Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3373735 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1968
Filing dateOct 21, 1965
Priority dateOct 21, 1965
Also published asDE1491731B
Publication numberUS 3373735 A, US 3373735A, US-A-3373735, US3373735 A, US3373735A
InventorsJohn P Gallagher
Original AssigneeJohn P. Gallagher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medical-surgical tube
US 3373735 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. P. GALLAGHl-:R 3,373,735

MEDICAL-SURGICAL TUBE Filed oct. 21, 1965 vg, IO :sa G O O @I @OOO Bywgwu ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,373,735 MEDICAL-SURGICAL TUBE .lohn P. Gallagher, 2415 Foxhall Road NW.,

` Washington, D.C. 20007 Filed Oct. 21, 1965, Ser. No. 500,118 7 Claims. (Cl. 12S-2) This invention relates to an improved medical-surgical tube and in particular to such a tube having a colorchange acid-base indicator means associa-ted `therewith.

In many surgical or clinical procedures, in which tubes or catheters are employed, it is essential to be able to determine the location of the outlet or distal end o-f the tube within the body of the patient. One important and common use of medical-surgical tubes is for feeding patients wherein a feeding tube is inserted through one of the nostrils into the stomach of the patient. After the tube is lodged in the stomach, the desired fluids may 'be forced through the tubel directly int-o the patients stomach. However, .it is not uncommon, in passing the distal en-d of the tube from the nasal cavity toward the stomach, that the distal end enters the traohea whereby the distal end lodges in a lung rather than the stomach of a patient. Forcing of fluids into such a mislocated tube could result in undesirable complications.

l/Iedieal-.surgical tubes having X--ray o-paque portions are known whereby directing7 a beam of X-rays through the body of a patient in the neighborhood of the inserted tube while observing the relative position of the tube a skilled technician or a physician could determine whether the feeding tube is correctly positioned in the stomach or incorrectly positioned in a lung of the patient. While the use of the X-ray technique for determining the position of medical-surgical tubes will provide the desired result-s such techniques require substantial skills and considerable time and equipment.

I-t is, therefore, a principal object of the present invention to provide a simple, relatively inexpensive, medicalsurgical tube having incorporated therein a color-change acid-base indicator means whereby it may be simply, quickly and inexpensively determined if, for example, the distal end of a feeding tube is correctly positioned in a patients stomach by merely determining the color of a color indicator which has 'been bathed in the body fluid surrounding the distal end of the tube.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention are provided by a medical-surgical tube having an internal end portion adapted to be inserted within a body cavity and an external end portion adapted to remain outside of the body, a color-change indicator carrier means associated with the external end portion of the tube and means providing liquid communication between the inner wall of the tube and said indicator carrier means.

The invention will be more particularly described with specic reference to a stom-ach tube and in conjunction with the illustrative embodiments of the invention sho-wn in the drawings wherein:

FIGURE l is a diagrammatic view of the upper portion of the human head illustrating one method of positioning a stomach tube through the nasal passage into the stomach of the patient;

FIGURE 2 is a section on line 2 2 of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 3 is a transverse section on line 3-3 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse section .simil-ar to that illustrated in FIGURE 2 of a further form of the present invention; and

FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to that shown in FIGURE 3 of a further form of the improved medioal-surgical tube of the invention.

Referring to the drawings and in particular to FIG- ICC URES l, 2 and 3, 10 generally designates a stomach tube constructed in accordance with the present invention.

The tube 10 has a distal, or internal end portion 14 and an external end portion 12. In FIGURE l the stomach tube 10 is4 shown passing through a nostril of a patient 15, down through the esophagus 18, thence to the stomach indicated by the reference arrow. Also in FIG- URE l, in broken lines, there is illustrated the tube 10 passing through the nasal passage of the patient 15 and into the larynx, through the trachea thence into the lungs in a manner not desired where the tube 10 is to be used to feed the patient 15.

Now referring particularly to FIGURES 2 and 3, adjacent the external end portion 12 of the tube 10 an absorbent piaper ring 22 is molded within the tu'be intermediate the outer wall 24 and the inner wall 26 .with the axis of the ring of absorbent paper 22 being generally coaxial with the axis of the bore of the tube. A plurality of perforations 28 pass through ythe inner wall 26 o'f the tube 10 to the inner surface 30 of the absorbent paper ring 22 whereby liquid within the tube will bath the absorbent paper. In this form of the invention the absorbent paper 22 provides a carrier means for a colorchange indicator. Preferably the color-change indicator is of the acid-base type and as used herein the color-change indicator is a substance which is used for the visual detection and determination of a specific constituent present in a liquid or mixture of liquids.

In general, indicators for the detection of acids and bases consist of substance that undergo visual change Within :a predetermined limited range of hydrogen iron ooncentrationjMany such indicators are known in the art. Of the well-known indicators, litmus, a blue coloring matter from various species of liohens, particularly Vrariolaria, has been found to be a very satisfactory colorchange acid-base indicato-r for the improved stomach tube. Litmus is partially soluble in water or alcohol and when used as .an acid-base indicator it turns red at pH 4.5 and blue .at pH 8.3. Litmus is non-toxis and in view of its nontoxi-mity has been used as a coloring agent for beve-rages.

Prior to sale of the improved medical-surgical tube, the carrier 22 or the color-change indicator is charged with for example a litmus solution which after drying remainswithin the carrier..

Other useful color-change acid-base indicators are set forth in the following table with their color characterisitics:

TAB LE I Trade Name Methyl Orange Phenol Red Phenolphthalein.

In operation of the stomach tube hereinabove described with reference to the FIGURES 1 through 3, after the tube is inserted in the stomach of a patient a small amount of the fluid present in the body adjacent the distal end is drawn into the tube to pass through the openings 28 and thus wet the color-change indicator carrier 22. If the distal end of the tube is properly within the stomach of the patient, and if the indicator is, for example, litmus the absorbent paper 22 will turn red as, on the average the pH of stomach juices is about 1 to about 2. If, however, the distal end of the tube has become improperly lodged in the lungs, the color indicator would indicate a blue color as the pH of the mucous and other uids in the lungs averages about 7 wit a range of from about 7.45 to about 8.15.

The juices bathing the lower end of the tube 10 may be drawn into the tube, to the zone of the color-change indicator by suction means or as illustrated, in FIGURE 3, a plurality of capillary bores 40 may be provided in the tube, connecting the distal end and the absorbent paper 22. As a substitute for or in conjunction with the opening 28 and/or the capillary tubes 40, the tube may be provided with a channel extending from the distal end to the carrier 22, which channel may be tilled with a wicking substance such as absorbent paper and the like whereby body uids at the distal end of the tube may be wicked into wetting relationship with the ring type carrier 22 for the color-change indicator.

Referring to FIGURE 4 of the drawing, a further form of the improved medical-surgical tube is illustrated. In FIGURE 4 the tube 10' having an inlet or external end portion 12 is provided with an internal carrier 22', such as absorbent paper, for a color-change indicator. In FIG- URE 4 the carrier 22 is molded within the tube wall between the outer surface 24 and the inner surface 26 of the tube and one end 43 of the carrier 22 projects inwardly through the inner wall 26' to provide a wick whereby when body uids are drawn upwardly from the distal end to the zone adjacent the color-change indicator carrier 22', the indicator carrier 22' is wetted by wicking action. This form of the invention may also be provided with capillary channels 40 as indicated in FIGURE 3 of the drawing.

Referring to FIGURE S of the drawing, a further form of the present invention is illustrated, wherein the medical-surgical tube 10" having an external end portion 12" is provided with a perforated zone 44 comprising a plurality of perforations 28 which provide for communication between the inner wall 26" and the outer wall 24 of the tube 10". An absorbent band or strip 22 is mounted about the zone of perforations 44 in contact with the outer surface 24 of the tube 10" and is maintained in said stated relationship by a plastic, metal or the like sleeve 46 which may be heat sealed, cemented or frictionally maintained in its illustrated relationship on the outer surface of the tube 10". This form of the invention may also be provided with capillary or wicking channels as discussed with reference to FIGURE 3 of the drawing. In the form of the invention illustrated in FIG- UR-E 5, if the ring or band 46 is frictionally maintained in its illustrated relationship to the perforate zone 44 and the absorbent carrier 22" for the color-change indicator, the absorbent band 22" may be readily replaced after each use.

From the foregoing description, taken in consideration with the drawings, it will be seen that the present invention fully accomplishes the aims and objects hereinbefore set forth. While the invention has been particularly described with reference to the stomach tube, the invention has other uses for example, the urine of a healthy person has a known range of pH values and a doctor or technician can readily observe the pI-I condition of the urine during catheter draining thereof through the use of the present invention,

I claim:

1. A medical-surgical tube having an internal end portion adapted to be inserted within a body cavity and an external end portion adapted to remain outside the body, a color-change acid-base indicator carrier means on the tube and located adjacent the outlet end portion of the tube, and means providing liquid communication between the inner wall of the tube and said indicator carrier means.

2. The invention 'clened in claim 1 wherein said indicator carrier means comprises a piece of absorbent material and an indicator absorbed thereon.

3. The invention defined in claim 2 wherein the indicator absorbed on the absorbent material comprises litmus or phenolphthalein.

4. A medical-surgical tube having Van internal end portion adapted to be inserted within a body and an external end portion adapted to remain outside the body, a color-change indicator carrier means on the tube and located adjacent the external end portion of the tube, an indicator absorbed on said carrier means, means providing liquid communication between the internal wall of the tube and the indicator absorbed on the indicator carrier means.

5. The invention defined in claim 4 wherein the indicator carrier means comprises an absorbent paper band formed within the tube and the means providing liquid communication between the internal wall of the tube and said indicator carrier means comprises a plurality of openings extending from the indicator carrier means through the inner wall of the tube in the zone of the indicator carrier means.

6. The invention defined in claim 1' wherein said indicator carrier means comprises a piece of absorbent paper one edge of which is maintained in uid contact with a portion of the inner wall of said tube.

7. The invention defined in claim 1 wherein the indicator carrier means comprises a band of absorbent material extending about a portion of the outer surface of the tube, a protective band extends over said absorbent carrier, and a zone of perforations extends between the inner surface of said absorbent carrier and the interior of said tube.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,567,445 9/ 1951 Parker 116-114 X 2,918,893 12/1959 Norton 116-114 3,058,472 10/ 1962 Thornton 12S- 348 3,15 5,091 1 1/ 1964 Nissenbaum 128--2 FOREIGN PATENTS 519,368 2/ 1931 Germany. 241,199 1/ 1926 Great Britain.

DALTON L. TRULUCK, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2567445 *Aug 21, 1946Sep 11, 1951Elizabeth W ParkerMethod of measuring the ph of aqueous liquids, moist foodstuffs, and the like
US2918893 *Nov 17, 1955Dec 29, 1959Clyde A NortonLeakage indicator for liquid fuel systems
US3058472 *Dec 9, 1958Oct 16, 1962Baxter Don IncGastric tube
US3155091 *Apr 30, 1963Nov 3, 1964Diagnosto Associates LtdDiagnostic device for the detection and location of the sites of internal anatomicalabnormalities
DE241199C * Title not available
DE519368C *Oct 6, 1929Feb 26, 1931Franz SchnurpfeilBodensaeurepruefer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3426758 *Oct 10, 1966Feb 11, 1969American Hospital Supply CorpMedical catheter with balloon leakage indicator
US4046139 *Aug 23, 1976Sep 6, 1977Bernard HornMedical temperature measuring device
US4275768 *Jun 16, 1978Jun 30, 1981Riggs E GrayReinforced hose having embedded indicia strip
US4344439 *Oct 20, 1980Aug 17, 1982Ulrico JacobellisCatheter for use in localizing the origin of idiopathic microscopic hematuria
US4381011 *May 4, 1981Apr 26, 1983Somers 3Rd Lewis SEnteral feeding apparatus and method
US4601724 *May 29, 1984Jul 22, 1986Cordis CorporationManufacture of tubing assembly for drainage catheter
US4632119 *Oct 23, 1985Dec 30, 1986University Of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical SchoolAmbulatory esophageal pH monitor
US4655763 *Apr 30, 1984Apr 7, 1987Nutrapack, Inc.Testing and dispensing apparatus for an enteral feeding system
US4827944 *Jul 22, 1987May 9, 1989Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBody fluid sample collection tube composite
US4981470 *Jun 21, 1989Jan 1, 1991Synectics Medical, Inc.Intraesophageal catheter with pH sensor
US5005572 *Jan 31, 1989Apr 9, 1991Brigham & Women's HospitalCO2 indicator and the use thereof to evaluate placement of tracheal tubes
US5085216 *Apr 12, 1991Feb 4, 1992Henley Jr Robert LNasogastric/nasointestinal enteral feeding tube and method for avoiding tracheobronchial misplacement
US5105812 *Jul 25, 1990Apr 21, 1992Baylor College Of MedicineNasogastric tube with removable pH detector
US5166075 *Apr 24, 1992Nov 24, 1992Nellcor IncorporatedMethod for determining whether respiratory gas is present in a gaseous sample
US5179002 *Apr 25, 1991Jan 12, 1993Nellcor IncorporatedApparatus for determining whether respiratory gas is present in a gaseous sample
US5273029 *Apr 30, 1992Dec 28, 1993Wilk Peter JEndotracheal tube assembly and related method and obturator
US5334189 *Jun 3, 1991Aug 2, 1994Wade Stephen EDevice for controlled diffusion of a chemical substance
US5375592 *Apr 8, 1993Dec 27, 1994Kirk; Gilbert M.Carbon dioxide detector and shield
US5411022 *Jul 1, 1993May 2, 1995Mccue; MichaelContinuous pH monitoring system and method of using same
US5417657 *Oct 6, 1993May 23, 1995Hauer; CarolynNo-sepsis urinary drainage catheter
US5421325 *Dec 28, 1993Jun 6, 1995Cinberg; James Z.Endotracheal tube assembly and related method
US5438985 *Jan 25, 1993Aug 8, 1995Synectics Medical, IncorporatedAmbulatory recording of the presence and activity of substances in gastro-intestinal compartments
US5468451 *Jun 22, 1993Nov 21, 1995Minco AbDevice for indicating the presence of carbon dioxide in a patient's exhaled air
US5477854 *Sep 16, 1993Dec 26, 1995Synectics Medical, Inc.System and method to monitor gastrointestinal Helicobacter pylori infection
US5477860 *Nov 5, 1992Dec 26, 1995Synectics Medical, Inc.Catheter for measuring respiration and respiratory effort
US5479935 *Oct 21, 1993Jan 2, 1996Synectics Medical, Inc.Ambulatory reflux monitoring system
US5507289 *Mar 23, 1994Apr 16, 1996Synectics Medical, Inc.System and method to diagnose bacterial growth
US5517985 *Nov 2, 1994May 21, 1996Kirk; Gilbert M.Carbon dioxide detector and shield
US5551425 *Jan 18, 1995Sep 3, 1996Synectics Medical, Inc.Potential difference and perfusion pressure catheter
US5657759 *Jan 6, 1995Aug 19, 1997Synectics Medical, IncorporatedMeasurement of gastric emptying and gastrointestinal output
US5749358 *Oct 10, 1996May 12, 1998Nellcor Puritan Bennett IncorporatedResuscitator bag exhaust port with CO2 indicator
US5810741 *Dec 21, 1995Sep 22, 1998Synectics Medical AbMethod of measuring respiration and respiratory effort using plural catheters
US5833625 *Dec 19, 1995Nov 10, 1998Synectics Medical AbAmbulatory reflux monitoring system
US5891054 *Sep 12, 1997Apr 6, 1999Saint Louis UniversityMethod for determining feeding the tube location
US6033368 *Mar 28, 1996Mar 7, 2000Nitromed, Inc.Condensate colorimetric nitrogen oxide analyzer
US6132372 *Apr 1, 1997Oct 17, 2000Synectics Medical, IncorporatedMeasurement of gastric emptying and gastrointestinal output
US6153439 *Aug 31, 1998Nov 28, 2000Johnson; Theodore D.Method of analyzing body fluids
US6419634Jan 31, 2000Jul 16, 2002Nitromed, Inc.Condensate colorimetric nitrogen oxide analyzer
US6475145May 17, 2000Nov 5, 2002Baymar, Inc.Method and apparatus for detection of acid reflux
US6929008Oct 8, 2002Aug 16, 2005Vital Signs, Inc.Carbon dioxide indicating apparatus, particularly, disk-like carbon dioxide indicating apparatus
US7017578 *Nov 4, 2004Mar 28, 2006Tresnak Rick JEndotracheal tube system and method of use
US7066914Mar 16, 2005Jun 27, 2006Bird Products CorporationCatheter having a tip with an elongated collar
US7140370 *Apr 21, 2004Nov 28, 2006Chrickemil, L.L.C.Endotracheal tube system and method of use
US7575565 *Aug 19, 2005Aug 18, 2009Cannuflow, Inc.Extravasation minimization device
US7811276Feb 20, 2009Oct 12, 2010Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcMedical sensor and technique for using the same
US7976518Jul 12, 2011Corpak Medsystems, Inc.Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US7992561Aug 9, 2011Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US7993299Aug 18, 2009Aug 9, 2011Cannuflow, Inc.Extravasation minimization device
US8062221Sep 30, 2005Nov 22, 2011Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcSensor for tissue gas detection and technique for using the same
US8062234Jun 23, 2005Nov 22, 2011University College Cardiff Consultants LimitedPh sensor
US8109272Sep 25, 2006Feb 7, 2012Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US8128574Sep 25, 2006Mar 6, 2012Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US8328771 *Dec 11, 2012Roger Dillard MassengaleMethod for fluid delivery and catheters for use with same
US8396524Mar 12, 2013Covidien LpMedical sensor and technique for using the same
US8420405Apr 16, 2013Covidien LpCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US8431087Apr 30, 2013Covidien LpCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US8431088Apr 30, 2013Covidien LpCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US8449834Sep 25, 2006May 28, 2013Covidien LpCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US8454526Sep 25, 2006Jun 4, 2013Covidien LpCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US8597183Dec 21, 2009Dec 3, 2013Pneumoflex Systems, LlcInvoluntary contraction induced pressure as a medical diagnostic tool using involuntary reflex cough test
US8597184Sep 9, 2010Dec 3, 2013Pneumoflex Systems, LlcTechniques for evaluating urinary stress incontinence and use of involuntary reflex cough as a medical diagnostic tool
US8602987Dec 21, 2009Dec 10, 2013Pneumoflex Systems, LlcTechniques for evaluating stress urinary incontinence (SUI) using involuntary reflex cough test
US8652066Dec 8, 2006Feb 18, 2014Pneumoflex Systems, LlcInvoluntary contraction induced pressure as a medical diagnostic tool
US8690790Oct 17, 2006Apr 8, 2014Pneumoflex Systems, LlcTechniques for evaluating urinary stress incontinence
US8720445 *Jun 13, 2008May 13, 2014Affirm Medical Technologies, LlcTracheal tube with colorimetric CO2 indicator
US8840550Oct 22, 2013Sep 23, 2014Pneumoflex Systems, LlcInvoluntary contraction induced pressure as a medical diagnostic tool using involuntary reflex cough test
US8845533Oct 22, 2013Sep 30, 2014Pneumoflex Systems, LlcTechniques for evaluating urinary stress incontinence and use of involuntary reflex cough as a medical diagnostic tool
US8845534Oct 23, 2013Sep 30, 2014Pneumoflex Systems, LlcTechniques for evaluating stress urinary incontinence (SUI) using involuntary reflex cough test
US9011328Sep 9, 2010Apr 21, 2015Pneumoflex Systems, LlcOral-esophageal-gastric device with esophageal cuff to reduce gastric reflux and/or emesis
US9028406Sep 9, 2010May 12, 2015Pneumoflex Systems, LlcOral-esophageal-gastric device to diagnose reflux and/or emesis
US9028441Sep 7, 2012May 12, 2015Corpak Medsystems, Inc.Apparatus and method used with guidance system for feeding and suctioning
US9131956Jun 2, 2011Sep 15, 2015Corpak Medsystems, Inc.Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US9173602 *Aug 20, 2012Nov 3, 2015Paul J. GilbertFluid characteristic measurement
US9233236Mar 25, 2013Jan 12, 2016Cannuflow, Inc.Method of providing for the minimization of extravasation during arthroscopic surgery
US20040116899 *Dec 16, 2002Jun 17, 2004Shaughnessy Michael C.Bolus for non-occluding high flow enteral feeding tube
US20050159712 *Mar 16, 2005Jul 21, 2005Erik AndersenCatheter having a tip with an elongated collar
US20050235995 *Apr 21, 2004Oct 27, 2005Tresnak Rick JEndotracheal tube system and method of use
US20050235997 *Nov 4, 2004Oct 27, 2005Tresnak Rick JEndotracheal tube system and method of use
US20050235998 *Apr 28, 2005Oct 27, 2005Tresnak Rick JEndotracheal tube system and method of use
US20070060913 *Aug 19, 2005Mar 15, 2007Cannuflow, Inc.Extravasation minimization device
US20070083094 *Mar 7, 2006Apr 12, 2007Colburn Joel CMedical sensor and technique for using the same
US20070135736 *Dec 8, 2006Jun 14, 2007Pneumoflex Systems LlcInvoluntary Contraction Induced Pressure as a Medical Diagnostic Tool
US20070238942 *Jul 24, 2006Oct 11, 2007Esophamet Corp.Apparatus and method for detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd)
US20070255090 *Oct 17, 2006Nov 1, 2007Addington W RTechniques for Evaluating Urinary Stress Incontinence
US20080072905 *Sep 25, 2006Mar 27, 2008Baker Clark RCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US20080072913 *Sep 25, 2006Mar 27, 2008Baker Clark RCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US20080075633 *Sep 25, 2006Mar 27, 2008Rafael OstrowskiCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US20080076993 *Sep 27, 2006Mar 27, 2008Nellcor Puritan Bennett IncorporatedMedical sensor and technique for using the same
US20080077034 *Sep 25, 2006Mar 27, 2008Baker Clark RCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US20080077036 *Sep 25, 2006Mar 27, 2008Baker Clark RCarbon dioxide-sensing airway products and technique for using the same
US20080078394 *Sep 25, 2006Apr 3, 2008Rafael OstrowskiCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US20080081003 *Sep 25, 2006Apr 3, 2008Rafael OstrowskiCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US20080083265 *Sep 25, 2006Apr 10, 2008Rafael OstrowskiCarbon dioxide detector having borosilicate substrate
US20080294069 *Jun 23, 2005Nov 27, 2008University College Cardiff Consultants LimitedPh Sensor
US20090095290 *Jun 13, 2008Apr 16, 2009Brian CainTracheal tube with colorimetric co2 indicator
US20090165801 *Dec 18, 2008Jul 2, 2009Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcCarbon dioxide detector having an acrylic based substrate
US20090198182 *Jun 29, 2005Aug 6, 2009Jms Co., Ltd.Member For Catheter's Position Verification Having Color Change Indicator And Catheter Having The Member For Catheter's Position Verification
US20090246797 *Feb 19, 2009Oct 1, 2009Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcMedical device for the assessment of internal organ tissue and technique for using the same
US20090306629 *Dec 10, 2009Cannuflow, Inc.Extravasation Minimization Device
US20100137736 *Dec 21, 2009Jun 3, 2010Pneumoflex Systems, LlcInvoluntary contraction induced pressure as a medical diagnostic tool using involuntary reflex cough test
US20100137737 *Dec 21, 2009Jun 3, 2010Pneumoflex Systems, LlcTechniques for evaluating stress urinary incontinence (sui) using involuntary reflex cough test
US20110040157 *Sep 9, 2010Feb 17, 2011PNEUMOFLEX SYSTEMS, LLC, State of Incorporation:Techniques for evaluating urinary stress incontinence and use of involuntary reflex cough as a medical diagnostic tool
US20110040211 *Feb 17, 2011Pneumoflex Systems, LlcOral-esophageal-gastric device to diagnose reflux and/or emesis
US20110046653 *Feb 24, 2011PNEUMOFLEX SYSTEMS, LLC, State of Incorporation: FloridaOral-esophageal-gastric device with esophageal cuff to reduce gastric reflux and/or emesis
US20110077495 *Mar 31, 2011Gilbert Paul JDetection indicator
US20110190731 *Aug 4, 2011I-FlowMethod for Fluid Delivery and Catheters for Use with Same
US20120316415 *Dec 13, 2012Paul J GilbertFluid characteristic measurement
EP0251471A1 *May 19, 1987Jan 7, 1988Vincent L. VaillancourtNaso-gastric intubation system
EP0300221A2 *Jun 23, 1988Jan 25, 1989Becton Dickinson and CompanyBody fluid sample collection tube composite
EP1774985A1 *Jun 29, 2005Apr 18, 2007JMS Co., Ltd.Member for catheter's position verification having color change indicator and catheter having the member for catheter's position verification
WO1990015572A1 *Jun 15, 1990Dec 27, 1990Synetics Medical, Inc.Intraesophageal catheter
WO1995011716A1 *Oct 19, 1994May 4, 1995The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaIntegrated end tidal carbon dioxide monitor and endotracheal tube
WO2006000764A1 *Jun 23, 2005Jan 5, 2006University College Cardiff Consultants LimitedPh sensor
WO2007121119A2Apr 6, 2007Oct 25, 2007Esophamet CorporationApparatus and method for detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd)
WO2012057725A1 *Dec 7, 2010May 3, 2012Gilbert Paul JDetection indicator
WO2013025993A1 *Aug 17, 2012Feb 21, 2013Gilbert Paul JFluid characteristic measurement
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/581, 604/523, 600/584, 138/104, 137/559, 128/207.18, 116/206, 422/548
International ClassificationA61M31/00, A61M25/00, A61J15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M31/00, A61M25/00, A61J15/00, A61B5/14539
European ClassificationA61B5/145J, A61M25/00, A61M31/00, A61J15/00