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Publication numberUS3373742 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1968
Filing dateSep 2, 1965
Priority dateSep 2, 1965
Publication numberUS 3373742 A, US 3373742A, US-A-3373742, US3373742 A, US3373742A
InventorsAnderson Jr Warren C, Shears Stuart T
Original AssigneeUnited Carr Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bandage fastener and assembly
US 3373742 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1968 s. T. SHEARS ETAL 3,373,742

BANDAGE FASTENER AND ASSEMBLY Filed Sept. 2, 1965 Fil I zzveniorsi Siaeari T She-022x95 Warren 6. flnde2'so2z Jr,

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ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE The combination of a stretch fabric, rolled bandage which is adapted to be tightly wound about part of ones body and a fastening device for securing the end of the bandage to the underlying windings. The fastening device is of a molded, synthetic plastic construction and is permanently attached to one end of the bandage, preferably by heat sealing. In addition, the fastener is self-orienting in that the flexible projection(s) which piercingly engages underlying windings may be readily deflected below its normal plane to effect such engagement regardless of the attitude of the other parts of the fastening device as it emerges from the end of the bandage roll.

This invention relates generally to an improved fastener formed from a synthetic, thermoplastic, heat-scalable resin, and more particularly, to a fastener to be used in securing the end of an elastically, longitudinally stretchable web strip, for example, a bandage, and the combination of a fastener and a strip of the type mentioned above.

The reader is no doubt familiar with the type of wraparound, elastically stretchable bandage, such as that marketed under the trade name Ace bandage by Beckton, Dickinson and Company, which is used, often by athletes, to give added support to a joint such as a knee which has been strained or wrenched, etc. In essence, the bandage, which is usually rolled for packaging and storing, is wound about the joint by beginning at one end of the strip and successively rather tightly overlapping subsequent windings. The terminating end of the bandage is finally secured in a stretched condition to the previously wound layers by one or more separate metal clips having a slightly curved base and a plurality of teeth or prongs extending downwardly from the underside of the base adjacent each end thereof by engaging one group of prongs in the free end of the bandage strip and the other group in one or more of the adjacent bandage windings. The fact that the end of the elastically stretchable bandage is in tension and pulls against the holding action of the clip contributes greatly to the efiectiveness of this type of fastener.

However, the clips discussed above have several disadvantages; namely, that they are likely to become lost or misplaced when the bandage is not being used, that they often become unfastened and fall away without any awareness on the part of the wearer, particularly after periods of continuous flexing of the limb about which the bandage is wound, and that the metal clip frequently catches and tears the fabric of a stocking or other garment Worn over the bandaged limb.

More recent developments in fasteners of this type include those formed of a thermoplastic resin having a series of integral points or prongs projecting downwardly at an angle from a curved plastic base. In certain variations this fastener has a group of prongs at each end of the base and is employed in the same manner as the metal fastener discussed above and has the same inherent disadvantages with the exception that it is much less likely to tear a garment covering the bandaged area. In another variation the known plastic fastener has a planar base, which is devoid tes Patent C) single group of prongs at the opposite end for engaging the adjacent bandage windings. This latter variation is considered superior to that immediately previously described in that it is permanently attached to the bandage strip and therefore cannot become lost or misplaced.

However, even the last mentioned form of plastic fastener is considered inferior to the present invention, since the attaching points or prongs which engage the bandage windings extend only from one surface and in one dire-ction from the base of the fastener. As previously mentioned, the elastic bandage is rolled when not in use. Thus, where a fastener having attaching prongs which extend in only one direction is permanently attached to the end of the strip, the user must always insure that the bandage is properly rewound when removed from a limb; otherwise, the prongs of the fastener will extend away from the bandage windings when the strip is subsequently used. In evaluating this disadvantage, one must consider that the bandage is always rewound in a reverse direction, so to speak. Thus, the end to which the fastener is attached will not appear until the strip has been completely wound on a limb. At that point, if the fastener prongs are improperly oriented, the bandage must be completely removed, properly rolled, and rewound about the joint. It goes without saying that this can be a time-consuming and somewhat exasperating situation.

Thus, an object of the present invention is to provide a fastener of a synthetic, thermoplastic resin which is adapted to be permanently secured to the end of a strip of elastic bandage material.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fastener for use with a bandage strip, which fastener will not damage a garment covering the bandaged area.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a bandage structure which is to be wound about the joint of a limb, wherein a pronged fastener for securing the end of the bandage is permanently affixed thereto and the prongs can be flexed to engage adjacent bandage windings, regardless of the orientation of the fastener with respect to said windings.

Other objects and advantages of the novel fastener and rbandage structure will become evident from a reading of the following detailed description in conjunction with a viewing of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged top plan view of the novel fastener;

FIG. 2 is a section taken on line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of the fastener showing the prong deflected in one direction from the plane of the base;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of an assembly wherein a pair of the novel fasteners, actual size, are used to secure the end of a bandage wrap to adjacent bandage windings;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of a section taken on line 55 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged top plan view of an alternate form of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a side elevation showing the fastener of FIG. 6 secured to a bandage strip with the prongs deflected downwardly for engagement with the bandage windings below; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged top plan view of still another form of the invention.

The fastener 1 is formed from a synthetic, thermoplastic resin, for example, the acetal resin marketed by Dupont under the trade name Delrin, and includes a flat, generally planar base 2, a pair of side bars 3 extending laterally from one end of the base, an end tab 4 connecting the side bars and co-operating with the side bars and the base to define an opening 5, and a prong 6 integrally molded to the end tab 4 and extending across the opening to a free end adjacent the base 2. Prong 6 is gradually tapered between its junction with the end tab 4 and its free end and normally lies generally in an imaginary plane corresponding to that of the base 2. The side bars, end tab, and prong are molded slightly thicker than the base 2 to add increased springiness and resiliency to v these parts.

As best seen in FIG. 3, the prong 6- is readily deflectable out of the plane of the base 2, in that instance above said plane, by one grasping the end tab 4 and bending the fastener downwardly about the side bars 3 and simultaneously pushing upwardly on the underside of the prong. The prong may of course be deflected in the opposite direction; i.e., downwardly, by reversing the bending direction.

FIGS. 4 and 5 depict the novel fastener as used to secure the free end of an elastically, longitudinally stretchable bandage strip such as that discussed in the introductory remarks above. The end 7 of the bandage strip 8 is bounded by a thin pellicle 9 of thermoplastic material, for example, polyvinyl chloride. The base portion 2 of the fastener is heat-sealed to the pellicle 9 and to the bandage strip imemdiately adjacent the longitudinal end 7 thereof, such that the remaining portions of the fastener extend outwardly beyond the length of the strip. One should now envision that the bandage strip depicted has been wound about the joint of a limb such as a knee and the terminating end 7 has been pulled in tension above the remaining windings. To secure the strip end, the tab 4 is bent slightly upwardly about the side bars 3, and the prong 6 is deflected downwardly below the base 2 and through the interstices of the material of one or more of the adjacent bandage layers. Since the resilient material of the strip end '7 is tending to pull to the left, as viewed in FIGS. 4 and 5, the prong 6 is pulled back against the adjacent bandage windings and held securely therein. To remove the bandage, the wearer need only pull upwardly on the tab 4, withdraw the prongs 6 from the bandage, and continue to unwrap and roll the bandage.

From what has previously been said, the reader will appreciate that one need not concern himself with the direction in which the bandage is wrapped about the joint or rolled for storage, in that regardless of whether the end of the bandage unravels with the fastener base 2 above, as viewed in FIGS. 4 and 5, or below the strip end, the prong 6 can be deflected downwardly to engage the under-bandage windings. Moreover, were a fastener heatsealed to the opposite end of the bandage strip for securing the initial winding about a limb, the prong 6 can readily be deflected upwardly to engage subsequent windings passing over the fastener.

It will also be observed that the end of the prong shown in the drawings is slightly rounded. This configuration has been found to be adequate for use with bandage materials which are fine and easily pierceable. However, the prong may be made sharply pointed for use with coarser, less easily penetrable materials.

It has also been found that the binding 9 may be eliminated and the fastener base 2 heatsealed directly to the material of the bandage, if so desired.

As readily observed in the drawings, the side bars 3, end tab 4, and prong 6 are slightly thicker than the base 2 of the fastener. This increased thickness provides the proper resiliency to cause the side bars 3 and prong 6 to return to the straight, unflexed condition of FIGS. 1 and 2 when the fastener is disengaged from the bandage windings. In the illustrated fastener, the base 2 is approximately .025 in. thick, whereas the thickness of the side bars is between .035 in. immediately adjacent the base and .050 in. at the end tab 4. Where a material such as Delrin is employed, a side bar thickness greater than the above would tend to render those parts more brittle and therefore more likely to crack or fracture when bent. On the other hand, were the side bars only as thick as the base 2, i.e., on the order of .025 in., they would be more likely to take a set in a bent condition over a prolonged period of usage and would not return immediately to the unflexed condition when the fastener is disengaged.

The alternate form of the invention 10 includes a planar base 2a, a flat, generally semicircular shaped end tab 4a, an integral, centrally located connecting bar 3a joining the end tab to the base and a pair of integral attaching prongs 6a disposed on opposite sides of the connecting bar 3a. The fastener 1a is employed in the same manner as the previously described form of the invention; i.e., the base is heat-sealed to the end of a bandage strip and the prongs 6a are embedded in the bandage windings by bending the tab 4a about the bar 3a to flex the prongs 6a out of the plane of the base towards the bandage windings to be engaged.

The fastener 1b includes a central, planar base 212, a pair of side bars 3b extending in opposite directions from each side of the base, end tabs 4b connecting each pair of side bars and co-operating with the side bars and the base to define a pair of openings 5b, and a pair of prongs 6b integrally molded to the end tabs 4b and extending towards each other across the openings 5b to a free end termination adjacent the base.

Unlike the previously described forms of the invention the fastener 1b is not designed to be permanently attached to a fabric strip. Rather one of the resilient prongs 6b is first deflected upwardly or downwardly and into the strip adjacent its longitudinal end and the remaining prong which extends beyond the strip is engaged in adjacent strip portions or underwindings in the case of a wrapped bandage.

While the last described fastener is more likely to become separated from a strip than the previously described permanently attached fasteners, it should be noted that the arrowhead configuration of the free ends of the prongs 6b provides for an excellent fastening and represents an improvement in this respect over metal and plastic fasteners previously known wherein prongs having a continuously tapering configuration were employed. Further since the prongs 6b may be deflected upwardly or downwardly with respect to the base 2b the latter fastener is adapted for use in a situation where the alignment of the fabric strip portions to be joined dictates that the individual prongs extend-in opposite directions from the plane of the base.

For purposes of illustration three forms of the invention have been definitely outlined in the preceding description. However, it is to be clearly understood that what has been disclosed therein is to be construed in a descriptive and not a limiting sense, in that the scope of the invention is best defined by the following claims.

We claim:

1. In combination with a stretch fabric bandage roll of the type adapted to be tightly wound about part of ones body, a self-orienting, synthetic resinous fastening device for securing the end of the roll to the underlying windings comprising a base portion permanently attached to the bandage adjacent one end thereof, a flexible bar extending outwardly from one end of said base portion, an end tab joined to said bar at its end remote from said base portion, and an integral, resilient projection extending from said end tab to a sharply pointed free end lying nearer to said base portion than to said end tab, said base portion, bar, end tab and projection normally lying in a common horizontal plane, said projection being readily pivotable out of said plane for piercing engagement of the underlying bandage windings regardless of the orientation of said base portion, bar and end tab with respect to said windings when the end of-the bandage roll is reached.

2. In combination with a stretch fabric bandage roll of the type adapted to be tightly wound about part of ones body a self-orienting, synthetic resinous fastening device for securing the end of the roll to the underlying windings comprising a base portion permanently attached to the bandage adjacent one end thereof, spaced flexible side bars extending outwardly from one end of said base portion, an end tab connecting the ends of said side bars remote from said base portion, and an integral, resilient projection extending from said end tab to a sharply pointed free end lying nearer to said, base portion than to said end tab, said base portion, side bars, end tab and projection normally lying in a common horizontal plane, said projection being relatively pivotable out of said plane for piercing engagement of the underlying bandage windings regardless of the orientation of said base portion, side bars and end tab with respect to said windings when the end of the bandage roll is reached.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,120,143 6/1938 Divel 2487 5 2,663,027 12/1953 Posson 2-337 2,912,735 11/1959 Johnson et a1 2487 3,170,213 2/1965 Thomas 24255 3,247,847 4/1966 Mathison 128171 10 ADELE M. EAGER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2120143 *Jul 30, 1937Jun 7, 1938Reginald Divel RoyCloser for the lips of a corpse
US2663027 *Mar 30, 1950Dec 22, 1953Posson Donald GElastic belt and support therefor
US2912735 *Feb 14, 1957Nov 17, 1959Tidy Pin Company IncDiaper fastener
US3170213 *Jul 31, 1962Feb 23, 1965Jr Fred G ThomasClasping devices
US3247847 *Jan 27, 1964Apr 26, 1966Robert V MathisonBandage structures
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3857140 *Feb 28, 1973Dec 31, 1974Joyce PDetachable bandage clasp
US5231735 *Apr 3, 1992Aug 3, 1993Paxton Jerre HaleClip for closing the folded end of a flexible bag
US7513902May 13, 2004Apr 7, 2009The Cleveland Clinic FoundationSkin lesion exciser and skin-closure device therefor
US7799042Sep 21, 2010The Cleveland Clinic FoundationSkin lesion exciser and skin-closure device therefor
US7806907Sep 30, 2002Oct 5, 2010The Cleveland Clinic FoundationSkin lesion exciser and skin-closure device therefor
US20030078596 *Sep 30, 2002Apr 24, 2003Banbury Michael K.Skin lesion exciser and skin-closure device therefor
US20040215217 *May 13, 2004Oct 28, 2004The Cleveland Clinic FoundationSkin lesion exciser and skin-closure device therefor
US20060282104 *Jun 22, 2006Dec 14, 2006Cleveland Clinic FoundationSkin lesion exciser and skin-closure device therefor
US20080249549 *Apr 3, 2008Oct 9, 2008The Cleveland Clinic FoundationSkin lesion exciser and skin-closure device therefor
WO2014093077A1 *Dec 4, 2013Jun 19, 20143M Innovative Properties CompanyUniversal locking clip
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/78, 24/561
International ClassificationA41F1/00, A61F15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41F1/00, A61F15/006
European ClassificationA61F15/00F, A41F1/00