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Publication numberUS3375540 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1968
Filing dateJul 19, 1965
Priority dateJul 19, 1965
Publication numberUS 3375540 A, US 3375540A, US-A-3375540, US3375540 A, US3375540A
InventorsHyde Elmer A
Original AssigneeElmer A. Hyde
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Attachment for floor cleaning machine
US 3375540 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1968 E. A. HYDE 3,375,540

ATTACHMENT FOR FLOOR CLEANING MACHI NE Filed July 19, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. ELMEP A. H v05 A RN-I 55.

A ril 2, 1968 E. A. HYDE ATTACHMENT FOR FLOOR CLEANING MACHINE '5 SheetsSheet 2 Filed July 19, 1965 24 8 I 0 Z0! Z0 5 3 I I I 37 a N W 44 INVENTOR.

A 7- TOR/V5 KS ELMER A. HYDE I April was E. A. HYDE 3,375,540.

ATTACHMENT FOR FLOOR CLEANING MACHINE Filed July 19, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet :5

' 5/ 1% K@. 45 3 5/ 47 55 55 if INVENTOR.

EL M57? A. H v05 %,W ZWZ 7MWM ATTORNE)$ 3,375,540 Patented Apr. 2, 1968 3,375,540 ATTACHMENT FQR FLOOR CLEANING MACHINE Elmer A. Hyde, Box 1832, Billings, Mont. 59101 Filed July 19, 1965, Ser. No. 472,869 4 Claims. (Cl. 15-320) ABSTRACT UP THE DISCLOSURE An attachment for a power-operated rotary floor scrubbing element carried by a frame structure having handle means attached thereto for imparting forward and reverse, as well as transverse, movements thereto, including soap dispensing apparatus for injecting soap into the center of the brush and vacuum apparatus with a vacuum chamber concentric with the brush having an outwardly opening mouth adapted to be closed by a depending skirt along the leading edge of the mouth as the machine is moved horizontally over a surface. The machine also has wheels which are movable from an operative to an inoperative position, and adjustable in the operative position to vary the height of the machine.

My invention relates generally to floor cleaning devices and more particularly to improvements in a power operated floor scrubbing machine having a single rotary scrubbing element. Still more particularly my device relates to improvements in the means for suplying cleaning fluid to the rotary scrubbing member and to means for efficiently removing such fluid from the surface being scrubbed after it has been used.

In conventional rotary floor scrubbing machines cleaning fluid is supplied to the upper surface of the rotary scrubbing element generally near the rotary axis thereof. As the rotary scrubbing element rotates the fluid is forced radially outwardly and enters a series of passages the upper ends of which are disposed over the entire upper surface of the scrubber elements. Such passages terminate at their lower ends in the vicinity of a scrubbing brush or pad and serve to convey cleaning fluid thereto. Inasmuch as the cleaning fluid is forced outwardly over the upper surface of the scrubbing element during rotation that portion which enters the outer passages is not used to its fullest extent since it works only with the outermost portion of the pad or brush and then is forced radially outwardly therefrom due to the rotation thereof.

Supplying cleaning fluid only to the central portion of the pad or brush generally at the level of the surface to be scrubbed, as opposed to the upper surface of the scrubbing element permits the cleaning fluid to work over the entire radial dimension of the pad or brush. Such an arrangement obviously permits the use of a lesser amount of cleaning fluid with a much greater efflciency of that used. Normally in the use of such devices the used fluid is removed in a separate operation by an independent vacuum device. Thus, as the operator progresses, the fluid which has been used covers that portion of the floor which has been scrubbed and prevents the operator from viewing same to ascertain whether same has been sufficiently scrubbed to render it clean.

Another disadvantage in such machines resides in the fact that as they approach furniture or walls during the cleaning operation same may be splattered and damaged by the used cleaning fluid. To remove the above objectional features, I provide a vacuum attachment which depends from the supporting frame structure in concentric relation to the rotary scrubbing element and which terminates at its lower edge in a downwardly radially outwardly opening pick-up mouth. The pick-up mouth is vertically spaced from the surface to be scrub-bed and has disposed radially outwardly thereof an annular flexible skirt the lower edge of which terminates generally in the plane of the floor engaging surface of the scrubbing pad or brush. The skirt is carried by the supporting frame structure and prevents used cleaning fluid from being splattered on adjacent furniture or walls. Also, lateral movements of the frame structure and scrubbing element in a given direction causes the skirt to flex radially inwardly adjacent the leading edge whereupon it closes the adjacent portion of the pick-up mouth. When such portion is closed, the :pick-up function of the mouth is limited to that portion of the mouth adjacent the trailing edge. Thus, only the cleaning fluid which has been completely used is picked up and the area of the mouth is reduced to more efficiently use the partial vacuum being created.

It is a primary object of my invention to provide a floor scrubbing device of the class above described which will combine the operations of scrubbing and vacuuming into a single machine.

It is another object of my invention to provide a device of the class above described which includes a rotary scrubbing element having an annular scrubbing member detachably mounted to the under surface thereof and means for supplying a predetermined amount of cleaning fluid to said annular scrubbing member adjacent the central opening thereof generally at the level of the surface being scrubbed.

It is still another object of my invention to provide a vacuum attachment which is easily adaptable to be attached to various machines having a single rotary scrubbing element.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a device of the class above described which includes means for elevating and transporting same without damage to the depending vacuum attachment.

it is a still further object of my invention to provide a device of the class above described which is rugged and durable in construction, relatively inexpensive to produce and completely satisfactory for its intended use.

These and other highly important objects will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon consideration of the following specification, attached drawings, and appended claims.

Referring to the drawings wherein like characters represent like parts throughout the several views:

FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation of a single brush rotary scrubbing machine showing my vacuum attachment mounted thereon, some parts broken away and shown in section.

FIG. 2 is a view in front elevation thereof, some parts broken away and shown in section;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view as seen from the line 3-3 of FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view as seen from the line 44 of FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 5 is a view in horizontal section as seen from the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a view in vertical section as seen from the line 66 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a view in vertical section as seen from the line 77 of FIG. 6 on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view in side elevation showing a portion of the elevating mechanism and transport wheels, portions thereof broken away and shown in section;

FIG. 9 is a view in side elevation similar to FIG. 1 showing my device being moved from a dotted line elevated position to a full line transport position;

FIG. 10 is a view in rear elevation on an enlarged scale, portions thereof broken away and shown in section;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary detailed view in elevation as seen from the line 1111 of FIG. 9; and

FIG. 12 is a horizontal sectional view as seen from the line 1212 of FIG. 11.

Referring with greater particularity to the drawings there is shown a floor scrubbing device indicated generally by the numeral 15. Floor scrubbing device 15 is of a type which utilizes but a single rotary scrubbing element 16 which is carried by an inverted cup-like frame structure 17. Handle means for imparting lateral movements to the scrubber element 16 and frame structure 17 is indicated generally by the numeral 18. The rotary scrubbing element '16 includes power means in the nature of a gear-head equipped electric motor 19 which is suitably secured to the cup-like frame structure 17 in concentric relationship therewith and which has a depending power output shaft 20 extending therefrom. Detachably secured to the power output shaft 20, by means of bayonet type connections 20 is a circular body portion 21. Body portion 21 is composed of some material such as wood and serves to detachably mount an annular scrubbing pad 22 as at 23.

It will be here noted that the inverted cup-like frame 17 includes the depending sidewall portion 24 the lower edge of which terminates somewhat above the level of the surface X to be scrubbed for reasons hereafter to be described.

Normally during operation of the above described device a desired amount of cleaning fluid in the nature of a powdered detergent or the like mixed in water is supplied to the pad 22, through a medium of a tubular conduit 25, from a liquid reservoir 26 mounted on the handle 18. A valve interposed in the tubular conduit 25 controls the flow of cleaning fluid by manipulation of the control rod 28. As shown particularly in FIGS, 4 and 5, body portion 21 of scrubbing element 16 is provided with an upwardly opening auxiliary reservoir 27. Reservoir 27 is generally annular in nature and is formed on the upper surface of body portion 21 adjacent the power output shaft 20 of the gear head equipped motor 19. It will be noted that conduit 25 terminates at a point immediately above the reservoir 27 and serves to supply cleaning fluid thereto during rotation thereof. For the purpose of conveying fluid from reservoir 27 to the pad 22 there is provided a plurality of passages 21' formed in the body 21. Passages 21' have one end disposed adjacent the outer periphery of the reservoir 27 and extend downwardly and radially inwardly to a point where the other end terminates near the central opening of the pad 22. With this arrangement cleaning fluid is supplied to the pad 22 at the central portion thereof generally at the level of the surface X and is forced radiallyoutwardly therefrom during rotation of the body portion 21. Thus it will be seen that all of the cleaning fluid supplied to the pad 22 must traverse the entire radial dimension of the pad 22 and is utilized a maximum amount in the scrubbing process.

' portions 35, 36

As above described such machines normally deposit.

the used cleaning fluid radially of the device and prevents an operator from viewing that portion of the floor scrubbed to ascertain whether it has been scrubbed a sufficient amount to render same clean. Usually this maybe done only after a separate vacuuming operation. Also, in view of the fact that the wall portion 24 terminates somewhat above the level of the pad 22 the unused cleaning fluid has a tendency to be thrown radially outwardly from the pad 22 and splatters on adjacent furniture or wall portions causing damage to same. both the scrubbing and vacuuming operations into one and also to remove the above disadvantages I provide an integral vacuum system which includes a source of partial vacuum such as the fan-equipped electric motor 29 suitably mounted on the upper portion of reservoir 26. Reservoir 26 is divided into laterally spaced sections 30, 31 by means of the vertically disposed partition 32. Section 30 serves as a reservoir for unused cleaning fluid while section 31 serves as a reservoir for used cleaning fluid and has direct communication with the source of partial vacuum 29.

An annular member 33 includes the top wall portion 34 and inner and outer radially spaced vertical wall which collectively define an annular vacuum chamber 37. Member 33 is detachably mounted to the wall portion 24 of frame structure 17 in concentric relationshipwith body portion 21 and pad 22 by means of circumferentially spaced brackets 38 carried by the top wall portion 34 of member 33. As shown brackets 38 have openings 38' which receive short studs 39 that are screw threadedly received in cooperating apertures formed in the wall 24. An annular rubber bumper element 40 is bonded to the exterior surface of wall 2'4, as shownin .FIG. 7, to prevent damage to furniture or wall surfaces which may be contacted. Sponge rubber elements 41 are bonded to the top wall 34 of member 33 adjacent each of the brackets 38 intermediate bumper 40 and top wall 34 for. a reason which i will become apparent hereinafter. As best seen in FIG,

7, the inner and outer walls 35, 36 depend from the top wall 34 with the lower portions thereof defining an annular pick-up mouth 42. The lower. edge 43 of the inner wall 35 terminated at a .levelbelow that of the lower edge 44 of outer wall 36 thus, mouth 42 opens from vacuum chamber 37 downwardly and radially outwardly for a reason which will become apparent immediately hereinafter.

Disposed radially outwardly of the mouth 42 in concentric relationship thereto is a depending flexible, annular skirt 45. Skirt 45 is secured to the outer surface of outer wall 36 by means of spring steel ring clamp 46 with the lower edge 47 thereof. generally in the plane of the floor engaging surface 49 of pad 22. Assuming that the scrubbing device '15 of FIGS. 4 and 7 are moving in a direction from left to right the skirt 45 will be flexed radially inwardly at the leading edge of member 33 by engagement of the lower edge 47 of skirt 45 with the surface X being scrubbed. As this happens the mouth 42 will be closed at the point where the skirt 45 engages the lower edges 43, 44 of inner and outer walls 35, .36

respectively thereby limiting pickup function of the mouth 42 to that portion disposed adjacent the trailing edge of member 33. Thus it will be seen that, in as much as the area of the mouth 42 has been reduced, the effectiveness of the open portion will be increased with but a minimum amount of partial vacuum and in an area where it is most desirable to pick up the used cleaning solution. It will be seen particularly in FIG. 7 that the openings 38' of brackets 38 are vertically elongated and permit a floating attachment of member 33. This allows skirt 45 to remain in contact with surface X even thoughsame flex inwardly as illustrated in FIG. 7, thus maintaining In order to combine mouth 42 in the above described closed condition during such movements. Also, it will be seen that the sponge rubber members 41 act to urge the skirt 45 into engagement with the floor X.

Providing communication between the annular vacuum chamber 37 of member 33 and permitting such floating movements thereof is a pair of flexible conduit elements 50. The lower ends of flexible conduits 50 are one each connected to a pair of circumferentially spaced, vertically extended rigid conduits 51 carried by the member 33 and which communicated with the chamber 37. The upper end of flexible conduits 50 are joined as at 52 and are connected to the bottom end of a stand pipe 53. Stand pipe 53 extends upwardly into the chamber 31 of reservoir 26 to a point where it terminates adjacent the fanequipped motor 29. A baflle plate 54 is interposed between the upper end of stand pipe 53 and fan-equipped motor 29 and prevents the used cleaning solution being pickedup from entering the fan, not shown.

When it is desired to transport the scrubbing device from one room to another the same is tipped back on to a pair of laterally spaced wheels 55, which are positioned directly below the lower portion of hand 18. To prevent damage to the member 33 and/or skirt 45 during such tipping movements the wheels 55 are mounted for raising and lowering movements by means indicated generally at 56 and consisting of a rearwardly projecting U-shaped frame member 57 and a bellcrank 58 jo-urnalled between the laterally spaced legs 59 of frame member 57, as at 59. Wheels 55 are journalled for rotation on an axle, as at 55' on one end of bellerank 58 with the other end thereof being operatively connected to handle 18 through a link 60. It will be noted that handle 18 is pivotally secured on a horizontal axis normal to the vertical axis of body portion 21 as at 61 and, as such, imparts pivotal movements to the bellcrank 58 about axle 59' through the medium of link 60 when handle 18 is moved about its pivotal axis 61. Thus, as shown in FIG. 9, when handle 18 is pivoted forward the wheels 55 are lowered into engagement with floor X to raise the frame structure 17 and scrubber element 16. Conversely, movements of handle 18 in the opposite direction will lower frame structure 17 and scrubber element 16 into engagement with surface X where it may again be put into operation.

To maintain or lock the wheels 55 in either a raised or lowered position and also to permit adjustment of the outer end of handle 18 to a comfortable height for an operator, I provide means for locking the handle 18 against pivotal movements about the pivotal connection 61 thereof consisting of a control rod 62. The lower end of rod 62 is pivotally mounted to the axle 59' of bellcrank 58 and the upper end thereof is pivotally secured to a locking collar 63. Locking collar 63 is journalled for axial sliding movements on handle 18 by means of a headed pin 64 and a cam element 65 which operates to clamp the collar 63 in a selected position of axial movement on handle 18. Thus it will be seen that releasing of the collar 63 for sliding movements permits pivotal movements of handle 18 to either adjust same or raise and lower wheels 55. Clamping collar 63, by means of cam element 65, precludes such movements.

Upon filling the tank section 31 with used cleaning solution same may be drained by use of a drain cock 66 placed in the lowermost portion of the tank.

My invention has been thoroughly tested and found to be completely satisfactory for the accomplishment of the above objects, and while I have shown and described a preferred embodiment, I wish it to be specifically understood that the same is capable of modification without departure from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A removable attachment for a power-operated rotary floor scrubbing element carried by an invertedCup-like frame structure having handle means attached thereto for imparting forward and reverse, as well as transverse, movements to said scrubbing element and frame structure:

(a) reservoir means;

(b) means for conveying a desired amount of cleaning fluid from said reservoir to said scrubber element;

(c) a source of partial vacuum;

(d) means connected with said source of partial vacuum defining an annular vacuum chamber;

(e) means attached to said annular chamber engaging the lower portion of said frame structure for maintaining said annular chamber concentric with said scrubber element and generally in a common. hori zontal plane therewith;

(f) said annular chamber defining means including depending radially inner and outer wall elements which define therebetween a downwardly and radially outwardly opening annular pick-up mouth in radially outward relationship to said scrubber element;

(g) said inner wall element terminating below the outer wall element but above the level of the floor engaging surface of said scrubber element;

(h) and a depending flexible resilient annular skirt carried by said radially outer wall element and terminating at its lower limits generally in the plane of the floor-engaging surface of said scrubber element;

(i) said skirt and said inner wall being so related that flexing of said skirt radially inwardly adjacent the leading edge thereof in response to movements in a given direction will close the adjacent portion of said pick-up mouth and thereby limit the pick-up function of said mouth to that portion adjacent the trailing edge of said skirt.

2. A scrubbing device including the structure defined in claim 1 operatively attached to a power operated rotary floor scrubbing element in which said handle means is pivotally secured to said frame structure for pivotal movements about a horizontal axis normal to and laterally spaced from the rotary axis of said scrubber element and in further combination with means for elevating and transporting said frame structure and scrubber element with respect to the surface to be scrubbed comprising:

(a) laterally spaced wheel means;

(b) bracket means rotatably mounting said wheel means laterally outwardly of said frame structure and scrubber element in generally underlying relationship to said handle means for movements toward and away from the surface being scrubbed;

(c) linkage means operatively connected between said handle and said bracket means for imparting said raising and lowering movements to said wheel means responsive to movements of said handle about its pivotal axis; and

((1) means for locking said wheel means and said handle means in a selected position of said movements.

3. A scrubbing device including the structure defined in claim 1 operatively attached to a power operated rotary floor scrubbing element in which said scrubbing element includes:

(a) power means secured to said frame structure including a vertically disposed rotary power output shaft;

(b) a generally circular body portion detachably secured to said power output shaft and having upper and lower horizontally disposed surface;

(0) an annular scrubbing member;

((1) means detachable securing said scrubbing member to said lower surface in concentric relationship to said body portion;

(e) an auxiliary reservoir defined by the upper sur- 7 face of said body adapted to receive cleaning fluid from said conveying means; and

(f) passage means defined by said body portion and extending between the outer periphery of said auxiliary reservoir and said scrubbing member adjacent the central opening therein whereby to supply fluid from said auxiliary reservoir to said scrubbing member centrally thereof.

4. The structure defined in claim 1 in which said means connected with said source of partial vacuum defining an annular vacuum chamber is mounted for limited vertical movements with respect to said frame structure.

8 References Cited, UNITED STATES PATENTS 4/1962 Osborn, 15-328X 2/1934 Gruendel 15 -50 3/1939 Longshoreet a1. 15-50 X 12/1953 Percy 15-377 X 6/1954 Danielsson 15--320 X 4/1962 Holt 1549 8/1966 Doyle et a1. l5351 X ROBERT W. MICHELL, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1948815 *Dec 7, 1931Feb 27, 1934Edward B GruendelRotary floor treating machine
US2149453 *Oct 8, 1936Mar 7, 1939Reconstruction Finance CorpVacuum scrubber
US2663893 *Jul 14, 1950Dec 29, 1953La Vern A PercyFloor treatment implement with vacuum cleaning mechanism
US2680260 *Aug 6, 1947Jun 8, 1954Henning SundinScrubbing machine with rotating brush for scrubbing surfaces
US3027581 *Aug 31, 1959Apr 3, 1962William E HoltFloor machine with adjustable handle assembly
US3029461 *Jun 30, 1960Apr 17, 1962Bissell IncCombination vacuum cleaner and floor scrubber
US3264674 *May 20, 1964Aug 9, 1966Doyle Vacuum Cleaner CoFloor treating machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3531819 *Jan 24, 1968Oct 6, 1970Contract Cleaning Co Pty LtdCombined floor-polisher and suction cleaner
US3935678 *Nov 18, 1974Feb 3, 1976Miksa MartonVacuum attachment for abrading machine
US4000538 *Mar 10, 1975Jan 4, 1977Jacques TissierCleaning device
US4137601 *Aug 2, 1977Feb 6, 1979Milliken Research CorporationDevice for scrubbing surfaces
US4178654 *Oct 26, 1977Dec 18, 1979Alfred MitchellFloor polishing machines
US4264999 *Oct 30, 1979May 5, 1981Monson Clifford LRotary flooring surface treating device
US4333204 *Jul 7, 1980Jun 8, 1982Monson Clifford LRotary flooring surface treating device
US4339840 *Apr 6, 1981Jul 20, 1982Monson Clifford LRotary flooring surface treating device
US4510643 *May 2, 1983Apr 16, 1985Hisao KitadaVacuum floor polisher
US4881288 *Jul 13, 1988Nov 21, 1989Tennant Trend Inc.Center feed dispenser for cleaning solution
US5163203 *Sep 29, 1989Nov 17, 1992Ovidiu TanasescuApparatus for wet cleaning of floors
US5522114 *Apr 3, 1995Jun 4, 1996Allison; Robert M.Carpet cleaning apparatus
US5974626 *Mar 26, 1997Nov 2, 1999Nilfisk-Advance, Inc.Collection system for a floor polishing machine
US6266892Jul 17, 2000Jul 31, 2001Concept Cleaning Systems, Inc.Device for enhancing removal of liquid from fabric
US6298577Jul 19, 1999Oct 9, 2001Concept Cleaning Systems, Inc.Device for enhancing removal of liquid from fabric
US6301744May 12, 2000Oct 16, 2001Oreck Holdings, LlcMethod for drawing a flow of air and particulates into a vacuum cleaner
US6536071 *Jan 12, 2001Mar 25, 2003Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Tank mounting of carpet extractor
US8510902Dec 3, 2008Aug 20, 2013Dri-Eaz Products, Inc.Air induction hard surface cleaning tool with an internal baffle
USRE38998Jan 23, 2004Mar 7, 2006Oreck Holdings, LlcBalanced flow vacuum cleaner
DE3802256A1 *Jan 27, 1988Oct 26, 1989Kaercher Gmbh & Co AlfredCleaning appliance for hard surfaces
DE4202987A1 *Feb 3, 1992Aug 5, 1993Hako Gmbh & CoMobile wet cleaning machine for floors with disc shaped cleaning tool - has suction foot, and duct enclosed by sealing strip on two sides, with two connections
EP1603443A1 *Feb 23, 2004Dec 14, 2005Joseph DeleoPolishing vacuum cleaner for hard surfaces
WO1981001236A1 *Oct 30, 1980May 14, 1981Monson CRotary flooring surface treating device
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/320, 15/328, 15/351, 15/401
International ClassificationA47L11/29, A47L11/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/30, A47L11/4038, A47L11/4044, A47L11/4088, A47L11/4091
European ClassificationA47L11/40F2, A47L11/40N6, A47L11/40P, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/30