEWART COMPANY, 3562 WEST 69TH STREET, CLEVELAND,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BEYER, LEWIS, R.,;REEL/FRAME:004735/0845
Effective date: 19870420