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Publication numberUS3368813 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1968
Filing dateJan 18, 1965
Priority dateJan 18, 1965
Publication numberUS 3368813 A, US 3368813A, US-A-3368813, US3368813 A, US3368813A
InventorsPhilip B Mcgraw
Original AssigneePhilip B. Mcgraw
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baseball game having chance means including a self-reversing top
US 3368813 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. P. 5., M GRAW 3,368,813 BASEBALL GAME HAVING CHANCE MEANS INCLUDING Feb. 13, 1968 A SELF-REVERSING TOP Filed Jan. 18, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 R v w w W M B W W I l H P V1 Bv L ATTORNEYS Feb. 13, 1968 P. MCGRAW I 3,368,813

BASEBALL GAME HAV NCE MEANS INCLUD N CHA ING A SELF-REVERSING TOP Filed Jan. 18, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 m m L] '8 80 76 7a :4 UN) INVENTOR PHILIPB. CGRAW A TTORNEVS United States Patent Ofifice 3,368,813 Patented Feb. 13, 1968 3,368,813 BASEBALL GAME HAVING CHANCE MEANS INCLUDING A SELF-REVERSING TOP Phili B. McGraw, 424 Hillcrest, Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 48236 Filed Jan. 18, 1965, Ser. No. 426,200 3 Claims. (Cl. 27393) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The invention relates to a simulated baseball game. The structure comprises a fiat base board having a plurality of openings. A self-reversing top is spun on the base board and is adapted to come to rest in any one of the openings either in a generally upright position or a generally inverted position. Indicia associated with certain of the openings indicates two different game actions, one of which may be applicable if the top comes to rest in the opening in upright position and the other of which may be applicable if the top comes to rest in the opening in inverted position. A signal automatically registers a home run when the top comes to rest in one of the openings in inverted position but not when it comes to rest therein in upright position.

The invention relates to toys and refers more specifically to structure for and a method of playing a simulated game of baseball.

Baseball has long been considered the national sport of the United States. However, baseball as it is popularly known has limitations which prevent enjoyment thereof by particular people at particular times. Thus, for example, teams must-be fairly evenly matched to provide an interesting game. That is, the age of players should normally be comparable as well as the physical condition of the players. Further, the usual game of baseball requires a specific number of people and must usually be played under the right weather conditions in the right season of the year.

In the past, structure for and methods of playing simulated baseball have usually not been sufiiciently related to the usual baseball game to hold the interest of the players. Prior games sufiicient to hold the interest of the players have been complicated in structure and/or intricate in method of playing so as to be expensive and difiicult.

It is therefore a purpose of the present invention to provide improved structure for playing a simulated game of baseball.

Another object is to provide an improved method of playing a simulated baseball game.

Another object is to provide a game including a base board having a baseball field laid out thereon, a plurality of openings in the board and a top adapted to be spun on the board and means for securing a simulated baseball game in accordance with the openings in the board and the location and position of the top when the top stops spinning.

Another object is to provide structure as set forth above wherein the top is a self reversing top operable to spin about the opposite ends of a single axis therethrough.

Another object is to provide a method of playing a simulated baseball game including spinning a top on a base board having a plurality of openings therein and scoring a simulated baseball game in accordance with the position and location of the top on the board or in the openings when the top stops spinning.

Another object is to provide structure for and a method of playing a simulated game of baseball which is simple, economical and eflicient.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds, especially when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a top plan view of structure for playing a simulated game of baseball constructed in accordance with the invention.

FIGURE 2 is a transverse section view of the structure illustrated in FIGURE 1 taken substantially on the line 22 in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a partly diagrammatic and partly schematic illustration of structure for lighting up the scoreboard of the structure for playing a simulated game of baseball illustrated in FIGURE 1 to indicate a home, run.

FIGURE 4 is a modification of the structure illustrated in FIGURE 3 for lighting up the scoreboard to indicate a home run.

With particular reference to the figures of the drawing, one embodiment of the invention will now be considered in detail.

As shown best in FIGURE 1, the structure 10 for playing a simulated game of baseball includes the base board 12, scoreboard 14 and self reversing top 16. Structure 18 or 20 is provided as illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 4 for lighting up the scoreboard 12 when a home run is made in the baseball game.

In use, the top 16 is spun from the circle 22 on board 12 representing home-plate of a baseball diamond. The top 16 will walk across the board 12 and fall into one of the plurality of openings therethrough. The score for each player is kept in accordance with the usual baseball rules and the action indicated in the simulated baseball game. When a home run is indicated as when the top falls into one of the home run openings 24 in a predetermined position, the structure 18 or 20 will cause the home run indicator 26 on the scoreboard 14 to light up and bell 72 to ring.

More specifically the base board 12 may be wooden and includes the sides 28 to retain the top 16 within the confines of a ball field, including ball diamond 30, foul lines 32 and outfield fence 34 which may be printed on the base board 12 or alternatively may be printed on a plastic or paper sheet adhered to the board 12. Board 12 is also provided with a plurality of openings, such as openings 24, extending therethrough in which the top 16 may come to rest in either of its two alternative positions which will be considered subsequently.

In accordance with the rules of the simulated ball game, the openings 24 have certain baseball action instructions printed therearound, such as long fly-out, triple and upstrike and ground-out double play. In accordance with the rules of the game, if the top falls in an opening with the stern portion 36 down, a player scores the baseball action printed around the upper part of the opening. If however the top 36 falls into an opening 24 with the bottom 38 of the top in the opening, that is, with the stem 36 up, the player will score either a ball or the baseball action specifically indicated at the particular opening.

The top 16 includes the spherical bottom 38 and stem 36 and is symmetrical about an axially extending center line 39 through the stem 36. The exact structure of the self-reversing top 16 is particularly set forth in United States Patent No. 2,700,246 and will not therefore be considered in detail herein.

The top 16, as explained in the referenced patent, is of a structure to spin alternatively on the bottom 38 and stem 36 at different times when in use. Further, in use the top 16 has a tendency to walk or move about on a flat surface, such as base board 12, on which it is spun. .Spinning of the top 16 may be accomplished in the usual a, .1; manner by placing the stem between the thumb and index and middle fingers and snapping the fingers briskly.

The scoreboard 14 illustrated best in FIGURE 2 may be constructed of wood or similar material and extends upwardly from the end of the base board 12 representing the baseball out-field, as shown in FIGURE 1. The scoreboard 14 is secured to the base board 12 by convenient brackets 40. The scoreboard 14 includes a chart :2 for marking the runs scored by different players or teams in different innings in accordance with the usual baseball scoring system.

Ball, strike and out indicators 44, 46 and .8, each including a manually rotatable pointer 50, 52 and 54 respcctively, for indicating the number of strikes or balls on a batter and the number of outs in an inning are also provided on the scoreboard 14. Separate manually rotatable pointers 56, 58 and 6d are provided for indicating the positions of runners on the bases in conjunction with the dial 62 on the scoreboard The dial 64 which includes the rotatable disc 66 having the slot 63 in the periphery thereof is provided for indicating the number of runs in a single inning on rotating the dial 64 to uncover the appropriate number of runs printed concentrically around the periphery of the dial 64.

The scoreboard 14 further includes a light 26 connected to apparatus 18. illustrated best in FIGURE 3, for lighting the light 26 when the top 16 goes into one of the two openings 24 indicated home run on the base 12 with the stem 36 down. Apparatus 18 includes the batteries 73 secured to the scoreboard 14 by means of bracket 18, the bell 72 operable to provide an oral indication of a home run, switch mechanism 7 and light 26 connected in a series circuit.

The switching mechanism 74- illustrated in FIGURE 3 includes a lever 76, pivot mounting means 78 located centrally of the lever 76 for mounting the lever 76 on the base board 12. The end 8t of the lever 76 is provided with a disc 82 which extends into a home run opening 24. The end 84 of the lever 76 is electrically conductive connected in the series circuit along with the contact member and together with the contact member 36 serves to complete the series circuit through the light 26, battery 76 and bell 72 on counterclockwise pivoting of the lever 76.

In operation, the lever 76 is normally biased by gravity so that the disc 82 is in the opening 24 and the end 34 of the lever 76 is out of contact with the contact member 86. When the top 16 enters the opening 24' with the bottom 38 down, as shown in FIGURE 2, the disc 82 is not touched by the top 16 so that the circuit through the light 76 and bell 72 is not completed and under the rules of the game, as will be explained subsequently, the player will score a ball. If, however, the top enters the opening 24 with the stem down, the stem 36 contacts the disc 82 to pivot the lever 76 in a counterclockwise direction completing the circuit through the light 26, battery 76 and bell 72 through the end 34 of lever 76 and contact 86 whereby a home run is indicated by the light 26 on the scoreboard and the ringing of the bell 72.

An alternative construction for the openings through the board 12 and the structure 2% are illustrated in FIG- URE 3. As illustrated in FIGURE 3, the openings 83 are provided with a bevelled upper edge 90 and are of smaller diameter than the openings 24 through the board 12. Firmer seating of the top 16 in the openings 88 and more top action is thus provided. A cu 92 of metal or other material capable of conducting electricity is secured over the bottom of the opening 88 by convenient means (not shown) and is connected to the conductor 94 of a pair of conductors 94 and 96 which conductors are in series with the light 26, battery 79 and bell 72, as in the circuit of FIGURE 2. The other conductor 96 is connected to a disc 98 held in position in the opening 88 by the light coil spring 100 which is secured within the opening 33. Conductor 96 is electrically insulated from the cup 92 by convenient means (not shown). The disc 93 is provided with an electrically conductive stem 162 which is electrically connected to the disc 98 and which is operable on depression of the disc 98 to engage the cup 92 and complete the electric circuit therethrough. Thus, in operation again the disc 98 is moved downwardly to complete a circuit through the light 26 and bell '72 only when the top 16 enters the opening 38 with the stem in a down position to contact the disc 98.

The rules of the simulated baseball game are similar to the rules of regulation baseball. Thus the baseball action indicated for a single spin of the top is determined by the position of the top when it stops and the location thereof on the board. For example, if the top falls in one of the openings with the stem down, the player or batter who has spun the top is credited with a hit, strike or out, as indicated by the information printed around the outside of the opening 24 on the base 12. If the top comes to rest in an opening stem up, the batter is credited with one ball, except where different baseball information is indicated by information printed around the opening 24 in which the top has come to rest. If the top comes to rest anywhere on the base board 12 without dropping into an opening, the spin of the top is scored as a strike against the batter or player who has spun the top. If the stem of the top catches on the edge of a hole and does not fall freely into the hole, the spin does not count, and if the top is spun too forcibly and jumps off the board. the batter or spinner is automatically out. As with normal baseball each player or team gets three outs per inning. As many innings may be played as the players desire.

At the start of each game, each player or team is given a top 16 of different color. The first team at bat is determined by the first top to spin into a hole, stern up. The first team at bat is considered the visitors and the other team is designated as the home team. The teams keep score for each other by means of a wipe-oft crayon or grease pencil on the chart 42.

The player at bat places the top 16 on the homeplate 42 and spins the top so that the top will move about the base board 12 to eventually come to a halt in one of the openings theretbrough or elsewhere on the board to indicate baseball action as printed about the openings or as otherwise determined as set forth above, again in accordance with the general rules of the simulated baseball game.

Thus four balls are considered a walk, the batter goes to first base, and other base runners are advanced one base if the preceding bases are occupied. With three strikes the batter is out and with three outs the team is retired and the opposing team is at bat. When the top indicates a single, the batter advances to first base and all other base runners automatically advance one base only. On a double the runner moves to second base and all other base runners automatically advance two base, while with a triple, the batter goes to third base and all other base runners automatically score. On a home run, the batter and all other base runners automatically score and on a wild pitch, the batter is credited with a ball, except when there are base runners, and any runner on any base automatically advances one base.

While one embodiment of the present invention and a modification thereof have been considered in detail, other embodiments and modifications are contemplated by the inventor. It is the intention to include all embodiments and modifications defined by the appended claims within: the scope of the invention.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. Structure for playing a simulated game of ball comprising a substantially fiat horizontal base board having a plurality of openings therethrough, a spinning top associated with said base board, said top having means so that when spun in an upright position it will gradually turn to an inverted position while continuing to spin, said top being adapted to come to rest in any one of said openings either in a generally upright position or a generally inverted position, a signal, means including an operator associated with one of said openings for operating said signal in response to actuation of said operator, said top having means operable so that said top will actuate said operator when said top comes to rest in said one opening in one of its aforesaid positions but not in the other.

2. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said top has a generally spherical body and a stern projecting upwardly therefrom in the upright position of said top, said stem being the means operable to actuate said operator when said top comes to rest in said one opening in a gen erally inverted position.

3. The structure defined in claim 2, including indicia associated with certain openings indicating two different game actions one of which according to the rules may be applicable if the top comes to rest therein in generally upright position and the other of which may be applicable if the top comes to rest therein in generally inverted position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,194,147 8/1916 Dancel 273-93 1,361,616 12/1920 Reeves 27393 1,531,172 3/1925 Bowles 273-93 1,678,573 7/1928 Nakashima 273-123 2,229,295 1/ 1941 Koci 273-118 2,700,246 2 1/ 1955 Osterberg 4664 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,037,950 9/1953 France.

256,766 8/ 1926 Great Britain.

2,492 6/1926 Australia.

LOUIS G. MANCENE, Primary Examiner.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, F. BARRY SHAY, Examiners.

S. NA'ITER, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1194147 *Sep 28, 1914Aug 8, 1916 Game apparatus
US1361616 *Jun 9, 1920Dec 7, 1920William H ReevesBaseball-game apparatus
US1531172 *Oct 25, 1924Mar 24, 1925Agee Bowles BenjaminGame of chance
US1678573 *Sep 24, 1927Jul 24, 1928Yozo NakashimaAmusement device
US2229295 *Feb 29, 1940Jan 21, 1941Chicago Coin Machine Mfg CoBall objective
US2700246 *Nov 1, 1950Jan 25, 1955Werner PhistbergSelf-reversing top
AU249226A * Title not available
FR1037950A * Title not available
GB256766A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3957269 *Mar 21, 1975May 18, 1976Reginald BouchardTactical baseball game
US4452453 *Nov 12, 1981Jun 5, 1984Daley James ABaseball board game apparatus
US5582409 *May 17, 1995Dec 10, 1996Mayorga; FernandoBaseball board game
US6805348 *Jun 2, 2003Oct 19, 2004Samuel ChenBaseball board game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/244.1, 273/108.3, 273/147, 273/108
International ClassificationA63F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0608
European ClassificationA63F7/06A1