Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3376868 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1968
Filing dateJun 4, 1964
Priority dateJun 4, 1964
Also published asDE1491736A1
Publication numberUS 3376868 A, US 3376868A, US-A-3376868, US3376868 A, US3376868A
InventorsMondiadis Dimitri G
Original AssigneeHowe Sound Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical evacuator device
US 3376868 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 9, 1968 D. G. MONDIADIS 3,376,868

SURGICAL EVACUATOR DEVICE Filed June 4, 1964' FIG.|

INVENTOR. 1 50 a 46 DIMITRI G. MONDIADIS I ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,376,868 SURGICAL EVACUATOR DEVICE Dimitri G. Mondiadis, New York, N.Y., assignor to Howe Sound Company Filed June 4, 1964, Ser. No. 372,479 6 Claims. (Cl. 128-278) This invention relates to surgical evacuator devices for draining fluids from a wound and, more particularly to a device which functions both as a-pump and as a container for the fluids withdrawn. v

Post-operative drainage of closed surgical wounds has been accomplished by inserting plastic tubes within the Wound itself and extending them outwardly from the patients body at a point somewhat removed from the incision. The number of these tubes is determined by the nature and size of the wound. Liquid may be introduced into the wound through one such tube and removed by suction along with body fluids through one or more of the other tubes which serve as evacuators. The evacuator tubes are generally left in place for a period of time after the liquid supply tube has been clamped off or removed to eliminate voids produced by the liquid and to dry the wound. This closed internal circulation of a surgical wound decreases the healing time and contributes substantially to the comfort of the patient.

In accordancewith the present invention an improved surgical evacuator device is provided to induce suction in the evacuator tube .or tubes used in draining the wound and to provide a container in which the withdrawn fluid may be collected for hygienic disposal. One primary object of the invention is to provide an evacuator device which is as economical in cost as it is reliable in maintaining the necessary suction during the protracted period of this treatment. An important feature of the new device particularly contributing to this end is a one-piece pump-container body which creates the necessary suction. This is in contrast to prior art devices which conventionally incorporate separate actuating meanssuch as coil springs. Such springs may be disposed within the evacuator container itself, thus adding to the bulk of the structure and reducing available-interior space, or may be disposed externally making the device cumbersome and inconvenient to use and operate. Prior art devices also conventionally use intricate valves to control the flow of air and/or liquids into the container. Such valve means add to weight and cost and complicate the structure.

Broadly stated, the new evacuator device for removing and collecting fluids from a closed wound comprises a compressible pump-container of resilient elastomeric material having top and bottom portions connected by a corrugated sidewall. This pump-container is expandable solely by the resiliency of its corrugated sidewall after it is compressed. An evacuator tube opening in communication with the interior of the pump container is adapted to receive an evacuator tube th'erein A vent opening communicates with the atmosphere. A sealing means is attached to the top and is adapted to seal thevent opening.

It is particularly advantageous to form the pump-container of an elastomeric material of considerable elastic memory which is translucent so that visual observation may be made of the amount and other characteristics of the fluid collected within it. A vent sealing means is contemplated in several embodiments which permit negative pressure to be established within the pump container without back-flow into the wound. When full the evacuator device may be replaced by an empty one and the closed circulation treatment continued. The full pump-container which is removed may be disposed of hygienically without being opened and therefore its economical construction is of considerable significance.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is described hereinbelow with reference to the accompanying draw ing, wherein I FIG. .1 is an elevation partly broken away of the as.- sernbled surgical evacuator device;

FIG. 2 is a section taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective of the valve unit of the assembly; 7

FIG. 4 is a detailed section of another embodiment of the invention illustrating a diaphragm sealing means; and

FIG. 5 is a detail section of another embodiment illustrating a diaphragm sealing means in the valve turret.

The evacuator device of the invention includes a substantially closed pump-container comprising top and bottom portions 10 and 12 connected by a continuous substantially cylindrical corrugated wall 14. The corrugations of the wall 14 are defined by alternate annular ridges and grooves in parallel planes in the manner of a bellows. It is preferred that the pump-container be formed integrally of a resilient elastomeric material having a high elastic recovery characteristic. Polypropylene is particularly advantageous for this purpose and it is also translucent to permit observation of the interior of the pump-container. Indicating marks may be formed on the sidewall 14 of the pump-container to permit measurement of the volume of its liquid contents and an integral loop 16 may be included as shown to permit the device to be supported in use.

It is a feature of this pump-container that it may be axially compressed by downward displacement of the top portion 10 toward the bottom portion 12, and thereafter the inherent resilience of the sidewall'l4 will tend to ex pand the corrugations and return the pump-container to its normal configuration.

Referring to FIGS. 13 there is shown as'an integral part of the elastomeric pump-container a valveunit which includes a turret 18 projecting from the top portion it) of the pump-container. The interior of turret 18 is hollow and communicates with the interior of the pump- I container by means of an opening 20. Also, a vent opening 22 and an evacuator tube opening 24 extend through the wall of the turret 18 in communication with its interior. integrally molded to the turret 18 is a removable plug 26 of the same material as the pump-container and the turret and having a stopper portion 28 adapted to seat in the vent opening 22 in fluid-tight sealed relation-- ship therewith. A hinge portion 36 attaches the plug 26 to the turret 1S and permits it to be moved quickly and easily into and out of the sealed position.

Removably fitted in the opening 24 is the end of a flexible evacuator tube 32 which may be of a suitable synthetic elastomeric material. The end of the tube 32 remote from the turret 14 is preferably equipped with a forked connector 34 in which are mounted respective opposed ends of a looped tube 36 formed with a multiplicity of perforations 38. The looped tube 36 is of conventional 3 construction and is designed to be inserted within the surgical wound that is to be drained.

"Referring to FIG. 4, there is shown detail section of another embodiment of the device. There the evacuator 32 seats in an opening 40 in communication with the interior of the pump-container. The vent comprises a plurality of openings 42 communicating with the atmosphere. The vent openings 42 are sealed by a resilient diaphragm 44 attached to the top 10. The diaphragm 44 is adapted to cover the openings 42 such that when gas is expressed from the interior of the pump-container the diaphragm will lift up permitting escape of gas. When the gas pressure within the container is less than atmospheric the diaphragm 44 will seat over the openings 42 and seal them.

Referring to FIG. 5, a detail section of another embodiment of the turret is shown. There a hollow turret 46 has an evacuator tube opening 48 adapted to receive the evacuator tube 32 therein. A plurality of vent openings 50 are provided in the upper portion of the turret 46. The vent openings 50 are sealed against the atomsphere when the gas pressure within the pump container is reduced by means of a resilient diaphragm 52. A guard 54 protects the diaphragm 52 from being accidentally unseated when in use.

In FIGS. 1 and 2, the stopper portion 28 of the plug 26 is in its position closing the vent 22 leading into the interior of the turret 18, while in FIG. 3 the plug 28 has been removed to leave the vent opening 22 in free communication with the atmosphere. When the tube 32 is properly inserted in the wound and the wound has been closed, the plug 26 is placed in its open position shown in FIG. 3 and the pump-container is axially compressed by hand to bring the top portion down quite close to the bottom portion 12. Air within the pumpcontainer is thus expelled through the vent opening 22,

and when the maximum collapse of the pump-container is reached the plug 26 is moved on its hinge 30 so that its stopper portion 28 closes ofl? the vent opening 22 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

' Upon release of the manual compression collapsing the pump-container, the resilience of its corrugated sidewall 14 creates a tendency in it to expand and increase the enclosed volume therewithin. This in turn creates a suction transmitted through the tubes 32 and 36, and from the latter by the openings 38 to whatever fluid may have collected in the wound. Consequently, this fluid is drawn through the tubes 36 and 32 into the pump-container. Because the wound is closed, air does not leak into the pump-container to disturb its operation and it continues to expand slowly as it is filled with drained fluid. While this takes place the assembly may be attached on or adjacent to the patient by means of the loop 16.

If for any reason suction is broken and the pump-container expands without drawing fluid into its interior, the suction can be reestablished simply by removing the plug 26 to open the vent 22 so that the pump-container may be compressed and re-sealed. When it is expanded and substantially full, the pump-container may be detached from the tube 32 and disposed of as desired. A new unit may then be attached and the operation repeated until further drainage of the patients wound is unnecessary.

In the embodiments of FIGS. 4 and 5 there is no need for separate manual operation of the vent control. When the pump-container is manually compressed the interior gases are easily expelled through the vent openings 50 (FIG. 5). The suction created by reason of the expansive action of the corrugated side walls 14 causes the diaphragm 52 to instantly seat upon the openings 50 when the compressive forces upon the pump-container are released.

I claim:

1. An evacuator device for removing and collecting fluids from a closed wound, said evacuator device comprising:

(a) a compressible pump-container of resilient elastomeric material having top and bottom portions "connected by a corrugated sidewall having a wall thickness with elastic memory sufficient to expand said pump-container solely by the resiliency of its corrugated sidewall after it is compressed;

(b) a valve turret on said top portion defining the sole communication to the pump-container interior and having an evacuator tube opening therein adapted to receive an evacuator tube and a vent opening communicating with the atmosphere; and

(c) a resilient diaphragm connected to said top and adapted to seal said vent opening.

2. An evacuator device for removing and collecting fluids from a closedwound, said evacuator device comprising:

(a) a compressible pump-container of resilient translucent polypropylene having top and bottom portions connected by a corrugated sidewall having a wall thickness with elastic memory suflicient to expand said pump-container solely by the resiliency of its corrugated sidewall after it is compressed;

(b) a valve turret on said top portion defining the sole communication to the pump-container interior and having an evacuator tube opening therein adapted to receive an evacuator tube and a vent opening communicating with the atmosphere; and

(c) sealing means connected to said top and adapted to seal said vent opening.

3. An evacuator device for removing and collecting fluids from a closed wound, said evacuator device comprising:

(a) an axially compressible pump-container of integral resilient elastomeric material having top and bottom portions connected by a corrugated sidewall having a Wall thickness with elastic memory sufficient to expand said pump-container solely by the resiliency of its corrugated sidewall after it is compressed;

(b) an integral hollow valve turret of the same material as said pump-container on the exterior side of said top portion, said turret defining the sole communication to the pump-container interior through an evacuator tube opening and a vent opening communicating with the atmosphere;

(0) an evacuator tube removably inserted in said evacuator tube opening and adapted to communicate with said fluids in said Wound; and

(d) a displaceable plug of the same material as said pump-container hinged integrally to the exterior of said turret and adapted to be removably inserted in and to seal said vent opening.

4. An evacuator device for removing and collecting fluids from a closed wound, said evacuator device comprising:

(a) an axially compressible pump-container of integral resilient elastomeric material having top and bottom portions connected by a corrugated sidewall, said pump-container being expandable solely by the resiliency of its corrugated sidewall after it is compressed;

(b) an integral hollow valve turret of the same material as the pump-container on the exterior side of said 'top portion, said turret defining the sole communication to the pump-container interior through an evacuator tube opening and a vent comprising a plurality of openings communicating with the atmosphere;

(0) an evacuator tube removably inserted in said evacuator tube opening and adapted to communicate with said fluids in said wound; and

(d) a resilient diaphragm disposed upon said vent openings and adapted to prevent air from entering said pump container when the interior gas pressure is less than atmospheric pressure.

5 6 5. An evacuator device according to claim 4 wherein 3,084,691 4/1963 Stoner 128278 said elastomeric material is of polypropylene and said 3,062,152 11/1962 Huff 103-148 pump-container is substantially translucent. 3,058,627 10/1962 Eskridge 128--278 6. An evacuator device in accordance with claim 5 3,172,577 3/1965 Hartung 128-278 wherem 1n add1t1on sa1d turret 1s pr0v1ded Wlth a guard 5 OTHER REFERENCES to protect said diaphragm against accidental opening.

Bel-O-Pak, brochure of Quest, Inc., rece1ved 1n Patent References Cited Ofiice September 1963. UNITED STATES PATENTS RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner. 3,190,619 6/1965 Penney et a1. 128-272 10 3,115,138 12/1963 McElvenny et a1. 128-278 CHARLES R ROSENBAUM Dedication 3,376,868.--Dimif/ri G. M ondiadis New York, N.Y. SURGICAL EVACUA- TOR DEVICE. Patent md Apr. 9, 1968. Dedication filed Sept. 10, 1970, by the assignee, H owmedioa, Inc. Hereby dedicates the entire term of the atent to the Public.

[Official Gazette February 9, 1.971

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3058627 *Apr 27, 1961Oct 16, 1962C B FischbachCombined suction pump, storage container and dispenser
US3062152 *Aug 29, 1960Nov 6, 1962Huff Sr Russell CBilge pump
US3084691 *Nov 4, 1960Apr 9, 1963Air ShieldsAspirator
US3115138 *Jul 14, 1960Dec 24, 1963McelvennyEvacuator
US3172577 *Jul 23, 1963Mar 9, 1965R E Hartung Company IncPump bottle
US3190619 *May 27, 1963Jun 22, 1965Union Carbide CorpFluid mixing container assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3565076 *May 22, 1968Feb 23, 1971Kadan Daniel AEvacuator system and apparatus
US3596653 *Aug 27, 1968Aug 3, 1971Hotchkiss Instr IncEndoscope with coincident illumination and viewing
US3742952 *Apr 28, 1971Jul 3, 1973Alpha Ind IncSurgical suction pump assembly
US3774611 *Jun 8, 1972Nov 27, 1973Oakes GStabilized contamination free surgical evacuator
US3779243 *Oct 15, 1971Dec 18, 1973Carr HContamination free surgical evacuator
US3809086 *Dec 9, 1971May 7, 1974Sherwood Medical Ind IncWound drainage device
US3853128 *Jul 10, 1972Dec 10, 1974Deknated IncValved underwater drainage apparatus
US3871377 *Sep 25, 1968Mar 18, 1975Richards Mfg CoEvacuator apparatus
US3875941 *Apr 3, 1974Apr 8, 1975Medical Dynamics IncSystem for evacuating fluids from the body
US3991763 *Apr 17, 1975Nov 16, 1976Arbrook, Inc.Surgical evacuator
US4014337 *Mar 26, 1976Mar 29, 1977Richards Manufacturing Company, Inc.Evacuator device
US4112949 *Nov 15, 1976Sep 12, 1978Howmedica Inc.Apparatus for collecting body fluid
US4141361 *May 17, 1972Feb 27, 1979Snyder Manufacturing Co., IncorporatedEvacuator
US4278089 *Nov 9, 1978Jul 14, 1981Howmedica, Inc.Wound drainage device
US4338826 *Sep 11, 1980Jul 13, 1982Air Test Labs, Inc.Sampling apparatus
US4377166 *Mar 27, 1972Mar 22, 1983Wilder Joseph RSurgical evacuator
US4460354 *Jul 8, 1980Jul 17, 1984Snyder Laboratories, Inc.For evacuating fluids from the body
US4529402 *Feb 21, 1984Jul 16, 1985Snyder Laboratories, Inc.Closed wound suction evacuator with rotary valve
US4578060 *Jul 20, 1983Mar 25, 1986Howmedica, Inc.Wound drainage device
US4643719 *Jul 19, 1984Feb 17, 1987Garth Geoffrey CManually operable aspirator
US4664652 *Feb 7, 1985May 12, 1987Snyder Laboratories, Inc.Wound evacuator
US4671791 *Nov 28, 1984Jun 9, 1987Ekbladh Fred Vage GSuction pump
US4832580 *Oct 14, 1987May 23, 1989Sunstar Engineering Inc.Fluid pressurizing delivery pump system
US4990137 *Jun 29, 1988Feb 5, 1991Memorial Hospital For Cancer And Allied DiseasesBody fluids from a patient
US5496299 *Sep 21, 1994Mar 5, 1996C. R. Bard, Inc.Suction reservoir
US5588958 *Sep 21, 1994Dec 31, 1996C. R. Bard, Inc.Closed wound orthopaedic drainage and autotransfusion system
US6261276Apr 12, 1996Jul 17, 2001I.S.I. International, Inc.Apparatus for draining surgical wounds
US7144385 *Jun 18, 2002Dec 5, 2006Sumitomo Bakelite Company LimitedDischarging implement for medical care
US7758555Sep 19, 2007Jul 20, 2010Kci Licensing, Inc.Reduced pressure treatment system having blockage clearing and dual-zone pressure protection capabilities
US7776028 *Mar 31, 2005Aug 17, 2010Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedAdjustable overlay reduced pressure wound treatment system
US7824384Aug 10, 2005Nov 2, 2010Kci Licensing, Inc.Chest tube drainage system
US7880050Feb 8, 2008Feb 1, 2011Kci Licensing, Inc.Breathable interface system for topical reduced pressure
US7927319Feb 20, 2008Apr 19, 2011Kci Licensing, Inc.System and method for distinguishing leaks from a disengaged canister condition in a reduced pressure treatment system
US8007257Oct 15, 2007Aug 30, 2011Kci Licensing Inc.Reduced pressure delivery system having a manually-activated pump for providing treatment to low-severity wounds
US8057449Feb 8, 2008Nov 15, 2011Kci Licensing Inc.Apparatus and method for administering reduced pressure treatment to a tissue site
US8148595Jan 27, 2011Apr 3, 2012Kci Licensing, Inc.Breathable interface system for topical reduced pressure
US8158844Mar 12, 2009Apr 17, 2012Kci Licensing, Inc.Limited-access, reduced-pressure systems and methods
US8177772Sep 26, 2006May 15, 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Catheter connection systems
US8235939Mar 13, 2007Aug 7, 2012Kci Licensing, Inc.System and method for purging a reduced pressure apparatus during the administration of reduced pressure treatment
US8235971Sep 10, 2010Aug 7, 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Catheter connection systems
US8267908Nov 21, 2008Sep 18, 2012Kci Licensing, Inc.Delivery tube, system, and method for storing liquid from a tissue site
US8287507May 1, 2009Oct 16, 2012Kci Licensing, Inc.Reduced pressure indicator for a reduced pressure source
US8328776Jun 28, 2010Dec 11, 2012Kci Licensing, Inc.Reduced pressure treatment system having blockage clearing and dual-zone pressure protection capabilities
US8337475Oct 12, 2005Dec 25, 2012C. R. Bard, Inc.Corporeal drainage system
US8357131Sep 16, 2009Jan 22, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Laminar dressings, systems, and methods for applying reduced pressure at a tissue site
US8366690Sep 18, 2007Feb 5, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.System and method for determining a fill status of a canister of fluid in a reduced pressure treatment system
US8366691Aug 7, 2009Feb 5, 2013Kci Licensing, IncReduced-pressure treatment systems with reservoir control
US8372049Mar 5, 2009Feb 12, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Dressing and method for applying reduced pressure to and collecting and storing fluid from a tissue site
US8372050Mar 5, 2009Feb 12, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Dressing and method for applying reduced pressure to and collecting and storing fluid from a tissue site
US8377017Jan 3, 2008Feb 19, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Low-profile reduced pressure treatment system
US8409170Feb 8, 2008Apr 2, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.System and method for managing reduced pressure at a tissue site
US8425478Sep 16, 2009Apr 23, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Multi-layer dressings, systems, and methods for applying reduced pressure at a tissue site
US8444611Jul 21, 2004May 21, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Negative pressure wound treatment dressing
US8449508Jun 28, 2010May 28, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Dressing and method for applying reduced pressure to and collecting and storing fluid from a tissue site
US8529526Oct 20, 2009Sep 10, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Dressing reduced-pressure indicators, systems, and methods
US8535283Feb 8, 2008Sep 17, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.System and method for applying reduced pressure at a tissue site
US8540699 *Aug 13, 2010Sep 24, 2013Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure wound treatment system
US8575416Jan 11, 2012Nov 5, 2013Kci Licensing, Inc.Limited-access, reduced-pressure systems and methods
US8585403 *Oct 10, 2012Nov 19, 2013Inger-Marie AmesDental appliance and method for removing bodily and other fluids from a dental site
US8636721Nov 22, 2004Jan 28, 2014Henry M. Jackson Foundation For The Advancement Of Military Medicine, Inc.Portable hand pump for evacuation of fluids
US8641692Jul 9, 2009Feb 4, 2014Kci Licensing, Inc.Manually-actuated, reduced-pressure systems for treating wounds
US8679079Aug 9, 2011Mar 25, 2014Kci Licensing, Inc.Reduced pressure delivery system having a manually-activated pump for providing treatment to low-severity wounds
US8728044Nov 13, 2009May 20, 2014Kci Licensing, Inc.Fluid pouch, system, and method for storing fluid from a tissue site
US8827967Mar 23, 2011Sep 9, 2014Kci Licensing, Inc.System and method for distinguishing leaks from a disengaged canister condition in a reduced pressure treatment system
US20100305549 *Aug 13, 2010Dec 2, 2010Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure wound treatment system
US20120316521 *Jun 28, 2011Dec 13, 2012Ronaldo Scholze WebsterManual negative pressure dressing-Webster's Dressing
US20130008901 *Dec 23, 2010Jan 10, 2013Giuseppe CostaContainer cap
US20130095450 *Oct 10, 2012Apr 18, 2013Inger-Marie AmesDental Appliance and Method for Removing Bodily and Other Fluids From a Dental Site
USRE29877 *Jun 22, 1977Jan 9, 1979Deknatel Inc.Valved underwater drainage apparatus
CN101547712BOct 15, 2007May 30, 2012凯希特许有限公司Reduced pressure delivery system having a manually-activated pump for providing treatment to low-severity wounds
WO2008048527A2 *Oct 15, 2007Apr 24, 2008Kci Licensing IncReduced pressure delivery system having a manually-activated pump for providing treatment to low-severity wounds
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/133, 417/472
International ClassificationA61M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/0011
European ClassificationA61M1/00A5