Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3375874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1968
Filing dateApr 13, 1965
Priority dateApr 13, 1965
Publication numberUS 3375874 A, US 3375874A, US-A-3375874, US3375874 A, US3375874A
InventorsCherry Vonner R, Cox Roland O
Original AssigneeOtis Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Subsurface well control apparatus
US 3375874 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v. R. CHERRY ETAL 3,375,874 SUBSURFACE WELL CONTROL APPARATUS April 2, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 I '7 INVENTORS Vonner R. Cherry Roland 0. Cox

7/ WWNEY Filed April 13, 1965 A ril 2, 1968 v. R. CHERRY ETAL ,3

SUBSURFACE WELL CONTROL APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 13, 1965 INVENTORS Vonner R. Cherry Roland 0. Cox

Fig.6

Fig.5-A

w ym

Fig.4

A ril 2, 1968 v. R. CHERRY ETAL 3,375,374

SUBSURFACE WELL CONTROL APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April 13, 1965 Fig. 7-0

m w OW. m Tr N80 E h C O we; w. R A 7 rd A ril 2, 1968 v. R. CHERRY ETAL 3,375,374

SUBSURFACE WELL CONTROL APPARATUS Filed April 15, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS Vonner R. Cherry 4 I Roland 0. Cox f M Wfm United States Patent Oflice 3,375,874 Patented Apr. 2, 1938 3,375,874 SUBSURFACE WELL CONTROL APPARATUS Vonner R. Cherry, Mountain Home, Ark., and Roland 0. Cox, Dallas, Tex., assignors to Otis Engineering Corporation, Dallas, Tex., a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 13, 1965, Ser. No. 447,803 15 Claims. (Cl. 166-414) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A control valve system providing surface controlled subterranean valve means permitting injection or withdrawal or simultaneous injection and withdrawal of fluids in a Well and providing for large volume of flow into or out of the well and positive shut-oil of flow when desired.

This invention relates to well tools and more particularly to apparatus for controlling flow in wells.

One object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for controlling flow within a well which accommodates extremely high rates of flow and which provides automatic protection against uncontrolled flow from the well.

Another object of the invention is to provide a well control apparatus of the type described in which the full bore of the tubing throughout its entire length is available during normal operations for the running of well tools therethrough for performing such operations as cleaning, bailing, swabbing, running corrosion or pressure surveys, or the like.

Yet another object is to provide a well control apparatus of the type described for use in a Well equipped for flow through a plurality of flow passages, which after it has actuated to close the flow passages can be manipulated either hydraulically or mechanically to open one or more of the flow passages.

A particular object of the invention is to provide apparatus for controlling flow of fluids within a well equipped for flow through a plurality of flow passages, at least two, which permits large volumes of flow, which apparatus automatically prevents undesired uncontrolled flow from the well, and which has means operable to open or close one or more of the flow passages hydraulically or mechanically.

A further object of the invention is to provide a well control apparatus of the type described which is economical to manufacture, install and service.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a safety device of the character described which will automatically shut off flow from the well at a subsurface level in response to a predetermined condition sensed at the surface.

An important object of this invention is to provide a control device of the character described which is adapted to permit the introduction or Withdrawal of fluids into or from the well at extremely high rates such as would be required in the case of gas storage wells.

Another important object is to provide, in a storage Well, a subsurface control means which will permit large volumes of fluids to be injected into or withdrawn from the well and which will automatically shut off flow from the Well in an emergency such as failure of the surface connetcions or surface equipment.

Another object is to provide a well safety apparatus which permits free circulation of fluids in either the conventional or reverse pattern, whereby fiuidsmay be forced downwardly through thetubing to return to the surface through the tubing-casing annulus or fluids may be forced downwardly through the tubing-annulus to return to the surface through the tubing, as desired.

Another object is to provide a Well safety apparatus of the character described which will permit the unloading of water from the bottom of the well through the tubing without interrupting the flow into or out of the Well through the tubing-casing annulus.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the reading of the following description of a device constructed in accordance with the invention, and reference to the accompanying drawings thereof, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic view showing a well flow control during its installation into or removal from the well;

FIGURE 2 is a schematic view showing the Well flow control device installed in a well and in position for normal operating conditions, flow being permitted through either or both the tubing and tubing-casing annulus passageways;

FIGURE 3 is a schematic view similar to FIGURE 2 showing the well flow control device in position closing the tubing and the tubing-casing annulus passageways, preventing flow from the well;

FIGURE 4 is a schematic view similar to FIGURES 2 and 3 showing the device with the tubing passageway reopened by hydraulic means, the tubin-g-casing annulus passageway remaining closed;

FIGURE 5 is a schematic view similar to FIGURE 2 showing the valves held in their fully opened positions by mechanical means;

FIGURE 5-A is an enlarged view of the mechanical shifting tool of FIGURE 5 which holds the valves open;

FIGURE 6 is a schematic view showing the upper or safety valve portion of the well flow control device removed and replaced by a tube;

FIGURE 7-A is a longitudinal sectional view showing the upper portion of a well flow control device constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 7-B is a view similar to FIGURE 7-A, being a continuation thereof showing an intermediate portion of the well flow control device;

FIGURE 7-C is a view similar to FIGURE 7B being a continuation thereof showing the lower portion of the well flow control device;

FIGURE 8-A is a view similar to FIGURE 7-A showing the Well flow control device of FIGURES 7-A, 7-B and 7-C with the valves thereof in their closed positions;

FIGURES 8-B is a view similar to FIGURE 8A, being a continuation thereof, showing the intermediate portion of the device;

FIGURE 8-0 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partly in elevation and partly in section, of the flapper valve of FIGURE 8-A and its seat; and,

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary partly sectional enlarged view showing the flapper valve illustrated in FIGURE 7-A.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, it will be seen that a well casing 20 which is installed in the well bore in the conventional manner passes through the subterranean formation 21 and that the lower portion of the well casing is then plugged by the deposition of cement as at 22. The well casing 20 is provided with perforations 23 which communicate the bore 24 of the casing with the subterranean formation so that fluids may flow therebetween. A well packer 25 which constitutes the lower portion of the well flow control device 26 of the present invention is installed in an intermediate portion of the well casing 20, and may be set near the surface or near the subterranean formation, as desired. However, it will usually be preferable to install the packer near the surface, probably a distance equal to the length of from one to three joints of tubing.

While the well packer 25 may be of any suitable type, it is necessary that it be capable of withstanding a pressure differential in either longitudinal direction. Thus, the packer may be of the removable lug type such as that disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 2,506,680 issued to Herbert C. Otis, or US. Patent No. 2,862,560 to I. H. Bostock et al., or it may be of the permanent type such as that exemplified by the Otis type WA Packer which is illustrated and described on page 3638 of the Composite Catalog of Oil Field Equipment and Services, 1964-65 edition, and which is provided with a flapper valve of the type described and illustrated on page 3643 of the Composite Catalog of Oil Field Equipment and Services, 1964- 65 edition. The packer illustrated and described herein is substantially identical to the Otis type WA Packer, but is provided with additional features.

It will be noted in FIGURE 1 that the packer 25 is provided with a mandrel 26:: having an external anchoring and seal means 27 thereon. The packer mandrel has a bore 28 extending therethrough and this bore is closable by a flapper valve 29 which is biased toward closed position by a spring (not shown). The flapper valve is normally closed except when some means is provided for holding it open. The upper end of the bore 28 of the packer is enlarged as at 30 to form a receptacle for the lower portion of a valve housing 35, forming part of the flow control device 26, as will be described more fully later. Below the flapper valve the bore 28 of the mandrel is enlarged as at 31 to provide ample space for the ivotal movement of the flapper valve and to provide space for the flow of fluids which may enter and leave lateral openings 32 formed in the wall of the mandrel 26 below the seal member 27. Below the lateral openings 32 the packer mandrel bore is reduced in diameter to form an internal annular sealing surface 33, and below this sealing surface the bore of the mandrel is further reduced to provide an internal annular upwardly facing stop shoulder 34, whose purpose will be hereinafter described. Below the stop shoulder the portion 36 of the bore is threaded, and, if desired, the lower end of the packer mandrel may be provided with external threads 37 for attachment of a tail pipe which may extend downwardly below the packer toward the bottom of the well.

In the upper portion of the well casing shown in FIG- URE 1, the valve housing forming the upper portion of the control device 26 is shown as it appears while being installed or removed from the well. This upper portion of the control device is lowered into the well on the string of well tubing 40 to which it is connected, and a depending conduit 39 having a threaded bottom end portion 41 extends downwardly from the valve housing 35 and is engageable with corresponding internal threads 36 in the lower portion of the bore of the well packer. When the conduit 39 is lowered through the bore of the packer past the flapper valve 29, an annular enlargement or head 42 at the lower end of the conduit 39 having a seal ring 43 mounted in an external annular groove formed in such enlargement or head is received in the reduced bore of the packer providing the sealing surface 33 at the lower end of the bore of the packer, and the seal ring 43 engages and seals between the enlargement 42 and the sealing surface. The beveled shoulder 44 at the lower end of the enlargement engages the stop shoulder 34 to limit downward movement of the conduit 39 in the packer. As the conduit 39 is moved into the packer, the reduced seal head 45 at the lower end of the valve housing 35 moves into the enlarged bore 30 at the upper end of the packer and the beveled shoulder 46 at the lower end of the seal head engages the upwardly facing stop shoulder 47 at the lower end of the enlarged bore to limit downward movement of the valve housing in the bore of the packer. An annular seal ring 48 disposed in an external annular groove in the seal head engages the bore wall of the enlarged bore 30 to seal between the seal head and the packer.

A small diameter control fluid line 50 connects the upper end of the valve housing 35 with a surface control apparatus 51 at the surface of the earth, which supplies hydraulic fluid under pressure from a suitable source, such as a pump 52, through the line 50 to the valve housing to control flow of fluid through the casing and tubing between the subterranean formation 21 and surface flow lines 53 and 54 which communicate with the casing and the tubing, respectively. The well installation includes a usual casing head 55 through which the flow line 53 opens to the casing and has usual well known means (not shown) through which the packer 25 and other well tools may be moved into the well casing and which prevents flow of fluids from the casing during this operation.

As is clearly shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, the upper end of the housing 35 is provided with a reduced neck or upward extension into which the lower end of the tubing string 40 is threaded. The bore 61 of the housing extends downwardly from the neck to a slightly enlarged portion 62 just below the neck in which is slidably disposed the upper reduced end or tubular extension 63 of a valve operating piston 64 which is slidably mounted in an enlarged bore or cylinder 65 formed in the valve housing and comprising a portion of the bore of the housing. The control fluid flow line 50 is threaded or otherwise secured in the enlarged upper end of a flow passage 66 in the housing extending downwardly from the upper end of the housing below the neck 60 into the cylinder 65 above the piston 64. A seal ring 67 is mounted in an external annular recess formed in the periphery of the piston 64 and seals between the piston and the wall of the cylinder 65. A depending tubular extension 68 extends downwardly from the piston 64 through a reduced internal annular seat flange 69 formed in the bore of the housing 35 at the lower end of the chamber 65, and a helical coil spring 70 is supported at one end on the internal annular flange 69 and engages the under side of the piston 64 to bias the piston upwardly in the chamber toward the position shown in FIGURE 3. An annular seal ring 71 is mounted in an internal annular groove in the lower end of the enlarged portion 62 of the bore of the housing and seals between the housing and the upper tubular extension 63 above the piston 64, whereby fluid passing through the bore 72 of the lower depending extension 68, the piston 64 and the upper extension 63 will pass upwardly therefrom into the enlarged bore 62 and upwardly through the bore 61 into the tubing string 40 thereabove, through which it flows to the surface of the well and outwardly through the flow line 54.

The lower extension 68 of the piston 64 is movable through the bore of the internal annular flange 69 and adapted to engage a pivotally mounted flapper valve 75 secured by means of a pivot pin 76 to the housing adjacent the underside of the flange 69 to swing between a closed position, toward which it is biased by a suitable biasing means, not shown, wherein it engages the beveled seat 77 formed on the underside of the flange at the lower end of the bore of the flange to close the passage therethrough, and an open position shown in FIGURE 2 to which the flapper valve is moved by the engagement of the lower tubular extension 68 of the piston with the flapper valve as the piston moves longitudinally in the housing between the upper position shown in FIGURE 3 and the lower position shown in FIGURE 2.

In the enlarged portion" 80 of the bore of the valve housing 35 below the flange 69, there is slidable a sliding sleeve valve 81 having lateral flow ports 82 formed therein for communicating the bore 83 of the sleeve valve with lateral ports 85 formed in the wall of the housing and communicating the exterior of the housing with the bore thereof. An upper external annular seal ring 86 disposed in an external annular groove formed in the wall of the sleeve valve 81 above the lateral ports 82 seals between the sleeve valve and the bore wall of the enlarged bore 80 of the housing above the lateral ports 85, and a lower external annular seal ring 87 disposed in an external annular groove formed in the lower portion of the sleeve valve 81 at a point spaced below the ports 82 of the sleeve valve seals between the lower end of the sleeve valve below the ports 82 of the sleeve valve and the bore wall of the housing below the ports 85. An intermediate seal ring 88 is disposed in an external annular groove formed in the periphery of the sleeve valve 81 just below the lateral ports 82 of the sleeve valve and spaced sufliciently above the lower seal ring 87 to engage the bore wall of the enlarged bore of the valve housing above the lateral ports 85 in the housing when the sleeve valve is in the upper position shown in FIGURE 3. Thus, when the valve is in the lower position shown in FIGURE 2, the upper seal ring 86 and the intermediate seal ring 88 seal between the sleeve valve and the valve housing on opposite sides of the lateral ports 82 of the sleeve valve and on opposite sides of the ports 85 in the valve housing and direct flow from within the bore 83 of the sleeve valve outwardly through the ports 82 to and through the lateral ports 85 of the housing and to the exterior of the housing. Conversely, when the sleeve valve is in the upper position shown in FIGURE 3, the lower seal ring 87 and the intermediate seal ring 88 seal between the exterior of the sleeve valve 81 and the bore wall of the valve housing below and above the lateral ports 85 of the housing to prevent flow of fluid from within the bore of the sleeve valve to the lateral ports 85, and thus shut off flow outwardly from within the bore of the sleeve valve through the ports 85 to the exterior of the housing.

The depending conduit or conductor tube 39 extends upwardly through the reduced lower portion 90 of the bore of the valve housing, and through the lower portion of the bore 83 of the sleeve valve 81 and through an internal annular flange 91 formed in the bore of the sleeve valve into the upper portion 96 of the bore of the sleeve valve. An internal annular sealing ring 92 is disposed in an internal annular groove formed in the flange 91 and engages and seals between the flange and the upper portion of the conduit 39, whereby fluid flowing through the bore 95 of the conduit 39 will pass upwardly through the conduit, through the sleeve valve 81 to the upper portion 96 of the bore of the sleeve valve above the flange 91 and through the bore of an internal annular stop flange 97 at the upper end of the sleeve valve to the bore of the depending tubular extension 68 projecting downwardly from the piston 64 and engaging the flange 97.

The depending conduit is rigidly secured to the valve housing 35 by one or more pins 98. The sleeve valve is biased upwardly relative to the depending conduit, and therefore relative to the valve housing, by a spring 99 whose top end engages the downwardly facing shoulder 100 of the flange 97 defining the reduced upper portion of the bore 83 of the sleeve valve 81 and whose bottom end engages the top shoulder 102 of an external annular flange 103 of the depending conduit located in the bore 83 between the sleeve valve flanges 91 and 97. Upward movement of the sleeve valve relative to the depending conduit is limited by the engagement of the top shoulder of the flange 91 with the bottom shoulder of the flange 103.

It will be apparent that while the upper portion or valve housing 35 of the flow control device 26 is shown as being releasably securable to its lower portion or packer 25 by means of the external and internal threads of the dependent conduit 39 of the valve housing 35 and the mandrel 26a of the packer 25, respectively, the two portions of the flow control device can be releasably secured together by any other suitable means, for example, by a well known Hatch mechanism such as is used to connect a tubing string to the Otis Twin Flow Conversion Unit illustrated and described on page 3655 of the above mentioned Composite Catalogue.

In use, when the flow control device 26 is to be installed in a well casing, the upper end of the packer 25 is connected to the lower end of a suitable setting tool and the assembly of the packer and the setting tool is lowerable into the casing by means of a flexible member or line connected to the setting tool. If the setting tool is of a common type utilizing the force generated by the detonation of a powder charge contained therein to set the packer, the flexible member includes an insulated electric conductor means through which an electric current can be transmitted from the surface to the setting tool to detonate the powder charge. The setting tool preferably has means, such as a rod or stinger, which extends through the mandrel and engages the flapper valve 29 to hold it open in order to facilitate movement of the mandrel and setting tool through any fliuds present in the casing by permitting them to flow through the bore or flow passage 28 of the mandrel.

The assembly of the well packer and the setting tool is then introduced into the upper end of the casing, through usual surface equipment, such as a lubricator, mounted on the well head 55 and is then lowered into the well casing by means of the flexible member. At this time the flow line 53 is closed by a suitable valve (not shown). The surface equipment includes sealing means engageable with the flexible member to prevent fluid flow out of the casing as the flexible member is moved therethrough to lower the setting tool and the packer in the casing.

When the well packer is lowered to the desired location in the well casing, the powder charge in the setting tool is detonated by an electric current transmitted to the setting tool through the electric conductor which extends to the surface and the detonation of the powder charge causes the anchoring and sealing means 27 of the packer to move into anchoring and sealing engagement with the well casing to anchor the mandrel against movement in the casing and also to seal between the mandrel and the casing above the casing perforations 23 and above the ports or passages 32 of the mandrel thus closing the annulus between the packer mandrel and the casing. The setting tool is then released from the packer mandrel and is moved upwardly and out of the well casing through the usual surface equipment mounted on the well head. As the setting tool is moved upwardly relative to the mandrel, its rod or stinger means, which engages the flapper valve 29 and holds it open, moves out of engagement with the flapper valve which then is moved by suitable spring means to its closed position thus closing the mandrel passage 28.

When the setting tool has been removed from the casing, the pressure in the well casing above the packer may be reduced by opening a valve in the flow line 53 to permit fluid to flow from the casing. The upper portion or valve housing of the flow control apparatus is then connected to the lower end of the string of tubing and is lowered together with the control fluid line through the surface equipment mounted on the well head into the upper end of the casing. If the fluid under pressure is not introduced through such fluid control line 50 into the bore above the piston 64 to move and to hold the piston in its lower position, the flapper valve will be in its closed position engaging the seat 77 of the valve housing. If desired, during the movement of the valve housing 35 into the well casing, fluid pressure may be introduced into the cylinder 65 'of the valve housing through the fluid control line 50, in which event the valve operating piston 64 is moved to its lowermost position in the housing wherein it holds the flappervalve 75 and the sleeve valve 81 in their open positions so that fluids may flow through the flow passage provided :by the depending conduit 39, the piston 64 and its extensions, and the bore 61 of the housing; and also through the lower portion 90 of the bore of the housing and the ports or apertures 82 and of the sleeve valve and the valve housing to facilitate downward movement of the upper portion of the flow control device through the casing.

As the lower portion of the depending conduit 39 telescopes into the passage 28 of the mandrel, it engages the flapper valve 29 and moves it to its lower open position shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 and then its bottom threaded portion 41 moves into the reduced threaded portion 36 of the bore or passage of the mandrel whereupon the string of tubing is rotated to cause the threaded lower end portion 41 of the depending conduit to be secured to the mandrel. The control fluid line 50 may be wound about the tubing during such rotation of the valve housing since it is relatively flexible or ductile. If desired, of course, the control fluid line may be rotated simultaneously with the tubing at the surface to prevent such winding thereof about the tubing.

When the depending conduit is releasably secured to the mandrel, and the engagement of the shoulder 44 of the enlargement 42 with the shoulder 34 of the mandrel prevents further downward movement of the valve housing into the mandrel, the O-ring 43 is in sealing engagement with the seal surface 33 of the mandrel below the ports 32 of the mandrel and the O-ring 48 engages the internal surfaces of the mandrel defining the upper enlarged portion of the bore of the packer mandrel.

If sufiicient fluid pressure has been maintained in the bore 65 holding the piston 64 in the lowermost position illustrated in FIGURE 2 during the downward movement of the valve housing through the casing and its connection to the packer mandrel, the operative elements of the flow control device will now be in the positions illustrated in FIGURE 2. If fluid pressure has not been so maintained in the bore 65 of the valve housing, the piston 64 is in its uppermost position in the valve housing and the flapper valve 75 and the sleeve valve 81 are in their upper closed positions as shown in FIGURE 3. Fluid pressure may then be introduced through the control fluid line 50 into the bore 65 above the piston 64 to cause it to move downwardly in the valve housing whereupon the depending piston extension 68 first engages the flapper valve 75 and moves it to its open position and then engages the flange 97 of the sleeve valve and moves the sleeve valve downwardly against the force exerted thereon by the spring 99 to its open position. The operative elements of the flow control are then in the position illustrated in FIGURE 2.

When the operative elements of the flow control ap paratus are in the positions illustrated in FIGURE 2, well fluids from below the packer may flow upwardly to the flow line 54 connected to the top end of the tubing through the lowermost portion 106 of the bore or flow passage of the packer mandrel, the flow passage 95 of the depending conduit, the bore of the flange 97 of the sleeve valve, the passage 72 of the piston 64 and its ex tensions, the passage 61 of the valve housing and the tubing 40. Simultaneously, the well fluids from below the packer may also flow upwardly to the surface, to the flow line 53 which opens to the casing, through the apertures or ports 32 and the flow passage 28 of the packer mandrel, the portion 90 of the passage of the valve housing, the lower portion of the bore 83, of the sleeve valve below its flange 91, the now communicating and aligned ports 82 and 85 of the sleeve valve and of the valve housing, respectively, and the annulus or annular passage between the valve housing and the string of tubing 40.

The surface control apparatus 51 may be of any suitable well known type having means which are responsive to the pressure in the annulus and the tubing, the pressure from the annulus being communicated to the control apparatus through a suitable conduit 107 which opens to the casing and the pressure within the tubing being communicated to the control apparatus through a conduit 108 which opens to the passage of the tubing at the surface. The control apparatus may also have a manually operated means 110. If the pressure within the tubing or the well casing moves out of predetermined ranges, the control apparatus will disconnect the control fluid line 50 from the source of pressure and will communicate its upper end with the atmosphere to permit the pressure therein to decrease, whereupon the piston 64 moves upwardly permitting the flapper valve 75 and the sleeve valve 81 to move to their upper closed positions.

If it is thereafter desired to reopen the flow control device to permit flow of the well fluids both through the tubing and the annulus, fluid under pressure is again introduced into the cylinder 65 through the flow fluid line 50 to again move the piston and the sleeve valve to their lowermost positions illustrated in FIGURE 2.

If it is desired that the well fluids flow to the surface only through the tubing, the control apparatus 51 is set to maintain a maximum pressure in the cylinder 65 which will move the piston to and hold it in the intermediate position illustrated in FIGURE 4 whereupon the fluid will flow to the surface only through the tubing. In this case also, the control apparatus 51 may be made responsive to the pressure within the tubing or within the tubing and the annulus to cause the fluid within the cylinder 65 to be vented and permit the valve piston to be moved back to its upper position to stop flow through the tubing whenever the pressure within the tubing or within the annulus, moves out of predetermined pressure ranges.

If due to some malfunction or damage to the flow control device, such as rupture of the control fluid line 50, the piston cannot be moved downwardly from its closed position to its open position, the piston may be moved to and held in its intermediate or its lowermost position by a suitable tool 120, FIGURES 5 and 5-A which is movable into the tubing through a suitable sealing or stufiing box means 121 mounted on the well head. For example, such means may include a pair of threaded posts 122 secured to the well head in any suitable manner and extending upwardly therefrom and above the flow line 54. The upper end of the tubing is provided with an upwardly opening extension 124 which is closed by a seal plate 125 mounted on the posts which extend through suitable apertures in the seal plate and held in place by nuts 126. The seal plate has an opening through which an elongate member 128, such as a small diameter pipe or rod, may extend movably and be engaged by a sealing means 129 of the seal plate. The rod has a collet tool 130 mounted on its lower end which may be of the same general type as the Otis Type F Collar Stop illustrated and described on page 3667 of the aforementioned Composite Catalogue and which includes a mandrel 131 rigidly secured in any suitable manner, as by a coupling 132, to the lower end of the rod 128 and a collet member 133 releasably secured in a lower position on the mandrel by a shear pin 134 which extends through suitable aligned apertures in the upper tubular portion 135 of the collet member and the mandrel. The collet member has a pair of resilient collet fingers 136 and 137 which initially are held in retracted positions by a latch wire 138 pivotally connected to one latch finger 137. The latch wire has a hook portion 139 which is engageable with a pin 140 carried by the other latch finger 136. The outer end of the latch wire extends outwardly of the outer surface of an external boss 142 of the latch finger 136 when it is in latching engagement with the pin 140 thereof. The external bosses 142 and 143 on the lower ends of the collet fingers 136 and 137 have downwardly facing abrupt stop shoulders 144 which are engageable with the annular top shoulder or surface 145 of the upper piston extension 63. These stop shoulders, when the latch fingers are in their retracted posi tions, are held out of engagement with any upwardly facing obstructions such as the upper ends of each section of the tubing, during downward movement of the collet tool through the tubing.

The mandrel has an enlarged bottom end portion which provides an upwardly and outwardly beveled camming shoulder 151 which is engageable with the inner upper cam shoulders 153 of the collet fingers and with similar inner lower upwardly facing stop shoulders 154 thereof. Downward movement of the rod 128 relative to the collet member 133, after the shear pin 134 is sheared, is limited not only by the engagement of the shoulder 151 with the stop shoulders 154 of the collet fingers but also by the engagement of the top end surface 156 of the collet member with the bottom surface of an annular stop member 157 rigidly secured in any suitable manner to the rod.

When the piston 64 is to be moved downwardly by the tool 130, the rod 128 is moved downwardly through the tubing until at least the lower end portions of the collet fingers move downwardly beneath the downwardly facing shoulder 160 of the valve housing defining the upper end of the enlarged portion 65 of its bore. The rod is then lifted upwardly to cause the outer end of the latch wire to engage the downwardly facing shoulder 160 and, as upward movement of the rod is continued, the hook portion 139 of the resilient latch wire moves out of engagement with the pin 140 and thus releases the lower ends of the collet fingers for outward movement. The rod is then moved downwardly again and, as the top shoulders 162 of the external bosses 142 and 143 move below the housing shoulder 160 the lower ends of the collet fingers move resiliently outwardly so that their bosses are disposed between the top end surface 145 of the piston extension 63 and the shoulder 160, the space between these shoulders, when the piston is in its uppermost position as illustrated in FIGURE 3, being wide enough to receive the external bosses therein. Further downward movement of the rod will now cause the abrupt shoulders 144 of the bosses to engage the top shoulder 145 of the piston rod extension 63. The piston being biased upwardly by the spring, a downward force then imparted to the piston rod will cause the shear pin 134 to shear, whereupon the mandrel moves downwardly relative to the collet member, and lower cam surface 151 of its enlargement 150 engaging the upper shoulders 153 of the collet fingers and camming the lower end of the collet fingers outwardly if these have not moved fully outward due to the resilient force of the collet fingers. Such downward movement of the rod 128, and the mandrel 131 relative to the collet member is continued until the shoulder 151 engages the inner lower shoulders 154 of the collet fingers and the flange 157 engages the top surface 156 of the collet member, whereupon the collet member moves downwardly with the mandrel. A downward force may then be imposed on the rod 128, as by means of the force plate 165, which has apertures through which the posts 122 extend, and the nuts 166 on the post, the rod having an external flange 167 engageable by the plate. The plate may be forced downwardly by rotating the nuts threaded on the posts. Such rotation of the nuts will now move the rod and the tool 130 downwardly relative to the tubing and the valve housing. Such downward movement of the force plate will now move the piston downwardly either to its intermediate portion or to its lowermost position and flow of well fluid may take place through the flow control device, as desired. The flow control device will, when the piston 64 is held in its lower position by the rod and tool 120, of course not function to prevent such flow in the event that pressure conditions in the tubing or in the annulus move out of predetermined ranges since it is held rigidly in open position.

Referring now particularly to FIGURE 6, if it is desired to perform remedial operations on the well, the upper portion or valve housing may be removed from the well by first rotating the tubing to release the depending conduit 39 from the packer mandrel. As the depending conduit is removed upwardly from the packer mandrel, the flapper valve 29 of the packer closes and the pressure in the casing above the mandrel may then be reduced to facilitate removal of the tubing and the upper portion or valve housing 39 of the flow control device from the well. The surface equipment will of course include usual sealing or blowout preventers which prevent flow of fluid from the well during removal from or installation in the well of the tubing. The lower end of the tubing may then have an extension 39a rigidly secured thereto as by a suitable coupling 170. The extension 39a is similar to the depending conduit 39 of the flow control device 26 and has a similar enlargement 42a provided with an O-ring 43a and a reduced externally threaded bottom end portion 41a whose threads are engageable in the threaded portion 36 of the bore of the packer mandrel. The tubing with the extension 39a secured to its lower end is then moved downwardly until the lower end of the extension moves into the passage 28 of the packer mandrel, its lower end engages the flapper valve 29 and moves it to its open position, and then the tubing is rotated to cause the lower bottom end portion 41a of the extension 39a to threadedly engage and be releasably secured in the threaded portion 36 of the bore of the packer mandrel. Downward movement of the extension is of course arrested when the shoulder 44a of its enlargement 42a engages the shoulder 34 of the packer mandrel. Fluid flow can then take place through the tubing and through the annulus between the well casing and the tubing and its extension.

Referring now particularly to FIGURES 7-A, 7-B, 7C of the drawings, the actual structure of a flow control device 26 embodying the invention is shown with the packer in anchored and sealing engagement with the Well casing and the piston 64 in its lowermost position in the valve housing 35. The packer mandrel 26a includes a top section 201, a slip carrier section 202 threaded on the neduced lower end portion of the top section, a flapper valve section 203 whose upper end is threaded on the slip carrier section, a port section 204 whose upper end is threaded in the lower internally threaded portion of the valve section, and a bottom section 205. Suitable seal means, such as O-rings 206 are disposed in suitable annular recesses to seal between such pairs of mandrel sections as is desired.

The anchoring and seal means 27 of the packer includes a top annular slip carrier 208 which is initially held in an upper position on the top mandrel section by a shear screw 209, with its upper portion of enlarged internal diameter 210 telescoped over the intermediate under portion 211 of the top mandrel section. A plurality of radially outwardly movable upper slips 214, of the anchoring and seal means are initially disposed about the upper mandrel section and held in their retracted positions by a frangible wire 215 which is received in circumferentially aligned external grooves or slots of the slips. The slip carrier is provided with an annular external flange .218 which extends into the internal slots 219 of the slips and the slips are provided with internal flanges 220 which are receivable in the internal annular recess 221 of the upper slip carrier. The downwardly facing shoulder 222 of the top slip carrier is engageable with the top end surfaces of the upper slips 214.. An upper annular expander 223 of the anchoring and sealing means is initially releasably held in an upper position on the mandrel by a set screw 224 with only its uppermost end portion extending between the top mandrel section and the lower portions of the slips. The slips and the expander are provided with arcua te outwardly and downwardly extending surfaces 227 and .228, respectively, so that downward movement of the slips relative to the expander will move the slips laterally outwardly and cause their upwardly facing teeth to move into gripping or anchoring engagement with the internal surfaces of the well casing.

The anchoring and sealing means 27 also includes a plurality of resilient annular sealing elements 230, 231, and 232 with retainer rings 233 and 234 disposed between the intermediate seal element 231 and the top and bottom seal elements 230 and 232, respectively. The retainer ring 233 is initially releasably held in an upper position on the top mandrel section by a shear screw 235 and similarly the lower retainer rings 234 is releasably held in an upper position on the mandrel by a shear screw 236.

A lower slip expander 240 of the anchoring and sealing means 27 disposed immediately below the bottom sealing element is initially held in an upper position on the top mandrel section by a shear screw 241. Back up rings 244 ll 1 and 245 are preferably disposed between the expanders 223 and 240 and the top and bottom seal elements, respectively. The back up rings bridge the gap between the expanders and the well casing when the packer is set to prevent extrusion of the substance of the seal elements between the expanders and the well casing.

The anchoring and seal means 27 also includes a lower set of slips 250 which are initially held in the retracted position by a frangible wire 251 received in aligned circumferential Slots or recesses of said slips when the lower expander 240 is held in the upper position relative to the lower slips by the shear screw 241. The lower slips have internal flanges 253 which are receivable in the external annular recess 254 of the slip carrier mandrel section 202 and with internal slots 255 in which the external annular flange 256 of the slip carrier section is receivable. The upwardly facing annular shoulder 258 of the slip carrier section is engageable with the bottom end surfaces of the lower slips to limit their downward movement on the packer mandrel.

The slip carrier section 202 of the packer mandrel has a beveled seat at its lower end having an internal annular recess in which is received an O-ring or other suitable seal means 260 which is engageable by the annular Shoulder or seat surface 261 of the flapper valve 29. The flapper valve is pivotally mounted, as by a suitable pin 262, on the mandrel section 203 and is biased upwardly toward its upper or closed position by a coil spring 266 disposed about the pin 262. One of straight end portions of the spring bears against the outer surface of the flapper valve and its other Straight end portion bears against the internal surface defining the enlarged portion 31 of the bore of the packer mandrel.

The port mandrel section 204 is provided with the passages or ports 32. The internally threaded portion 36 of the mandrel bore, in which the threaded end portion 41 of the depending conduit 39 is engageable, is provided by the bottom mandrel section 205. A tension sleeve 269, the lower portion of which may be seen in FIGURE 7B, is threaded in the upper end of the packer mandrel.

The valve housing 35 includes a top section 27 having a reduced upper end portion in which is receivable the threaded lower end of the tubing 40 and which has the passage 66 which opens to the cylinder or enlarged bore 65 of the valve housing. The upper end of the passage 66 is enlarged and threaded as at 271 to receive the threaded lower end portion of the control fluid conduit 50. The housing also includes a piston section 272 Whose upper end is threaded on the lower end of the top section, a connector section 273 whose upper end portion is threaded in the lower end portion of the piston section, a port section 274 having the ports 85 whose upper end portion is threaded on the lower end portion of the connector section, and a bottom section 275 whose top reduced end portion is threaded in the port housing section.

The depending conduit 39 includes a top section 280 on which is mounted a ring 281 which provides the top annular shoulder 104 which is engaged by the spring 99. The spring ring 281 is held against downward movement by a suitable split ring 282 which is received in a suitable external annular recess of the top section of the depending conduit.

The depending conduit also includes a connector or coupling section 285 which is threaded on the upper section thereof. The coupling section has external circumferentially spaced annular recesses 287 in which are received the inner portions of pins 288 which extend through suitable apertures in the valve housing section 275 into the annular recess 287. The pins 288 may be welded or otherwise secured in seal tight relationship to the valve housing section 275 and hold the depending conduit against longitudinal movement relative to the valve housing. The intermediate section 290 of the depending conduit is threaded in the lower end of the connector section 285 and its lower end is threaded in the 12 upper end portion of the bottom section 292 which is provided with the external threaded bottom end portion 41.

The packing or seal means 48 which is enga-geable with the seal surface 33 of the packer mandrel is disposed on the intermediate section 290 between the top shoulder 295 of its bottom section and the bottom shoulder 296 of a retainer ring 297 whose upward movement on the intermediate section is limited by the engagement of its top annular shoulder or surface with the downwardly facing annular shoulder 298 of the intermediate section.

The sleeve valve 81 includes a top section 300 having the internal flange 91 engageable by the bottom end of the dependent piston extension 68 which provides the downwardly facing shoulder 100 which is engageable by the upper end of the spring 99. The top section of the sleeve valve is provided with a longitudinally extending slot 302 in which is received slidably the outer end of a guide pin 303 rigidly secured to the top section of the depending conduit. The guide pin prevents rotation of the depending conduit relative to the sleeve valve.

The middle section 305 of the valve sleeve provides the ports 82 and the flange 91 which has the seal means 92 which seals between the sleeve valve and the depending conduit 39. The middle section also carries the seal means 86, 87 and 88 which seal between the valve housing and the valve sleeve. The seal means 88 is disposed bet-ween the annular downwardly facing shoulder 308 of the middle section and the top end surface or shoulder 309 of its bottom section 310. The top and bottom sections have external annular recesses in which the sealing means 86 and 87 are disposed.

The piston 64 includes a tubular member 312 which provides the upper and lower piston extensions 63 and 68, respectively, and an annular piston ring 313 is disposed on the tubular member and held against displacement thereon by a pair of split retainer or lock rings 314 and 315 which are received in suitable external annular recesses of the tubular member. The piston ring is provided with internal and external annular recesses in which are disposed 'O-rings 316 and 317 which seal between the piston ring and the tubular piston member 312 and the valve housing. Downward movement of the piston is limited by the engagement of the bottom surface of the piston ring with the top surface 318 of the connector housing section 273. The spring which biases the piston upwardly in the valve housing engages the bottom surface of the piston ring and the top annular surface 319 of a retainer ring 320 held against downward displacement in the valve housing by a seat ring 321. The seat ring has a suitable internal annular recess in which is disposed the resilient seal ring 323 which is engageable by the annular seat shoulder or seat 325 of the flapper valve 75. The flapper valve is biased upwardly by a spring 327 which is disposed about the pin 76 by means of which the flapper valve is pivotally secured to the seat ring and whose opposite end portions bear against the internal annular surface of the valve housing section 274 and the outer surface of the flapper valve. A guide pin 330 which extends through a suitable aperture of the spring retainer ring 320 has its inner portion received in a suitable longitudinal recess or groove 332 of the tubular member. The guide pin 330 prevents rotation of the piston relative to the housing to insure that each time the piston moves from its upper to its lower position its beveled surface or edge 334 will engage the inner surface 335 of the flapper valve. Such beveled surface facilitates the movement by the piston of the flange valve to its open position. The flapper valve is provided with a recess 336 in its inner surface in which the lower portions of the guide pin are receivable to ensure that the guide pin will not prevent movement of the flapper valve to its fully closed position.

When the packer is to be set in the well casing, the mandrel 26a is connected to one portion of the setting tool by means of the tension sleeve 269 whose lower end is threaded in the top mandrel section 201 and whose upper end is threadedly secured to the setting tool. The setting tool also has an element which is engageable with the top slip carrier .208 and which when the setting tool is operated moves the slip carrier 208 and therefore the upper slips 21-4 downwardly relative to the upper expander 223 and to the mandrel. The shear screws 209, 224, 235, 236 and 241 increase progressively in shear strength so that a downward force imparted to the top slip carrier causes the shear screw 209 to shear while the upper expander is still secured against movement relative to the mandrel. Such downward movement of the top slip carrier and the top slips relative to the upper expander moves the upper slips outwardly until their upwardly facing teeth engage the internal surfaces of the casing and prevent further movement of the slips of the expander. Upward movement imparted to the mandrel then causes the upper expander to move upwardly relative to the upper slips until the slips are in anchoring engagement with the well casing whereupon the shear screw 224 falls. Continued upward movement of the mandrel then causes the shear screws 235 and 236 to shear successively as the sealing elements are compressed between the upper and lower expanders and expanded radially outwardly into sealing engagement with the well casing since lower expander 240 moves upwardly with the mandrel. When the sealing elements are in fully expanded position and the lower expander is held thereby against further upward movement, the continued upward movement imparted to the packer mandrel causes the shear screw 241 to shear whereupon the lower slips 250 move upwardly relative to the lower expander and are moved outwardly into anchoring engagement with internal surfaces of the well casing and thereafter prevent downward movement of the lower eX- pander in the casing. When upward force is not being applied the lower slips prevent downward movement of the lower expandenThe upper and lower slips then hold the packer in the well casing and hold the sealing elements in expanded sealing engagement with the casing. When the slips and the sealing elements are in their fully expanded positions in the casing, the mandrel can no longer move upwardly and increased upward force exerted by the setting tool causes the tension sleeve 269 to fail or rupture thus disconnecting the setting tool from the packer and permitting removal of the setting tool from the packer and well casing. During the lowering and setting of the packer in the well casing, the flapper valve 29 may be held in its open position by a suitable rod or stinger of the setting tool and then, as the setting tool is moved upwardly and the rod or stinger is withdrawn, the flapper valve 261 will be moved to its closed position by its spring 266 and any upwardly acting pressure differential existing thereacross.

If it is thereafter desired to move the upper portion of the flow control device, that is the valve housing 35, into operative connection with the packer mandrel, the valve housing is secured to the lower end of the string of tubing 40 by means of its top section 270 and is then lowered into the well. As the depending conduit 39 of the valve housing moves downwardly through the packer mandrel, it engages the flapper valve 29 and moves it downwardly to its open position. The string of tubing and therefore the depending conduit is then rotated to the left, as seen from above, to cause the lower threaded portion 41 of the depending conduit to engage the threaded portion 36 of the bore of the packer mandrel. When the depending conduit is connected to the packer mandrel, its seal means 48 sealingly engages the sealing surface 33 of the packer mandrel. The seal means 43, disposed in the suitable external recesses of the bottom valve housing section 275 then engages the seal surface defining the enlarged portion .30 of the bore of the packer mandrel and the shoulder 46 of the valve housing engages the shoulder 47 of the packer mandrel. I

If, during the lowering of the valve housing 35, fluid pressure introduced through the control fluid line 50 has been maintained in the cylinder sufficiently great to hold the piston 64 in its lowermost position in the valve housing, the operative elements of the flow control device will now be in positions shown in FIGURES 7-A, 7-B and 7-C. If they have not been so held, they are now in the positions illustrated in FIGURES 8-A and 8-B, with the piston 64 in its uppermost position and the flapper valve and the sleeve valve 81 in their closed positions, and fluid is prevented from flowing either through the annulus between the string of tubing and the casing and also through the tubing itself. If it is then desired to open the tubing to permit flow of fluids through the tubing, control fluid under pressure is transmitted to the cylinder 65 above the piston 64 through the control fluid line herein described previously and as the force of the spring 70 and of the spring 327, which holds the flapper valve closed and of any upwardly acting pressure differential exerted on the flapper valve, is overcome by such control fluid pressure, the piston 64 moves downwardly and the flapper valve is moved to its open position. If the pressure in the cylinder 65 is now maintained at such value that it does not move the piston to its lowermost position but only to the position wherein it extends just below the flapper valve 75, flow of fluids can take place only through the tubing, since the sleeve valve is not opened. If it is desired to permit fluid flow through the annulus as well as the tubing, the pressure in the cylinder 65 above the piston 64 is increased to move it downwardly to its lowermost position. As the piston moves downwardly, its lower end moves into the top section 300 of the sleeve valve and engages its flange 91, the sleeve valve 81 is moved downwardly against the force of the spring 99 to its lowermost position wherein the ports or passages 82 of the sleeve valve are in alignment and communication with the ports 85 of the valve housing.

If it is thereafter desired to remove the upper portion of the packer from the well casing, the string of tubing 40 is rotated at the surface to disengage the threaded lower end portion 47 of the depending conduit from threaded engagement with the threaded portion 36 of the bore of the mandrel. The valve housing may then be removed upwardly and during the removal of the valve housing the pressure in the cylinder 65 above the piston 64 may either be maintained to hold the sleeve and flapper valves in their open positions or may be reduced to permit the piston 64 to move upwardly and the flapperand sleeve valves to move upwardly to their closed positions.

Thereafter, if it is desired to perform remedial operations on the well, as by circulating fluid downwardly through the string of tubing to below the packer and then upwardly through the annular above the packer, a depending extension 39a is secured to the lower end of the tubing, as shown schematically in FIGURE 6, the tubing is lowered again into the well and rotated to connect the depending extension to the packer mandrel, whereupon fluids may be circulated downwardly through the tubing and the depending extension 39a thereof, and the lower portion 106 of the bore of the packer mandrel to the casing below the well packer and then upwardly through the ports 32 of the packer mandrel, the bore of the packer mandrel and the annulus back to the surface.

It will be apparent that the upper portion of the flow control device may be considered to be aflow control assembly which provides an inner flow passage which extends through the depending conduit, the piston and the upper portions of the bore of the housing, and an outer flow passage between the depending conduit and the housmg.

It will further be seen that such flow control assembly has a sleeve valve for closing the port means of the housing which communicate the outer flow passage with the exterior of the housing and a flapper valve for closing the bore of the housing, and thus the inner flow passage.

It will further be seen that the provision of the sleeve valve and the flapper valve which are operable by the piston permits selective opening and closing of the inner and outer flow passage both when the flow control assembly is secured to the packer and when it is being moved into the casing or being removed therefrom.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory only, and changes in the details of the construction illustrated may be made by those skilled in the art, within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A flow control device including: a well packer comprising a mandrel, anchoring and sealing means for anchoring said mandrel in a well casing and sealing therebetween, said mandrel having a longitudinal bore and port means opening to said bore from below said sealing means, first valve means for closing said bore above said port means, means biasing said valve means toward closed position, said mandrel having connecting means in said bore below said port means; and a flow control assembly comprising a valve housing having a depending tubular member telescopable into the bore of said mandrel and having connecting means at its lower end engageable with said connecting means of said mandrel for releasably connecting said assembly to said packer mandrel, said tubular member moving said first valve means to open position as it is telescoped into the bore of said mandrel, said housing and said depending tubular member having a first passage communicating with the exterior of said packer mandrel below said sealing means and a second passage communicating with the exterior of said packer mandrel below said sealing means through said port means of said mandrel, said housing having port means above said sealing means, said second passage communicating with the exterior of said housing above said sealing means through said housing port means.

2. The flow control device of claim 1, and second valve means in said housing for closing said first and second passages.

3. The flow control device of claim 2, and pressure responsive means in said housing operatively associated with said second valve means in said housing for operating said second valve means to open and close said first and second passages.

4. The flow control device of claim 3, and means biasing said second valve means in said housing toward closed positions; and means for transmitting control fluid under pressure to said housing to act on said pressure responsive means to cause said pressure responsive means to move said second valve means to open position.

5. A flow control assembly including: a tubular housing connectable at its upper end to a flow conductor; depending conduit means having a longitudinal flow passage therein having an upper portion extending upwardly into said housing and providing with said housing a downwardly opening outer longitudinal passage; said housing having port means opening the upper portion of said outer longitudinal passage to the exterior of said housing; first valve means movable in said housing for closing said port means; means biasing said first valve means to position closing said port means; piston means longitudinally movable in said housing between first and second positions and having a longitudinal passage communicating axially with the flow passage of said conduit means, said piston means when in said first position in said housing providing with said housing and said depending conduit means an axially continuous longitudinal unobstructed open inner flow passage extending through said housing and said depending conduit means, said piston means and said first valve means having coengageable means for moving said first valve means from closed position to open position upon movement of said piston means to said first position; and second valve means movably mounted in said housing for closing said inner flow passage when said piston means is disposed in said second position in said housing and spaced from said valve, said second valve means being engaged by said piston means to be moved to open position out of said axial passage by said piston means when said piston means is disposed in an intermediate position in said housing out of the engagement with said first valve means whereby said first valve means is closed when said piston means is in said intermediate position, said piston means and cooperating means engaging and holding both said second valve means and said first valve means open when said piston means is moved to said first position in said housing.

6. The flow control assembly of claim 5, wherein said second valve means in said housing for closing said inner flow passage is disposed in said housin above said first valve means and between said piston means and said first valve means.

7. The flow control assembly of claim 6, and means biasing said piston means toward said second position.

8. The flow control assembly of claim 7 wherein said housing has means for introducing control fluid under pressure into said housing to act on said piston means to move said piston means to said first position.

9. The flow control assembly of claim 5, and means biasing said piston means toward said second position.

10. The fiow control assembly of claim 5 wherein said housing has means for introducing control fluid under pressure into said housing to act on said piston means to move said piston means to said first position.

11. A flow control assembly including: a tubular housing having a longitudinal bore extending therethrough; piston means movable longitudinally in said bore between first and second positions; means biasing said piston means to said first position, said piston means having a longitudinal passage, said housing having means for conducting fluid under pressure thereinto to act on said piston means and move said piston means toward said second position; first valve means in said housing for closing said bore; means biasing said first valve means toward closed position; said housing having port means communicating said bore with the exterior thereof below said first valve means; said housing having a tubular member extending upwardly into said bore and having a longitudinal passage opening to said bore below said first valve means and to the exterior of said housing below the lower end of said housing, said piston means when in said second position providing with said housing and said tubular member an inner longitudinal flow passage, said tubular member and said housing providing an outer longitudinal passage opening to the exterior of said housing below said first valve means through said housing port means and also at the lower end of said housing above the lower end of said tubular member; second valve means in said housing below said first valve means for closing said housing port means and movable in said housing between positions opening and closing said port means; means biasing said second valve means toward closed position; and an elongate tubular section projecting longitudinally from said piston means and movable therewith, said tubular section being engageable with said first valve means to hold said first valve means in open position and engageable with said second valve means to hold said second valve means in open position when said piston means is in said second position, and being moved out of engagement with either of said valve means when said piston means is in said first position whereby both said valve means are closed, said tubular section being engageable with said first valve means and being out of engagement with said second valve means when said piston means is in an intermediate position between said first and second positions, whereby said first valve means is held open and Wh g QOI1d valve means remains closed.

12. The flow control assembly of claim 11, wherein said tubular member is provided with connecting means at its lower end for releas-ably connecting said tubular member to a packer mandrel in which it is telescopable.

13. In combination with the flow control assembly of claim 11, a well packer including: a mandrel, anchoring and sealing means for anchoring said mandrel in a flow conductor and sealing therebetween, said mandrel having a longitudinal bore and port means opening from the exterior of said mandrel to said bore below said sealing means, said mandrel having connecting means in said bore below said ports, said tubular member of said flow control assembly being telescopable into said longitudinal bore of said mandrel, said connecting means of said tubular member and said mandrel being engageable to releasably connect said tubular member to said mandrel.

14. The device of claim 13 where said mandrel of said packer is provided with valve means for closing said longitudinal bore above said port means and with means biasing said valve means toward closed position.

15. In a well having an outer flow conductor: packer means anchored in said flow conductor above a producing formation of the well, said packer including a tubular mandrel having anchoring and sealing means thereon for anchoring and sealing said mandrel in said well flow conductor; an inner flow conductor extending through said outer flow conductor and spaced therefrom to provide an outer passageway; and a flow control assembly releasably connecting the lower end of said inner flow conductor to said mandrel, said inner and outer flow conductors, said flow control assembly and said mandrel providing first and second passages extending from the surface of the well and communicating with the producing formation, said flow control assembly having valve means for selectively closing said first and second passages and comprising: a tubular housing having a longitudinal bore extending therethrough; piston means movable longitudinally in said bore between first and second positions; means biasing said piston means to said first position, said piston means having a longitudinal passage, said housing having means for conducting fluid under pressure thereinto to act on said piston means and move said piston means toward said second position; first valve means in said housing for closing said bore; means biasing said first valve means toward closed position; said housing having port means communicating said bore with the exterior thereof below said first valve means; said inner flow conductor in said packer extending upwardly into said bore of said housing and having its longitudinal passage opening to said bore below said first valve means and to the exterior of said packer below the lower end of said housing, said piston means when in said second position providing with said housing and said inner flow conductor an inner longitudinal flow passage, an outer longitudinal passageway having an opening to the exterior of said housing below said first valve means through said housing port means and also having an opening to the exterior of the packer at the lower end of said passageway above the lower end of said packer and said inner flow conductor; second valve means in said housing below said first valve means for closing said housing port means and movable in said housing between positions opening and closing said port means; means biasing said second valve means toward closed position; and an elongate tubular section projecting longitudinally from said piston means and movable therewith, said tubular section being engageable with said first valve means to hold said first valve means in open position and engageable with said second valve means to hold said second valve means in open position when said piston means is in said second position, and being moved out of engagement with either of said valve means when said piston means is in said first position whereby both said valve means are closed, said tubular section being engageable with said first valve means and being out of engagement with said second valve means when said piston means is in an intermediate position between said first and second positions, whereby said first valve means is held open and said second valve means remains closed.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,277,380 3/1942 Yancey 166-115 X 2,766,831 10/1956 Otis 166114 X 2,831,539 4/1958 En Dean et a1.

2,951,536 9/1960 Garrett a- 16645 X 2,963,089 12/1960 Sizer 16672 2,971,581 2/1961 Reglin 1661 14 X 3,040,811 6/1962 Pistole et a1. 166-72 3,156,300 11/1964 Page 166-72 X 3,163,225 12/1964 Perkins 166-428 X 3,313,350 4/1967 \Page 166-72 X CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner. I. A. CALVERT, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2277380 *Nov 30, 1939Mar 24, 1942Gray Tool CoApparatus for producing wells
US2766831 *Mar 6, 1950Oct 16, 1956Continental Assurance CompanySelective cross-over packer
US2831539 *May 26, 1954Apr 22, 1958Gulf Research Development CoAutomatic dual-zone storm choke
US2951536 *Dec 22, 1955Sep 6, 1960Garrett Henry UMethod and apparatus for remote control of valves or the like
US2963089 *Mar 7, 1955Dec 6, 1960Otis Eng CoFlow control apparatus
US2971581 *Aug 30, 1956Feb 14, 1961Reglin Charles RWell production apparatus
US3040811 *Apr 23, 1959Jun 26, 1962Jersey Prod Res CoSubsurface safety valve
US3156300 *Aug 14, 1963Nov 10, 1964Page John SMethod and apparatus for protecting wells
US3163225 *Feb 15, 1961Dec 29, 1964Halliburton CoWell packers
US3313350 *May 14, 1964Apr 11, 1967Page Jr John STubing and annulus flow control apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3491831 *Jun 22, 1967Jan 27, 1970Dollison William WSubsurface safety valve with operator
US3726341 *Mar 12, 1971Apr 10, 1973Gray Tool CoPetroleum well tubing safety valve
US3794112 *Oct 2, 1972Feb 26, 1974Exxon Production Research CoSurface controlled subsurface safety valve
US3850238 *Oct 25, 1973Nov 26, 1974Exxon Production Research CoMethod of operating a surface controlled subsurface safety valve
US4143712 *Jul 12, 1972Mar 13, 1979Otis Engineering CorporationApparatus for treating or completing wells
US4183404 *Nov 13, 1978Jan 15, 1980Otis Engineering CorporationPlural parallel tubing with safety joints or release from suspended receptacle
US4193449 *Jun 5, 1978Mar 18, 1980Fmc CorporationValve operating circuit
US4258786 *Apr 24, 1979Mar 31, 1981Fmc CorporationSafety valve operating apparatus
US4276937 *Feb 7, 1979Jul 7, 1981Otis Engineering CorporationWell safety system
US4350205 *Mar 6, 1980Sep 21, 1982Schlumberger Technology CorporationWork over methods and apparatus
US4354554 *Apr 21, 1980Oct 19, 1982Otis Engineering CorporationWell safety valve
US4367794 *Dec 24, 1980Jan 11, 1983Exxon Production Research Co.Acoustically actuated downhole blowout preventer
US4373582 *Dec 22, 1980Feb 15, 1983Exxon Production Research Co.Acoustically controlled electro-mechanical circulation sub
US4453599 *May 10, 1982Jun 12, 1984Otis Engineering CorporationMethod and apparatus for controlling a well
US4485876 *Sep 26, 1983Dec 4, 1984Baker Oil Tools, Inc.Method of controlling fluid pressure
US4540047 *Jul 14, 1983Sep 10, 1985Ava International CorporationFlow controlling apparatus
US4641707 *Oct 22, 1984Feb 10, 1987Ava International CorporationWell apparatus
US4682656 *Jun 20, 1986Jul 28, 1987Otis Engineering CorporationCompletion apparatus and method for gas lift production
US4842074 *Oct 15, 1987Jun 27, 1989Otis Engineering CorporationGas storage well safety system and method
US5193615 *Jan 22, 1991Mar 16, 1993Ava International CorporationApparatus for use in controlling flow through a tubing string suspended and packed off within well bore as well as within the annulus between the tubing string and well bore above and below the packer
US6644411 *Apr 18, 2001Nov 11, 2003Kvaerner Oilfield Products, Inc.Tubing hanger with flapper valve
US7219743Sep 1, 2004May 22, 2007Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod and apparatus to isolate a wellbore during pump workover
US7228914 *Feb 20, 2004Jun 12, 2007Baker Hughes IncorporatedInterventionless reservoir control systems
US7255178 *Sep 10, 2003Aug 14, 2007Bj Services CompanyDrillable bridge plug
US7475736Nov 9, 2006Jan 13, 2009Bj Services CompanySelf centralizing non-rotational slip and cone system for downhole tools
US7543652 *Sep 19, 2006Jun 9, 2009Schlumberger Technology CorporationSubsurface annular safety barrier
US7600572Sep 13, 2006Oct 13, 2009Bj Services CompanyDrillable bridge plug
US7841416Aug 21, 2007Nov 30, 2010Bj Services Company LlcMethod and apparatus for retaining a soft seal in an integrated flapper mount, hard seat, spring housing surface controlled subsurface safety valve
US7963342 *Aug 31, 2006Jun 21, 2011Marathon Oil CompanyDownhole isolation valve and methods for use
US8528632 *Sep 16, 2010Sep 10, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedPacker deployment with electric submersible pump with optional retention of the packer after pump removal
US8651188 *Dec 30, 2009Feb 18, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationGas lift barrier valve
US8800668Feb 7, 2011Aug 12, 2014Saudi Arabian Oil CompanyPartially retrievable safety valve
US20110155391 *Dec 30, 2009Jun 30, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationGas lift barrier valve
US20120067564 *Sep 16, 2010Mar 22, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedPacker Deployment with Electric Submersible Pump with Optional Retention of the Packer After Pump Removal
EP1895091A1Aug 14, 2007Mar 5, 2008Bj Services CompanySubsurface safety valve method and apparatus
WO2005024176A1 *Sep 3, 2004Mar 17, 2005Baker Hughes IncMethod and apparatus to isolate a wellbore during pump workover
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/114, 166/148, 166/321
International ClassificationE21B34/10, E21B34/00, E21B34/12, E21B33/12
Cooperative ClassificationE21B34/10, E21B2034/005, E21B33/12, E21B34/12
European ClassificationE21B33/12, E21B34/12, E21B34/10