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Publication numberUS3370586 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1968
Filing dateJun 1, 1965
Priority dateJun 1, 1965
Publication numberUS 3370586 A, US 3370586A, US-A-3370586, US3370586 A, US3370586A
InventorsAragona Robert J, Fryling Jerome T
Original AssigneeAragona
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Underwater breathing device with valved float
US 3370586 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3,370,586 UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICE WITH VALVED FLOAT Filed June 1, 1965 F 1968 R. J. ARAGONA ETAL 3 Sheets-Sheet I INVENTORS.

' 05527 c/ AzAam/A ATTORNEYS.

Feb. 27, 1968 R. .1. ARAGONA ETAL 3,370,585

UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICE WITH VALVED FLOAT 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 1, 1965 I Tia/4 INVENTORS. A24 60/1/14 W, K2 w m 7! W Jaw/v5 Z F271 MG ATTORNEYS.

Feb. 27, 1968 R. J. ARAGONA ETAL UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICE WITH VALVED FLOAT 5 Sheets-Sheet /84 Filed June 1, 1965 INVENTORS. 05527 J Am 4am ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent 3,370,586 UNDERWATER BREATHING DEVICE WITH VALVED FLOAT Robert J. Aragona, RD. 5, Box 102, Wcstcott Road, Schenectady, N.Y. 12306, and Jerome T. Fryling, Schenectady, N.Y.; said Fryling assignor to said Aragona Filed June 1, 1965, Ser. No. 460,031 6 Claims. (Cl. 128145) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A snorkel type of underwater breathing apparatus in which a float is provided with a valved air passage, a splash guard and an air hose. The float and air hose are attached to a harness worn on the sw-immer body whereby the float may be towed by the swimmer. The mouthpiece has a pair of conduits which are supported on the harness, one being attached to the air hose and the other opening into the water.

This invention relates to an underwater breathing device, and more particularly to an underwater breathing device which is so constructed and arranged to preclude the inadvertent inhalation of water by the user.

The underwater breathing devices known to the prior art may be separated into various categories, e.g., (1) the scuba type, in which the swimmer carries a self-contained pressurzide breathing device, (2) the user-carrier compressor type which utilizes an underwater compressor means and an above water air source to provide the user with a source of oxygen, and the non-compressor type in which the user carries a breathing apparatus adjacent the face connected to an above water air source.

It is with this latter category that this invention is primarily concerned, although certain subcombinations of this invention may be utilized in other devices. One disadvantage of the underwater breathing devices known to the prior art is that water may be inhaled therethrough, much to the discomfort and chagrin ofthe user. Another disadvantage of the devices known to the prior art is that the exhausted air exits adjacent the face of the user, thus limiting his ability to observe the adjacent surroundings. Other disadvantages of the prior art reside in the use of complicated check valves to correctly distribute the flow of air through the underwater breathing device.

It is an object of the instant invention to provide arr underwater breathing device which utilizes the breathing power of the user to inhale air from an above water station.

Another object of this invention is to provide an above water air inlet station which precludes the inhalation of water into the air distribution system of an underwater breathing device.

Another object of the instant invention is to provide an underwater breathing device in which exhaust air is emitted rearwardly of the face of a user.

A further object of this invention is to provide an underwater breathing device having a single hose communicating with the surface in order to avoid tangling of hoses.

Another object of this invention is to provide pivotally mounted pressure operated check valves to control the flow of air within the apparatus.

A further object of this invention is to provide a float having an air inlet station which precludes the entry of water into a breathing apparatus.

Other objects and advantages of the instant invention reside in the combinations of elements, arrangements of parts and features of construction and use, some of which will be apparent and some of which will be more fully pointed out hereinafter and disclosed in the accompanying drawings wherein there is shown preferred embodiments of this inventive concept.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a pictorial view showing the underwater breathing apparatus of the instat invention as it appears in use;

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of the float device utilized in the underwater breathing apparatus of the instant invention, certain parts being broken away for clarity of illustration;

FIGURE 3 is a front elevational View of the float of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of the float of FIGURE 2, taken along line 44 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse sectional view of FIGURE 4 taken along line 55 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 6 is a cross-sectional view of the device of FIGURE 4 taken along line 6-6 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 7 is a cross-sectional view of the float of FIGURE 4 taken along line 77 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 8 is a top plan view of the inlet and outlet connections carried by a user;

FIGURE 9 is an end elevational view of the structure of FIGURE 8 as seen along line 9-9 viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 10 is a longitudinal sectional view of the fresh air conduit, taken along line 1010 of FIGURE 8 and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 11 is a front elevational view of the structure of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 12 is a top plan View of a mouthpiece and air conduits of the instant invention;

FIGURE 13 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the air conduits shown in FIGURE 12 taken along line 1313 and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 14 is a front eleVati-onal view of the mouthpiece of FIGURES 12;

FIGURE 15 is a top plan view of another embodiment of a float of the instant invention, certain parts being broken away for clarity of illustration;

FIGURE 16 is a transverse sectional view of the float of FIGURE 15, taken along line 16-16 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURES 17 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the float of FIGURES 15, taken along line 1'5-15 thereof and viewing in the direction of the arrows; and

FIGURE 18 is a cross-sectional view of the air inlet of the float shown in FIGURES 15 to 17.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, wherein like reference characters designate like elements throughout the several views thereof, and particularly to FIGURES 1 to 14 inclusive, there in indicated generally at 10 an underwater breathing apparatus comprising a float shown generally at 12 on a surface 14 of a body of water, and an air distribution system indicated generally at 16 secured to a user 18 for supplying suflicient quantities of air for breathing.

Referring now to FIGURES 2 to 7 inclusive, float 12 includes two laterally spaced floatable supports or pontoons 26 which may be of Wood, Styrofoam or the like, and which are fixedly secured to a horizontal transverse platform 22 by a series of substantially vertical conventional nut and bolt connecting members 24. Dependingly secured to the under side of platform 22 between pontoons is an eye 26 which acts as a securing means for a tow rope or wire 28 as more fully explained hereinafter. It should be noted that the configuration of pontoons 20 and eye 26 provides an easily towable float as shown in FIGURE 3. It is apparent that the configuration of FIGURE 3 is more easily towed than is an innertube, for example, which presents a frictional surface transverse to the direction of travel.

Secured centrally of platform 22 is a mushroom-shaped structure shown generally at 30 which houses the air inlet mechanisms of the instant invention. Mushroom-shaped structure 30 comprises a vertical tube shown generally at 32 secured to platform 22 so that a portion of tube 32 extends below platform 22 and a horizontal disc indicated generally at 34 secured to the uppermost end of vertical tube 32.

Tube 32 includes a bottom wall 36 which is provided with a pair of openings 38 separated by a cross bar 39, each opening having the configuration of a segment of a circle, and a top wall 40 having an aperture 42 for the entry of air as will be more fully explained hereinafter. Disposed within tube 32 is a valve closure indicated generally at 44 comprising a lower float 46, an upper ballshaped closure member 48 and a shaft 50 fixedly connecting float 46 and walve closure 48.

As more fully explained hereinafter, valve closure member 44 must be made of a material which floats in water, such as for example, wood, styrofoam, plastic or the like. Secured between upper and lower walls 36, 40 and forming a guide means for valve closure member 44 are three spaced rods 52, 54, 56 to insure that valve closure member 44 reciprocates linearly so that ball closure 48 will close aperture 42. Also secured within tube 32 is a flange 53 having an aperture 55 that cooperates with ball valve or float 46 to create an air lock within tube 32 to preclude the entry of water into the air distribution system leading to a swimmer. Secured to one side of tube 32 and communicating with the interior thereof through open ing 58 is an air outlet tube 60 to which is secured a fresh air conduit 62 as is more fully explained hereinafter.

Horizontal disc 34 includes an upper impervious circular plate 64 and a lower plate 66 forming a central aperture 68 and a series of laterally spaced air inlets 70. As shown in FIGURE 4, plates 64, 66 are spaced apart at their center to provide an air conduit between air inlets 70, opening 42, opening 58 in tube 32 tube 60 and fresh air conduit 62. I

From the previously mentioned structure, it is seen that float 12 provides an air supply for an underwater swimrner in which it is practically impossible to inhale water. For example, the positioning of air inlets 70 beneath horizontal disc 34 precludes the inhalation of water produced by waves on surface 14. The use of a floating reciprocable valve 44 results in the closing of aperture 42 when float- 46 is raised by an upsurging wa've while the placement of opening 58 precludes the wave from entering tube 60 and fresh air conduit 62.

Referring now to FIGURES 8 to 11 inclusive, there is I shown generally at 72 a support means comprising a substantially planar platform 74 having an elongate slot 76 at each end thereof for the reception of a body encompassing strap 77 which secures support means 72 to the torso of a swimmer as shown in FIGURE 1. Support means 72 includes a centrally mounted upstanding lug 78 having an aperture 80 into which is looped wire 28 for towing float 12. As previously mentioned, the relationship between eye 26, rope or wire 28, and lug 78 results in the movement of float 12 over surface 14 in a most expeditious manner.

Secured to platform 74 between upstanding lug- 78 the other end of fresh conduit 82 is secured by a second fresh air conduit to a breathing apparatus held in the mouth of a swimmer as is more fully explained hereinafter.

Secured on the support means 72 on the other side of upstanding lug 78 is an air exhaust support generally indicated at 92 including a first support section 94 secured to platform 74 in any conventional manner and having a first enlarged aperture 96, a second smaller aperture 98 communicating therewith and a shoulder 100 formed at the juncture of apertures 96, 98. Pivotally mounted on shoulder 100 is a flap-type check valve indicated generally at 102 comprising an annular upstanding sealing ring 104 secured to shoulder 100 and a circular closure plate 106 mounted on an S-shaped spring 108 one end of which is secured to shoulder 100. As shown in FIG- URES 8 and 10, closure plate 106 overlaps annular'sealing ring 104 with spring 108 providing the biasing forces necessary to effectuate a one-way closure.

Fitted about a smaller section 110 of first support 94 is an exhaust air conduit 112 which conducts the exhaust gas from a breathing apparatus held in the mouth of a swimmer as will be more fully explained hereinafter.

Secured within enlarged aperture 96 is a second cylindrical support 114 comprising a first frusto-conical aperture 116 communicating through a circular aperture 118 to an enlarged circular aperture 120. As shown in FIG- URES 8 and 10, the differences in diameters of apertures 118-, 120 creates a shoulder 122 on which ismounted a flap-type check valve 124 of identical configuration with check valve 102.

As will be more fully explained hereinafter, the exhaled air from a swimmer travels through conduit 112 into aperture 98 and opens flap-type check valve 102 against F the biasing forces produced by spring 108. Unless the swimmer is taking very short breaths, the amount of air exhaled will not only open check valve 102 and fill the volume between check valves 102, 124, but will also open check valve 124 with the exhaled air escaping through a body of water as indicated in FIGURE 1. It should be apparent that the use of two check valves in air exhaust support 92 precludes the possibility of an inflowing rush of water reaching a swimmer.

Referring now to FIGURES 12 to 14 inclusive, there is indicated generally at 126' a breathing apparatus including a mouthpiece indicated generally at 128 and a distribution T indicated generally at 130.

Mouthpiece 128 comprises an arcuate substantially semicircular flange 132 having acentrally disposed aperture 134 about which is secured a collar 136for engagement with distribution T 130. Mouthpiece 128 alsoincludes a pair of centrally mounted coplanar sections 138, 140 which a-swimmer may grasp between his teeth in a convention manner.

Distribution T 130 includes a male T shown generally at 144 having a first leg 146 formed with an aperture 148 fixedly secured in collar 136 of mouthpiece 128. T

144 also includes a second leg 150 and a third leg 152,

legs 150, 152' forming a common aperture 154 communicating with aperture 148 and consequently with aperture 134 of mouthpiece128. I

Secured about leg 152 of T 144 is a connecting member shown generally at 156cornprising an enlarged cylindrical body 158 having an enlarged aperture 160 fixedly receiving leg 152. Connecting member 156 also includes a smaller cylindrical section 162 having a smaller aperture 164 communicating with aperture 160 and forming a shoulder 166 formed at the junction of the apertures. As intimated previously, fresh air conduit 90' connectsfresh air support 82 with cylindrical section 162 thus providing fresh air communication between float 12 and mouthpiece 128. v Mounted on shoulder 166 is a flap-type check valve' 168 of identical configuration with check valves 102' and 124, as more fully explained hereafter. Leg 150 of male T 144 forms an aperture 170 of smaller diameter than aperture 154 with a check valve indicated generally at 172 mounted on the annular ring of leg 150.

An exhaust connection indicated generally at 174 includes a first enlarged cylindrical section 176 forming an enlarged aperture 178 fixedly secured about leg 150 and a second smaller cylindrical section 180 forming a smaller aperture 182 communiacting with opening 178. As previously indicated, exhaust hose 112 provides communication between exhaust air connection 92 and mouthpiece 128.

In the operation of breathing apparatus 126, mouthpiece 128 will be grasped in the teeth of a user so that the user may breathe through the mouth. Upon inhalation, check valve 172 will remain closed with check valve 168 opening, thus providing a flow of fresh air from float 12 through fresh air conduit 62, fresh air support 82, fresh air conduit 90 and distribution T 130. Upon exhalation, check valve 168 will close with check valve 172 opening thus allowing the flow of stale air from mouthpiece 128 to exhaust air support 92 through exhaust air conduit 112. As previously explained, check valves 102, 124 will open upon the flow of fresh air through support 92, thus discharging exhaled air rearwardly of the user as indicated in FIGURE 1.

Referring now to FIGURES to 18 inclusive, there is indicated generally at 184 a modified form of a float which may be utilized with the remainder of the components of the instant invention and which comprises a supporting structure indicated generally at 186, an air inlet tube shown generally at 188 and a horizontal disc indicated generally at 190.

Supporting means 186 is of similar configuration to that of float 12 and comprises a pair of parallel spaced apart floating supports or pontoons 192 secured to a horizontal transverse platform 194 by any conventional fastening means, such as nuts and bolts 196. Dependingly secured to the underside of platform 194 is an eye 198 for securement with a tow rope or two wire as previously explained. Air inlet tube 188 comprises an inverted J- shaped tube 199 forming a central aperture 200 and secured to platform 194 by a frusto-conical connecting member 202. Tube 199 extends below platform 194 and is connected to a fresh air conduit 62 by an intermediate connecting member 204.

The upper end of tube 199 is equipped with a ball-type check valve indicated generally at 206 which is composed of a valve cage shown generally at 208 in FIGURE 18. Valve cage 208 includes an upper plate 210 forming a circular valve seat 212 coaxial with opening 200 of air inlet tube 199. Valve cage 208 also includes a lower plate 213 forming an aperture 214 and a plurality of valve guides 216 connecting plates 210 and 213. A ball valve 218 is positioned within valve cage 208 such that air may normally flow through valve seat 212 into tube 198, but should Water attempt to enter tube 199 it will carry floatable ball valve 218 into seating engagement with valve seat 212.

Horizontal disc 190 includes an upper surface 220 and a lower surface 222 spaced apart at their centers as shown in FIGURE 17. It should be apparent that horizontal disc 190 isolates valve 206 from any wave action initiating from water surface 14 except for a breaker, which will necessarily approach valve 206 from an upwardly direction thus allowing valve seat 212 to be open under ordinary conditions. It is apparent that this construction provides a substantially continuous source of air for an underwater swimmer.

It is now seen that there is herein provided an improved underwater breathing device having all the objects of this invention and others, including many advantages of great practical utility and commercial importance.

Since many embodiments may be made of the instant inventive concept, and since many modifications may be made in the embodiments hereinbefore shown and described, it is to be understood that the foregoing is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

We claim:

1. An underwater breathing device comprising a float including means for horizontally supporting said float on a surface of water, a vertical air passage tube secured to said support means having air inlet means and air outlet means, said float further including a horizontal disc secured to said vertical air passage, said disc having an upper and lower surface and providing an interior air conduit in communication with said vertical air passage tube, said lower surface being formed with at least one downwardly facing opening in communication with said interior air conduit to provide a fresh air supply thereto;

said vertical air passage having an upper valve seat positioned adjacent an upper end of said passage, a lower valve seat positioned below said upper valve seat, and an opening adjacent a lower end of said passage, a floatable valve member positioned in said air passage for selectively closing said valve seats upon the entry of water into said opening, said valve member having an upper closure member configured to seal against said upper valve seat, a lower closure member configured to seal against said lower valve seat, means fixedly connecting said upper closure member and said lower closure member in spaced apart relation, said upper closure member being positioned below said upper valve seat and said lower closure member being positioned below said lower valve seat;

said air outlet means of said vertical tube communicating with said vertical air passageway between said valve seats;

support means comprising an encompassing strap of a size sufficient to fit about the torso of a user, fresh air conduit means of substantially uniform cross sectional area on said strap, exhaust air conduit means on said strap;

fresh air conduit means operably connecting said air outlet means on said float and said fresh air conduit means on said support means;

a mouthpiece having means adapted to be gripped by the teeth of a user providing a fresh air inlet and an exhaust air outlet;

conduit means operably connecting said fresh air conduit means on said strap and said fresh air inlet means on said mouthpiece;

conduit means operably connecting said exhaust air outlet of said mouthpiece and said exhaust air conduit means on said support means for emitting exhaust air rearwardly of said user.

2. The structure of claim 1 wherein said closure member and said floatable member are spheres and said means connecting said closure member and said floatable member is a rod.

3. The structure of claim 1 wherein said air passage includes guide means for limiting movement of said valve member to a substantially vertical direction.

4. An underwater breathing device as defined in claim 1 wherein said mouthpiece includes a first valve interposed in said fresh air inlet and means normally biasing said first valve to its closed position, a second valve interposed in said exhaust air outlet, and means normally biasing said second valve to its closed position, said first valve opening and closing, alternately, upon inhalation and exhalation by the user, and said second valve closing and opening, alternately, upon inhalation and exhalation by the user.

5. An underwater breathing device as defined in claim 1 wherein valve means is disposed in said exhaust air conduit means on said support means, said last named valve means including a pair of normally closed valve disposed in said air exhaust conduit means in axially spaced relation relative thereto, and means normal- 1y biasing said pair of valves to their respective normally closed positions.

8 in said exhaust air conduit means in axially spaced relation relative thereto, and means normally biasing said pair of valves to their respective normally closed positions.

References Cited 6. An underwater breathing device as defined in claim 1 wherein UNITED STATES PATENTS said mouthpiece includes a first valve interposed in 908,690 1/1909 Neubert 128145 said fresh air inlet and means normally biasing said 1,324,514 12/1919 Mueller 128-145 X first valve to its closed position, a second valve in- 10 1,824,512 9/1931 Szamier 128-445 X terposed in said exhaust air outlet and means nor- 2,780,224 2/1957 Walla e 128145 X mally biasing said second valve to its closed posi- 2,974,331 3/1961 Dize 9--11 X tion, said first valve opening and closing, alternately, upon inhalation and exhalation by the user, and FOREIGN PATENTS said second valve closing and opening, alternately, 5 1,177,002 12/1953 Franceupon inhalation and exhalation by the user; and valve means disposed in said exhaust air conduit means on said support means, said last named valve means including a pair of normally closed valves disposed RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

W. E. KAMM, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US908690 *Oct 3, 1906Jan 5, 1909Schraders Son IncDiving-gear or the like.
US1324514 *Mar 24, 1919Dec 9, 1919 Liee-peesebveb
US1824512 *Oct 4, 1930Sep 22, 1931Vincenty SzamierDiving apparatus
US2780224 *Mar 16, 1953Feb 5, 1957Wallace JamesMask for learning to swim above and under water
US2974331 *Dec 19, 1958Mar 14, 1961Melvin W DizeSwim float
FR1177002A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3467091 *Jan 4, 1968Sep 16, 1969Aragona Robert JUnderwater breathing devices with valved air supply means
US3951142 *Mar 19, 1975Apr 20, 1976Robert MartinUnderwater breathing apparatus
US4793341 *May 20, 1987Dec 27, 1988Arasmith Stanley DUnderwater breathing apparatus having a repository
US4819626 *Nov 13, 1987Apr 11, 1989The Secretary Of State For Defence In Her Majesty's Government Of The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern IrelandContamination prevention device for diver's breathing apparatus
US4986267 *Jul 12, 1988Jan 22, 1991Doss Stephen FUnderwater breathing apparatus
US5471976 *Jun 9, 1993Dec 5, 1995Smith; Raymond K.Mini diving system
US5622165 *Apr 5, 1996Apr 22, 1997Huang; Chun-MingSnorkel diving device
US6408844 *Apr 28, 1999Jun 25, 2002Lee Hwa-JoonBreathing apparatus
US6435178 *Jan 6, 2000Aug 20, 2002Cheng-Chi LinSwim mask with floating air-suction device
US6478024Dec 29, 1999Nov 12, 2002Nathaniel White, Jr.Snorkeling equipment
US7032591 *Sep 26, 2003Apr 25, 2006Monnich John MSnorkel with improved purging system
US7621268 *Nov 15, 2004Nov 24, 2009Junck Anthony DLow physiological deadspace snorkel
EP0340143A1 *Apr 21, 1989Nov 2, 1989Zamora Pablo MolinaAir supply for divers
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/201.11
International ClassificationB63C11/20, B63C11/02
Cooperative ClassificationB63C11/207
European ClassificationB63C11/20S1