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Publication numberUS3368725 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1968
Filing dateApr 17, 1967
Priority dateApr 17, 1967
Publication numberUS 3368725 A, US 3368725A, US-A-3368725, US3368725 A, US3368725A
InventorsMartin Edward J
Original AssigneeEdward J. Martin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pack frame
US 3368725 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 13, 1968 E. J. MARTIN 3,368,725

PACK FRAME Filed April 17, 1967 INVENTOR. I

@ WM Wm Arron/ms United States Patent 3,368,725 PACK FRAME Edward J. Martin, 4909 Fremont Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 55409 Filed Apr. 17, 1967, Ser. No. 631,344 8 Claims. (Cl. 224-9) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A pack frame with a rigid panel lying against a mans shoulder and carrying a bag, swingable away from the panel when the panel is oriented horizontally as a seat against a tree; the frame having rigid strut members extending downwardly and outwardly from the panel to engage and cradle the tree trunk, and a chain attaching the strut members to the tree.

This invention relates to a pack frame for carrying a load on a mans back, and for attaching to a tree trunk as a seat for supporting the weight of a man.

An object of my invention is to provide a new and improved multi-purpose pack frame of simple and ineX- pensive construction and operation so as to also serve as a seat attachable to a tree. 7

Another object of my invention is to provide a pack frame for ready and easy attachment to a tree by means of elongate strut members projecting downwardly and outwardly from the bottom of the rigid seat-panel for cradling the trunk of the tree during attachment and then allowing the panel to be supported in substantially horizontal position with the bag oriented so that access into the bag can be readily and easily had while sitting on the seat.

Another object of my invention is to provide a pack frame with a rigid back engaging panel on which the bag is mounted, and rigid strut members projecting outwardly and downwardly from the rigid panel to cradle the bag and protect the bag against damage and against jostling during use, even though the person carrying the bag may fall and roll onto the ground, and also providing cleats for digging into the bark of the tree when the pack frame is attached thereto and for engaging the ground in the event of a fall by the person carrying the bag so as to assist the person in preventing dangerous skidding down an incline.

These and other objects and advantages of my invention will more fully appear from the following description made in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the invention carried on a mans back;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the invention applied to the trunk of a tree;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the invention applied to a tree or stump.

The pack frame, indicated in general by numeral 10, is devised to be carried by a man M or to be mounted upon a tree T. The pack frame includes a rigid panel 11 which may be constructed of wood and which is normally carried on the mans back in an upright position. The panel 11 has a front surface 12 which normally lies against the mans back and which is unobstructed so as to permit complete freedom of movement thereover, whereby when the frame is mounted on the tree T as shown in FIG. 2, a person may sit on the frame and be facing in any of a plurality of positions. The person sitting on the panel 11 as seen in FIG. 2 may comfortably lean against the trunk of the tree to permit him to remain perfectly still which is important during hunting of wild game.

as indicated in FIG. 1 as he is 3,368,725 Patented Feb. 13, 1968 A knapsack or bag 13, which may be constructed of canvas, normally lies against the outer surface 14 of the panel 11. The open top 15 of the bag 13 is disposed adjacent the upper edge of the panel, and the upper peripheral portion of the bag 13 is afiixed to the upper edge portion of the panel by means of a clamping bar 16 aflixed as by screws to the panel 11. It will be seen that the lower portion of the bag 13 is free of the panel 11, but normally lies against the panel when the panel is in its upright position on the mans back. The lower portion of the bag 13 is free to swing away from the panel when the panel is oriented in substantially horizontal position as seen in FIG. 2 so as to permit ready and easy access into the open top 15 of the bag adjacent the upper edge 11a of the panel.

The bag 13 is provided with a flap 17 to normally close the open top 15.

The frame 10 is also provided with a pair of rigid frame elements or strut members 18 and 19 respectively dis posed along opposite longitudinal edges of the panel 11. The strut members 18 and 19 are constructed of rigid rods having elongate upright leg portions 18a and 19a lying against the outer surface 14 of the panel 11 and afiixed thereto by clips 20 secured to the panel with countersunk bolts 21. It will be seen that the upright leg members 18a and 19a of the struts extend downwardly beyond the lower or bottom edge 11b of the panel, and are then bent angularly outwardly to define the outwardly projecting leg members 18b, 19b extending away from the mans body as indicated in FIG. 1. The terminal ends of the outwardly projecting leg members 18b, 19b are interconnected by a crossbar 21 which is affixed there to as by welding. The crossbar 21 is also aflixed to the diagonal legs 18c, 19c which provide additional bracing to the strut members 18 and 19. The cross bar 21 is constructed of rigid material, and has a plurality of fingerlike cleats 22 affixed thereto and normally projecting downwardly when the frame is carried on the mans back.

It will be noted that between the bottom edge 11a of the panel 11 and the crossbar 21, the space between the strut members 18 and 19 open and unobstructed so as to receive portions of the tree trunk therein, particularly during installation of the pack frame onto the tree, but to also permit the frame to be mounted on a tree which is very irregularly shaped with a minimum of inconvenience and even allowing the pack frame to be mounted on a tree with a limb of the tree projecting in and through the space between the lower portions of the strut members and adjacent the bottom edge of the panel.

The pack frame has a pair of loops 23a and 23b arranged to support the pack frame on his back, and in the form shown, the loops 23a, 23b are all part of an integral piece of chain 23 which is secured by a book 24 to the top edge of the pack frame and is secured by fasteners 25 to the lower portions of the strut members 18, 19. It should be understood that suitable padding or covering may be provided for the chain loops 23a, 23b if desired, but ordinarily no such padding will be necessary when the pack frame is used during the late autumn or winter months during big game hunting, because of the amount of clothes that the hunter will be wearing.

Preferably the fasteners 25 are swivel snaps and are well adapted to securing the chain 23 around the trunk T of the tree in the manner indicated in FIG. 2 so that the panel 11 provides a seat and the cleats 22 will dig into the bark of the tree in order to make the seat very steady.

Normally the pack frame will be carried by the hunter progressively moving through the Woods during hunting. If he finds it desirable to sit or stand in one location for a time, he may remove the pack from his back, unfasten one of the snaps 25, remove the chain from the hook 24 and wrap the chain around the trunk of the tree as indicated in FIGS. 2 and 3. When the chain has been fastened to the snap again, the pack frame will be horizontal and stationary on the tree with the cleats 22 digging into the bark so as to restrict any movement of the pack frame or seat while the crossbar 21 bears against the outer surface of the bark and tree for carrying the weight which is placed upon the panel. It will be recognized that the hunter may either sit on this horizontal panel or may stand on it so as to obtain a greatly improved view of the surrounding area. When the hunter sits on the panel 11, he need merely lift the flap 17 so as to obtain ready and easy access into the open top of the bag.

When the hunter desires to move on again he need merely fasten the hook 24 to the chain midway of its length and then secure the ends to the fasteners 25 to define the loops 23a and 23b again. When the pack frame is again mounted on the hunters back, the bag 13 will swing back to its upright position against the outer surface 14 of the panel. The bag will be cradled between the strut members 18, 19 and will be restricted against swinging thereby and will be well protected from jarring or blows that may occur due to brush or movement through the Woods over uncertain terrain. In the event that the man should lose his footing, as when descending an incline, the bottom of the bag 13 will be adequately protected by the lower portion of the strut members 18, 19 and the cleats 22 will dig into the surface of the ground to prevent unrestricted sliding down the incline.

It will be seen that I have provided a new and improved pack frame and tree seat for a hunter wherein the pack frame is readily and easily applicable to the tree in a stationary condition and Will confine and protect the bag as the man Walks through the woods or by chance loses his footing and falls down.

It will, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, detail, arrangement and proportion of the parts without departing from the scope of my invention which consists of the matter described herein and set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A multi-purpose frame to be alternately carried on a mans back and mounted on a tree,

comprising a rigid panel having top and bottom edges,

upright side edges and one surface alternately en- 4 gaging the mans back and functioning as a seat adjacent a tree,

a bag lying against the other surface of the panel and having an open top,

attaching means securing the bag to the panel,

a pair of rigid frame rods affixed to and extending along respective side edges of the panel and downwardly beyond the bottom edge thereof, said rods having lower portions extending obliquely outwardly below the bag, the space between said rods beyond the bottom edge of the panel being open and unobstructed to receive and cradle the tree trunk therein during attachment thereto,

a rigid crossbar affixed to and extending between the terminal ends of said frame rods and engaging the tree trunk to support the panel against downward pp an elongate flexible panel supporting means connected with the panel for encompassing the mans shoulders to carry the panel and bag on his back and said panel supporting means including connector means on said frame rods and spaced from said crossbar and releasably connecting an elongate flexible element in encompassing relation to the tree trunk.

2. The invention set forth in claim 1 and said crossbar having a plurality of downwardly projecting cleats and normally spaced from the mans back for digging into the ground surface in the event of a fall, and also for engaging and digging into the bark of a tree when the frame is applied to a tree trunk.

3. The invention set forth in claim 1 and said attaching means securing the bag adjacent the open top thereof to the panel adjacent the top edge thereof and permitting swinging of the bag into hanging position as the panel is oriented in horizontal position adjacent the tree.

4. The invention set forth in claim 3 and said frame rods having L-shaped portions between the panel and crossbar, said connector means connected to the L-shaped frame rods for cooperation with said elongate flexible element in alternately securing the frame on a tree trunk and to the mans shoulders,

and said crossbar having a plurality of downwardly projecting cleats thereon normally spaced away from the mans body for engaging and digging into the ground during a fall to avoid unnecessary sliding and also digging into the bark of a tree when mounted thereon.

5'. A multi-purpose frame to be alternately carried on a mans back and mounted on a tree,

comprising a rigid panel having one surface alternately engaging the mans back and functioning as a seat adjacent the tree, said surface being exposed and unobstructed to permit complete freedom of movement thereover,

a bag lying against the other surface of the panel and having an open top, the bag having means adjacent the open top securing the bag to the top edge of the panel and permit downward swinging of the bag bottom away from the panel when the panel is oriented horizontally adjacent a tree whereby to permit access downwardly into the open top from above the panel and along said edge of the panel, a pair of elongate rigid frame elements aflixed to the panel and extending along the respective side edges thereof in spaced relation to the panel to confine and retain the bag therebetween against sideward swinging,

elongate flexible panel-supporting means connected with the panel and alternately encompassing the mans shoulders and the tree trunk for supporting the panel in vertical and horizontal positions,

and a rigid crossbar spaced outwardly from the bottom edge of the panel and from said panel supporting means and afiixed to said frame elements for engaging the tree trunk and supporting the panel against downwardly tipping relative to the tree.

6. The invention according to claim 5 and including a plurality of rigid cleats aflixed on said crossbar and projecting downwardly therefrom for engaging and dig ging into the ground during a fall to prevent excessive sliding, and to dig into the trunk of a tree when applied thereto.

7. The invention according to claim 5 and said crossbar being spaced below and obliquely outwardly from the bottom edge of the panel, the frame having an open and unobstructed space directly below the bottom edge of the panel and adjoining said crossbar to receive and cradle the tree trunk during application of the frame to the tree, and releasable fastener means releasably afiixing an elongate flexible element in tree encompassing relation.

8. The invention set forth in claim 4 wherein said one surface of the rigid panel being exposed and unobstructed References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1943 Tyndall 224-9 3/1966 Gray 224-9 GERALD M. FORLENZA, Primary Examiner.

R. BALLANTYNE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2314293 *Mar 18, 1941Mar 16, 1943Benton W BlairKnapsack construction
US3241734 *May 13, 1964Mar 22, 1966Gray James DTree seat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3493080 *Mar 20, 1968Feb 3, 1970Ehlert Harry CPortable tree seat
US3513940 *Apr 29, 1969May 26, 1970Ussery Frank GHunter's seat
US3598201 *May 21, 1969Aug 10, 1971Thurmond James AClimbing device
US3730294 *Nov 19, 1971May 1, 1973Thurmond JFoldable, readily-transportable seat
US3822813 *Mar 19, 1973Jul 9, 1974Carter SBack pack frame for supporting a tent
US3944022 *May 9, 1975Mar 16, 1976Ming Joseph WTree climbing stand
US4022292 *Aug 12, 1976May 10, 1977Gompel James J VanPortable tree stand or crows nest
US4061202 *Apr 1, 1976Dec 6, 1977Campbell Donald EHunting stand
US4286739 *Jul 6, 1979Sep 1, 1981Potomac Applied MechanicsConvertible back pack frame
US4409907 *Jun 4, 1981Oct 18, 1983Brell Mar Products, Inc.Portable tree table
US4411335 *Mar 26, 1981Oct 25, 1983Forrester Joseph HHunter's tree stand
US4475627 *Aug 5, 1981Oct 9, 1984Bucksy IncorporatedPortable tree stand/camp stool
US4484700 *Nov 3, 1983Nov 27, 1984Bush Sydney JDevice for use in carrying a child
US4582165 *Aug 8, 1985Apr 15, 1986Latini Lawrence RPack frame and tree stand
US4600081 *Apr 15, 1985Jul 15, 1986Wade Richard JPortable tree seat for hunters and outdoorsmen
US4605094 *Oct 30, 1985Aug 12, 1986Minerd Richard ACombination tree seat and animal drag
US4720029 *Aug 8, 1986Jan 19, 1988Varanakis John EFolding chair/backpack
US4727961 *Jun 27, 1986Mar 1, 1988Dawson Howard DHunting tree stand
US4776503 *Mar 9, 1987Oct 11, 1988Sink Robert LHunting, backpacking and camping accessory
US4830143 *Aug 10, 1988May 16, 1989Fisher Donald FCompact, leveraged fork unit and device for supporting weighted objects upon pole shaped projections
US5156096 *Mar 15, 1991Oct 20, 1992Lamprey John PAnti-rotational outdoor shelf
US5316105 *Mar 3, 1993May 31, 1994Reggin Robert FPortable tree stand for deer hunting
US5337986 *Aug 25, 1993Aug 16, 1994Dec-Kor, Inc.Post mounted hanger
US5492255 *May 5, 1993Feb 20, 1996Gansky; Alton E.Multi-functional pack frame assembly
US5944241 *Jul 7, 1997Aug 31, 1999Globig; James E.Combination seat and storage enclosure
US6663065Jun 18, 2002Dec 16, 2003Franklin WhittenburgPortable boom
US8205626Jul 18, 2007Jun 26, 2012Myers Donald JTree stand cover
US20110259934 *Apr 27, 2011Oct 27, 2011O'ryan Timothy JosephTree stand and gear carrying system
Classifications
U.S. Classification224/155, 108/152, 182/187
International ClassificationA45F4/02, A45F4/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45F4/02
European ClassificationA45F4/02