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Publication numberUS3374591 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1968
Filing dateJan 20, 1966
Priority dateJan 20, 1966
Publication numberUS 3374591 A, US 3374591A, US-A-3374591, US3374591 A, US3374591A
InventorsGeorge E Meyer, Papalia Rocco, Paul W Tillisch
Original AssigneeKaiser Gypsum Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient partition structure
US 3374591 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 26, 1968 P. w. TILLISCH ETAL 3,374,591

RESILIENT PARTITION STRUCTURE Original Filed Dec. 28, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 36 FIg 1 Full 1 fillies/0 Glory: 5. Meyer Run P4p4li4 INVENTOR.

March 26, 1968 P. w. TILLISCH ETAL 3,374,591

RESILIENT PARTITION STRUCTURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Original Filed Dec. 28, 1962 March 26, 1968 P. w. TILLISCH ETAL 3,374,591v

RE SILIENT PARTITION STRUCTURE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Original Filed Dec; 28, 1962 llllllllllllll I,

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United States Patent G 3,374,591 RESILIENT PARTITION STRUCTURE Paul W. Tillisch, George E. Meyer and Rocco Papalia, Antioch, Calif., assignors to Kaiser Gypsum Company, Inc., Oakland, Calif., a corporation of Washington Continuation of application Ser. No. 247,976, Dec. 28, 1962. This appfication Jan. 20, 1966, Ser. No. 521,886 9 Claims. (Cl. 52241) This application is a continuation of our copending application for patent, Ser, No. 247,976, filed on or about Dec. 28, 1962, now abandoned.

This invention relates to wall construction; and more particularly it relates to ceiling and to floor track means for supporting wall board panel construction, and to partitions produced thereby.

In normal building construction, particularly of the multistory type, and more particularly in such construction where concrete slabs form successive floors and/or ceilings, there is a tendency of such floor slabs and ceiling slabs to deflect or sag with the passage of time. In the construction of such buildings, non-loadbearing partitions are also installed in general practice and these may comprise gypsum lath or wall board, or lath or board composed principally of mineral, e.g. glass, fiber or of cellulose fibers of the well known types; and, if desired, with application also of plaster coats. The deflection or sag of the concrete ceiling or floor construction has created numerous problems in the satisfactory installation of nonloadbearing partitions, for example in dry wall construction, in that the sagging, for instance, may result in bowing or even cracking of the partition, lath, plaster or the wall board, for example, aiter installation. Such unsightly damage is very diflicult to correct.

According to the present invention, such sagging, deflection or warping of ceiling and floor construction is compensated for by means of an improved ceiling track or an improved floor track, or both, each of which enables adjustment to the changes occurring in the normal floor and ceiling construction. By the present invention the mentioned sag or deflection is compensated for by yieldable support means incorporated in the floor track or ceiling track or both, permitting adjustment to avoid stresses or strains in the wall board panels or laths. In one embodiment there is employed a ceiling track having a resilient means incorporated therein to effect vertical adjustment. One such resilient means in each arm is an inwardly inclined arm such as in FIGURE and another is a resilient loop, e.g., as shown in FIGURE 10. In a further embodiment, for example, there is a vertically slidable means incorporated in the ceiling track or runner means to effect such adjustment.

Some advantageous embodiments of the present invention are shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is an end view of a floor track according to the present invention,

FIGURE 2 is a side view showing a floor track of the present invention attached to a subjacent support such as a floor.

FIGURE 3 is a vertical sectional view showing a wall board installed in a floor track of the present invention.

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a floor track of the present invention.

FIGURE 5 is an end view of a ceiling track of the present invention.

3,374,591 Patented Mar. 26, 1968 FIGURE 6 is a side view of a ceiling track according to the present invention.

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of a ceiling track according to the present invention as installed in a ceiling.

FIGURE 8 is a vertical sectional view of a ceiling track and wall board installation according to the present invention.

FIGURE 9 is a vertical section view showing a wall board in combination with a ceiling track and a floor runner, each according to the present invention.

FIGURE 10 is an end view of another embodiment of a resilient ceiling track according to this invention.

FIGURE 11 is a partial sectional view of a wall board and partition installation employing the ceiling track or runner of FIGURE 10.

FIGURE 12 is an exploded end view of another embodiment of a yieldable support ceiling track according to this invention, having internal and external members.

FIGURE 13 is an end view of a variation of the internal member of the embodimet of FIGURE 12.

FIGURE 14 is a sectional view of a partition employing the yieldable support ceiling track according to FIG- URE 13.

In FIGURES 1 to 4 there is shown floor track 19, having a web 36 and two side legs or arms 37, each of said legs having spaced-apart inwardly directed flanges 11 at the top and a downwardly bent portion or leg 12 on each such flange which springs against the side of a lath or wall board such as 18, when the latter is installed in track 10 as shown, for example, in FIGURE 3. Downwardl-y bent legs 12 also serve as a guide for the insertion of lath or wall board. Flange 11 is partially cut away from side leg 37 to provide a tongue 13 which can be bent upwardly to provide further support for wall board 18 as shown in FIGURE 3. It is a particular advantage of the tongues or tabs 13 that, when bent up to a vertical position or to an angle at from 45 to from the horizontal, they are embedded in the later-applied plaster coating and aid in strengthening the floor-track-board and combination. These tabs or tongues 13 can be located at one side only of the floor track but, preferably, at both sides thereof. Such tabs or tongues function as tensible tabs in that they eiiect anincrease in the tensile strength of the floor elements of the wall assembly, or the floor beam as will be further described, whereby the partition is protected against stresses which would be otherwise imposed by downward deflection of the concrete floor or ceiling.

In base or web 36 of channel 10 are successive struckout tongues 14 which are spaced from each other along the length of the track and effect springing contact with a subjacent support 15 as shown, for example, in FIGURE 2, tongues 14 being bent downwardly from web 36 as at 19. Such tongues 14 in one embodiment are only partially cut out and thereby act as break-away tabs under sufficient sagging stress. This is also an advantage because plaster filled into channel 10 is more completely retained therein until it hardens, with better avoidance of attachment thereof to concrete flooring. Each flange or any desired number of them is nailed to subjacent support 15 by a nail such as shown at 16. It will be understood that alternatively a screw or other means can be employed to afi'ix tongue 14 to subjacent support such as 15. It can be seen that tongue 14 is free to move up and down by means of a hinge effect as at 19, although it is affixed to the subjacent support such as the floor 15.

When installed in place the wall board 18 is set into channel and the base of wall board 18 then rests on web 36 of channe 10 and is supported in vertical position by flanges 11, sprung legs 12 and tongues 13. Flanges 11 are suitably spaced apart along the length of the channel. Cut-away tongues 13 of flange 11 are bent upwardly and plaster is applied as at 17 and is likewise charged into channel 10 to fill in also around the base of board 18 and to harden to provide an over-all solid beam effect, of excellent tensile strength. It is an advantage of the floor track provided with resilient means that it is essentially self-leveling, i.e. compensates for unevenness or minor surface variations in the floor.

Another feature of the present invention is the provision of a yieldable support ceiling track having, e.g., a resilient means which compensates for the sagging of the ceiling, for example, in a multistory apartment or oflice building where there will be problems of sagging of either cement slabs or other types of ceiling construction. One embodiment of such ceiling track according to the present invention is shown in FIGURES 5, 6, 7 and 8 where 20 generally represents the ceiling track article itself. This track is comprised of a web 21 having at each side inwardly inclined flanges 22 and 23. At the outer edge of each of these flanges are, respectively, shoulders or stiffening walls 24 and 25 which are disposed generally perpendicularly to web 21. Extending inwardly from shoulder 24 and generally parallel to web 21 is flange 26; and extending inwardly from shoulder 25 and also generally parallel to web 21 is flange 27. Preferably, flange 26 is longer than flange 27 in the present embodiment. Struckout tongues 28 are provided in flange 26 and these extend downwardly from the flange. Extending downwardly, i.e., in the direction generally perpendicular to the plane of web 21, at the outer edge of flange 27 and attached thereto is supporting element 29 which is provided with a number of apertures 30, this element being also a flat piece of metal adapted to lie adjacent to or abutting the upper side face of a later-installed wall board or lath 31, and having apertures 30 which provide means for keying a coat of plaster 32 to board 31 as shown in FIGURE 8. Struck-out tongues 28 are adapted to be bent downwardly after board 31 is installed and prior to application of a coating of plaster 32 on the surface of wall board or lath, to assist in holding it in an upright position. It will be noted that flange 21 is of sufiicient length that the upper end of the wall board terminates below, or abuts the lower face thereof, and in any event cannot extend into the interior of ceiling track 20. Likewise tongues 28 are narrow and leave only narrow apertures in flange 26 whereby any substantial penetration of later-applied plaster into the interior of track 20 is effectively prevented by the entire combination.

Track 20 is suitably nailed, screwed or otherwise aflixed to ceiling 33 as at 34. As ceiling 33 will tend to sag with the passage of time, track 20 will take up any such sag by reason of the resilience provided by the coaction of web 21 and adjacent inclined flanges 22 and 23, each of which is at an acute angle to web 21, because the web and an adjacent inclined flange bend toward each other to prevent the effect of such sagging of the ceiling from reaching wall board 31 and causing it to buckle or crack.

Inasmuch as the empty space in track 20 would have the effect of transmitting sound along the track and between the walls, it is in some instances desirable to provide some acoustical property in this ceiling track, i.e, to prevent sound passage therethrough. To this end, a strip of foamed rubber, foamed urethane resin, or other resilient and sound-absorbing material 35 is inserted in the track without deleteriously affecting the sag-absorption properties thereof. Strips of foam urethane with an adhesive backing are obtainable in commerce and are easily applied afiixed to the interior surface of the web of such ceiling track with great improvement in the soundabsorbing characteristics of the resilient partition.

As shown in FIGURE 9, it can be seen that the ceiling track 20 and floor track 10 both provide resilient means whereby changes in the vertical position of ceiling 33 or of floor 15 are compensated for and the respective tracks adjust themselves thereto, while at the same time preventing transmission of buckling forces or cracking stresses to the wall board which is installed therebetween, as at 18, and to plaster coating 17, where such is applied. As ceiling 33 sags, web 21 and inwardly inclined flanges 22 and 23 will bend toward each other preventing transmission of or dampening the force of such sag effect with respect to flanges 26 and 27 and to the top of wall board 18 in the embodiments shown. Similarly as subjacent support 15 sags, for example, toward the central portion of a floor track. 10 with a plaster filling 17 and the inserted end of wall board 18, tongue 14 which is nailed or otherwise aflixed to subjacent support 15 will bend downwardly without disturbing the horizontal alignment of the main track 10. At the same time, since tongue 14 is affixed to support 15, it prevents sideward movement of track 10 with respect to the subjacent support or with respect to ceiling track 20. The bent-up tabs 13 also strengthen and stiffen the floor assembly; and it has been found that the non-loadbearing partition of this construction is self-supporting when a concrete floor sags away from the floor track, the total floor track assembly acting as a beam to support the remaining elements of the partition. It will be noted that ceiling track 20 is likewise affixed to ceiling 33 to prevent horizontal motion, while permitting vertical adjustment in height.

A variation of the resiliently yieldable support in the ceiling track is shown in FIGURES l0 and 11, where the ceiling track 38 comprises a web or horizontal portion.

39 and downwardly extending side arms 40 and 41, each having an inward loop or bent portion 42, 43 respectively, and each arm having an inwardly extending horizontal flange, 44, 45, respectively at its outer end, i.e. at the end remote from the web 39. At the inward extremity of horizontal flange 44 is disposed downwardly, preferably vertically, extending flange or plate 46. Upon installation, web 39 is aflixed to a ceiling stud or other base by screws or nails 51, for example. Tabs 47 are provided at intervals along the length of horizontal flange 45, and after installation of a board such as 48, are bent downwardly to assist'in holding the board upright and to key to later-applied plaster coat 49 by irnbedmcnt therein. Board 48 is afiixed to flange 46 by screws or nails 50, and plaster can be applied thereover. Upon later deflection of the ceiling, any vertical change is compensated for by the springing or resilient action of loops 42, 43, reducing or substantially preventing warping or cracking of wall board 48 and greatly reducing spalling, cracking or damaging of plaster coat 49. Tabs 47 are cut out of flange 45 similarly to tabs 28 in flange 26. Alternatively such tabs can be welded to the under surface of flanges 26 or 45 but this is a more expensive procedure, and partially cut-out tabs are preferred. If desired, downward flange 46 can be provided also with apertures similar to apertures 30 on flange 29 for better adhesion of plaster coat 49.

Another variant of the yieldable support ceiling track is shown in FIGURES 12 to 14, wherein there is provided an exterior channel track 52 comprising web 53 and arms 54 and 55. Preferably, arms 54 and 55 are slightly sprung or bent inwardly, i.e., at an angle of slightly less than 90, preferably between and to the horizontal web, to provide a springing engagement of the other elements of the structure as will be later described. Preferably, also, arms 54 and 55 are slightly curved outwardly at the ends, whereby they will tend to slide over a plaster coating when vertical movement occurs. There is also provided an internal wall board-engaging channel 56, having web 62 and outwardly extending flanges 57 and 58, which is slidably disposed within channel 52, flanges 57 and 58 being in frictional engagement with arms 54 and 55. Channel 56 is also provided with arms 59 and 60 within which is disposed the top of wall board or lath 61, for example. Flanges 57 and 58 can extend outwardly from the web of the internal channel or from the ends of the arms of the channel, as shown in FIG- URES 12 and 13, respectively. The embodiment of FIG- URE 13 has the advantage of ease of manufacture. When assembled, the web of the internal chanel is spaced from the web of the external channel to permit sliding or vertical movement to accommodate for sagging of the ceil ing. Arms 54 and 55 of the exterior channel springrngly engage the outer ends of the outwardly extending flanges of the interior channel but the former are free to slide over such ends, when ceiling deflects or sags, to prevent communication of added stress or pressure to the wall board or panel supported within the ceiling track assembly. The exterior channel is fixed against horizontal movement, suitably by screwing or nailing to the ceiling 33 as at 51. When plaster coat 63 is applied, flanges 57 and 58' prevent any penetration thereof into space 64, so that freedom of vertical movement of channels 52 and 56 with respect to each other is effected. By means of sllght outward curvatures 65 and 66 on the arms 54 and 55, respectively, of exterior channel 52, these arms are enabled to move downwardly over plaster coating 63 wlth mini-mum damage thereto upon later sagging of ceiling 33. Preferably, the arms of the interior channel of this assembly are slightly sprung inwardly, which enables more secure gripping of the top of the panel or board insert, accommodates also to differences in width of the panel and ensures open springing contact with the exterior channel arms.

It will 'be understood that a resilient sound-absorbing material, for example, foamed rubber or foamed urethane resin, can be inserted in any of the ceiling track assemblies described herein, preferably afiixed to the interior surface of the web which is afiixed to the ceiling support. Such an insertion is particularly advantageous in that it reduces and minimizes sound transmission through such partitions. The ceiling and floor tracks and channels described are preferably made of ferrous metal, e.g., steel, but another metal, e.g., aluminum, or other suitable material can be employed if desired. Where the term wall board is used in the specification and claims, it is intended to include any sheet-like wall member such as a board, lath, panel or the like.

The above specific description and drawings have been given for puroposes of illustration only and various changes and modifications can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the claims.

Having now described the invention,

What is claimed is: Z

1. Ceiling runner for wall construction to yieldably support a wall board comprising an elongated web, an inwardly inclined flange at each side of said web and integral therewith, each said flange extending downwardly when said runner is positioned in a ceiling, a stiffening wall extending from the edge of said inclined flange remote from said web and substantially perpendicularly to and spaced from said web, a flange extending inwardly from each said stiffening wall parallel to said base and remote therefrom, one of said parallel flanges being wider than the other said parallel flange and adapted to abut the top surface of a later-installed board, and a vertical flange extending downwardly from said other parallel flange and adapted to abut a side face of a later-installed board.

2. Ceiling runner as in claim 1 wherein a resilient sound-absorbing material is disposed along said Web between said inclined flanges.

3. Ceiling track for wall construction to yieldably support a wall board comprising a channel runner having a web and two depending arms, a resilient means in each of said arms, an inwardly extending flange at the lower end of each said arm, a downwardly extending flange disposed at the inward edge of one of said inwardly extending flanges and adapted to abut to an upper side face of a later-installed wall board and downwardly bendable tabs on the other said flange to retain said wall board in upright position.

4. Ceiling track for wall construction to yieldably support a wall board comprising a channel runner having a Web and two depending arms, a resilient means in each of said arms, an inwardly extending flange at the lower end of each said arm, a downwardly extending flange disposed at the inward edge of one of said inwardly extending flanges and adapted to be afiixed to a later-installed wall board and bendable tabs afiixed to the other said flange and adapted to be bent downwardly to retain said wall board in upright position and to be embedded in later-applied plaster coating.

5. A non-loadbearing partition construction comprising a channel ceiling track, a channel floor track vertical- 1y yieldably aflixed to a floor in vertical alignment with said ceiling track, wall board extending between and supported by said tracks, said ceiling track having a web affixed to a ceiling and a yieldable means adapted to abut the top portion of said Wall board and having means to support said wall board in upright position, the bottom portion of said wall board being disposed in said floor track, and a plaster coating disposed on said wall board and maintained out of contact with the interior of said ceiling track and filled into said floor track, said plaster coating on said wall board and in the floor track forming a continuous layer.

6. A non-loadbearing partition construction comprising a ceiling track, a channel floor track vertically yieldably afiixed to a floor in vertical alignment with said ceiling track, wall board extending between and supported by said tracks, the bottom portion of said wall board being disposed in said channel floor track, a plaster coating disposed on said wall board and maintained out of contact with the interior of said ceiling track and filled into said floor track, said ceiling track having a web aflixed to a ceiling and two downwardly and inwardly extending arms in springing relationship with said web, and having a horizontal inwardly extending flange at the lowermost end of each of said arms, the first said flange abutting the top of said wall board, downwardly bent tabs aflixed to said first flange and embedded in said plaster coating, and a vertically extending flange disposed at the inner extremity of said second horizontal flange and abutting the upper surface of said wall board.

7. Partition construction as in claim 6 wherein said floor runner is provided with upwardly extending spacedapart tabs at the upper edge thereof adjacent said Wall board and embedded in said plaster coating.

8. A non-loadbearing partition construction comprising a ceiling runner connected to a ceiling, a floor runner on a floor in alignment with said ceiling runner, a wall board extending between and supported by said ceiling runner and said floor runner, said ceiling runner having a resilient flange means abutting the top of said wall board and having an elongated vertical stiflening member opposite said resilient means to abut the upper side face of said wall board and retaining means extending downwardly from said resilient means and in contact with the opposite face of said wall board, said floor runner comprising a channel adapted to receive the base of said wall board and resilient means between the web of said floor channel and said floor, said resilient means in said web being at least partially cut out, spaced-apart tabs and said tabs disposed underneath the base of said wall board and aflixed to said floor.

9. Floor runner for wall construction comprising an elongated web, an arm extending upwardly at each side of said web to form a channel to receive and support the base of a Wall board, a plurality of inwardly extending flanges at the top of each said arm spaced from each other along each said arm, said inwardly extending flanges being partially cut away to form bendable tabs, a downwardly References Cited extending flange at the inner extremity of each said in V wardly extending flange and adapted to effect springing UNITED STATES PATENTS i contact with a later-installed wall board, and spaced cut- 1,870,579 8/1932 Levene 52-40O out tongues in said web adapted to effect springing contact 5 1,935,537 11/ 1933 Balduf 52-.346 of said Web with a subjacent support when said runner is 1,975,470 10/ 1934 Mclnerney 52-400 installed on said support, said inwardly and downwardly 3,125,193 3/1964 Brown 52242 extending flanges being adapted to be embedded in laterapplied plaster. JOHNYE. MURTAGH, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1870579 *Mar 9, 1931Aug 9, 1932Levene Louis LPartition wall edge construction
US1935537 *Jan 11, 1932Nov 14, 1933United States Gypsum CoResilient building structure
US1975470 *May 5, 1933Oct 2, 1934John McinerneyYielding wall joint
US3125193 *Jan 12, 1962Mar 17, 1964 Movable partition systems
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3851434 *Nov 5, 1973Dec 3, 1974Boyd TBatten roof and sheet metal batten
US4672785 *Jul 17, 1986Jun 16, 1987United States Gypsum CompanyModified runner and area separation wall structure utilizing runner
US6021618 *Jan 30, 1998Feb 8, 2000Elderson; William L.Stud wall system and method using spacer member
US6430881May 18, 2000Aug 13, 2002Aegis Metal Framing LlcTop plate
US6694695Aug 27, 2001Feb 24, 2004Dietrich Industries, Inc.Wall stud spacer system with spacer retainers
US6708460Mar 5, 2000Mar 23, 2004Dietrich Industries, Inc.Stud wall system and method using a combined bridging and spacing device
US6920734Jun 25, 2001Jul 26, 2005Dietrich Industries, Inc.Bridging system for off-module studs
US7017310Mar 6, 2003Mar 28, 2006Dietrich Industries, Inc.Spacer bar retainers and methods for retaining spacer bars in metal wall studs
US7159369Aug 14, 2003Jan 9, 2007Dietrich Industries, Inc.Stud wall system and method using combined bridging and spacing device
US7168219Dec 20, 2002Jan 30, 2007Dietrich Industries, Inc.Support apparatuses and jambs for windows and doors and methods of constructing same
US8708103 *Mar 3, 2009Apr 29, 2014Quick Products, Inc.Joints for a stand
US20040031224 *Aug 14, 2003Feb 19, 2004Elderson William L.Stud wall system and method using combined bridging and spacing device
US20040172912 *Mar 6, 2003Sep 9, 2004Brunt James WilsonSpacer bar retainers and methods for retaining spacer bars in metal wall studs
US20040237451 *Jun 15, 2004Dec 2, 2004Elderson William L.Stud wall system and method using combined bridging and spacing device
US20100224446 *Sep 9, 2010Dan BulleySupport Apparatuses, Interconnect Structures and Methods of Forming Interconnect Structures
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/241, 52/393
International ClassificationE04B2/72, E04B2/84, E04B2/82
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/842, E04B2/82, E04B2/723
European ClassificationE04B2/84P, E04B2/82