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Publication numberUS3375815 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1968
Filing dateFeb 3, 1965
Priority dateFeb 3, 1965
Publication numberUS 3375815 A, US 3375815A, US-A-3375815, US3375815 A, US3375815A
InventorsStanley J Novak
Original AssigneeStanley J. Novak
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bow with inflexible tubular nocking member
US 3375815 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April-2, 1968 s.J. NovAK 3,375,815

BOW WITH INFLEXBLE TUBULAR NCKING MEMBER Filed Feb. 5, 1965 FIG. 2 I

INVENTOR. STANLEY J. NOVAK ATTORNEY United States Patent Office 3,375,815 BOW WITH INFLEXIBLE TUBULAR NOCKING MEMBER Stanley J. Novak, Bartlett Road, Middle Island, N.Y. 11953 Filed Feb. 3, 196s, ser. No. 429,976 16 Claims. (Cl. 124-23) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A bow having an inflexible tubular sleeve mounted on its bowstring at the noc'king point. The inside diameter of the sleeve is just large enough for the bowstring to pass through, while the outside diameter of the sleeve is small enough to receive an arrow nock. As the bowstring is drawn, the sleeve maintains the bowstring straight in the vicinity of the nocking point to eliminate finger pinch.

The present invention relates to an archery device and to a bowstring sheath for such a device.

A serious shortcoming of conventional archery bows is that they cause the problem commonly known as finger pinch. As the bowstring is drawn, the string forms an acute angle at the point at which the arrow is nocked. rFhis causes a pinching of the index, middle and ring fingers which are used to draw the bowstring. Such pinching has a number of undesirable results. First, the fingers used to draw the -bowstring are subject to, at least, discomfort and even to possible injury. Second, from the standpoint of markmanship, finger pinch makes drawing the bowstring difficult and prevents the execution of smooth releases of the string and arrow. These factors lead to inaccuracies in shooting in terms of both direction and distance.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved archery device.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a new and improved bowstring sheath for an archery device.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a bowstring sheath which eliminates finger pinch and potential injuries to the fingers which are used to draw the bowstring.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an archery device which permits easy drawing of the bowstring and smooth release of the bowstring and the arrow resulting in improved accuracy and distance.

`An archery device constructed in accordance with the present invention includes a bow member and a bowstring attached between the ends of the bow member. Also included in the archery device of the invention is an inflexible tubular member mounted on the bowstring having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock land an inside diameter large enough to pass a bowstring therethrough.

For a Ibetter understanding of the present invention, together with other and further objects thereof, reference is had to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, and its scope will be pointed out in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawing:

FIGURE l shows la portion of a conventional archery device and how when using such a device the archers fingers are subjected to the problem of finger pinch;

FIGURE 2 shows an archery device constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 3 shows a portion of the archery device of FIGURE 2 in drawn position; and

FIGURES 4 through 7 show the details of various dif- 3,3 ,815 Patented Apr. 2 1968 ferent bowstring sheaths constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Referring to FIGURE 1, where a portion of a convention-al archery device is illustrated, a bowstring 10 having a serving 11 over its central portion is seen in drawn position. The serving 11 is simply a thread wrapped around the bowstring which provides reinforcement for the bowstring at the point of nocking of an arrow 15. The bowstring is drawn `by the index finger 12, the middle finger 13 and the ring finger 14 with the arrow 15 positioned between the index and middle fingers.

As the bowstring 10 is drawn, an acute angle is formed at the point of nocking of the arrow 15. This causes the index finger 12 to be pinched between the arrow 15 and that portion of the serving 11 just above the point of nocking. The middle finger 13 is pinched between the ring finger 14 and the arrow 15, while the ring nger is pinched between the middle finger and that portion of the serving 11 just below the point of nocking.

It is apparent that this pinching of the index, middle and ring fingers is apt to cause, at least, discomfort and even possible injury to the fingers. In addition, difficulty is encountered in releasing the string and arrow at the desired moment and at the desired orientation since the bowstring acts on the fingers in such a way as to force them to remain in contact with the arrow.

Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3, an archery device constructed in accordance with the present invention includes a bow member 2f) having the usual curvature and a bowstring 21 attached between the ends 22 and 23 of the bow member. A suitable hand portion 24 for grasping the bow member 20 may also be provided.

Also included in the archery device of the invention is an inflexible tubular member 25 mounted on the bowstring 21. The tubular member 25 has an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock. The inside diameter of the tubular member 25 is large enough to pass the bowstring 21 through it. Although tubular member 25 is shown as having a uniform` outside diameter along its entire length, all that is necessary is that the tubular member have an outside diameter along a portion of its length small enough to receive an arrow nock. The thickness of the wall of the tubular member 25 is preferably approximately the same as the thickness of the serving on conventional archery devices. l

The tubular member 25 may be mounted on the bowstring 21 by applying any suitable adhesive to the string at a predetermined point vat which the tubular member is to be mounted, sliding the tubular member onto the string to the point of mounting and then permitting the adhesive to dry. It may be that in some instances, when it is found that the friction existing between the lbowstring 21 and the tubular member 25 is alone sufficient, the tubular member may be mounted onto the bowstring without the use of an adhesive.

As is most apparent from FIGURE 3, when the bowstring 21 is drawn, the tubular member 25 prevents the bowstring from forming an acute angle such as the one shown in FIGURE l. This is due to the fact that tubular member 25 is formed of an infiexible material which prevents bending of the bowstring 21. The result is that an archer using an archery device constructed in accordance with the present invention is not injured or hampered by the problem of finger pinch.

FIGURE 4 shows in greater detail the bowstring sheath 25 of FIGURE 3. Although tubular member 25 is shown in the sectional portion of FIGURE 4 as being formed of a metal, it will be obvious that any suitable material having the requisite strength to render the sheath inflexible may be used. An additional feature is to treat the end regions of tubular member 25 in such a manner as to remove sharp edges which, because of rubbing between the bowstring 21 and the tubular member, may cause the bowstring to wear. In the FIGURE 4 embodiment, this is accomplished by having the end regions of the sheath flared outward. It is apparent that the flaring at the ends of the sheath may be even more pronounced than that shown in FIGURE 4. The most pronounced flaring would result in the edges being rolled back completely to the sheath.

FIGURE 5 shows another embodiment of a bowstring sheath constructed in accordance with the present invention. This embodiment is very similar to the one shown in FIGURE 4. The basic difference is that in FIGURE 5 the end regions of the tubular member 2S are provided with rubber strips 26 covering the edges of the tubular member to achieve the desired lack of sharp edges. The rubber strips may be applied, for example, by rubber dipping. The rubber strips 26 serve the additional purpose of protecting the archer who does not use an arm guarded against possible injury which may be inflicted by the sheath after the string is released. It is apparent that plastic stripping may be used instead of the rubber strips 26 to achieve the desired results.

FIGURE 6 shows still another embodiment of a bowstring sheath constructed in accordance with the present invention. In this embodiment there are provided an inflexible tubular member 27, similar to the one shown in FIGURE 4 without the flared end regions, along with first and second sleeves 28 and 29, respectively, mounted on the tubular member 27. The inflexible tubular member 27 has an outside diameter at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter large enough to pass a bowstring 30 through it. The two sleeves 2S and 29 are, for the embodiment in FIGURE 6, formed of an inflexible material, shown in the sectional portion of FIGURE 6 as being of a plastic or like material. It will be apparent that any other material possessing the requisite characteristics may also be employed. Each of the sleeves 28 and 29 is provided with a recess surface 31 and 32, respectively, into which the opposite ends of the tubular member 27 are seated. The depth of the recesses 3l and 32 along with the length of the tubular member 27 is so set that the two sleeves, when mounted on the tubular member 27, are separated by a distance 33 which is large enough to receive an arrow nock. The mounting of the sleeves 28 and 29 on the tubular member 27 may be effected by a press-fit As was the case for the bowstring sheaths in FIGURES 4 and 5, end regions of the bowstring sheath of FIGURE 6 are also treated so that they lack sharp edges. In the embodiment of FIGURE 6, the inside surfaces of the sleeves 28 and 29 are rounded at the ends farthest from each other so as to remove sharp edges. This condition may be accomplished by counter-sinking the openings and if desired by further rounding with a file or similar tool.

Instead of forming the sleeves 28 and 29 of an inflexible material, a flexible material, such as teflon, may be used. Such a material would not, in most cases, subject the bowstring 30 to wear at the edges because of its flexibility. In order to prevent a flexible sleeve from snapping at the point at which the tubular member is seated, this pontion of the sleeve may be built up to make it less flexible with the outer end of the sleeve being thinner and more flexible.

FIGURE 7 shows yet another embodiment of a bowstring sheath constructed in accordance with the present invention. The bowstring sheath of FIGURE 7 is very similar to the one shown in FIGURE 6. The primary difference is` that the bowstring sheath of FIGURE 7 has the outside surfaces of the sleeves 34 and 35, mounted on tubular member 36, shaped to receive human fingers. Such shaping of the sleeves 34 and 35 may be accomplished by the molding or machining of the sleeves. lt is obvious that by shaping the outside surface of the sleeves 34 and 35, the archer has more comfort in drawing the bowstring 37.

It should be pointed out that various additional features may be added to the bowstring sheets just described, without departing from the principles of the present invention. For example, rubber or plastic coverings may be -provided on the surfaces which are grasped by the archers fingers. This feature is provided for archers who prefer not to use a shooting glove.

While there have been described what are at present considered to be the preferred embodiments of this invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the invention and it is, therefore, aimed to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

l. An archery device comprising:

(a) a bow member;

(b) a bowstring attached between the ends of said bow member;

(c) and a substantially cylindrical inflexible tubular member mounted on said bowstring having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an yinside diameter large enough to pass said bowstring therethrough, at least one end of said tubular member being flare-d outwardly and being otherwise free of laterally projecting extensions.

2. An archery device comprising:

(a) a bow member;

(b) a bowstring attached between t-he ends of said bow member;

(-c) and `a substantially cylindrical infiexible tubular member fixed to said bowstring at a prescribed point having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock :and an inside diameter large enough to p-ass said bowstring therethrough, at least one end of said tubular member being flared outwardly and being otherwise free of laterally projecting extensions.

3. An archery device comprising:

(a) a bow member;

(b) a bowstring .att-ached between the ends of said bow member;

(c) and a substantially cylindrical inflexible tubular member mounted on said bowstring having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an in side diameter large enough to pass said bowstring therethrough, at least one end of said tubular member being flared outwardly and being Otherwise free of laterally projecting extensions, the end regions of the inside surface of said tubular member being so treated `as to lack sharp edges.

4. Anv archery device comprising:

(a) a bow member;

(b) a bowstring attached bow member;

(c) and a substantially cylindrical inflexible tubular member mounted on said bowstring having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter large enougih to pass said bowstring therethrough, the end regions of said tubular membeing flared outward, the tubular member being free of laterally projecting extensions between the flared end regions.

5. An archery device comprising:

(a) a bow member;

(b) a bowstring attached between the ends of said bow member;

(c) ra substantially cylindrical inexible tubular member mounted on said bowstring having an outside diameter, at least along a portion 0f its length, small between the ends of said enough to receive Ian arrow nock and an inside diameter large enough to pass said bowstring therethrough, at least one end of said tubular member being flared outwardly and being otherwise free of laterally projecting extensions;

(d) and protective rubber strips covering the end edges of said tubular member.

6. An archery device comprising:

(a) a bow mem-ber;

('b) a bowstring attached between the ends of said bow member;

(c) a substantially cylindrical intiexible tubular member mounted on said bowstring having an outsi-de diameter, at least lalong a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter .large enough t-o pass said bowstring therethrough, the end regions of said tubular member being flared outward, the tubular member being free of laterally projecting extensions between the flared end regions;

(d) and protective rubber strips covering the edges of said flared regions.

7. An archery device comprising:

(a) a bow member;

(b) ya bowstring attached between the ends of said bow member;

(c) an inliexible tubular member mounted on said bowstring having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter large enough to pass said bowstring therethrough;

(d) a -rst sleeve mounted on said tubular member;

(e) land a second sleeve mounted on said tubular member and separated from said first sleeve by a distance large enough to pass an arrow nock between said two sleeves.

8. An acrhery device comprising:

(a) a bow member;

(b) a bowstring attached between the ends of said lbow member;

(c) `an inflexible tubular member mounted on said bowstring having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter l-arge enough to pass said bowstring therethrough;

(d) a iirst inflexible sleeve tightly mounted on said tubular member;

(e) and a second inflexible sleeve tightly mounted on said tubular member and separated from said first sleeve by a distance large enough to pass an arrow nock between said two sleeves.

9. An archery device according to claim 8 wherein the inside surfaces of the sleeves are rounded at the ends farthest from cach other to remove sharp edges.

10. An archery device according to claim 8 wherein the outside surfaces of the sleeves are shaped to receive huma-n fingers.

11. A bowstring sheath comprising:

(a) a substantially cylindrical inflexible tubular member having an outside diameter, at least along a the outside surfaces of the huma-n fingers.

portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter large en-ough to pass a bowstring therethrough; at least one end of said tubular member being flared outwardly;

(b) and protective rubber strips covering the edges of said tubular member, said tubular member being `otherwise free of laterally projecting extensions.

12. A bowstring she-ath comprising:

(a) a substantially cylindrical intiexible tubular member having an outside diameter, at least along a portion o-f its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter large enough to pass a bowstring therethrough, the end regions of said .member being flared outward;

` (b) and protective rubber strips covering the edges of said flared regions, said tubular member being other- Wise free off laterally projecting extensions.

13. A bowstring sheath comprising:

(a) an intlexible tubular member having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter large enough to pass a bowstring therethrough;

(b) a first sleeve mounted on said tubular member;

(c) and a second sleeve mounted on said tubular member and separated from said lirst sleeve by a distance large enough to pass an arrow nock between said ltwo sleeves,

14. A bowstring sheath comprising:

(a) lan inflexible tubular member having an outside diameter, at least along a portion of its length, small enough to receive an arrow nock and an inside diameter large enough to pass a bowstring therethrough;

(.b) a rst inflexible sleeve tightly mounted on said tubular member; l

(c) and a second inflexible sleeve tightly mounted on said tubular member and separated from said first `sleeve by a distance large enough to pass an arrow nock between said two sleeves.

15. A bowstring sheath .according to claim 14 wherein the inside surfaces of the sleeves are rounded at the ends farthest vfrom each other to remove sharp edges. 16. A bowstring sheath .according to claim 14 wherein sleeves are shaped to receive References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 673,688 5/1901 Pickett 273-63 1,785,589 12/1930` Mead 124-30 1,960,477 5/1934 Cowdery 4.-- 124--23 2,905,166 9/1959 Niemeyer 124-30 3,135,020 6/1964 Holl et .al 124-30 ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner. RlCHARD C. PINKHAM, F. BARRY SHAY,

Examiners.

0 W. R. BROWNE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US673688 *Dec 28, 1900May 7, 1901Bowling Ball CompanyBowling-ball.
US1785589 *Mar 17, 1928Dec 16, 1930Mead Earl GStream-line arrow and string-engaging means therefor
US1960477 *Mar 5, 1929May 29, 1934American Fork & Hoe CoBow for archery
US2905166 *Sep 5, 1956Sep 22, 1959Niemeyer Roy KBow string nock
US3135020 *May 4, 1961Jun 2, 1964John S HollNocking point for bowstring
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3756215 *Sep 7, 1971Sep 4, 1973Remington Arms Co IncRotatable nocking attachment
US3921979 *Nov 30, 1973Nov 25, 1975Babolat Maillot WittIntermediate members for the crossing points of tennis racket stringings
US3937205 *Jan 24, 1974Feb 10, 1976Saunders Archery Co.Bow string finger guard
US4004564 *Jun 26, 1975Jan 25, 1977Astratronics, Inc.Bow string release
US4057246 *Mar 15, 1976Nov 8, 1977Wilson Bradford WMultipurpose push pull exerciser
US4297985 *Dec 3, 1979Nov 3, 1981Rudolph RodriguezCatapult device and projectile therefore
US4909233 *Feb 3, 1989Mar 20, 1990Stephenson William RAdjustable threaded nock rest for archery
US5190021 *Aug 5, 1991Mar 2, 1993Hull Harold LQuick release foot strap
US6343600 *Aug 24, 2000Feb 5, 2002Jeremy L. SteinmanFinger guard for archers
US8448633Oct 27, 2009May 28, 2013Mcp Ip, LlcString damper having aperture
US8826896Jul 28, 2010Sep 9, 2014Mcp Ip, LlcArchery bowstring weight
US9250031May 28, 2013Feb 2, 2016Mcp Ip, LlcString damper having aperture
US20110094489 *Apr 28, 2011Mcpherson Mathew AString Damper Having Aperture
USRE36555 *Feb 1, 1996Feb 8, 2000Tru-Fire CorporationCushioned nock
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/23.1, 124/91
International ClassificationF41B5/18
Cooperative ClassificationF41B5/1415
European ClassificationF41B5/14D4B