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Publication numberUS3377722 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1968
Filing dateMar 13, 1967
Priority dateMar 13, 1967
Publication numberUS 3377722 A, US 3377722A, US-A-3377722, US3377722 A, US3377722A
InventorsDowning Billy N
Original AssigneeBilly N. Downing
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bouncing shoes
US 3377722 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. N. DOWNING BOUNCING SHOES April 16, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 13, 1967 April 16, 1968 B. N. DOWNING BOUNGING SHOES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 13, 1967 flILLyM FOW/WNG- United States Patent 3,377,722 BOUNCING SHGES Billy N. Downing, 1676 E. Kingsley Ave, Apt. 1, Pomona, Calif. 91767 Filed Mar. 13, 1967, Ser. No. 622,488 Claims. (Cl. 36-78) ABSTRACT ()F THE DISCLOSURE wherein each of the pairs of spring members consists of independent, uniformly tapered cantilevers which uniformly distribute the stresses induced during compression of the device, the adjacent ends of the cantilever of each spring member are pivotably interconnected. The device also is provided with an adjustable foot support.

Background of the invention This invention relates to exercising toys, and more particularly to resilient bouncing or jumping shoes.

Exercising devices of this type are not only enjoyable but they-are also helpful to the wearer. While they provide a form of amusement, they are also providing the wearer with needed and necessary exercise. In addition, the device is safe and thus it is possible to prevent injury.

While much prior effort has been directed to devices of this type, exemplified by U.S. Patent 2,953,861 and French Patent 472,837, these prior art devices have not been satisfactory due primarily to the type of spring members utilized. While prior art springs, as exemplified by U.S. Patent 2,614,830 and British Patent 560,542, have a general configuration similar in some aspects to the inventive spring member, they will not function in the same manner. Application of pressure upon the foot support structure of the inventive device induces a load on each spring which results in a proportional deflection of the spring in a plane perpendicular to the leaf plane. This spring-plane/load-plane relationship is entirely different than that of the spring in the above cited U.S. Patent 2,614,830 in which torsional stresses are induced, or for the fiat configuration, in which loads and defiections are predominantly within the plane of the spring. The continuons leaf structure of the inventive spring provides action which cannot be obtained by the spring illustrated in the above cited French Patent 472,837. Also, the spring described herein does not require additional redundant appendages between joints as indicated for the springs of the above mentioned French Patent 472,837 and the British Patent 560,542, while providing stable performance.

Summary of the invention device capable of producing entertainment and exercise for the wearer.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel bouncing shoe which prevents side sway and twisting motion while in use.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an exercising toy which supports a persons foot by means of a leaf spring.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved bouncing shoe of greater resilient capacity by a lightweight construction that is inherently capable of allowing the device to compress to a fully collapsed position.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel spring consistin of independent, uniformly tapered cantilevers which uniformly distribute the stresses induced during compression of the device.

Another object of the invention is to provide a resilient jumping shoe which includes a foot support structure which is adjustable in width both at the toe and at the heel to accommodate a range of foot sizes, and is easily attached or removed from a persons foot.

Another object of the invention is to provide an entertainment and exercising device which is of a lightweight construction with inherent stability to assure controllability and safe operation.

Other objects of the invention, not specifically set forth above, will become readily apparent from the following description and accompanying drawings wherein:

Brief description of the drawings FIG. 1 is a side view of an embodiment of the invention bouncing shoe in the unloaded condition;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the spring assembly of the FIG. 1 embodiment in the fully loaded or fully compressed condition;

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the spring of the FIG. 1 embodiment in the fully loaded condition;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the forward foot platform of the FIG. 1 embodiment;

FIG. 5 is a side view of another embodiment of the inventive bouncing shoe; and

FIG. 6 is a bottom view of the spring of the FIG. 5 embodiment in the fully loaded condition.

Description of the embodiments Referring now to the drawings, the FIG. 1 embodiment comprises a spring assembly indicated generally at 10, a forward foot support assembly indicated generally at 11, and a rear foot support assembly indicated generally at 12.

The spring assembly 10 comprises an upper spring leaf 13 and a lower spring leaf 14 pivotally' interconnected at 15. The lower spring leaf 14 is provided with a plurality of buffer elements 16 (four being shown in this embodiment as seen in FIG. 3), while upper spring leaf 13 supports the forward and rear foot support assemblies 11 and 12 as described in detail hereinafter. Each of the upper and lower spring leaves 13 and 14 are constructed from suitable spring steel and are identical in construction and each are constructed with four apertures therein with in which are positioned either compressible buffer elements 16 or the foot assembly securing means. As readily seen in FIG. 3 the spring leaves each include four tapered cantilevers 17 projecting from the uniform midsection 18 to form a continuous leaf. Each surface element of each leaf sustains substantially identical tensile (or compressive) stresses. The tapered cantilevers 17 carry the minute bending loads which occur near the pivots or joints 15 with the same effectiveness as the higher bending loads which occur at the midsection 18. Resilient grommets 19 of the foot support assemblies (see FIG. 1) are constructed so as to extend on each side of the leaf 13 and provide stabilizing constraints of the support assemblies with respect to the spring leaf 13 in all directions except rotation in the fiexural plane. Local flexural freedom at the grommets 19 allows the upper leaf 13 to defleet symmetrically with lower leaf 14 upon application of load. The pivots or joints 15 are constructed by the end of each of the tapered cantilevers 17 being twisted approximately 90 from the plane of the leaf and the adjacent ends 29 of the upper and lower leaves 13 and 14 being connected by means of pins, rivets or the like indicated at 21 such that they do not produce a binding action on the ends 20 of the cantilevers 17. The buffer elements 16 attached to the lower leaf 14 attenuate the impact shocks which occur during contact of the spring assembly It with the deck or surface 22 (see FIG. 2), while additionally serving as stops for the foot support securing means durin complete compression of the spring. The longitudinal sides of the leaves are parallel and the tapered cantilevers form a V at each end of each leaf, as shown in FIG. 3.

The forward or toe support assembly 11, as shown in greater detail in FIG. 4, consists of a pair of sliding lugs or platform members 23 each havin a depressed center portion 24 and a flange portion 25, center portion 24 being provided with a pair of slots 26 while flange portion is provided with a slot 27. A toe strap generally indicated at 28 (see FIG. 1) has each end thereof secured to the sliding lugs 23 via the slots 27 in the flange portions. The lugs or platform members 23 are adjustably secured to upper spring leaf 13 by two bolts 29 which extend through the slots 26 in the lug central portions 24, through the resilient grommets 1?, and through two of the above described apertures in the upper spring leaf 13, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the bolts 29 being secured by nuts 3%. Note that the heads of bolts 29 are positioned within the depressed central portions 24 of lugs 23. As can be readily seen from FIG. 4, the foot assembly 11 can be adjusted in width by loosening the nuts 30, sliding the lug or platform members 23 together or apart in a telescoping manner, due to the depressed central portions 24 and slots 26 therein, and retorqueing the nuts 39 on the bolts 2?. Thus, various size shoe or foot widths may be accommodated with the flange portion 25 of the lugs functionin as side supports for the foot.

The rear or heel support assembly 12 shown on FIG. 1 is generally similar in construction to the forward assembly 11 and includes a pair of sliding lugs or platform members 23 each having a depressed central portion 24' and a flange portion 25 with the flange portion 25 including a heel retaining section 31 and a slot 32 within which is secured the ends of an arch strap 33 having an arch pad 34 thereon. The depressed central portions 24 of the lugs 23' are provided with slots (not shown) which are similar to those illustrated at 26 in FIG. 4. The heel support lugs 24' are adjustably secured to the upper spring leaf 13 via two bolts 29 which extend through the lugs 24, the resilient grommets 19, and the remaining two apertures in the leaf 13 and are torqued down by nuts 3%), as described with respect to the forward or toe support assembly 11. The ends of the heel retaining sections 31 (not shown) are lapped one over the other in a sliding relationship and retained by a loop (not shown). Thus the rear or heel assembly may also be adjusted to accommodate various widths of feet or shoes.

Referring now to FIG. 2, wherein the spring assembly 10 is shown in the fully loaded or fully compressed condition. The upper and lower leaves, 13 and 14, respectively, are essentially parallel and the load capacity of the spring has been reached. In this completely compressed condition the bolts 29 make contact with the butter elements 16. Additional loads on the spring leaves are absorbed by compression of the buffers 16.

It is thus seen that the spring leaves 13 and 14 are so constructed that loading or compressing same results in a proportional deflection of the leaves in a plane perpendicular t0 the leaf plane and produces a spring-planc/ load-plane relationship. Also, loading of the spring leaves 13 and 14 only causes them to straighten in an endwise direction and does not create a change in the overall configuration such as that produced by compressing the spring illustrated in the above mentioned US. Patent 2,614,830.

Referring now to the F165. 5 and 6 embodiment, the bouncing shoe therein illustrated consists of a spring assembly 1t) and foot support assembly 35. The foot support assembly 35 is of a one-piece construction and consists of a foot support platform 36 having upperwardly extending side or flange portions 37 and a heel retaining portion 38. Each of the flange portions 37 are provided with a slot 39 within which the ends of a toe strap 40 are secured; while the heel retaining portion 38 is provided with a pair of slots 41 (only one shown) within which the ends of an arch strap 42 are secured. The platform 36 is firmly fastened to the spring assembly 10' by means of two bolts 43 (only one shown) and secured by nuts 44 with a pair of spacers 45 intermediate the plat form and the spring assembly. The ends of bolts 43 are covered by a pair of resilient snubbers 46 (only one shown). if desired the foot support assembly 35 could be made of an adjustable two piece construction similar to the manner in which the P16. 4 assembly is constructed.

The spring assembly ill is generally similar in construction to the FIG. 1 embodiment and comprises an upper spring leaf 13' and a lower spring leaf 14 constructed from suitable spring steel and pivotally connected at 15'. The spring leaves 13' and 14 each include four tapered cantilevers 17 but the length of the midsection 18 is reduced to a limiting value of approximately zero. As in the FIG. 1 embodiment, each surface element of each leaf sustains substantially identical tensile or compression stresses, and the tapered ca: levers 3.7 carry the bending loads produced by activation of the spring as sembly with the same effectiveness. The pivots or joints 15' are constructed by the end 47 of each of the cantilevers 17 of both spring leaves 13 and 14' are enlarged, as shown in FIG. 6, and the sides 48 thereof bend toward the opposing spring leaf (see FIG. 5) and provided with apertures. The cantilever ends 47 of the upper leaf 13 is of a smaller width than the ends of the lower leaf 14' such that the upper leaf ends are positioned within the lower leaf ends and are secured together by pins, rivets, or the like as indicated at 49. The lower leaf 14' is provided with a pair of resilient pads 50. The two compliant snubber 46 and the pads 50 perform the same functions as the buffers 16 in the FIG. 1 embodiment.

As in the FIG. 1 embodiment, with the FIG. 5 embodiment in fully loaded or compressed condition, the upper and lower leaves 13' and 14' are essentially parallel and the load capacity of the spring is reached. The loading results in a proportional deflection of the leaves in a plane perpendicular to the leaf plane and produces the desired spring-plane/load-plane relationship.

It has thus been shown that this invention provides a toy or exercising device which can be worn on one or both feet and produces action which is more effective than the prior known devices, while providing safe and enjoyable activity for the wearer.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, modifications will become apparent to those skilled in the art, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such modifications as come within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. An entertainment and exercising device comprising a spring assembly and a foot support means operably secured to said spring assembly, said spring assembly including a pair of leaf members, each of said leaf members including four tapered cantilevers projecting from a uniform midsection, means for pivotally interconnecting the cantilevers of. one leaf member with cooperating cantilevers of the other leaf member, means operably connected to at least one of said pair of leaf members for attenuating the impact shocks created by the actuation of said spring assembly, said leaf members being constructed and pivotally interconnected such that in the fully compressed condition said leaf members are essentially parallel, whereby compressing said leaf members produces identical tensile stresses and results in a proportional deflection in a plane perpendicular to the plane of said leaf members and produces required spring-p'lane/ load-plane relationship.

2. The device defined in claim 1, wherein each of said leaf members is constructed such that the longitudinal sides thereof are parallel, and the pair of tapered cantilevers at each end thereof are tapered to form a V at each end of said leaf member.

3. The device defined in claim 1, wherein each of said pair of leaf members are substantially identical in construction, each of said leaf members being provided with a plurality of apertures, said shock attenuating being operatively secured in said apertures of one of said leaf members, and securing means for said foot support means being operatively positioned in said apertures of the other of said leaf members.

4. The device defined in claim 3, wherein said means for pivotally interconnecting said cooperating cantilevers of said leaf members comprises a pin like means inserted through an aperture in the ends of said cantilevers, said ends being constructed such that the portion containing said aperture is in a plane substantially perpendicular to the plane of the adjacent portion of said cantilevers.

5. The device defined in claim 1, wherein said foot support means is adjustable in width.

6. The device defined in claim 5, wherein said adjustable foot support means comprises a forward support assembly and a rear support assembly, each of said assemblies including a pair of platform members movable with respect to one another in a telescoping manner.

7. The device defined in claim 1, additionally including resilient grommet means, at least a portion of said grommet means being operably positioned intermediate said spring assembly and said foot support means and provide stabilizing constraints of said foot support means.

8. The device defined in claim 1, wherein said foot support means is of a one piece construction.

9. The device defined in claim 1, wherein each of said leaf members of said spring assembly are constructed such that said midsection is reduced in size to a limiting value of approximately zero.

10. The device defined in claim 1, wherein said foot support means is operatively secured to one of said pair of leaf members by a pair of bolt-like means, said shock attenuating means comprising resilient snubber means operatively covering the ends of said bolt-like means and a pair of pad-like members secured to the other of said leaf members adjacent the midsection thereof and in alignment with said resilient snubber means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 337,146 3/1886 Gluecksmann 36-7.8 1,613,538 1/1927 Schad 367.8 2,953,861 9/1960 Horten 367.8

PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US337146 *Oct 15, 1885Mar 2, 1886Joseph GluecksmannSpring shoe
US1613538 *Oct 30, 1925Jan 4, 1927Anthony C SchadAthletic spring exerciser
US2953861 *May 13, 1959Sep 27, 1960Horten Albert JResilient jumping shoes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4255822 *Oct 30, 1978Mar 17, 1981William DixonShoe holder adapters for stiff platform
US4492374 *Apr 21, 1981Jan 8, 1985David LekhtmanSporting and exercising spring shoe
US4707934 *Sep 22, 1986Nov 24, 1987Hart LeroyJumping shoe attachment
US5292295 *Aug 3, 1992Mar 8, 1994Gerlach Michael JExercise hoop
US5643148 *Jul 9, 1996Jul 1, 1997Denis Naville S.A.Sporting and exercising device having a foot receiving portion and an anticollapse spring portion
US5713819 *Sep 25, 1996Feb 3, 1998Hsieh; FrankBouncing exerciser with torsion springs
US5860225 *Feb 28, 1997Jan 19, 1999Breeze TechnologySelf-ventilating footwear
US6318001 *Jul 20, 2000Nov 20, 2001Yan-Yee LeeSpringy sports shoe
US6436012Nov 19, 1998Aug 20, 2002Christophe EbersbergSporting and exercising device having a spring portion with stringed/clipped shock absorbers
US6832979Mar 17, 2003Dec 21, 2004Jesse D. YarbroughMobile spring board construction
US7318793 *Nov 7, 2003Jan 15, 2008William Richard DubrulPush up/pull up exercise apparatus and methods for use
US8617033Jan 30, 2009Dec 31, 2013Jeffrey David StewartExercise apparatuses and methods of using the same
US8814768 *Jun 28, 2013Aug 26, 2014Seong Sam YangStability exercise device
US20140187394 *Dec 27, 2012Jul 3, 2014Nautilus, Inc.Exercise device
WO1998055185A2 *Jun 5, 1998Dec 10, 1998Ioffe SemyonExercise boot
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/7.8, 482/77
International ClassificationA63B25/00, A43B13/18, A63B25/10
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/182, A43B13/184, A63B25/10
European ClassificationA63B25/10, A43B13/18A1, A43B13/18A3