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Publication numberUS3367757 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1968
Filing dateOct 22, 1965
Priority dateOct 22, 1965
Publication numberUS 3367757 A, US 3367757A, US-A-3367757, US3367757 A, US3367757A
InventorsChurch Peter K
Original AssigneePeter K. Church
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire kindling device
US 3367757 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 6, 1968 P. K. CHURCH 3,367,757

FIRE KINDLING DEVICE Filed Oct. 22, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. FIG, 3. [0 PETER K. CHURCH ATTORNEYS Feb. 6, 1968 P. K. CHURCH FIRE KINDLING DEVICE 2 SheetsSheet 2 Filed Oct. 22, 1965 FIG. 4.

FIG.5.

IN VENTOR. PETER K. CHURCH FIG. 6.

ATTO RN EYS United States Patent G 3,367,757 FIRE KINDLING DEVICE Peter K. Church, P.O. Box 234, Colorado Springs, Colo. 8ii901 Filed Oct. 22, 1965, Ser. No. 501,869 6 Claims. (Cl. 44-38) This invention relates to a fire kindling device and more particularly to a kindling device in the form of a sheet of folded corrugated cardboard impregnated with an inflammable material.

Various materials employed in making fires are usually difiicult to ignite, as for example large logs or charcoal, in that a high temperature is required for initial combustion. For this reason, it is usually necessary to build a primer fire out of some type of kindling to ignite the logs or charcoal. Kindling materials such as wood shavings and sticks are bulky and can become messy and cumbersome to use. Newspaper or other types of paper have a short burning time and leave an undesirable ash. The kindling materials above mentioned are not always available or in some instances impart an undesirable smell and odor to the charcoal which in turn can be transferred to the foods being cooked.

There have been developed and marketed various liquid or foam lighting substances for charcoal; however, these substances are generally highly volatile and raise some question as to the safety of their use. Such liquids also produce undesirable fumes and odors. Additionally, the spraying of a liquid starter on logs does not dispose any of the liquid on the underside thereof Where the fire should be started.

The present invention, which eliminates the foregoing objections provides a fire starter in the form of a folded corrugated cardboard sheet impregnated with melted paraffin or another suitable inflammable material. It can be stored in a fiat configuration which occupies very little space compared with a comparable amount of wood kindling. The kindling of the instant invention is waterproof and easily handled and stored. There is no danger of fire or explosion from inflammable vapors from the kindling. It is long burning and produces a hot and odorless flame. The present invention has been found to be equally effective in the starting of campfires, charcoal burners and wood-burning stoves.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a novel and improved fire starter for charcoal and log fires.

A second objective is to provide an improved kindling means which is stored in a compact form so as to maintain a high ratio of stored heat energy to displaced volume.

A further objective of the present invention is to provide an improved dry fire kindling means which is easily stored without danger of accidental preignition.

A further objective is to provide an improved fire starting means which is easy to ignite and burns with a hot and steady flame for a time sutficient to ignite large diameter logs even when wet from rain or snow.

A further object is to provide an improved fire starter which can be handled freely without any danger of toxic effect to children or adults.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved fire kindling means which is exceedingly simple in construction and inexpensive to manufacture.

Further objects are to provide an improved kindling means which is safe to store or ignite, compact, waterproof, rugged and inexpensive.

Other objects will be in part apparent and in part pointed out specifically hereinafter in connection with the description of the drawings that follow and in which:

FIGURE 1 is an end elevational view of the fire starter in its folded configuration;

3,367,757 Patented Feb. 6, 1968 FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view in the folded position;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view showing the same in unfolded condition and with a portion broken away to show the internal corrugated structure;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the fire starter positioned below a fireplace grate which is shown in dotted lines;

FIGURE 5 is a plan view of a modified form of the present invention for use in a charcoal grill in the unfolded position and with a portion broken away to show the interior structure;

FIGURE 6 is an end elevational view of the modified form of fire starter showing the charcoal briquets in dotted line and positioned thereon in supported relation.

Referring now to the drawings for a detailed description of the present invention and initially to FIGURES 1 through 4, it will be seen that the fire starter of the present invention has been generally designated in its entirety by reference numeral 10. In FIGURE 4, the starter is shown positioned ready for use beneath a typical fireplace grate 18 and between the logs 20. Before usage the starter is normally stored in a flat configuration as shown in the plan view of FIGURE 3.. The starter 10 is preferably constructed from a sheet of inflammably impregnated corrugated cardboard 12, the corrugations of which form an important part of the invention. The corrugations 14 are positioned to run longitudinally of the sheet, as can be seen in partial section in FIGURE 3. Running parallel with the corrugations and centrally disposed on the sheet 12 is a crease or cut 16 to facilitate folding the starter 10 into its V-shape. In FIGURE 1 of the drawings the starter is provided with a cut through the outer laminated sheet of paper 22 rather than a crease. Also longitudinally spaced along the center line of the starter 10 is a series of diamond-shaped apertures or openings 24, appearing as notches when the starter is folded in its V-shape. The apertures 24 allow the proper amount of air to circulate beneath and through the starter to facilitate proper burning with an even flame. The openings 24 also provide the necessary exposed edges for burning. The openings 24 may vary in number, shape and size. The configuration of the openings shown in FIG- URES 2 and 3 merely illustrate one workable design. If it is desired that the starter burn more intensely and provide a hotter fire, the number of openings 24 can be increased to allow greater exposure of the side edges of the cardboard.

Either before or after the openings 24 have been cut in the sheet 12, the sheet is dipped or soaked in a bath of an inflammable substance which impregnates the sheet. Melted paraffin or candle wax has been found to be desirable for many reasons. The kindling means of this invention is dry and therefore avoids the vapor problems of a liquid starter. Not only is the parafiin impregnated or coated starter waterproof and clean to handle but there is no danger of accidental preignition as might exist with liquid inflammables. The present starter also burns with a very clean and substantially odorless flame. Other inflammable substances such as ethylene glycol, various oils and grease-base materials may be used, however, a material having a melting point on the order of paraffin is preferred.

To use the starter 10, it is folded in a V-shape, as shown in FIGURE 4. It is then placed on the hearth beneath the grate 18 and logs 20 which are to be ignited. The fire starter 10 is then ignited with a match at one end approximate to the crease or fold 16. The flame will gradually spread down the complete length of the starter 10 around the openings 24. As the fire starter 10 begins to burn the heat created will cause the parafiin in the upper portions to become soft and melt. Because the corrugau tions 14 in the cardboard sheet are horizontally positioned, the melted parafiin will not run out on the hearth or ground before it has a chance to burn. As the starter 10 burns, air freely enters the end Openings 26, and passes out the apertures 24 to permit a draft which will amply support the combustion. The movement of the air passing through the fire starter 10 is illustrated by the arrows A. The fire starter 10 has been found to be equally effective igniting coal-burning stoves, camp fires and charcoal barbeque grills. Because of the hot flame produced and extended burning time it is possible to ignite large diameter logs or wood even when wet from snow or rain. With logs of large diameter, the starter may be placed between the logs with or without a grate.

In FIGURES and 6 a modified form of the present invention is set forth. The fire starter more specifically adapted for use in lighting charcoal briquets is generally identified by reference numeral 28. The starter 28 is formed of a narrow strip 34 of corrugated cardboard with the corrugations 30 running laterally of its length. A series of creases or cuts 32 may be positioned along the length thereof in spaced relation to facilitate folding. The cuts as seen in FIGURES 4 and 5 are on opposite sides of the strip 34 in alternate fashion so as to permit the strip to be folded in an involuted shape as seen in FIGURE 6. The strips 34 of corrugated cardboard have been or are dipped in a bath of parafiin or other suitable inflammable substance. The strips are normally stored in a planar configuration as seen in FIGURE 5. When it comes time to use the starters 28, they are folded along the cuts 32 into the involuted form and placed on the grate or bottom of the charcoal burner. The folded strips 34 are small in size so that a varying number can be used depending upon the size of the charcoal grill. Usually two or more will be necessary. The charcoal briquets 36, shown in the dotted lines, are then placed on top of the starters as can be seen in FIGURE 6 and the starter ignited. Because of their folded shape sufiicient amounts of air can circulate around and under the starter and the charcoal to adequately support complete ignition. In contrast to the liquid or spray type fire starters, the starter of the present invention places the source of heat beneath the charcoal rather than on top so that a maximum benefit of the heat energy is obtained. The corrugations 3t) run laterally with respect to the length of the strip 34. This permits a maximum exposure of the ends of the corrugations to provide more rapid burning. With the corrugations positioned in this manner, when the starters are ignited the flames tend to flare out the open ends of the corrugations as the melted paraffin vaporizes and burns. This not only causes more rapid burning along the full length of the sides of the starter, but also this flaring effect ignites any adjacently positioned starters. The lateral positioning of the corrugations 30 is most important in that the melted paraflin will remain in the corrugations and will not flow out before it is properly ignited. The starter 28 burns in a similar manner to a series of candles laid side by side burning at both ends. When a series of starters 28 are placed in fairly close side by side relation it is only necessary to ignite one of the starters. They will quickly ignite each other and burn with a clean and odorless flame while avoiding the accompanying and dangerous health and fire hazards of the fluid starters.

The actual shape of the starter can be made in many variations. For example, the width, length, and number of folds can be varied; the thickness of cardboard can vary along with the particular inflammable substance used.

Having thus described the several useful and novel features incorporated in the fire starter of the present invention it will be seen that many worthwhile objectives for which it was designed have been achieved. Although only two specific embodiments of the starter have been 4 illustrated and described herein, it will be realized that certain changes may well occur to those skilled in the art within the broad teaching thereof; hence, it is intended that the scope of protection afforded hereby shall be limited only insofar as said limitations are expressly set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A fire kindling device comprising a sheet of corrugated cardboard impregnated with an inflammable sub stance folded in a direction along a corrugation to define at least two planar portions and provide at least one involution which extends normal to the corrugationsand the fold therealong to position the corrugations in a horizontal plane when the kindling device is in use where by the inflammable substance is substantially prevented from flowing out of the corrugations due to the action of gravity and in which the sheet is folded along its longitudinal axis bisecting said sheet to define two planar portions, draft means comprising spaced apertures positioned in said sheet along said fold to permit multiple burning edges throughout the length of the sheet.

2. A fire kindling device comprising a sheet of corrugated cardboard impregnated with an inflammable substance folded in a direction along a corrugation to define at least two planar portions and provide at least one involution which extends normal to the corrugations and the fold therealon to position the corrugations in a horizontal plane when the kindling device is in use whereby the inflammable substance is substantially prevented from flowing out of the corrugations due to the action of gravity and in which the sheet is folded along its longitudinal axis bisecting said sheet to define two planar portions, a series of apertures in the planar portions longitudinally spaced along said fold.

3. A fire kindling device comprising a sheet of corrugated cardboard impregnated with an inflammable substance folded in a direction along a corrugation to define at least two planar portions and provide at least one involution which extends normal to the corrugations and the fold therealong to position the corrugations in a horizontal plane when the kindling device is in use whereby the inflammable substance is substantially prevented from flowing out of the corrugations due to the action of gravity and in which the sheet is folded along its longitudinal axis bisecting said sheet to define tWO planar portions, a series of diamond-shaped apertures in said sheet spaced along and bisected by said fold.

4. A fire kindling device as set forth in claim 1 in which the draft means comprises a series of oblong apertures which apertures are shaped to provide a maximum of edge exposure with a minimum of aperture area.

S. A fire kindling device as set forth in claim 2 in which the apertures are oblong in shape having their longest dimension lying perpendicular to the corrugations whereby a maximum of corrugation end exposure is attained.

6. A fire kindling device as set forth in claim 1 in which the inflammable substance is paraffin.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS DANIEL E. NY MAN,

C. F. DEES, Assistant Examiner.

Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US617424 *Dec 31, 1897Jan 10, 1899 Richard pflaum
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4074977 *Jun 11, 1976Feb 21, 1978Dunham Philip NCharcoal briquet system
US4762525 *Jun 15, 1987Aug 9, 1988Wood William PMultilayer, waterproofing, fireproofing, woodchips
US4981496 *Jun 19, 1989Jan 1, 1991Opalite CorporationCharcoal briquet and ignition means
US5830245 *Dec 6, 1996Nov 3, 1998Raddon; Stanley J.Stacked sheets of cardboard impregnation with wax
US6251147Oct 1, 1998Jun 26, 2001Gregory J. PetersonArtifical firelog and firestarter chip producing apparatus and method and products produced therefrom
US6655943Oct 1, 1999Dec 2, 2003Gregory J. PetersonArtificial firelog and firestarter chip producing apparatus
US6716259Jan 3, 2001Apr 6, 2004Gregory J. PetersonRecycling waste prewaxed corregated cardboard sheets into artificial logs more structurally rigid and more efficiently burning by slicing into strips, cutting into segments, compressing and extruding
US6716260May 4, 2001Apr 6, 2004Gregory J. PetersonArtificial firelog and firestarter chip producing apparatus comprising a cutting assembly, a compression conveyor auger assembly and a die; converts standard waxed corrugated cardboard boxes into artificial firelogs
US7404830Mar 17, 2004Jul 29, 2008Peterson Gregory JCompression of cardboard segments; extrusion through die
US7445442Mar 16, 2004Nov 4, 2008Peterson Gregory JArtificial firelog and firestarter chip producing apparatus and method and products produced therefrom
US7628825Dec 10, 2004Dec 8, 2009Clean Heat, LlcCompression of cardboard segments; extrusion through dies
US7628826Dec 10, 2004Dec 8, 2009Clean Heat, LlcArtificial firelog and firestarter chip producing apparatus and method and products produced therefrom
US20130340740 *Jun 20, 2012Dec 26, 2013Clark S.E. SchaeferCharcoal lighting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification44/522, 44/520, 44/533
International ClassificationF23Q13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23Q13/00
European ClassificationF23Q13/00