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Publication numberUS3374298 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1968
Filing dateApr 8, 1965
Priority dateApr 8, 1965
Publication numberUS 3374298 A, US 3374298A, US-A-3374298, US3374298 A, US3374298A
InventorsCharles E Studen
Original AssigneeCharles E. Studen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making drinking utensil jacket
US 3374298 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 March 19, c. STUDEN METHOD OF MAKING DRINKING UTENSIL JACKET Filed April 8, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 2

' INVENTOR. I CHARLES E. STUDEN ATTORNEYS March 19, 1968 STUDEN 3,314,293

METHOD OF MAKING DRINKING UTENSIL JACKET Filed April 8, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 5 I 24 INVENTOR.

CHARLES E. STUDEN ATTORNEYS United States Patent Ofitice 3,374,298 Patented Mar. 19, 1968 3,374,298 METHOD OF MAKING DRINKING UTENSIL JACKET Charles E. Studen, RR. 1, Pekin Road, Newbury, Ohio 44065 Filed Apr. 8, 1965, Ser. No. 446,530 2 Claims. ((11. 264-41) ABSCT (IF THE DISCLOSURE A method of making a collapsible polyethylene drinking utensil jacket having an inturned flange at one end thereof to support a utensil by extruding polyethylene foam through a die to form a tubular member having longitudinal indentations to facilitate collapse of the member, cutting the tubular member into predetermined lengths and fitting these lengths upon a mandril, said mandril being of a length to permit a pre-established amount of said cut tubular member to extend and overhang therefrom, displacing the mandril into a heatable female die shaping member to form an inturned flange, and applying heat to the female die to permanently set the inturned flange.

This invention relates to drinking utensils and more particularly, to a jacket or sleeve for use therewith.

The invention is directed to a method of making a drinking utensil jacket or coaster from tubular stock and the formation of the coaster in other configurations either by molding and/ or by a heat sealing process. Heretofore, drinking glass coasters have included such well-known designs as the customarily flat saucer type into which a glass is set, or the knitted sleeve type arrangement into which a glass is inserted. In the case of the flat saucer type condensation inevitably forms on the outer surface of the glass to continually vex and wet the hands of the user. Where a knitted sleeve type coaster has been employed, it has been found, that eventually the sleeve will be soaked to the point of uselessness. In both instances very little, if any, insulation is provided to isolate the contents of the drinking utensil from the surrounding ambient temperature conditions. As a result of the lack of insulation to surrounding temperature conditions, the temperature of the contents of the drinking utensil will vary in accordance with time. It is to overcome these and other disadvantages of existing drinking glass coasters that this invention is dedicated.

It is, accordingly, an object of this invention to provide a new and improved drinking utensil jacket which is capable of supporting a drinking utensil therein and prevent condensation rings from forming on furniture.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a tubular coaster which is collapsible to facilitate shipping and/ or storage.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a drinking utensil coaster which is easy to Wash and maintain.

A further object of this invention is to provide a method of making a collapsible drinking utensil coaster with as few intermediate steps as possible.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention then consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description setting forth in detail one approved means of carrying out the invention, such disclosed means, however, constituting but one of the various ways in which the principles of the invention may be used.

In accordance with these objects and first briefly described the invention relates to a drinking utensil coaster, and the method of making the same. The jacket consists of a generally tubular container that serves to fit over a glass or other drinking utensil, such as a can, etc., in close conformity thereto and provide a jacket or cozy therefor. A terminal end of the tubular container has an inturned flange formed integrally therewith for support of the drinking utensil thereupon. The tubular container is scored with a series of. diametrically opposed longitudinal flutes to facilitate folding of the container during shipping or storage. The container is made of an expanded polyethylene foam, uni-cellular cell structure, having good insulating characteristics and low moisture absorbency.

Turning now to the drawings we find:

, FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a novel drink jacket partly broken away;

FIG. 2 is a section along 22 of FIG. 1, showing a drinking glass in position;

FIG. 3 is a plan view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1 showing the jacket collapsed in phantom lines for shipping or packaging;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 2, showing a modified jacket for a tapered glass;

FIG. 5 is a schematic exploded view with parts broken away showing extruded jacket on a mandril and a flanged tool retracted;

' FIG. 6 'is a view similar to FIG. 4, showing the sleeve flanged.

FIG. 1 shows a tubular drink jacket shown at 10 having a plurality of flutes formed along the longitudinal dimension of the tubular member. The drink jacket itself is made from foam plastic, preferably expanded polyethylene foam. Polyethylene foam, as is well known, is characterized by its extreme light weight, and also by the fact that it is'easy to clean, will not absorb water and has reasonably good insulating characteristics.

The choice of polyethylene foam as the material from which the coaster was to be made was arrived at after careful thought to considerations such as: that the material not absorb the condensation from the cold glass, that the material will insulate the hand from theglass so that the glass and the beverage will not be warmed by the hand and in turn, the beverage and the glass will not cool the hand down to a point where it is objectionable. Also, further considerations in the choice of the material included, that the drink jacket must be an item which can be easily cleaned, and .can be easily re-used. Frequently, the jackets might be used to promote sales of various items; they therefore must be capable of being printed with suitable advertising material in the event this is desirable. For convenience and storing in the home and shipping, the jacket must be collapsible. After carefully considering all of these factors, it was decided that uni-cellular polyethylene foam would satisfy all of these requirements in a much better manner than any other known material.

As seen in the drawings, a tubular member 10 made of polyethylene foam, has an inturned flange 13 formed integrally to a terminal end thereof. In addition, a plurality of longitudinally extending folds, indentations, or flutes, 11 are formed along the tubular member. In general, in connection with these jackets, there are an even number of equally spaced folds or flutes 11 so the jacket may be easily collapsed by the application of force from any direction. The internal flange portion 13 supports the lower end of the glass thereupon, see FIGS. 2 and 4. The longitudinal dimension 14 of the jacket may be of any height so that it will either cover the lower portion of the glass or entire glass. Various jacket elevational heights to satisfy the needs and fancy of various individuals are contemplated.

FIG. 2 shows a straight sided glass 15, having no taper, and indicates the position of the drink jacket relative to the glass. As can be seen at FIG. 2, the jacket 10 is drawn up about the bottom end of glass 15 until the lower end thereof is seated upon, and supported by, the internal flange 13.

FIG. 4 indicates an alternate design for use with a tapered glass 16.

Looking now to FIG. 3, which illustrates a plan view of the jacket of FIG. 1, the versatility and advantages of my unique design are illustrated. By providing the jacket with diametrically opposed, equally spaced folds or flutes easy collapse and foldability of the item is achieved, see the phantom lines diagram of FIG. 3. It should be appreciated that the flute or fold 11 is of minimum depth so that the jacket will, due to its inherent resilience, spring back to its open, glass receivable position. The ability of the jacket to be collapsed greatly facilitates storage and shipping. The integrally formed, internally extending flange 13 does not interfere with the collapsibility of the jacket, but may even enhance the desirable eflect of causing the jacket to spring to its open position upon removal of the jacket collapsing force. Furthermore, the resilience of the jacket due to the longitudinal flutes or folds 11 permit extensive handling and washing without permanent damage resulting thereto. It should here be emphasized that while the flutes or folds 11 are all shown to extend along the longitudinal outer surface of tubular stock 10, they could, as well, have been formed along the inner surface.

FIG. illustrates one way in which the drinking utensil jackets may be manufactured. Generally tubular stock as shown at 17 which has been formed by an extrusion process or any other suitable means. The flutes or folds 11 will have been formed along the longitudinal extent of the tubular stock as a result of the extrusion process. The tubular stock is then cut to the desired elevational dimension of the jacket. The properly dimensioned tubular stock 17 will then be fitted over a mandril 18 having a flange 19 at one end thereof to limit the position of the stock thereupon. As shown in FIG. 5, upon one end of the tubular stock 17 abutting against flange 19 the other end will project beyond the end of mandril 18. The mandril is mounted for longitudinal movement to the right as shown in this drawing. However, it should be appreciated that relative movement of the part to each other is all that is required. A heat sealing mandril 20 which may be either fixed or mounted for angular rotative movement, is coaxially aligned with mandril 18. Mandril 20 is provided with an end portion 21 having an internal tapered or countersunk section 22 leading into a stepped concentric section 23. Heating means 24 are provided to permit thermal shaping of the polyethylene stock 17. As shown in FIG. 5, it is contemplated that the mandril 18 will be longitudinally movable to the right to achieve the formation of internal flange 13. FIG. 6 shows the resulting mating position taken by mandril 18 upon movement of the tubular stock of expanded polyethylene into the heat shaping mandril 20 so that the internal flange is bent over between mandril 18 and the stepped concentric 23 of the heat shaping die 20. The mandril 18 is held in the coupled position relative to die 20 until the flange 13 is permanently formed, by the application of heat through means 24. In this manner a brief flange 13 upon which a glass may be rested, as was indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2, is achieved.

This jacket for drinking utensils has been designed to provide and serve the very useful purpose of furnishing an insulating layer between the hand and the drink to prevent any heat transfer therebetween. My jacket is easily cleaned and will absorb a minimum amount of moisture from the glass. In addition, the jacket will provide an insulation between the hand and the glass to prevent any condensation transfer therebetween. It is desired that the drink jacket be of very serviceable material, but economically made. Alternate fabrication techniques of course are possible based upon quantity to be produced and the type of drink jacket.

This drink jacket lends itself to various manufacturing techniques and to various styles. It is, however, extremely serviceable, easily foldable and usable with all types of drinking utensils.

While it will be apparent that the embodiments of the invention herein disclosed are well calculated to fulfill the objects of the invention, it will be appreciated that the invention is susceptible to modification, variation, and change without departing from the proper scope or fair meaning of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A method of making a uni-cellular polyethylene foam, elongated cylindrical drinking glass jacket from tubular stock comprising the steps of, extruding polyethylene foam through a die to obtain an elongated tubular member having diametrically opposed longitudinal indentations formed along the outer surface thereof, said longitudinal indentations permitting said tubular member to be collapsible, cutting the tubular member into predetermined lengths, fitting the cut tubular member upon an elongated cylindrical mandril, said mandril being of predetermined length to permit a pre-established amount of said cut tubular member to extend and overhang therebeyond, said mandril being capable of longitudinal movement in a direction of said cut tubular member overhang, displacing said mandril into a countersunk female die shaping member which is heatable to result in an inturned flange being formed from said overhanging tubular cut, said inturned flange being of limited width whereby said tubular member may be collapsed applying heat to said female die while said mandril is disposed therewithin to permanently set said inturned flange, displacing said mandril away from said female die and removing said tubular member.

2. A method of making a uni-cellular polyethylene foam, elongated cylindrical drinking glass jacket from tubular stock comprising the steps of, extruding polyethylene foam through a die having desired dimensions to obtain an elongated tubular member having diametrically opposed longitudinal indentations formed along the outer surface thereof, said longitudinal indentations permitting said tubular member to be collapsible, cutting the tubular member into predetermined lengths, fitting the cut tubular member upon an elongated cylindrical mandril, said mandril being of predetermined length to permit a pre-established amount of said out tubular member to extend and overhang therebeyond, said mandril being capable of rotative movement, applying a radially and axially directed force by means of a heated member to said overhanging portion of said mandril mounted tubular member to form a radially inwardly directed flange thereupon said flange being of limited width whereby said tubular member may be collapsed, displacing said mandril away from said female die and removing said tubular member.

(References on foilowing page) References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 7/1956 Great Britain.

OTHER REFERENCES Walker 18 19 5 Plastics Engineering Handbook, 3rd ed., New York, Packard Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1960, pp. 136, 137, Price 26 151, 152 and 156.

Baker.

,Pirman 215 100 5 ROBERT F. WHITE, Primary Examiner.

Richie 51 10 R. R. KUCIA, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3504067 *Aug 15, 1967Mar 31, 1970Dart Ind IncMethod and apparatus for manufacturing collapsible flexible plastic container tubes
US3613881 *Oct 6, 1969Oct 19, 1971Fred N SchwendCombined carrier and package
US3978182 *Feb 4, 1974Aug 31, 1976Mobil Oil CorporationMethod for extruding a polystyrene foam with variations in mass concentration across the sheet and thermoforming the sheet
US4002787 *Jun 24, 1974Jan 11, 1977Bailly Richard LouisFoamed polymeric article and method for making the same
US4060577 *Feb 11, 1976Nov 29, 1977Maryland Cup CorporationMethod for producing seamless foam plastic cups from expandable sidewall blanks
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Classifications
U.S. Classification264/41, 264/296, 264/51, 215/395, 428/36.5, 264/148, 220/903, 264/321, 428/163, 220/902
International ClassificationB29C67/00, B29C53/06, B29C53/20, B29C51/04, B29C37/00, A47G23/02, B29C57/00, B29C51/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G23/0216, B29C67/0014, B29L2031/7132, B29C51/00, B29K2023/06, Y10S220/902, B29K2105/04, Y10S220/903, B29C37/0057, B29C57/00, B29C53/20, B29C67/2235, B29C53/06
European ClassificationB29C53/06, B29C67/22C4, B29C53/20, A47G23/02A2, B29C67/00E, B29C57/00