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Publication numberUS3367487 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1968
Filing dateMay 3, 1967
Priority dateMay 3, 1967
Publication numberUS 3367487 A, US 3367487A, US-A-3367487, US3367487 A, US3367487A
InventorsDwyer Jr Richard J
Original AssigneeKimberly Clark Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bulk package for cut size paper
US 3367487 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 6, 1968 R. J. DWYER, JR 3,367,487

BULK PACKAGE FOR CUT SIZE PAPER Filed May 5, 1967 United States Patent 3,367,487 BULK PACKAGE FOR CUT SIZE PAPER Richard J. Dwyer, Jr., Bellbrook, Ohio, assignor to I Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wis., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 3, 1967, Ser. No. 635,738 4 Claims. (Cl. 20657) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A bulk package for a multiple-ream stack of cut size paper designed for use with copy making machines. The package is a paperboard carton of a size sufficient to hold several reams. The carton is encircled by a tear strip which when removed to open the carton, detaches a portion of the top and two side panels of the carton at one end to expose the top and sides of the paper stack at that end. A substantial portion of the bottom panel of the carton is retained to provide support for the stack. The opened carton containing the stack acts as a service tray which can be placed on the delivery platform of a copy making machine ready for use.

Background of the invention This invention relates to an improved bulk package for cut size paper designed for use with copy making machines.

The present practice is to wrap individual 500 sheet reams of cut size paper in a protective paper overwrap. Several of these individually wrapped reams are then packed into an outer corrugated shipping container for shipment to customers. When made ready for use, the individual packages must be unwrapped and the contents of several packages stacked on the delivery platform of the copy making machine.

Modern copying machines turn out copies at an everincreasing rate, thus require constant replenishment of the cut size paper used to supply the machine. Replacement of the cut size paper from individually wrapped 500 sheet reams is time-consuming and inefficient. An improved handling means obviously would be a step forward in the art.

The bulk package of this invention eliminates the individually wrapped ream and permits more eflicient handling of the paper.

The package is in the form of a paperboard carton containing several reams of paper. The carton is designed, so that, after it is opened, a major portion of the carton remains with the cut size paper stack when it is placed on the machine. The opened carton acts as a service tray for handling the stack while maintaining the stack of sheets in aligned arrangement.

Summary of the invention The improved bulk package of this invention comprises a heavy paperboard carton of a size sufiicient to hold several reams of cut size paper. While the number of reams is optional, a carton large enough to hold a stack of six reams, or 3,000 sheets, is a preferred size.

'The carton is provided with a circumferential tear strip which passes through the top panel, the two side panels, and the bottom panel of the carton. When the tear strip is torn off, the end panel at the front of the carton and portions of the top and side panels are removed to expose the corresponding top and sides of the sheet stack. The tear strip extends through the bottom panel in a manner to retain a major portion of the bottom panel underlying substantially the full length of the sheet stack. The unremoved portion of the carton comprising the side, top, and the rear end panel maintains the sheets in alignment, While the bottom panel provides support along substantially the entire length of the bottom of the stack. The opened carton containing the entire stack is placed on the delivery platform of a copy making machine with the open end facing the machine. The front and side edges of the sheets in the front portion of the stack are free of obstructions and are accessible to the sheet handling mechanism of the machine without further handling or adjustment.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a bulk package for out size paper which may be easily opened and which, when opened, serves as a convenient service tray for handling the paper.

Another object is to provide a more economical package for cut size paper designed for use with copy making machines.

Still another object is to provide a bulk package for cut size paper which serves as a shipping carton and which converts to a service tray for the paper after being opened.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following specification and attached drawing.

Brief description of the drawings FIGURE 1 is a perspective View of one embodiment of a bulk pack-age carton having a removable tear strip arranged in accordance with the invention. 3

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1, in which the tear strip and the front end of the carton have been removed.

The package of FIG. 1 comprises a rectangular carton 30 of heavy paperboard containing several reams of cut size paper. The carton 30 comprises a top panel 31, a bottom panel 32, side panels 33 and 34, rear end panel 35, and front end panel 36. The usual overlapping flaps 35 which seal the carton are preferably part of the end panels to provide additional reinforcement.

A tear strip 37 and 37a encircles the carton, passing through the top, bottom and side panels. Portion 37 of the tear strip is preferably spaced several inches back from front panel 36, extending up side panel 34, over top panel 31, and down side panel 33 where it joins tear strip extension 37a. Tear strip extension 37a, as a continuation of strip 37, extends diagonally from the bottom of side panel 33 to a point short of the centerline of front'panel 36, past the centerline of front panel 36, and then diagonally back to tear strip 37 at the bottom of side panel 34. A graduated scale, as shown at 38, may be printed on one or both side panels adjacent the tear strip on those portions of the carton which remain after the tear strip is removed, to indicate approximately how many sheets remain in the carton during use.

In FIG. 2, the tear strip and end portions of the carton have been removed exposing the front end of the stack cut size sheets 40. Side edges 41 and 42 of the sheets in the stack, and the surface of top sheet 43 are exposed, so that all edges are unobstructed and become accessible to the sheet handling mechanism of the copy making machine after the opened carton containing the sheet stack is placed on the delivery platform of the machine.

3 The tongue-like central section 44 of the bottom panel, which remains after the carton is opened, provides sup port for the front portion of sheet stack 40.

Description of the preferred embodiment As shown in the drawings, the improved bulk package of this invention comprises a heavy paperboard carton 30 of a size sufficient to hold multiple reams of cut size paper 40. In the preferred embodiment the carton contains six reams, or 3,000 sheets. The number of sheets and size of carton being optional depending on the preference of a customer or user.

For a package of 3,000 sheets of 20# basis weight, 8 /2" x 11" paper, the appropriate outer dimensions of the carton are about 8% wide, 11% long and 11% high, i.e., of a size sufiicient to hold the stack of sheets snugly enough to prevent undesirable shifting. For ditferent sizes and numbers of sheets the dimensions will vary accordingly.

The carton stock should be strong enough to permit L spaced several inches back from the front end of the carton. In the preferred embodiment as shown, this distance is about four inches. It is also preferred that the tear strip in the top and side panels, be disposed in parallel alignment with the ends of the carton, although various other arrangements may be used. For example, when it is desirable to expose a larger portion of the top sheet as required by certain machines, the tear strip in the top panel may extend rearwardly so that most, or all, of the top panel can also be removed.

In the embodiment shown, the tear strip starts at the bottom of one side panel 34, extends upwardly on said side panel for the full 11 /4" height of the panel, passes crosswise over the top panel for its 8%" width, then down the other side panel for its full 11% height.

In the bottom panel 32, the tear strip 37a then runs diagonally from its terminal point at the bottom of one side panel to the front edge of the bottom panel at a point short of its center, continues along a central portion of the bottom panel substantially coextensive with the front edge of the front end panel and then runs diagonally back to meet the terminal point of the tear strip at the bottom of the first side panel. The width of the central portion of the bottom panel, as defined by the tear strip, at the point where it meets the front end of the stack is not critical. However, it should be of a width to provide support to the stack when the carton is opened. Preferably, it should not extend completely to the side edges since it is desirable for these edges to be free of obstructions.

The user opens the package by tearing the strip up one side, over the top, then down the other side, and across the bottom. The detachable front portion of the carton thus formed is then completely separated from the remainder of the package. The opened package then looks like the FIG. 2 illustration.

After the carton is opened and the front sections removed, the remaining portions of the side, top and back panels maintain the sheets in the stack in alignment, while the bottom panel provides support along substantially the entire length of the bottom of the stack, leaving free the side portions of the sheets located at the bottom near the front of the stack. The front and side edges of the sheets, from top to bottom of the stack, are therefore completely free of obstructions and accessible to the sheet handling mechanism of the copy making machine when the opened carton is placed onto the delivery platform of the machine. The central portion of the bottom panel which extends substantially to the front edge of the stack supports the exposed end of the stack to make it easy for the user to handle the opened package when placing it onto the platform.

It is important'that, in the opened package, the bottom panel of the carton extend for substantially the complete length of the stack, especially along a major portion of its longitudinal centerline. This enables the stack to be easily transported and placed onto the delivery platform, using substantially the full length of the bottom panel for support. In addition to providing support for handling the opened package, the full length of the remaining portion of the bottom panel is advantageous in that it maintains the stack of sheetsat the same level, front and back, until the entire stack is exhausted.

From the drawing, it will be seen that one of the remaining side panels of the opened carton may be marked with a scale, or other indicia, along an edge of the tear strip line to enable the operator to determine the approximate number of sheets remaining in the stack when in use. Both remaining panels may be so marked, if desired.

In constructing the package, the usual overlapping flaps used to seal the carton are preferably located at the front and back ends to provide additional strength during shipment and handling.

The above-described carton is suitable for use with most copy making machines. Various changes may be made in the location of the tear strip to accommodate it to certain peculiarities of the machine with which it is to be used without departing from the spirit of the invention.

For example the tear strip may extend up the sides as shown, but then may angle back to the rear of the top panel to provide a larger area of access to the top sheets for handling by the delivery mechanism of a machine. Along the bottom panel, however, the tear strip should be arranged so that at least the central portion of the panel extends substantially to the front of the stack after Opening.

It will be further apparent to those skilled in the art, that other suitable changes, modifications and variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A bulk package for multiple reams of cut size paper which comprises a rectangular paperboard carton and a multiple ream stack of cut size paper disposed therein; said carton having top and bottom panels, a first side panel, a second side panel, and front and rear end panels; said carton having a manually removable tear strip disposed near the front end thereof and arranged to encircle said carton circumferentially, starting at the bottom of said first side panel, extending to the top of said first side panel, across said top panel, down said second side panel, and across said bottom panel back to the starting point; said tear strip in said side and top panels being spaced at least several inches from said front end while in said bottom panel said tear strip extends to said front end and is coextensive therewith in at least a central portion thereof.

2. The package of claim 1 in which at least one side panel has indicia adjacent the edge of said tear strip opposite from said front end.

3. The package of claim 1 in which the tear strip in said side and top panels is disposed substantially in parallel alignment to the carton ends.

4. The package of claim 3 in which the tear strip in the bottom panel extends forward and diagonally inward from the bottom of the second side panel to a point short of the front centerline of said bottom panel, is substantially coextensive with a center portion of the front edge of said bottom panel and then extends diagonally backbottom of the first side panel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2/1931 Bendheim 229-7 Weiner 22951 Armstrong 229-51 Andrews 229--5l Praetorius 20656 WILLIAM T. DIXSON, JR.) Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1791344 *Nov 22, 1928Feb 3, 1931Peggy O Neal Cigar CorpMagazine carton for vending machines
US1864968 *Oct 13, 1930Jun 28, 1932Harry WeinerMerchandising carton
US2170230 *Dec 30, 1935Aug 22, 1939Western Paper Converting CompaDispensing package
US2467875 *Jan 7, 1947Apr 19, 1949Marathon CorpPackage and packaging material therefor
US3315875 *Feb 8, 1965Apr 25, 1967Dynamit Nobel AgDispensing container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3519125 *Jun 25, 1968Jul 7, 1970Procter & GambleTray forming bundle wrap
US3520466 *Apr 24, 1968Jul 14, 1970Us Plywood Champ Papers IncReclosable carton
US3632017 *Dec 30, 1969Jan 4, 1972Matthews Robert JMilk filter dispenser
US3642273 *Apr 29, 1970Feb 15, 1972Burt & Co F NCarton with inner compartment for use in feeding small-sized paper
US3647207 *May 18, 1970Mar 7, 1972Xerox CorpSheet-feeding mechanism centering device
US3761012 *May 26, 1971Sep 25, 1973Burt & Co F NCartons
US3767188 *May 24, 1971Oct 23, 1973Burt & Co F NPaper feeding device
US4290525 *Sep 17, 1979Sep 22, 1981Sisson Kimberley RAutomatic count and identification carrier for refundable cans
US4753348 *Jun 24, 1986Jun 28, 1988Allied Paper IncorporatedEasy access, moisture resistant, reusable, two-piece carton
US4770301 *Sep 27, 1984Sep 13, 1988Xerox CorporationHigh speed duplicator with copy sheet prepackaged shipping and loading carton
US4802586 *Sep 27, 1984Feb 7, 1989Xerox CorporationHigh speed duplicator with copy sheet prepackaged shipping and loading carton
US4844262 *May 9, 1988Jul 4, 1989Allied Paper IncorporatedEasy access, moisture resistant, resuable, two-piece carton
US5016753 *Jul 28, 1989May 21, 1991Henderson Donald MTelescoping packaging system
US5505368 *Apr 18, 1994Apr 9, 1996Hershey Foods CorporationContainer assembly and method of making the same
US6546210Nov 13, 2000Apr 8, 2003Seiko Epson CorporationCut sheet packaging member and image forming apparatus
US6945527 *Feb 28, 2003Sep 20, 2005Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.High capacity media apparatus and method
US7066333May 8, 2003Jun 27, 2006International Paper CompanyOffice paper end-display shipper display
US7165675Jul 8, 2003Jan 23, 2007Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Media wrapper and method of using the same
US7568611 *Apr 30, 2004Aug 4, 2009Meadwestvaco Packaging Systems, LlcCarton having stacking strength-enhancing feature
US8627638Aug 25, 2006Jan 14, 2014Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method of packaging media used in a document producing device
US20040169328 *Feb 28, 2003Sep 2, 2004Srinivas GuddantiHigh capacity media apparatus and method
US20050242165 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 3, 2005Cargile John W JrCarton having stacking strength-enhancing feature
US20060006216 *Jul 7, 2004Jan 12, 2006Moll Theresa AEnvelope container and dispenser
EP0206806A2Jun 24, 1986Dec 30, 1986Xerox CorporationCopy sheet prepackaged shipping and loading wrapper for use in a high volume duplicator
EP1099639A1 *Nov 10, 2000May 16, 2001Seiko Epson CorporationCut sheet packaging member and image forming apparatus
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EP1495876A1 *Feb 10, 2004Jan 12, 2005Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.A media wrapper and method of using the same
EP2117957A1 *Nov 8, 2007Nov 18, 2009UPM-Kymmene CorporationPackage for paper sheets
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/449, 206/459.1, 229/122, 229/235, 271/162
International ClassificationB65D5/54
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/5445
European ClassificationB65D5/54C