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Publication numberUS3373911 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1968
Filing dateNov 25, 1966
Priority dateNov 25, 1966
Publication numberUS 3373911 A, US 3373911A, US-A-3373911, US3373911 A, US3373911A
InventorsKebelbeck Melvin J
Original AssigneeMelvin J. Kebelbeck
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf cart mounted shoe pack
US 3373911 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1968 E BE 3,373,911

GOLF CART MOUNTED SHOE PACK Filed Nov. 25, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet l Me/wh J Kebe/beck INVENTOR.

March 19, 1968 M. J. KEBELBECK 3,373,911

GOLF CART MOUNTED SHOE PACK Filed Nov. 25. 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Me/wh J- Kate/beck INVENTOR.

1H Atlome United States Patent 3,373,911 GOLF CART MOUNTED SHOE PACK Melvin J. Kebelbeck, 304 Sunnyside Drive, Eugene, Oreg. 97402 Filed Nov. 25, 1966, Ser. No. 597,106 4 Claims. (Cl. 22429) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This disclosure is directed toward a receptacle adapted for attachment to a golf bag cart and to removably alternately receive therein street and golf shoes and also to a removable weatherproof cover for the receptacle.

This invention relates to a novel and useful shoe pack and more specifically to a shoe pack adapted for support from a golf bag cart. The shoe pack is constructed in a manner whereby it may be readily secured to a golf bag cart of the type including an upstanding structural member and the pack defines pocket means in which street and golf shoes may be alternately received.

Golfers wear golf shoes including sole spikes when playing golf. These spikes offer a golfer a non-slip footing on the golf course but may not be worn indoors While walking on conventional flooring since the sole spikes would cause damage to such flooring and golfers do not wear their shoes when walking on parking lots or'other hard surfaces such as sidewalks adjacent golf courses inasmuch as these hard surfaces would quickly wear down the sole spikes.

Accordingly, a golfer usually wears street shoes until just prior to his movement onto the golf course and at that time he changes from his street shoes to his golf shoes. The golf shoes are then worn until the golfer is ready to leave the golf course proper at which time the golfer again changes to his street shoes. The necessity of these changes of shoes presents a problem as to the storage of the golf shoes before and after the golfer is on the golf course and the storage of the street shoes while the golfer is on the golfcourse. Some golf courses of course have club houses in which golfers may change to their golf shoes and store their street shoes until they again enter the club house when leaving the golf course. However, there are many instances when such storage facilities are not available and also when it is not convenient to use such facilities when they are available.

It is therefore the main object of this invention to provide a shoe pack for mounting on a golf bag cart in which street and golf shoes may be alternately placed whenever the golfer decides to change his shoes.

Another object of this invention is to provide a shoe supporting pack in accordance with the immediately preceding object and which is adapted for securement to various types of golf bag carts.

Another object of this invention is to provide an apparatus in accordance with the preceding objects and including a weatherproof cover which may be readily removably secured over the shoe supporting pack in a manner so as to protect whatever shoes are disposed in the pack from the elements A final object of this invention to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide a shoe supporting pack for golf bag carts which will conform to conventional forms of manufacture, be of simple construction and easy to use so as to provide a device that will be economically feasible, long lasting and relatively trouble-free in operation.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a conventional form of golf bag cart illustrated with the shoe pack of the instant invention operatively mounted thereon;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 22 of FIGURE 1 and with the golf bag removed and portions of the shoe pack being broken away and illustrated in section;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of the upper portion of the golf bag cart on which the shoe pack is removably and adjustably secured;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 44 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 5-5 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary erspective view similar to FIGURE 3 but illustrating the removable cover for the pack in exploded position;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken substantially upon a plane passing through one of the mounting clamps for the shoe pack and on somewhat of an enlarged scale; and

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view similar to that of FIG- URE 7 but illustrating the manner in which toothed inserts may be carried by the clamping members of the clamp assembly.

Referring more specifically to the drawings the numeral 10 generally designates a conventional form of golf bag cart including a center upright 12 provided with a pivotable handle 14 on its upper end which may be secured in adjusted rotated position relative to the upright 12.

A conventional golf bag generally referred to by the reference numeral 16 is supported from the cart 10 in any convenient manner and the shoe pack of the instant invention is generally designated by the reference numeral 18 and mounted on the upright 12.

The shoe pack includes a base panel referred to in general by the reference numeral 20 and including a generally semi-circular center portion 22 which divides the base panel 20 into opposite side sections 24 and 26 disposed on opposite sides of the center portion 22.

The opposite side sections 24 and 26 are substantially coplanar and each includes a rounded lower corner 28 and an aperture 30 for the reception of a hook 32 on the corresponding end of an elastic tension member 34 secured across the rear face of the base panel 20. In addition, each of the opposite side sections 24 and 26 includes a laterally rearwardly struck horizontal tongue portion 36 and the base panel 20 has a wide elastic strap 38 secured across its rear face below the elastic tension member 34. The upper and lower ends of the generally semi-cylindrical center portion 22 are dimpled inwardly as at 40 for frictional engagement with the upright 12 and the opposite side sections 24 and 26 are apertured as at 42 and 44 on opposite sides of both upper and lower dimpled portions of the center portion 22 for the reception of headed fasteners 46 therethrough. Suitable coacting clamp members 48 including axially short generally semi-cylindrical center portions 50 corresponding to the center portion 22 and dimpled as at 52 are provided and include opposite side flange portions apertured as at 54 for receiving the fasteners 46 therethrough, threaded wing nuts 56 being threadedly engaged with the threaded fasteners 46 whereby the members 48 may coact with the center portion 22 of the panel 20 to clampingly engage the upright 12 at spaced points therealong. Of course, the projections 40' and 52 formed by the dimpled portions 4% and 52 frictionally engage the upright 12 so as to retain the base panel 20 in adjusted elevated position on the upright 12.

The tongue portions 36 project rearwardly from the rear surface of the panel 20 at the opposite sides of the rearwardly projecting center portion 22. Further, the tension member 34 and the strap 38 are also disposed at the rear of the panel 20 and the rearwardly projecting center portion 22 and the tension member 34 as well as the strap 38 coact to form a pair of pockets in which to receive a pair of street shoes 60 when a golfer is Wearing his golfing shoes. In addition, when the golfer is wearing his street shoes 60, the pockets defined by the shoe pack 18 may receive therein the golfers golf shoes.

As can best be seen from FIGURE 8 of the drawings, a pair of generally C-shaped inserts 62 and 64 may be utilized in conjunction with the dimpled portions of the center portion 22 and the members 48. When the inserts 62 and 64 are utilized, longer fasteners 46' are used and the projections 40 and 52' interlock in recesses 62 and 64 formed in the outer surfaces of the inserts 62 and 64 and the toothed inner surface portions 66 and 68 of the inserts 62 and 64 provide a tighter frictional grip on the upright 12. Further, the inserts 62 and 64- may be utilized so as to adapt the center portion 22 and the member 48 to be utilized in conjunction with uprights similar to upright 12 but of different diameters.

The shoe pack 18 includes a removable cover generally referred to by the reference numeral 70 provided with a rear wall 72 interconnecting pleated opposite side walls 74 and 76 as well as a bottom wall 78. In addition, the cover 76 includes a peripheral front wall 80 having an opening formed therein bound by anelastic peripheral member 82 and the cover 70 also includes a top flap 84 formed integrally with the upper edge portion of the partial front wall 8t and including a snap member 86 engageable with a corresponding snap member 88 carried by the rear wall 72. Of course, the elastic perimeter member 82 enables the removable cover 70 to be snapped over the periphery of the panel 20 from the rear side thereof In the installed position and with the flap 84 closed the removable cover 70 provides a substantially weather-tight cover for the shoe pack 18.

Inasmuch as the wing nuts 56 may be loosened so as to enable the members 48 and the panel 20 to be vertically shifted along the upright 12, the shoe pack 18 may be readily adjusted in vertical height. Further, inasmuch as the inserts 62 and 64 are provided the shoe pack 18 is adapted for use in conjunction with uprights of different diameters.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination with an inclined bag-supporting rodlike member of a golf bag cart, a shoe supporting pack, said pack defining pocket means adapted to removably receive therein a golfers shoes, and means removably supporting said pack from said rodlil e member, said shoe supporting pack including a base panel projecting outwardly from opposite sides of said rod-like member and disposed in a plane generally paralleling said rod-like member, said pocket means including a pair of individual shoe receiving pockets disposed on opposite sides of said rod-like member, said base panel including a generally semi-cylindrical mid-portion which opens toward and embracingly receives said rod-like member.

2. In combination with an inclined bag-supporting rodlike member of a golf bag cart, a shoe supporting pack, said pack defining pocket means adapted to removably receive therein a golfers shoes, and means removably supporting said pack from said rod-like member, said shoe supporting pack including a base panel projecting outwardly from opposite sides of said rod-like member and disposed in a plane generally paralleling said rodlike member, said pocket means including a pair of individual shoe receiving pockets disposed on opposite sides of said rod-like member, said panel, in the portions thereof projecting from opposite sides of said rod-like member, including laterally outwardly struck tongue portions adapted to engage the heel of a corresponding shoe supported from said panel, said base panel including a generally semi-cylindrical mid-portion which opens toward and embracingly receives said rod-like member.

3. In combination with an inclined bag-supporting rodlike member of a golf bag cart, a shoe supporting pack, said pack defining pocket means adapted to removably receive therein a golfers shoes, and means removably supporting said pack from said rod-like member, said shoe supporting pack including a base panel secured to and generally paralleling said rod-like member and including portions projecting outwardly of opposite sides of said rod-like member, said portions projecting outwardly from opposite sides of said rod-like member defining portions of individual shoe receiving pockets disposed on one side of the medial plane of said panel, and a cover for said pack defining a housing of flexible material including a large opening formed in one wall, elastic means secured about the peripheral edges of said opening in said one wall, and said housing being removably secured to said panel with the latter disposed within said housing and the marginal portions of said one wall of said housing stretched over the corresponding marginal edge portions of said panel.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein said housing includes a top wall defined by a swingable flap member formed integrally with the upper edge portion of said one wall of said housing and including means on its free edge portion adapted for removable securement to the wall of said housing remote from said one wall in overlying engagement therewith.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/1956 Higgens 224-29 9/1961 Turner 16 X

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2731182 *Sep 3, 1953Jan 17, 1956Edgar J HigginsBottle carrier
US3001650 *Jun 27, 1958Sep 26, 1961Potterton Ltd APortable showcases
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3915361 *Mar 22, 1974Oct 28, 1975Safariland Ltd IncHolster with adjustable mounting clip
US4142563 *Nov 3, 1976Mar 6, 1979Sikob Svensk Industris Konstruktions-Och Berakningskontor AbGolf bag
US4319616 *Aug 4, 1980Mar 16, 1982Light Richard DGolf club carrier
US4383563 *Jul 28, 1981May 17, 1983Kirchhoff Jr Christian HGolf bag
US4459827 *May 19, 1983Jul 17, 1984Rhodes Duane CGolf bag cooler kit
US5341928 *May 14, 1993Aug 30, 1994J&J Sports ProductsAdd-on pocket for golf bags
US5411237 *Jul 9, 1993May 2, 1995Dougherty; Robert G.Golf cart umbrella holder
US5472084 *Jul 19, 1994Dec 5, 1995Aliano, Jr.; Joseph F.For use with a riding golf cart
US6478151 *Sep 7, 2001Nov 12, 2002Karsten Manfacturing CorporationRemovable and repositionable pocket assembly for golf bags
US7832557Mar 10, 2008Nov 16, 2010Jatin AminGolf bag
US8141905Nov 8, 2002Mar 27, 2012Ball William TSki equipment tote
Classifications
U.S. Classification224/274, D03/320, 206/315.3, D03/318
International ClassificationA63B55/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63B55/08
European ClassificationA63B55/08