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Publication numberUS3370306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1968
Filing dateFeb 3, 1966
Priority dateFeb 3, 1966
Publication numberUS 3370306 A, US 3370306A, US-A-3370306, US3370306 A, US3370306A
InventorsHenry H Lovette
Original AssigneeHenry H. Lovette
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Body supporting units of sleeping or reclining furniture or equipment
US 3370306 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1968 H. H. LOVETTE BODY SUPPORTING UNITS OF SLEEPING OR RECLINING FURNITURE OR EQUIPMENT Filed Feb. 5, 1966 FIRM SOFT f FTRM llll IHI

EXTRA FIRM INVENTOR HENRY H. LOVETTE SOFT HQT B T SOFT L SOFT FTRM Haze United States Patent 3,376,366 BODY SUPPORTING UNITS OF SLEEPING OR RECLINING FURNITURE OR EQUIPMENT Henry H. Layette, 2431 English Road, High Point, N.C. 27260 Filed Feb, 3, 1966, Ser. No. 524,938 8 Claims. (Cl. 327) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLGSURE A box spring having a thin, pliable envelope hingedly attached along one side edge to the top of the box spring, and having an access opening along one end edge to removably receive a bed board. The envelope is approximately half the width of the box spring and is centrally disposed so that if two such springs are side by side, the envelope can be swung to span the adjacent side portions of the two springs.

Tlus invention generally appertains to novel improvements in reclining or sleeping furniture or equipment and more particularly relates to new and novel improvements in means for rendering the body supporting units of such equipment firmer for therapeutic and comfort purposes.

Most individuals, who suffer from back ailments, such as slipped or fused discs of the vertebrae column of the spine or from osteitis of the spinal column or neuralgia in the nerves of the back or muscular inflammation of the back, and other individuals, from a sole standpoint of a desired degree of comfort, regularly resort to the utilization of a bed board in connection with a spring unit and a mattress in order to obtain a firm body support with a bed. Usually, such bed boards, which are formed from plywood or the like, are merely freely superimposed on the upper surface of a spring unit, such as a box spring, and then the mattress is placed thereupon so that the bed board is loosely interposed between the upper surface of the spring unit and the mattress and is held in place on the spring unit by the weight of the mattress.

The loose interposition of a rigid bed board between the spring unit and a mattress, as in the case of a twin or single bed, while satisfactory in achieving the purpose of providing a firmer supporting surface for an individual lying on the mattress, has certain disadvantages which are mainly that the bed board is not securely located and structurally oriented in relation to the upper surface of the spring unit but instead is free to move and can jut out beyond the edges or borders of the mattress and the spring unit. in addition, when turning the mattress, it is necessary to make certain that the bed board is properly positioned between the spring unit and the mattress and this can be a very difficult and irksome task, especially when it is being carried out by only one individual.

As of late, it has become common practic in the bedding industry to produce queen or king sized beds so as to provide for the comfortable sleep of two individuals. Since such beds, when constructed from a single spring unit and a single mattress, have many drawbacks because of their considerable size, the industry has resorted to the production of such beds in sections. Thus, it is conventional to produce box or other spring units as a pair of single size, separate spring sections, which can be arranged in side by side relationship and connected together by releasable fastening means, so as to form a common, single functioning spring unit.

The use of a bed board, with a sectional spring unit of this type or even with a one piece queen or king sized spring unit or a conventional double bed, poses a problem, when one of the two individuals occupying the bed desires or needs a firmer sleeping support than afforded by the spring and mattress and the other individual does not desire or require the same. It can be realized that the use of a freely interposed bed board, which is of a lesser width than the overall width of a single spring unit or sectional unit, so that the bed board is positioned only in relation to the reclining body of one individual, is not an ideal solution to the problem because the bed board is not structurally located in its desired and correct position beneath the supined body of the individual.

Accordingly, an important object of the present invention is to provide means in structural association with a spring unit for positively orienting and securing a rigid flat member, such as a so-called bed board, in relation to the upper surface of the spring unit.

Another object of the present invention is to provide means in structural association with the upper surface of a spring unit whereby a bed board can be removably attached to the upper surface, the means being in permanent assembly with the spring unit but being of such a nature that, in the absence of a bed board, it offers no interference between the normal association of a mattress with a spring unit and the usual comfort correlation between a mattress and a spring unit of particular firmness or softness.

Another important object of the present invention is to provide means structurally attached to a spring unit for attaching a bed board to the upper surface of a spring unit in a manner so that the bed board can be positively placed over selected portions of the upper surface Without necessitating dislodgement or removal of such means from the spring unit.

A further object of the present invention is to provide means, especially in relation with joined spring sections which are releasably structurally associated so as to form the spring unit of a king or queen sized bed, for holding at least two bed boards, such means being associated with the upper supporting surfaces of each of the sections of thespring unit so that the bed boards can be placed in various positions relative to the upper supporting surface of each of the spring sections and relative to the area spanning the joined, juxtaposed sides of the spring sections.

A, still further object of the present invention is to provide a simple, extremely compact and inexpensive means for structurally associating a bed board with the upper surface of a spring unit in a manner so that the bed board can be utilized or not utilized and so that the bed board can be selectively positioned so as to positively overlie selected portions of the upper surface, without any dislocation of the structural association of such means with the spring unit.

The foregoing and ancillary objects are attained by this invention, the preferred embodiment of which is set forth in the following description and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a king or queen sized spring unit, which is composed of at least two separate and completely individual spring sections that are releasably joined together and illustrates the bed board supporting means of the present invention in structural association with each of the spring sections;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged, vertical cross-sectional view taken substantially on line 22 of FIGURE 1, and

FIGURES 3A-3D are diagrammatic end elevational views, showing some exemplary placements of the bed board supporting means in relation to the upper supporting surfaces of the joined sections of the common spring unit.

Referring now more particularly to the accompanying drawing, and initially to FIGURES 1 and 2, a king-sized bed unit is shown and includes a double bed type king sized bedstead 12 which supports a box spring unit 14. The box spring unit 14, which is merely exemplary of one environmental use of the present invention, is composed of two separate and individually complete sections 16 and 18, which are joined together at their inner juxtaposed sides by a releasable fastening means 20, which may take the form of a conventional siide fastener.

An envelope or pocket 22, which is formed from a suitable sturdy, pliable, fabric or plastic material, is structurally associated with the upper supporting'surface 24 of the spring section 16 and an identical envelope or pocket 26 is similarly structurally associated with the upper'supporting surface 28 of the spring section 18.

Since each of the envelopes is identical in construction and attachment to the spring sections 16 and 18, it will sufiice for the purpose of describing the construction to relate the same specifically to the envelope 22.

The envelope is of a planar form similar to the planar outline of the upper supporting surface of a spring unit, whether the latter be square or round but is of less dimension. Thus, the envelope 22 is substantially rectangular, corresponding to the rectangular planar outline of the upper supporting surface 24, but is of a length slightly less than the length, from the head to the foot'end, of the upper supporting surface 24, and is of a width approximately one half of the width of the upper supporting surface 24. Of course, such widthwiserelative dimensions of the envelope and the upper supporting surface 24 are given for exemplary purposes and, particularly, in relation to the use of the envelopes in association with the specific spring unit 14 or its structural counterpart.

The envelope or pocket 22, as shown in FIG. 2, is formed from a single piece of material, such as a type of mattress or box spring covering fabric or a plastic, which is folded over lengthwise. The envelope 22 includes opposing ends 30 and 32 and opposing side edges 34 and 36. The side edge 34 is formed by the looped or fold and is closed while the side edge 36 is closed off by stitching theside edges of the opposing 'face sections '40 and 42 of the fabric together by means of stitching 38. The side edge 36 is formed with a fiap 46 that is substantially normal to the side edge-36, prior to'the attachment of the envelope to the upper supporting surface -24. Theflap 46 is superimposed on the upper supporting surface and is secured thereto by stitching 45 or by any other suitable fastening means, thereby forming a hinge joint.

The end 30 is closed, ,while the end 32 is open and is provided with a releasable fastener means 48, such as a conventional slide fastener, whereby'e'nt'rance can be obtained to the interior of the envelope.

A bed board 44, which maybe formed'from inasonite, plywood, plyboa'rd or any solid material of this nature, is provided and is of a length substantially equal to the length of the envelope and of a width'slightly less than the Width of the'envelope. The bed board '44 is substantially flat and thin and is of a thickness to fit within the the envelope between the face sections 40 and 42, as shown in FIG. 2, so that the 'outer surfaces of the face sections, when the bed board is in place, are flat and slightly'taut and free from any wrinkles or the like.

It can be appreciated that the slide fastener 48 can be easily operated to permit the bed board to be sleeved into and out of the envelope or pocket 22.

The'envelope structurally orients and positions the bed board on the upper supportingsurface 24 and prevents the bed board from having any movement relative to the upper supporting surface. If it is not desired to utilize the bed board 44, then it can be easily removed and because of the thin, pliable nature of the fabric or plastic material forming the envelope, the envelope will not be of any functional consequence, when a mattress is superimposed thereon and on the upper supporting surface 24. The mattress and the spring section will have the same correlated degree of firmness or softness as they would have in the total absence of the envelope or pocket 22.

With reference to FIGURES 3A3D, various examples of the use of the bed board supporting and attaching means 22 and 26, in relation to the specifically shown king sized bed spring unit 14, are shown.

Considering FIGURE 3A, the envelope 22 is shown with a bed board 44 positioned therein, while the envelope 26 is shown devoid of a bed board 44. Thus, the major portion of the upper surface 24 of the spring section 16 will provide a firmer support for an individual lying on the mattress 50, that is superimposed on the upper surface and over the envelope 22. On the other hand, since the envelope 26 is without a bed board 44, the mattress 52 will lie on the upper supporting surface 28 of the spring section 18 and the envelope 26 will be compressed and the relationship between the mattress and the spring section will be the same as if there was nothing interposed therebetween. Therefore, the mattress section 52 will provide the usual degree of supporting surface firmness or softness for an occupant lying or reclining thereon. The adjoining side portions of the mattresses, which overlie the juncture between the spring sections, will 'be the same.

In FIGURE 3B, the envelope 22a is shown as the same as the envelope 22 in FIGURE 3A while the envelope 26a is shown as housing a bed board 44. The envelope 26a is joined to the upper supporting surface 28 by a hinge joint 46a, asshown in FIGURE 1, that is structurally the same as that shown specifically in FIGURE 2 in relation to the envelope 22. The envelope 26a, with the encased bed board 44, has been swung about the hinge atso that when a mattress unit is placed thereon, it will provide a softer support than will the portion of the mattress placed on the spring section 16 and placed on the adjoining side portions of the spring sections.

Another example is shown in FIGURE 3C, where the envelope 22b is devoid of a bed board while the envelope 26b is provided with a bed board. The envelopes are in the same position as shown in FIGURE 3B, but it will be obvious that the major portions of the upper surfaces 24 and 28 of the spring sections 16 and 18 will be softer while the adjoining portions of the spring sections will provide a firm support because the envelope 26b which spans the juxtaposed adjoining portions of the spring sections 16 and 18 is provided with the bed board 44.

It is possible to provide an extra firm support for the adjoining portions of the upper surfaces of the spring sections, as shown in FIGURE 3D, wherein the envelope 260 is shown in the same position as the envelope 26b in FIGURE 3C, but the envelope 220 is provided with a bed board and has been swung into a position to overlap or overlie the envelope 26c.

Thus, as shown in FIGURES 3A-3D, various arrangements can be realized to fit the needs and desires of two people using the bed, which is composed of the spring sections 16 and 18 and the mattress units 50 and 52 or a single mattress unit for that matter. Also, it is to be borne in mind that the same arrangements can be realized if the spring unit were of a one-piece single construction.

Such conditions can be realized whereby the spring section 16 will provide a firmer support while the spring section 18 will not and vice versa and whereby both of the spring sections will provide a firmer support and whereby either of the spring sections with the adjoining pOI'tions of the spring sections will afford a firmer support or with only the adjoining portions of the spring sections providing a firmer support or an extra firmer support.

In any event, it can be appreciated that the envelope will structurally orient a bed board in association with the upper surface of a spring unit or a section of a spring unit and is hingedly attached thereto in a longitudinal direction, considered from the head to the foot of the spring unit or section, whereby the envelope can be swung from a position resting on one portion of a spring section or a spring unit into a position resting on an adjoining section of the spring section or spring unit.

Also, it can be appreciated that the bed board can be easily removed and that because of the thin pliable nature of the material of the envelope, such envelope will not be an interfering factor of any consequence to the usual degree of firmness or softness of a mattress and a spring unit.

From the foregoing, it can be understood that many arrangements can be realized, both in connection with a single or twin bed spring unit and in connection with a one piece king or queen sized spring unit or, as illustrated in FIGURES 3A-3D, in connection with a king or queen sized spring unit, which is composed of individual, separate sections.

For example, in the instance of a regular double bed or outsize double bed, which is occupied by two persons, the envelope would be hinged along the longitudinal center line of the spring unit and would be of a Width approximately equal to one-half of the width of the spring unit. Such envelope, with an enclosed bed board, could then be used on the left or right side of the bed. Thus, the person, using the bed board, could sleep on either side of the bed by simply swinging the encased bed board over into position on the left or right side of the bed.

Accordingly, while the best known form of the present invention has been illustrated in the attached drawing and described in the foregoing description, other forms may be realized as come within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with a spring unit for an article of reclining or sleeping equipment, said spring unit having an upper supporting surface on which a mattress or cushion is adapted to be superimposed; means for increasing the supporting firmness of the spring unit and comprising a thin pliable envelope of a planar contour substantially corresponding to the planar contour of the upper surface of the spring unit, said envelope having opposing face portions and substantially opposing side edges, means hingedly attaching the envelope to the spring unit along one of said side edges to said upper surface whereby said envelope can be swung to position it on portions of the upper surface on each side of the attaching means with one of the face portions lying on the upper surface, and said envelope having means affording access to the interior thereof whereby a rigid flat member may be inserted into and removed from the envelope, and releasable fastener means structurally associated with said access means.

2. The invention of claim 1, wherein said envelope has opposing ends and said means affording access to the interior of the envelope comprises one of said ends being open, and said releasable fastener means being structurally associated with said open end to selectively close the same and secure the rigid flat member in the envelope.

3. The invention of claim 2, wherein said upper surface is substantially rectangular and said envelope is of a length substantially equal to the length of the upper surface and of a width approximately one-half less than the width of the upper surface.

4. In combination with a spring unit for an article of reclining or sleeping equipment, said spring unit having an upper supporting surface on which a mattress or cushion is adapted to be superimposed; means for increasing the supporting firmness of the spring unit and comprising a thin, pliable envelope of a planar contour substantially corresponding to the planar contour of the upper surface of the spring unit, means structurally attaching the envelope to the spring unit so that the envelope overlies and rests on the upper surface, said envelope having means affording access to the interior thereof whereby a rigid fiat member may be inserted into and removed from the envelope, and releasable fastener means structurally associated with said access means, said spring unit comprising at least two individual side by side spring sections having juxtaposed sides and fastening means joining said sides together so that the. spring sections cooperate to provide a common spring unit, each of said spring sections having an upper surface which constitute the upper surface of the spring unit, said spring sections being substantially rectangular and their upper surfaces being substantially rectangular, an envelope structurally associated with the upper surface of each spring section, said envelopes having opposing side edges with one side edge of each envelope being disposed adjacent to and spaced from the juxtaposed sides and said means structurally attaching an envelope to the spring unit including a hinge joint joining the one side edge of each envelope to the upper surface of its associated spring section whereby said envelopes can be selectively swung from positions overlying the upper surface of their associated spring sections into positions overlying the portions of the spring units adjacent the juxtaposed sides and spanning the juncture point between the spring sections.

5. The invention of claim 4, wherein said upper surfaces of the spring sections are substantially rectangular and said envelopes are of a length substantially equal to the lengths of the upper surfaces and of a width considerably approximately one-half the widths of the upper surfaces.

6. The invention of claim 4, wherein said envelopes have opposing ends, said means affording access to each envelope comprising one of said ends being open, and said releasable fastener means selectively closing off said open end.

7. The invention of claim 6, wherein said open ends of the envelopes are at the same end of the spring unit.

8. The invention of claim 7, wherein said releasable fastener means comprises a slide fastener.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,045,228 11/1912 Weltmer 5-91 2,706,821 4/1955 Griggs 5 357 2,734,556 2/1956 Hebrank 297284 X FOREIGN PATENTS 281,566 12/1927 Great Britain.

DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Primary Examiner.

R. D. KRAUS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1045228 *Oct 14, 1912Nov 26, 1912Tracy C WeltmerMattress-pad.
US2706821 *Apr 7, 1952Apr 26, 1955Griggs Dwight AMattress
US2734556 *Dec 18, 1953Feb 14, 1956 Combination seat and fatigue-relieving
GB281566A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4106142 *Sep 26, 1977Aug 15, 1978Schuder Paul SMattress construction
US6536372Mar 28, 2001Mar 25, 2003William A. LoeserApparatus for assisting animals in ascending elevated areas
US6618883 *Jan 30, 2002Sep 16, 2003Clair A. AnglandMattress support device for a sofa sleeper
US7013515Feb 27, 2004Mar 21, 2006Price J WesnerBody impression-resistant mattress assembly
US7793370 *Oct 27, 2008Sep 14, 2010Sheralyn HamptonBed skirt accessory device
US8651579Jun 25, 2012Feb 18, 2014Hip Innovations LlcApparatuses and methods for increasing support provided by cushioned furniture and other occupant supporting furniture
US20140157519 *Feb 15, 2014Jun 12, 2014Hip Innovations, LlcApparatuses and Methods for Increasing Support Provided by Cushioned and Other Occupant Supporting Furniture
WO2007005850A2 *Jul 1, 2006Jan 11, 2007Steven FirestoneSag stopper
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/659
International ClassificationA47C27/12, A47C27/16, A47C20/02, A47C20/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/16, A47C21/06
European ClassificationA47C27/16, A47C21/06