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Publication numberUS3370302 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1968
Filing dateFeb 25, 1966
Priority dateFeb 25, 1966
Publication numberUS 3370302 A, US 3370302A, US-A-3370302, US3370302 A, US3370302A
InventorsKarlyn Albert A
Original AssigneeAlbert A. Karlyn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective shield assembly
US 3370302 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

eb. 27, 1968 A. A. KARLYN 3,370,302

PROTECTIVE SHIELD ASSEMBLY Filed Feb. 25, 1966 INVEN'IUR.

5 ALBERT A. KARLYN 36 3 8 ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofiice 3,37l,3@2 PRQTECTIVE SHIELD ASSEMELY Aibert A. Karly n, SI Ridge Road, Wethersfield, Conn. ildlll Filed Feb. 25, I966, Ser. No. 53%,195 Ill Claims. (Cl. 2--2.5)

The present invention relates to protective devices, and more particularly to a substantially transparent protective shield assembly for use by an individual to ward off bodily injury. Recent riots and other violent events in the United States and abroad have clearly demonstrated the vulnerability of law enforcement officers, military personnel and citizens to injury from clubs, hurled missiles such as stones, bricks and the like, and gunshots as well as to manual blows. These same people are equally vulnerable to injury from the throwing of acids and other irritants which have been used as weapons by persons participating in riots.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel protective shield assembly for use by law enforcement ofiicers and others to ward off bodily injury and which is readily manipulated and substantially transparent so as to provide good visibility for the user even when in a position of maximum protection.

It is also an object to provide such a protective shield which is relatively light in weight to minimize fatigue and which has a very high degree of resistance to impact stresses and a high degree of transparency with substantial freedom from optical distortion.

Another object is to provide such a protective shield which may be readily and economically manufactured and which is simple to utilize and to maintain.

Still another object is to provide such a protective shield from which the user may readily release his arm if the shield is gripped by an adversary and which affords substantial cushioning against impacts.

Other objects and advantages will be readily apparent from the following detailed specification and the attached drawing wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the protective shield assembly embodying the present invention being utilized by a law enforcement officer fragmentarily illustrated in phantom line;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of a portion of the protective shield assembly of FIGURE 1 to an enlarged scale with the releasable coupling in open position;

FIGURE 3 is a transverse cross-sectional view thereof; and

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary plan view to an enlarged scale of a portion of a strap showing one releasable coupling element.

It has now been found that the foregoing objects and other advantages can readily be attained in a protective shield assembly for use by an individual which includes a substantially transparent shield of relatively high impact-resistant synthetic plastic material having a generally curvilinear cross section providing a concave inner surface. Arm-engageable means is mounted on the inner surface of the shield member for supporting engagement with the arm of the user and includes a releasable retaining assembly adjacent one side of the shield member for encircling the upper forearm of the user and releasable by a force acting to pull the shield member away from the arm of the user so as to free his arm therefrom. Holding means is provided adjacent the other side of the inner surface of the shield member for engagement with the lower arm of the user for facile manipulation and positioning of the shield assembly.

Although various synthetic plastic materials exhibit 3,37%,392 Patented Feb. 27, 1968 relatively high impact resistance such as blends of styrene-acrylonitrile-butadiene, blends of styrene-acrylatebutadiene, and high density polyethylene, polycarbonates have proven especially advantageous for the present invention because of their very high impact strength and highly desirable optical properties as well as their retention of impact strength even at temperatures below 0 Centigrade. Polycarbonate sheet material may be readily thermo-formed into simple curvilinear configurations without producing excessive internal stresses and affords a relatively lightweight member which may be solvent or flame polished to restore substantially its optical clarity after scratching'and other minor abrasions. Generally, polycarbonate sheet material employed for this purpose should be about .060.1'67 inch in thickness.

The shield may be a single thickness of sheet material or it may be a laminate of several layers of the same or dissimilar sheet materials. If so desired, it may include metallic or other inorganic layers which do not unduly reduce visibility.

By the provision of a transparent shield, the user may observe his surroundings without obstruction and yet have full protection for his head and upper body. The transversely curvilinear configuration with the concave inner surface increases the degree of protection for his arm supporting the shield and also increases the total resilience of the shield and its ability to withstand objects by defleeting them.

The strap is made of flexible material such as leather, rubber, plastic and the like and is preferably adjustable in length to provide a snug fit on the users arm. The releasable connecting means is most desirably a pull-out type snap connector which will release upon the application of a predetermined force. The snap connector has a post with a head of greater width than the shank and a snap retainer having an aperture therein receiving the post and resiliently deformable spring means engaged with the shank behind the head to maintain the post in engagement upon application of a strong force. The head which has camming surfaces on its outer and inner ends earns the spring means to release the head from the aperture. The strap is preferably comprised of three parts, two parts having end portions attached to the shield and their opposite end portions attached to the third part by means of an adjustable buckle and the releasable snap connector. The buckle provides a convenient means for adjusting the retaining means to fit the size of the arm of each particular user.

By providing the releasable retaining means, it is possible for the user to release himself from engagement with the shield when an adversary attacking or resisting the user grasps the shield and attempts to pull or push the user off balance therewith. When the shield is being held by an attacker, the user may release his hold on the hand grip and pull his arm away from the shield to cause release of the connecting means and disengagement of the users arm from the shield assembly so that the user is freed therefrom.

The holding means is preferably a rigid hand grip mounted on the inner surface of the shield for manual retention by the user for facile manipulation and positioning of the shield assembly. A cushion of resilient material such as foam rubber is provided on the inner surface of the shield and extends between the retaining assembly and the holding means to cushion the users arm against the impact of blows delivered to the outer surface of the shield. Preferably, the cushion extends well beyond the retaining assembly and holding means to provide maximum shielding for the users arm.

Referring now in detail to the attached drawing, a protective shield assembly embodying the present invention includes a substantially transparent shield of highly impact-resistant synthetic plastic material which has a generally arcuate transverse cross section forming an impact or outer surface 12 and a concave inner surface 13. A hand grip, generally designated by the numeral M, is fixedly mounted on the inner surface 13 adjacent one side of the shield 10 and has a handle portion 15 supported by a pair of mounting brackets 18 which are rigidly con nected to the shield 12 by means of fasteners A releasable retaining assembly, generally designated by the numeral 35 is mounted on the inner surface 13 adjacent the opposite side of the shield and has a flexible strap 32 which is fixedly attached at one end thereof to the shield 10 by means of the fastener 33 and has a conventional buckle 34 attached to the opposite or free end thereof.

A second flexible strap 36 is fixedly secured at one end thereof to the shield it) by means of the fastener and has an outwardly projecting post or pin mounted on the opposite or free end thereof that has a head 41 of greater width than its shank. A third flexible strap 42 has a series of longitudinally spaced apertures 4-4 on one end thereof for adjustable engagement with the buckle 3d in the usual manner. At its other end, as best seen in FIG- URE 4, the strap 42 has a releasable snap retainer 5i which has an aperture 52 therein and a resiliently deformable spring wire 54 positioned so as to extend on opposite sides of the aperture 52 and releasably retains the head 41 of the pin when the post 4% is disposed in the aperture 52. The straps 32, 36 and 4d are made of flexible material such as leather, rubber, plastic or the like.

A cushion of resilient material 56 such as foam rubber is attached on the inner surface 13 of the shield 1t} and extends between the hand grip 14 and the releasable retaining assembly 3d and therebeyond to the sides of the shield in order to act as a shock absorber to protect the arm and hand of the user against the impact of blows that may be delivered against the outer surface 12 of the shield It).

To employ the shield assembly the user inserts his arm through the loop provided by the releasable retaining assembly 3d, and manually grasps the handle portion 16 of the rigidly mounted hand grip 14. The effective length of the strap 42 may be adjusted to the girth of the users arm by means of the buckle 34 so as to provide firm engagement to support the shield assembly in the manner illustrated in FlGURE 1. Although the spring wire 54 is sufficiently rigid to hold the head 46 securely in the aperture 52 during the normal manipulation of the shield assembly, a predetermined force applied to pull the shield away from the user will cause the head 41 to expand the Wire 54 and effect release therefrom, thus freeing the arm of the user.

Accordingly, the protective shield assembly of this invention provides a protective shield for law enforcement oficers and others to enable them to ward off bodily injury and which is substantially transparent and is readily releasable by the user. The transparent shield provides full viewing by the user of the surrounding area and of attacking persons and hostile missiles coming his way, and its light Weight and the holding means make it possible for the user to quickly place the shield in a protective position. The releasable means enables the user to readily abandon the shield assembly when an attacker grasps it and attempts to throw the user off balance or drag him thereby.

The protective shield provided by this invention is durable in construction, transparent with substantial freedom from optical distortion and is easy to maintain.

Having thus described the invention, I claim:

1. A protective shield assembly for use by an individual comprising: a substantially transparent shield of relatively high impact-resistant synthetic plastic material, said shield having a generally curvilinear transverse cross section providing a concave inner surface; and arm-engageablc means mounted on said inner surface of said shield including a releasable retaining assembly for encircling the upper forearm 0f the user, said retaining assembly being releasable by a force acting to pull said shield away from the arm of the user to free his arm therefrom, and holding means for engagement by the lower arm of the user for facile manipulation and positioning of said shield assembly.

2. The protective shield assembly of claim 1 wherein said synthetic plastic material is polycarbonate.

3. The protective shield assembly of claim 1 wherein said releasable retaining assembly comprises a pair of flexible straps mounted on said inner surface of said shield and resiliently coupled releasable connecting means on overlapping ends of said straps, said connecting means being releasable by a force acting to pull said shield away from the arm of the user.

4. The protective shield assembly of claim l wherein said holding means is a rigid hand grip mounted on said inner surface of said shield.

5. The protective shield assembly of claim 1, wherein said arm-engageable means includes a cushion of resilient material on the inner surface of said shield extending between said retaining assembly and holding means to cushion the uscrs arm against impacts.

6, The protective shield assembly of claim 3 wherein said connecting means comprises a post with a head of greater width than its shank on One of said straps and a snap retainer on the other of said straps having an apcrture receiving said headed post and resiliently deformable spring means engaged with said shank of said post.

7. A protective shield assembly for use by an individual comprising: a substantially transparent shield of relatively high impact-resistant synthetic plastic material, said shield having a generally arcuatc transverse cross section providing a concave inner surface; a releasable retaining assembly mounted on said inner surface of said shield for encircling the upper forearm of the user, said retaining assembly including a flexible strap and resiliently coupled releasable connecting means releasable by a force acting to pull said shield away from the arm of the user; a rigid hand grip mounted on said inner surface of said shield for manual retention by the user for facile manipulation and positioning of said shield assembly; and a cushion of rcsilient material mounted on said inner surface of said shield and extending between said retaining assembly and said hand grip to cushion the users arm against impacts.

8. The protective shield assembly of claim 7 wherein said synthetic plastic material is polycarbonate.

9. The protective shield assembly of claim 7 wherein said flexible strap of said retaining assembly is comprised of a pair of strap elements secured at one end to said shield and having their other ends overlapping and wherein said connecting means comprises a post with a head of greater width than its shank on one of said overlapping ends and a snap retainer on the overlapping end of the other of said straps having an aperture receiving said headed post and resiliently deformable spring means cugaged with said shank of said post.

10. The protective shield of claim 7 wherein said cushion extends transversely of said shield beyond said retainlng assembly and said hand grip.

References Uted UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,140,107 5/1915 Brown.

1,250,197 12/1917 Louppe 22.5

1,314,953 8/1919 Eissler 2-2O 1,510,783 10/1924 Johnson 2-2 2,316,055 4/1943 Davey 22.5 XR

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,060,110 11/1953 France.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Iixu/ni/u'r. J. R. BOLER, Assistant Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,370,302 February 27, 1968 Albert A. Karlyn It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

In the heading to the printed specification, lines 3 and 4, forf'Albert A. Karlyn, 81 Ridge Road, Wethersfield, Conn. 06109" read Albert A. Karlyn, Wethersfield, Conn. assignor to Rowland Products, Incorporated, Kensington, Conn. a corporation of Connecticut Signed and sealed this 6th day of May 1969.

(SEAL) Attest: Q/V Edward M. Fletcher, Jr. W \A/\\/ Attesting Officer ommissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
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US1510783 *Mar 14, 1923Oct 7, 1924Johnson Carl LArm guard
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FR1060110A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3707004 *Feb 2, 1971Dec 26, 1972Christine S KapitanBallistic resistant protective guard
US3806952 *Dec 27, 1971Apr 30, 1974Viciulis FShield
US3866242 *Oct 27, 1972Feb 18, 1975Goodyear Aerospace CorpProtective shield
US4674394 *Oct 16, 1985Jun 23, 1987Pro-Tech Armored Products Of New York, Inc.Portable bullet-proof shield
US4848322 *Jan 19, 1988Jul 18, 1989Dash Georgia PEndoscopy shield
US5056155 *Jul 26, 1990Oct 15, 1991Truxell Leland CBuckler/shield for melee fighting
US5241703 *Jan 13, 1992Sep 7, 1993Roberts John CProtective shield with a forearm support
US5329636 *Apr 15, 1991Jul 19, 1994Siddle Bruce KSafety containment shield
US5641934 *Apr 17, 1995Jun 24, 1997Follett; Harold EugeneSee-through hand-held bullet-resistant shield
US5729857 *Oct 21, 1996Mar 24, 1998Martin; Patricia S.Device for removing snow and ice from the glass and painted surfaces of an automobile
US5787820 *Dec 9, 1996Aug 4, 1998Dittoe; Thomas D.Hand held protective shield device
US5850052 *Jun 19, 1997Dec 15, 1998Gabriel; WendellPadded safety shield
US5962617 *Feb 1, 1996Oct 5, 1999Simula Inc.Impact resistant polyurethane and method of manufacture thereof
US6127505 *Sep 2, 1998Oct 3, 2000Simula Inc.Impact resistant polyurethane and method of manufacture thereof
US6131524 *Jun 18, 1999Oct 17, 2000Nepper, Sr.; John P.Guardsman shield for opposably parrying a hostile assailant
US6367943 *Apr 7, 2000Apr 9, 2002Science & Engineering Associates, Inc.Riot or capture shield with integrated broad-area, high-intensity light array
US6892392Sep 25, 2002May 17, 2005Lineweight LlcPersonal body armor
US6990887Jan 30, 2004Jan 31, 2006O'donnell EugeneProtective shield
US7155857 *Jul 8, 2004Jan 2, 2007Elder Samuel FAssault rifle hand and forearm guard and method of use
US7520206 *May 2, 2005Apr 21, 2009Baker Alfred JBallistic shield and methods of use
US7571493 *Aug 4, 2005Aug 11, 2009Sandia CorporationArmored garment for protecting
US7798878Aug 28, 2007Sep 21, 2010Bobby LeePersonal windscreen apparatus
US7971516 *Mar 9, 2009Jul 5, 2011Guy HoganPortable ballistic shield
US8276498 *Aug 8, 2007Oct 2, 2012ComposiflexBallistic shield system
EP0887614A2 *Jun 23, 1998Dec 30, 1998Lothar MüllerProtection shield for use by the police force
WO2007126395A1 *Apr 24, 2007Nov 8, 2007Milan Emil JancProtective shield
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/2.5, 128/846, 2/16, 89/36.5
International ClassificationF41H5/00, F41H5/08
Cooperative ClassificationF41H5/08
European ClassificationF41H5/08