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Publication numberUS3378126 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1968
Filing dateFeb 28, 1966
Priority dateMar 6, 1965
Also published asDE1474800A1, DE1474800B2
Publication numberUS 3378126 A, US 3378126A, US-A-3378126, US3378126 A, US3378126A
InventorsKuckens Alexander, Niehaus Wolfgang
Original AssigneeNat Rejectors Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin-actuated credit-storing device
US 3378126 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 16, 1968 A. KUCKENS ET AL 3,378,126

COIN-ACTUATED CREDIT-STORING DEVICE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1.

Filed Feb. 28, 1966 April 16, 1968 Filed Feb. 28, 1966 A. KUCKENS ET AL COIN-ACTUATED CREDIT-STORING DEVICE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 April 16, 1968 KUCKENS ET AL 3,378,126

COIN-ACTUATED CREDIT-STORING DEVICE Filed Feb. 28, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 April 16, 1968 A. KUCKENS ET AL 3,378,126

COIN-ACTUATED CREDIT-STORING DEVICE Filed Feb. 28, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet United States Patent 0 3,378,126 COIN-ACTUATED GREEN-STORING DEVICE Alexander Kiickens, Hamburg, and Wolfgang Niehaus, Hainburg-Ncugraben, Germany, assignors to National Rejectors Inc., St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Filed Feb. 28, 1966, Ser. No. 530,717 Claims priority, application Germany, Mar. 6, 1965, K 55 456 13 Claims. (Cl. 194-10ll) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to improvements in coin-handling devices. More particularly, this invention relates to improvements in coin-handling devices which are resistant to cheating.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an improved coin-handling device which is resistant to cheating.

Coin-handling devices, which utilize mechanical, electro-mechanical and electronic means for testing coins, are known. When a coin is tested and accepted by such a coinhandling device, that coin will usually actuate a switch, such as a microswitch or an electronic switch; and, ordinarily, that switch will initiate the dispensing of merchandise or will apply a pulse to a credit accumulator. Some of those coin-handling devices accommodate coins of just one denomination; but other of those coin-handling devices accommodate coins of more than one denomination. In coin-handling devices that accommodate coins of just one denomination, the coins usually pass through one coin passageway and then actuate a switch as they are accepted; but, in coin-handling devices that accommodate coins of more than one denomination, the coins of different denominations are usually separated from each other and pass through different coin passageways to actuate different switches. The coin'handling device provide by the present invention makes it possible to test coins of more than one denomination in the same coin passageway, and also makes it possible "to use just one switch and yet apply the proper credits, corresponding to the values of the coins of difierent denominations, to the credit accumulator. As a result, the present invention can provide acompact coin-handling device with a minimum of coin passageways and switches. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a coin-handling device which makes it possible to test coins of more than one denomination in the same coin passageway, and also makes it possible to use just one switch and yet apply the proper credits, corresponding to the values of the coins of different denominations, to the credit accumulator.

With some coin-handling devices, it is possible to insert an accepted coin, to which a thread or thin wire has 3,378,126 Patented Apr. 16, 1968 ice been attached, and then use that coin to obtain merchandise having a value exceeding the value of that coin or to establish credits in excess of the value of that coin. Specifically, it is possible to insert such a coin, to let that coin actuate the switch that effects the dispensing of merchandise or the applying of credits to the credit no cumulator, and then to repeatedly pull and release that thread or wire so the coin will cause that switch to ellect the repeated dispensing of merchandise or the repeated application of credits to the credit accumulator. With some other coin-handling devices, the switches that are supposed to be actuated by accepted coins can be actuated by blasts of compressed air or can be actuated by flexible and pliable objects which are inserted into those coin-handling devices. The present invention provides a coin-handling device which has a switch that is actuated by accepted coins; but that invention makes it impossible to use an accepted coin, to which a thread or wire has been attached, to eiiect the repeated dispensing of merchandise or the repeated application of credits to the credit accumulator. Also, that invention keeps that switch from being actuated by blasts of compressed air or by the insertion of flexible and pliable objects into that coinhandling device. The present invention attains these desirable results by using a coil as the switch for the coinhandling device, by in-terposing a coin-directing element between that coil and the unit which tests the coins, and by requiring a signal from the unit that tests the coins plus a signal from that coil before any merchandise can be dispensed or any credits can be applied to the credit accumulator. The coin-directing element is disposed adjacent a passageway for rejected coins; and it normally is in position to intercept coins. The unit which tests the coins will leave that coin-directing element in its normal coin-intercepting position if a spurous coin or a coin of the wrong denomination is inserted, and hence that coindirecting element will cause such a coin to pass to the rejected coin passageway. The unit which tests the coins will cause that coimdirecting element to shift to coin-accepting position whenever an authentic coin of the proper denomination is inserted; and hence that coin will pass to the coil which acts as a switch. That coil will provide a signal which will coact with the signal, previously provided by the unit which tests the coins, to cause a credit, corresponding to the value of the accepted coin, to be applied to the credit accumulator; and that coil also will immediately enable the coin-directing element to return to its normal, coin-intercepting position. Because that coil enables that coin-directing element to return to its normal, coin-intercepting position immediately, that coindirecting element will keep a coin, to which a thread or thin wire is attached, from being pulled back into register Wit-h the unit that tests coins; and yet that coin cannot effect the dispensing of merchandise or the application of a credit to the accumulator unless it is pulled back into register with that unit and then allowed to pass through that unit and into the coil which serves as a switch. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a coin-handling device which uses a coil as a switch, which interposes a coin-directing element between that coil and the unit which tests the coins, and by requiring a signal from the unit that tests the coins plus a signal from that coil before any merchandise can be dispensed or any credits can be applied to the credit accumulator.

Where desired, two or more coin-testing units can be arranged in tandem in advance of the coin-directing element; and each of those coin-testing units can respond to a coin of dilferent denomination. Also, where desired, all of those coin-testing units can cause the coin-d1- recting element to shift from its normal, coin-intercepting position to a position where it permits coins to move past it. In addition, if desired, the coil which acts as a switch can be made large enough and can be arranged so all accepted coins, regardless of their denominations, will pass through it. In such event, that coil can make certain that merchandise is dispensed or credits are applied to the credit accumulator only when a coin reaches and passes into that coil. Also, in such event, that coil can make certain that the coin-directing element returns to its normal coin-intercepting position immediately after a coin enters that coil.

By using and gates or similar electrical mechanisms, a number of testing units can be used with a single coil to properly apply different credit values to the credit accumulator. For example, by using and gates, four testing units can be used with a single coil to test German five-Pfennig, ten-pfennig, fifty-pfennig, and one-mark coins and to apply appropriate credit values to the credit accumulator. The testing unit for the five-Pfennig coin will be connected to one input terminal of an and gate, the testing unit for the ten-pfennig coin will be connected to one input terminal of a second and gate, the testing unit for the fifty-pfennig coin will be connected to one input terminal of a third and gate, and the testing unit for the mark coin will be connected to one input terminal of a fourth and gate. The coil, which acts as a switch, will be connected to second terminals of all four of the and gates; and, whenever any of those and gates receives a signal from a testing unit and from the coil, it will apply an appropriate credit to the credit accumulator.

The coin-handling device provided by the present in vention has a coin entrance; and the four German coins can be introduced into that entrance in random fashion. A diameter-sizing gauge will cause the two smaller-diameter coins to pass to one coin passageway, and will cause the two larger-diameter coins to pass to a second coin passageway. The testing devices for the two smaller diameter coins will be arranged in tandem relation adjacent the one coin passageway, and the testing devices for the two larger-diameter coins will be arranged in tandem relation adjacent the second coin passageway. Where this is done, only two tests are needed to separate authentic coins of difierent denominations from each oth- 0 er and from spurious coins or coins of undesired denominations. This is dcsirable because it minimize the time required to test and separate coins.

As each coin passes into the coil which acts as a switch, that coil will cause the coin-directing element to immediately return to its normal, coin-intercepting position. This is desirable because it will keep a second coin, which is introduced into the coin entrance immediately after a first coin has been so introduced, from reaching the coil. If that second coin were to be permitted to reach that coil, the patron who inserted that second coin would lose the value of that second coin; because the credit corresponding to a second coin cannot be applied to the credit accumulator unless the first coin enters the coil before that second coin reaches its testing unit. Coins pass through the coin-handling device of the present invention so rapidly that it would take a considerable effort and a high degree of skill to cause a second coin to reach its testing unit before the immediately-preceding coin had passed its testing unit and had entered the coil. However, even if a second coin could so reach its testing unit, the coin-directing element would reject that sec ond coin and return it to the patron who inserted it.

The coin-directing element provided by the present in vention should effectively block any withdrawing movement of a thread or thin wire attached to an accepted coin; and hence should prevent any withdrawing movement of that coin. However, even if that coin-directing element permitted the thread or thin wire attached to a coin to move at all, that thread or thin wire could not move that coin back past that coindirecting element and into register with the testing unit. The most the movement of the coin, by the thread or thin Wire, could accomplish would be to cause the coil to develop a sig nal; but that signal would not effect the dispensing of any merchandise or the applying of any credits to the credit accumulator, because a signal must be provided by the testing unit as well as by the coil. In this way, the present invention keeps patrons from using threads or thin wires to manipulate coins and cheat the coin-handling device of that invention.

Other and further objects and advantages of the present invention should become apparent from an examination of the drawing and accompanying description.

In the drawing and accompanying description a preferred embodiment of the present invention is shown and described but it is to be understood that the drawing and accompanying description are for the purpose of illustration only and do not limit the invention and that the invention will be defined by the appended claims.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a conceptual showing of one preferred embodiment of coin-handling device that is made in accordance with the principles and teachings of the present invention,

FIG. 2 is a diagram of one circuit utilizing that coinhandiing device,

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic showing, partially in section, of the coin-handling device of FIG. 1, with the principles and teachings of the present invention,

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic showing, in side elevation, of the coin-handling device of FIG. 1,

FIG. 5 is simiiar to the upper part of FIG. 3, but it shows a small-diameter coin about to fall into the passage for smali-diameter coins,

FIG. 6 is similar to FIG. 5, but it shows a largedlameter coin being guided toward the passageway for large-diameter coins,

FIG. 7 is similar to the lower part of FIG. 3, but it shows a coin being intercepted by the coin-directing ele ment,

FIG. 8 is similar to FIG. 7, but it shows the coindrrecting element in position to permit a coin to pass by it,

FIG. 9 is similar to FIG. 3, but it shows a cash box below the coin-handling device, and

FIG. 10 is similar to the lower part of FIG. 9, but it emphasizes the coil which moves the coin-directing element.

Referring to the drawing in detail, the coin entrance for one preferred embodiment of coin-handling device that is provided by the present invention is denoted by the numeral 1; and that coin entrance is dimensioned so German five-pfennig, tenfennig, fifty-Pfennig, and onemark coins can readily pass through it and enter a coin passageway that is generally denoted by the numeral 2. That passageway is defined by walls 35) and 31 which are shown particularly by FIGS. 3, 5, 6 and 9. A generallyrectangular opening 32 is formed in the wall 31; and the lower edge of that opening is defined by a portion 34 of that wall which is bent inwardly and then downwardly. A coin-guiding wall 4t) coacts with the inwardly and downwardly wall portion 34 to form a second passageway. A plate 36 abuts the wall 31, below the level of the bend in the wall portion 34; and the upper edge of that plate serves as a runway for coins. A coin-guiding wall 38 is spaced from the runway 36 to define a third passageway. Coils 24 and 25 are disposed below the level of the coin-guiding wall 38; and the openings at the centers of those coils are vertically aligned with each other and with the outlet of the coin passageway defined by runway 36 and the coin-guiding wall 38. Coils 25 and 2'7 are disposed below the level of the coin-guiding wall .6 and the openings at the centers of those coils are vertically aligned with each other and with the outlet or" the coin passageway defined by the wall portion 34 and the coin-guirling wall ill.

A tunnel-like member '7 underlies the vertically-aligned centers of the coils 24 and 25, and also underlies the vertically-aligned centers of the coils 26 and 27. That member will receive coins passing through the coils Z4 and 25, and also will receive coins passing through the coils 26 and 27; and it will guide those coins toward the coin-intercepting portion 3a of a coin-directing element 8. The upper end of that coindirecting element is supported by a pivot 80, and that coin-directing element is mounted adjacent a coil 8b. A spring 42 urges the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coin-directing element 8 into position to block movement of coins from the funnel-like member 7 toward a coil 9 which acts as an electronic switch; but that spring will respond to energization of the coil db to move the coin-intercepting portion 3a of the coin-directing element 8 out of the path of such coins.

Coins which are permitted to pass to the coil 9 will pass through the center of that coil and cause that coil to develop a signal. Those coins will then move through a passageway 10 into a cash box 11. Coins that are prevented, by the coin-intercepting portion 3a of the coindirecting element 8, from passing to the coil 9 will be directed through a rejected coin passageway 12 to a returned coin receptacle 44 which is located at the exterior of the coin-handling device.

As shown b" FIG. 3, the coin entrance 1 is inclined to the vertical, and hence any coins introduced through that coin entrance will be inclined to the vertical. The wall 39 has the same inclination as the coin entrance 1; and it will force coins, introduced through that coin entrance, to tend to rest upon the wall 31, with the lower edges of those coins supported by the runway 36. The diameters of German fivefennig and fifty-pfennig coins are less than the distance between the runway 36 and the upper edge of the opening 32; and hence those coins will fall through that opening and be guided downwardly by the wall portion 3d and the coin-guiding wall id to the vertically-aligned openings in the coils 26 and 27. T he diameters of German ten-nfennig and one-mark coins are greater than the distance between the runway as and the upper edge of the opening 32, and hence those coins will roll past the end of that runway and be guided downwardly to the vertically-aligned openings in the coils 2.4 and 25.

The showing of the coils 2d-27 is diagrammatic only; and the passages through the coils 24 and 25' must be dimensioned so the largest coin which is intended to pass through the coin entrance 1 can easily fall through those passages. The coils 26 and 27 are dimensioned so the coins which fall through the opening 32 can easily pass through the passages in those coils. It will be noted that the coils 2 6 and 27 are mounted in tandem along the path for the German five-ptennig and fifty-pfennig coins; and this is desirable because it enables both of those coins to be tested in the same passageway. Similarly, it will be noted that the coils Z4 and 25 are mounted in tan em along the path for the German ten-pfcnnig and one-mark coins, thereby enabling both of those coins to be tested in he same passageway.

When a German ten-pfennig or one-mark coin is introduced through the coin entrance it, it will be too large to fall through the opening 32; and hence it will roll along the runway 36 and fall downwardly through the verticallyaligncd passages in the coils 2 and 25. A German fivepiennig or fiftyfennig coin introduced through the coin entrance 1 will fall through the opening 32,, and then pass downwardly through the verticallymligned passage.

in the coils 26 and 27. Any coin passing through the coils 24 and 25 will strike the left-hand portion of the funnel-like member 7, as that member is viewed in FIG. 3, and it will be guided toward the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coin-directing element 8. Any coin passing through the coils 26 and 27 will strike the righthand portion of the funnel-like member '7, and it will be guided toward the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coin-directing element 8. If that coin-intercepting portion is in the normal, coin-intercepting position shown by FIGS. 3, 7, 9 and 10 that coin will be kept from passing to the coil 9. Instead, that coin will roll down the rejected coin passageway 12 into the returned coin receptacle 44.

The coil 24 is part of an electronic coin tester 3 shown in FIG. 1; and that electronic coin tester preferably is like the electronic coin tester disclosed in our German patent application Ser. No. 1346,446IXc/43b for Elektronisches Munzpriifverfaln'en flir Metallische Miinzen which was filed Feb. 5, 1965, or is like the electronic coin tester disclosed in Wolfgang Niehaus German patent application Ser. No. K56,207lXc/43b for Elektronisches Mlinzpriifverfahren tilr Metallische Miinzen which was filed May 25, 1965 and June 11, 1965. Metal coins have specific resonant frequencies; and those resonant frequencies are dependent upon the dimensions of the coins, the materials or alloys of which the coins are made, and any plating on the surfaces of those coins. A coin which has been rendered resonant can coact with a coil, which is tuned to the resonant frequency of that coin, to develop a signal as that coin passes through that coil; and that signal can cause an electrornagnetically-operated coin-deflecting element to move out of coin-rejecting position so that coin can be accepted. If desired, a single coil such as the coil 2 can transmit energy to coins passing through it to render those coins resonant; and then that. coil can receive energy from any of those coins which is resonating at a frequency close to the resonant frequency of that coil to develop a signal which will etfect the acceptance of that coin, but will not respond to any of those coins which is resonating at a materially-different frequency to develop such a signal-- and hence such a coin will be rejected. On the other hand, if desired, a first coil can transmit energy to coins passing through it to render those coins resonant; and then a second coil such as the coil 24 can receive energy from any of those coins which is resonating at a frequency close to the resonant frequency of that second coil to develop a signal which will effect the acceptance of that coin, but will not respond to any of those coins which is resonating at a materially-dillerent frequency to develop such a signal-and hence such a coin will be rejected, The coil 24 will coact with the rest of the electronic coin tester 3 to provide a usable signal whenever an authentic German ten-pfennig coin passes downwardly through that coil; but it will not coact with the rest of that electronic coin tester to provide a usable signal if any coin other than an authentic Germany ten-prennig coin passes down'v'ardly through that coil, because such other coin will not resonate at the resonant frequency of the coil 24. The coil 25 is part of an. electronic coin tester 5', shown. in HG. 1; and that electronic coin tester preferably is like one of the electronic coin testers disclosed in said German patent applications. The coil 25 will be formed and dimensioned to resonate at the resonant frequency of an authentic German onemark coin, and that coil will coact with the rest of that electronic coin tester to provide a usable signal whenever an authentic German one-mark coin passes downwardly through that coil; but it will not coact with the rest of that electronic coin tester to provide a usable signal if any coin other than an authentic German one-mark coin passes clownwardly through that coil, because such other coin will not resonate at the resonant frequency of the coil 25. The coil 26 is part of an electronic coin tester 4, shown in FIG. 1; and that electronic coin tester preferably is like one of the electronic coin testers disclosed in said German patent applications. The coil 26 will be formed and dimensioned to resonate at the resonant frequency of an authentic German five-pfennig coin, and that coil will coact with the rest of that electronic coin tester to provide a usable signal whenever an authentic German five-pfennig coin passes downwardly through that coil; but it will not coact with the rest of that electronic coin tester to provide a usable signal if any coin other than an authentic German five-pfennig coin passes downwardly through that coil, because such other coin will not resonate at the resonant frequency of the coil 26. The coil 27 is part of an electronic coin tester 6, shown in FIG. 1; and that electronic coin tester preferably is like one of the electronic coin testers disclosed in said German patent applications. The coil 27 will be formed and dimensioned to resonate at the resonant frequency of an authentic German fitty-pfennig coin, and that coil will coact with the rest of that electronic coin tester to provide a usable signal whenever an authentic German fifty-pfennig coin passes downwardly through that coil; but it will not coact with the rest of that electronic coin tester to provide a usable signal if any coin other than an authentic German fifty-pfennig coin passes downwardly through that coil, because such other coin will not resonate at the resonant frequency of the coil 27.

As indicated particularly by FIG. 2, the electronic coin tester 3 is connected to the set terminal of a bi-stable element by a junction 52, the electronic coin tester 4 is connected to the set terminal of a bi-stable element 54 by a junction 56, the electronic coin tester 5 is connected to the set terminal of a bi-stable element 58 by a junction 60, and the electronic coin tester 6 is connected to the set terminal of a bi-stable element 62 by a junction 65. The electronic coin tester 3 is connected to the re-set terminals of the bistable elements 54, 58 and 62 by the junction 52 and by a junction 66 and a diode 68, and a junction 70 and diodes 72 and '74. The electronic coin tester 4 is connected to the re-set terminals of the bi-stable elements 5@, 58 and 62 by the junction 56 and by a diode 76, a junction 78 and diodes 8t) and 82. The electronic coin tester 5 is connected to the re-set terminals of the bistable elements 50, 54 and 62 by the junction and by a junction 84 and diodes 86 and 88, and a diode 9% The electronic coin tester 6 is connected to the re-set terminals of the bi-stable elements 5!), 54 and 53 by the junction and by a junction 92 and a diode 94, and a junction 96 and diodes 98 and 100. The output of the bi-stable element 50 is connected to the upper input terminal of an and gate 17 by a junction 102, and is connected to the coil 8b by that junction, a diode 13, and junctions 1G6, 108 and 110. The output of the bi-stable element 34 is connected to the upper input terminal of an and gate 18 by a junction 112, and is connected to the coil 81) by that junction, a diode 14 and junctions 1%, 168 and 110. The output of the bi-stable element 58 is connected to the upper input teminal of an and gate 19 by a junction 116, and is connected to the coil 3b by that junction, a diode 15, and junctions 198 and 110. The output of the bi-stable element 62 is connected to the upper input terminal of an and gate 20 by a junction 12%, and is connected to the coil 81') by that junction, a diode l6 and junction 110. The coil 9, which acts as an electronic switch, is connected to the re-set terminals of the bistable elements 50, 54, 58 and 62 by a junction 124, a junction 126 and a diode 128, a junction ti t and diode 132, a junction 134 and diodes 1.36 and 1 8. The coil 9 also is connected to the lower input terminals of the and gates 17, 18, 19 and 26 by the junction 1 3 and by junctions 14%, 142 and 144-. The output terminals of the and gates 17, 18, 19 and 2d are connected to the input terminals of a credit accumulator 21, and the output of that credit accumulator can be connected to a merchandise dispenser by a conductor 22. The diodes l.

When an authentic German five-pfennig coin is introduced into the coin entrance 1, it will fail downwardly through the opening 32 and pass through the coil 26. That coil will cause the electronic coin tester 4, of which it is a part, to apply a signal to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 54 via junction 55 and to up ly a signal to the re-set terminals of the bi-stable elements 50, 58 and 62 via junctions 56 and 78 and diodes 76, ill and S2. The diodes 63, 72 and 7 5 will keep a signal from being applied to the set" terminal of the bi-stable element 50, the diodes 86, 8S and will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 58, and the diodes 94, and will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable eiement 62. The bistable element 54- will immediately apply a negative signal to the upper input terminal of the and gate 18 via junction 112 and to the coil 8b via junction 112, diode 14, and junctions 1%, 188 and 116; and that bistable element will continue to apply that negative signal to that upper input terminal and to the Coil 81'). The diode 13 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 17, the diode 15 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the ant gate 19, and the diode it: will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 20. The coil Sb will promptly rotate the coin-directing eletent 8 from the position shown by H33. 3, 7, 9 and 10 to the position shown by FIG. 8; and hence, when the five-pfennig coin then passes downwardly through the coil 27, enters the funnel-like member 7, and is directed to ward the opening in the coil 9, that coin will not be intercepted by the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coindirecting element 8. Instead, that coin will pass through the coil 9; and, thereupon, that coil will apply a negative signal to the lower input terminals of the and gates l7, I8, 19, and via junctions 124, 142 and 144, and also will apply that negative signal to the re-set terminals of each of the bistable elements 50, S4, 58 and 62 via junctions li t, 126, I30 and 134 and diode 138, via junctions 12%, 126, 139 and 134 and diode 136, via junctions 124. 126 and 136 and diode 132, and via junctions 124 and F126 and diode 123, respectively. The diodes 68, 72 and 74 will keep that negative signal from being a plied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 58', the diodes 76, 8t) and 82 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 5 the diodes 85, 38 and 9-9 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 555, and the diodes 9d, 98 and 10! will keep that negative signal from being applied to the ct terminal of the bl-SilbiC element 62.

Because the ant gates 17, 39 and 253 do not have negative signals applied to the upper input terminals thereof, those and gates will not be able to supply a negative signal to the credit accumulator 21. Because the bi-stab.e elements 5%, 58 and had not previously been set, application of negative s g to the re-set" terminals of those bible elemen s will not atlect the condition of those his role elements.

The overall result is that the signal provided by the coil 9 will cause the and gate it? to apdy a credit-accumula mg signal to the crccit accumulator 21, and will cause the bi-stable cle sent 54 to re-set itself.

The five-piennig coin must pass through the coil 27, as it moves from the coil 26 to the funnel-like member 7. However, the coil 27, and the electronic coin tester 6 of which it a part, will not provide a signal that can set the iii-stable element 62, [766119.155 that coil will not resonate at the resonant frequency ot a live lfennig coin.

Consequently, the five-pfennig coin will cause only the bistable element 54 to be set.

When an authentic German ten-pfennig coin is introduced into the coin entrance 1. that coin will be too large to fall through the opening 32. Instead, that coin will roll along the runway 36 and then fall downwardly through the coil 24. That coil will cause the electronic coin tester 3, of which it is a part, to apply a signal to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 50 via junction 52 and to apply a signal to the re-set terminals of the bi-stable elements 54, 58 and 62 via junctions 52, 66 and 7t) and diodes 68, 72 and 74. The diodes 76, 8t and 32 will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 54, the diodes 86, 38 and 90 will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 58, and the diodes 94, 9d and 100 will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 62. The bistable ele meat 50 will immediately apply a signal to the upper input terminal of the and gate 17 via junction 102 and to the coil 81) via junction 1G2, diode 13, and junctions 166, 168 and 110; and that bistable element will continue to apply that negative signal to that upper input terminal and to the coil 8b. The diode 14 will keep tha negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 18, the diode 15 Will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and" gate 19, and the diode 16 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 20. The coil 315 will promptly rotate the coin-directing element 8 from the position shown by FIGS. 3, 7, 9 and 10 to the position shown by FIG. 8; and hence, when the ten-pfennig coin then pa ses downwardly through the coil 25. enters the funnel-like member 7, and is directed toward the opening in the coil 9, that coin will not be intercepted by the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coin-directing element 8. Instead, the coin will pass through the coil 9; and, thereupon, that coil will apply a negative signal to the lower input terminals of the and gates 17, 18, 19 and 20 via ju nctions 124, 146, 142 and 144 and also will app y that negtive signal to the re-set terminals of the bi-stable elements 5t 54, 58 and 62 via junctions 124, 126, 13% and 134 and diode 133, via junctions 124, 126, 130 and 134 and diode 136, via junctions 124-, 126 and 130 and diode 132, and via junctions 124 and 126 and diode 28, respectively. The diodes 68, 72 and 74 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 51' the diodes 76, 8t) and 82 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bistable element 54, the diodes 86, 8E and 90 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 53, and the diodes 94, 98 and 1% will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 62. Because the and gates 18, 19 and 2% do not have negative signals applied to the upper input terminals thereof, those and gates will not be able to supply a negative signal to the credit accumulator 21. Because the bi-stable elements 54, 5t and 62 had not previously been set, the application of negative signals to the re-set terminals of those bistable elements will not affect the condition of those bi-stable elements. The overall result is that the signal provided by the coil 9 will cause the and gate 17 to apply a credit-accumulating signal to the credit accumulator 21, and will cause the bistable element St) to re-set.

The teu pfennig coin must pass through the coil 25, as it moves from the coil 24 to the funnel-like member 7. However, the coil 25, and the electronic coin tester 5, of which it is a part, will not provide a signal that can set the bi-stable element 58, because that coil will not resonate at the resonant frequency of a ten-ptennig coin. Consequently, the tenpfennig coin will cause only the bi-stable element to be set.

When an authentic German fifty-piennig is introduced into the coin entrance 1, it will fall downwardly through the opening 32 and pass through the coil 26 and then through the coil 27. The coil 26, and the electronic coin tester 4, of which it is a part, will not provide a signal that can set the bi-stable element 54, because that coil will not resonate at the resonant frequency of a fiftypfennig coin; but the coil 27 will cause the electronic coin tester 6, of which it is a part, to apply a signal to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 62 via junction 65 and to apply a signal to the re-set" terminals of the bi-stable elements 50, 54 and 58 via junctions 65, 92 and 96 and diodes 100, 98 and 94. The diodes 68, 72 and 74 will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 50, the diodes 76, 86 and 82 will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 54, and the diodes 86, 88 and 90 will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 58. The bi-stable element 62 will immediately apply a signal to the upper input terminal of the and gate 20 via junction and to the coil 8/2 via junction 12!), diode 16, and junction 11%; and that bi-stable element will continue to apply that negative signal to that upper input terminal and to the coil 8]). The diode 13 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 17, the diode 14 will keep that negative sig nal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 18, and the diode 15 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input termiml of the and gate 19. The coil 8b will promptly rotate the coin-directing element 8 from the position shown by FIGS. 3, 7, 9 and 10 to the position shown by FIG. 8; and hence, when the fifty-pfennig coin then enters the funnel-like member 7, and is directed toward the opening in the coil 9, that coin will not be intercepted by the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coindirecting element 8. Instead, that coin will pass through the coil 9; and, thereupon, that coil will apply a negative signal to the lower input terminals of the and gates 17, 18, 19 and 2t) via junctions 124, 140, 142 and 144, and also will apply that negative signal to the re-set terminals of each of the bistable elements 50, 54, 58 and 62 via junctions 124-, 126, and 1.34 and diode 138, via junctions 124, 126, 139 and 134 and diode 136, via junctions 12 i, 126 and 130 and diode 132, and via junctions 124 and 126 and diode 128, respectively. The diodes 68, 72 and 74- will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 50, the diodes 76, 8t and 82 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 54, the diodes 86, 88 and 90 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 53, and the diodes 94, 93 and lltii) will keep that negative signal from bei g applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 62. Because the and gates 17, 13 and 19 do not have negative signals applied to the upper input terminals thereof, those and gates will not be able to supply a negative signal to the credit accumulator 21. Because the bi-stable elements 5%, 54 and 58 had not previously been set, the application of negative signals to the re-set terminals of those bistable elements will not affect the condition of those bistable elements. The overall result is that the signal provided by the coil 9 will cause the and gate 20 to apply a credit-accumulating signal to the credit accumulator 2i, and will cause the bi-stable element 62 to re-set itself.

When an authentic German mark is introduced into the coin entrance 1, that coin will be too large to fall through the opening 32. Instead, that coin will roll along the runway 36 and then fall downwardly through the coil 24, and the coil 25. The coil 24, and the electronic coin tester 3, of which it is a part, will not provide a signal that can set" the bi-stable element St) because that a s" from being applied to the set bi-stablc element 5? the diodes '76, 8 and 82 will keep a signal from being applied to the set terminal of the iii-stable element 54, and the diodes 94, $8 and lttlt? will keep a signal rom being applied to the set terminal of the oi-stable element 62. The bi-stablc element 58 will immediately apply a signal to the upper input terminal of the ant gate 19 via junction lid and to the coil 8b via junction 116, diode 15, and junctions 133 and 119; and that bi-stable element will Continue to apply that negative signal to that upper input terminal and to the coil 3!). The diode 13 will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 1'7, the diode 14- will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 15;, and the diode in will keep that negative signal from being applied to the upper input terminal of the and gate 26. The coil 31; will promptly rotate the coin-directing element 55 from the position shown by FIGS. 3, 7, 9 and ll to the position shown by HS. 8; and hence, when the one-mark coin enters the funnel-like member '7 and is directed toward the opening in the coil 9, that coin will not be intercepted by the coinir.=tercepting portion 3a of the coin-directing element 3. Instead, that coin will pass through the coil 9; and, thereupon, that coil will apply a negative signal to the lower input terminals of the and gates 17, 1S, and it via junctions 124, 1491, i423 and 144, and also will apply that negative signal to the reset terminals of each of the bi-stable elements 59, 54, 58 and 62 via junctions 124, 1. 36, 139 and 3.34 and diode 1.38, via junctions 124, 125, 130 and 13d and diode 136, via junctions 12 i, 126, and 13% and diode 132, and via junctions 124- and 126 and diode 123, respectively. The diodes 68, '72 and 7d will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the oi-stable ele sent 56, the diodes 76, 8t? and 82 will that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 54, the diodes 86, and 9%} will keep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element 58, and the diodes 94-, 3 and ill-G will lzeep that negative signal from being applied to the set terminal of the bi-stable element as.

Because the and gates 1'7, 18 and do not have negative signals applied to the upper input terminals thereof, those and. gates will not be able to supply a negative signal to the credit accumulator 2.1.. Because the bi-stable elements Ell, 54 and 62 had not previously been set, the application of negative signals to the reset terminals of those bi-stable elements will not affect the condition of those bi-stable elements. The overall result is that the signal provided by the coil will cause the and gate 1? to apply a credit-accumulating signal to the credit accumulator 21, and will cause the bi-stable element 58 to reset itself.

Preferably, the bi-stable elements 50, 5a, 58 and 6?. are of the type which set immediately in response to the application of a signal to the set terminal thereof; and the Conventional bistable multivibrator in FlG- 198 on page 203 of TM l1690 Bepartment of The Army Technical vlanual entitled Basic Theory And. Application Of Transistors which was published in March or" 1959 is one such bi-stable element. Such bistable elements will promptly and unerringly respond to the signals from the electronic coin testers 3, l, 5, and 6 to assume the required set positions. Each of the and gates 1'7, l8, l9 and 2-9 could be identical to the and gate shown in FEGJRE 20 3A on page 2B of the said Army Technical Manual. The signals from the coil 9 must actuate the appropriate anc gates and must also re-set the appropriate bistable elements. It is important that the si ial from the coil 9 be applied to the appropriate and gates before the corresponding bi-stable elements are reset. it necessary, a delay element could be provided between junction 124 and the junction 1% to make certain that the appropriate bistable elements remain set until after the coil 9 has applied its signal to the corresponding and gates.

The use of the and gates i7, l8, l9 and 29 keeps a patron from improperly ca 'ng credit-accumulating signals to be applied to the ere-cit accumulator 21, as by using thread or thin wire to recurrently move a coin through the coil The coin-directing element 8 is, of course, irtcnded to keep a patron from using a thread or thin wire to move a coin relative to that coil; but even if a patron is, somehow, able to move such a coin, any signal from the coil 9 could not by itself, cause a cieditaccumuluting signal to be applied to the credit cumulator 2i. Only the and gates 17, 18, i9 and can supply credit-accumulating signals to the credit 21; and none of those and gates can respond solely to signals from the coil 9. Instead, each of those and gates requires a signal from a bi-stable element in addition to the signal from the coil 9.

it will be noted that the coil 9 cannot develop th si nal which will be applied to the lower input terminals of the one gates 3.7, 18, 19 and 2% until the coin has ioved a substantial distance through that coil; and, by

that time, that coin is wholly below the coin-intercepting portion of the coin-directing element 8. Furthermore, at the instant the coil 9 applies the signal to the lower input terminals of the and gates 17, 18, 19 and 20, that coil also applies the signal to the re-set" terminals of the bi-stuble elements 50, 58 and 62, As a result, the appropriate oi-stable element will re-set itself, and permit the coin-directing element S to return to its normal, coin-intercepting position, before the patron can jerk the coin back up into po on to block the returning movement of that coin-directing element. Consequently, it is not possible to a thread or tin wire to a coin and use that coin to cheat the coin-handling device provided by the present invention.

it a spurious coin or a coin of undesired denomination is introduced through the coin entrance 1, that coin will roll alone the runway 36, if it is in the size range of a ten-pfennig or one mark coin; and that coin will then fall downwardly through the coils 24 and 25. The electronic coin testers 3 and 5, of which those coils are parts, will not develop signals which can set the bistable elements 58 and 58 because those coils will not resonate at the resonant frequency of that coin. As a result, that spurious coin or coin of undesired denomination will be intercepted by the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coin'directing element 8 and will be directed toward the rejected coin passageway 12. Similarly, if a spurious coin or coin 0f undesired denomination, in the size range of five-pfennig or fifty-picnnig coins is introduced, that coin will fall through the opening 32 in the wall 33, and pass downwardly through the coils 26 and 27. Th electronic coin testers 4 and 6, of which those coils are parts, will not develop signals which can set the bistable elements and 62 because those coils will not resonate at the resonant frequency of that coin. As a result, that spurious coin or coin of undesired denomination will be intercepted by the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coin-directing element 8 and will be directed toward the rejected coin passageway 12.

The credit accumulator 21 will receive credit-accunilating signals and will accumulate the credits correspond' g thereto. When the total of the accumulated credits equals the sales price, that credit accumulator will develop a signal; and that signal will pass through the conductor 22 to a su able merchandise dispensing accumulator machine. As that machine dispenses the desired merchandise, it will automatically re-set the credit accumulator 21.

If desired, a switch could be connected intermediate the electronic coin tester 3 and the junction 52, a second switch could be connected intermediate the electronic coin tester 4 and the junction 56, a third switch could be connected intermediate the electronic coin tester 5 and the junction 60, and a fourth switch could be connected intermediate the electronic coin tester 6 and the junction 65; and those switches could be controlled by the Credit accumulator 21. Such an arrangement would prevent the acceptance of a coin whenever the value of the accumulated credits exceeded the difference between the value of that coin and the sales price. For example, if the sales price was one mark and sixty pfennig, and if the electronic coin tester 5, the bi-stable element 58 and the coil 9 responded to the introduction of a one mark coin to cause the and gate 19 to apply a one mark credit-accumulating signal to the credit accumulator 21, that credit accumulator would then open the switch between the electronic coin tester 5 and the junction 66. If a second one mark coin was then inserted in the coin entrance 1, that coin would pass through the coil 25; but the electronic coin tester 5 could not respond to that coin to set" the bi-stable element 58; and hence the coinintercepting portion 8a of the coin-directing element 8' would reject that coin and direct it to the rejected coin passageway 12-. If a fifty pfennig coin was then inserted, the electronic coin tester 6, the bistable element 62, and the coil 9 would cause the and gate 20 to supply a fifty pfennig credit-accumulating signal to the credit accumlator 21. That credit accumulator would respond to the accumulated credits of one mark and fitty-pfennigs to open the switch between the electronic coin tester 6 and the junction 65. As a result, any further fifty piennig coin which was introduced through the coin entrance 1 and passed down through the coil 27 would be unable to cause the electronic coin tester 6 to set the bi-stable element 62. This means that the further fifty pfennig coin would be intercepted by the coin-intercepting portion 8a of the coin-directing element 8 and would be directed to the rejected coin passageway 12. If a five pfennig coin was then inserted through the coin entrance 1, the electronic coin tester 4, the bi-stable eletnent 54, and the coil 9 would cause the and gate 18 to apply a five pfennig credit-accumulating signal to the credit accumulator 21. That credit accumulator would respond to the total accumulated credits of one mark and fifty-five pfennig to open the switch between the electronic coin tester 3 and the junction 52; and the opening of that switch would keep a ten pfennig coin from being accepted, as by keeping the electronic coin tester 3 from responding to such a coin to set the bi-stable element 58. This is desirable; because the acceptance of a ten pfennig coin would make the total value of the inserted coins greater than the sales price-with consequent loss to the patron.

If a five pfennig, rather than a ten fennig, coin were introduced through the coin entrance l, the electronic coin tester 4 would again set the bi-stable element 54, and the coil 9 would again coact with that bi-stable element and the and gate 18 to apply a five pfennig creditaccumulating signal to the credit accmulator 21. That credit accumulator would then respond to the total credits of one mark and sixty pfennig to apply a signal to the merchandise-dispensing machine via the conductor 22.

If a ten pfennig coin had been inserted instead of the first five pfennig coin, that ten pfennig coin would have caused the electronic coin tester 3 to set the bi-stable element 59, and the coil 9 would have coacted with that bi-stable element and the and gate 17' to apply a ten pfennig credit-accumulating signal to the credit accumulator 21. That credit accumulator would then have responded to the total credits of one mark and sixty lid pfennig to apply a signal to the merchandise-dispensing machine via the conductor 22.

The drawing and accompanying description have shown and described a coin-handling device which can test, and accumulate the values of, coins of four dilierent denominations; but that coin-handling device can be made so it can test, and accumulate the values oi, coins of fewer or greater numbers of denominations. Also, if desired, a change-dispensing system could be associated with the credit accumulator 21 to permit change to be dispensed in the event the total value of the inserted coins exceeded the sales price. In such event, the switches between the electronic coin testing devices 3, 4-, 5 and 6 and the junetions 52, 56, 6d and 65, respectively, would be unnecessary.

Because the electronic coin testers 3, 4, 5 and 6 are capable of distinguishing between coins of generally similar diameters, because those electronic coin testers cause signals to be applied to and gates, and because the coil 9 also applies signals to those and gates, to cause them to supply credit-accumulating signals, the coin-handling device of the present invention does not need a separate coin-actuated switch for each denomination of coin. Further, that coin-handling device does not need a separate testing passageway for each coin of different denomination. Moreover, that coin-handling device needs just the one coin-directing element 8.

If a patron were to attach a thread or thin wire to a onernark coin, he might be able to intercept and hold that coin after that coin had passed through the coil 25 and had caused the electronic coin testing device 5 to set the bi-stable element 53 but before that coin had reached the coin directing element 8. That bi-st able element would apply a signal to, and would continue to maintain that signal at, the upper input terminal of the and gate 19. if that patron then inserted a lesser-value coin, in the expectation that the consequent signal from the coil 9 would cause the and gate to apply a one-mark creditaccumulating signal to the credit accumulator 21, that patron would be disappointed. Specifically, as the elecronic coin tester for that lesser value coin sets its corresponding bi-stable element, that electronic coin tester would simultaneously re-set the bi-stable element 58 and the other two bistable elements. The re-setting of the bistable element 58 would remove the signal at the upper input terminal of the and" gate 19; and the subsequent application to the lower input terminal of that and gate of the signal from the coil 9 could not cause that and gate to apply a credit-accumulating signal to the credit accurnlator 21. As a result, the patron would receive credit for the insertion of the lesser-value coin and nothing more.

The action of each electronic coin tester 3, 4, 5 or 6 in re-setting all of the other bi-stable elements at the same time it sets its corresponding bi-stable element makes certain that only one bi-stable element is set at any given time. Consequently, if a patron tries to develop a signal at the upper input terminal of any of the and gates 17, 18, 19 and 26 with a tethered coin, and then tries to use a second coin to obtain credits exceeding the value of that second coin, that patron will be disappointed.

Whereas the drawing and accompanying description have shown and described a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes can be made in the form of the invention without affecting the scope thereof.

What we claim is:

1. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that is disposed adjacent a path for coins and that is actuated by an authentic coin of a predetermined denomination in said path, a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path and that is actuated by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path, said coin tester and said coin-responsive element being spaced apart along said path so an authentic coin of said predetermined denomination in said path will initially actuate said coin tester but is kept from actuating said coin-responsive element, and a control device that requires two signals to actuate it, said coin tester responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause one of said signals to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive element responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause the other of said signals to be applied to said control device, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is permitted to actuate said coin tester but is kept from actuating said coin-responsive element, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin tester and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin tester, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin-responsive element and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin-responsive element unless said coin is caused to actuate said coin tester before each actuation of said coin-responsive element, the spacing apart of said coin tester and said coin-responsive element along said path making it difficult to move a coin of said predetermined denomination back and forth through a sufiicient distance in said path to cause said coin to actuate both said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and thereby eifect actuation of said control device.

2. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that has a sensor disposed adjacent a path for coins, a second coin tester that has a second sensor disposed adjacent said path for coins, the first said sensor and said second sensor being spaced apart aiong said path, a control device, and a second control device, the first said coin tester responding to a coin of a predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to the first said control device, said second coin tester responding to a coin of a second predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to said second control device, the first said coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of said second predetermined denomination, said second coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of the first said predetermined denomination, the spacing apart of said sensors of said coin testers along said path substantially completely preventing interaction between said sensors.

3. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that is disposed adjacent a path for coins and that is actuated by an authentic coin of a predetermined denomination in said path, a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path and that is actuated by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path, said coin tester and said coin-responsive element being spaced apart along said path so an authentic coin of said predetermined denomination in said path will initially actuate said coin tester and will thereafter actuate said coin-responsive element, and a control device that requires two signals to actuate it, said coin tester responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause one of said si nals to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive elem .t responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause the other of said signals to be applied to said control device, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is permitted to actuate said coin tester out is kept from actuating said coin-responsive element, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin tester and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin tester, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin-responsive element and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin-responsive element unless said coin is caused to actuate said coin tester before each actuation of said coinresponsive element, the spacing apart of said coin tester and said coin-responsive element along said path making it difficult to move a coin of said predetermined denomination back and forth through a sufficient distance in said path to cause said coin to actuate both said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and thereby effect actuation of said control device, and a member interposed between said coin tester and said coin-responsive element to resist movement of a coin of said predetermined denomination from a position adjacent said coin-responsive element to a position adjacent said coin tester.

4. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that is disposed adjacent a path for coins and that is actuated by an authentic coin of a predetermined denomination in said path, a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path and that is actuated by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path, said coin tester and said coin-responsive element being spaced apart along said path so an authentic coin of said predetermined denomination in said path will initially actuate said coin tester and will thereafter actuate said coin-responsive element, and a control device that requires two signals to actuate it, said coin tester responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause one of said signals to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive element responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause the other of said signals to be applied to said control device, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is permitted to actuate said coin tester but is kept from actuating said coin-responsive element, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin tester and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin tester, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin-responsive element and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin-responsive element unless said coin is caused to actuate said coin tester before each actuation of said coin-responsive element, the spacing apart of said coin tester and said coin-responsive element along said path making it diihcult to move a coin of said predetermined denomination back and forth through a suflicient distance in said path to cause said coin to actuate both said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and thereby etiect actuation of said coin device, and a member interposed between said coin tester and said coin-responsive element to resist movement of a coin of said predetermined denomination back and forth in said path adjacent said coin-responsive element.

5. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that is disposed adjacent a path for coins and that is actuated by an authentic coin of a predetermined denomination in said path, a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path and that is actuated by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path, said coin tester and said coin-responsive element being spaced apart along said path so an authentic coin of said predetermined denomination in said path will initially actuate said coin tester and will thereafter actuate said coin-responsive element, and a control device that requires two signals to actuate it, said coin tester responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause one of said signals to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive element responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause the other of said signals to be applied to said control device, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is permitted to actuate said coin tester but is kept from actuating said coin-responsive element, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin tester and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin tester, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin-responsive element and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin-responsive element unless said coin is caused to actuate said coin tester before each actuation of said coin-responsive element, the spacing apart of said coin tester and said coin-responsive element along said path making it difficult to move a coin of said predetermined denomination back and forth through a sufficient distance in said path to cause said coin to actuate both said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and thereby effect actuation of said control device, said coin-responsive element being spaced so far from said coin tester that a coin of said predetermined denomination must move wholly beyond said coin tester before it can move into position adjacent said coin-responsive element.

6. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that is disposed adjacent a path for coins and that is actuated by an authentic coin of a predetermined denomination in said path, a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path and that is actuated by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path, said coin tester and said coin-responsive element being spaced apart along said path so an authentic coin of said predetermined denomination in said path will initially actuate said coin tester and will thereafter actuate said coinresponsive element, and a control device that requires two signals to actuate it, said coin tester responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause one of said signals to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive element responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause the other of said signals to be applied to said control device, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is permitted to actuate said coin tester but is kept from actuating said coinresponsive element, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin tester and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin tester, said control device remaining unactuated if a co n of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin-responsive element and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin-responsive element unless said coin is caused to actuate said coin tester before each actuation of said coin-responsive element, the spacing apart of said coin tester and said coin-responsive element along said path making t d fficult to move a coin of said predetermined denomination back and forth through a sufiicient distance in said path to cause said coin to actuate both said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and thereby effect actuation of ,said control device, a rejected coin passageway that communicates with said path intermediate said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and a coin-directing element that is disposed adjacent the point of communication of said rejected coin passageway with said path, said coin-directing element normally being disposed to direct coins toward said rejected coin passageway and thereby keep said coins from actuating said com-responsive element, said coin-directing element responding to actuation of said coin tester to move out of its normal position and thereby permit a coin that has actuated said coin tester to pass to said coin-responsive element to actuate said coin-responsive element, said coin-directing element thereafter responding to actuation of said coinresponsive element to return to its normal position.

7. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that is disposed adjacent a path for coins and that is actuated by an authentic coin of a predetermined denomination in said path, a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path and that is actuated by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path, said coin tester and said coin-responsive element being spaced apart along said path so an authentic coin of said predetermined denomination in said path will initially actuate said coin tester and will thereafter actuate said coin-responsive element, and a control device that requires two signals to actuate it, said coin tester responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause one of said signals to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive element responding to the actuation thereof by a coin of said predetermined denomination in said path to cause the other of said signals to be applied to said control device, said control de- Vice remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is permitted to actuate said coin tester but is kept from actuating said coinresponsive element, said control device remaining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin tester and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin tester, said control device re maining unactuated if a coin of said predetermined denomination is held adjacent said coin-responsive element and is moved back and forth through said path to repeatedly actuate said coin-responsive element unless said coin is caused to actuate said coin tester before each actuation of said coin-responsive element, the spacing apart of said coin tester and said coin-responsive element along said path making it difficult to move a coin of said predetermined denomination back and forth through a suificient distance in said path to cause said coin to actuate both said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and thereby effect actuation of said control device, a rejected coin passageway that communicates with said path intermediate said coin tester and said coin-responsive element, and a coin-directing element that is disposed adjacent the point of communication of said rejected coin passageway with said path, said coin-directing element normally being disposed to direct coins toward said rejected coin passageway and thereby keep said coins from actuating said coinresponsive element, said coin-directing element responding to actuation of said coin tester to move out of its normal position and thereby permit a coin that has actuated said coin tester to pass to said coin-responsive element to actuate said coin-responsive element.

8. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that has a sensor disposed adjacent a path for coins, a second coin tester that has a second sensor disposed adjacent said path for coins, the first said sensor and said second sensor being spaced apart along said path, a control device, and a second control device, the first said coin tester responding to a coin of a predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to the first said control device, said second coin tester responding to a coin of a second predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to said. second control device, the first said coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of said second predetermined denomination, said second coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of the first said predetermined denomination, the spacing apart of said sensors of said coin testers along said path substantially completely preventing interaction between said sensors, and a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path, the first said control device requiring a second signal in addiic-n to said signal which the first said coin tester causes to be applied to said control device, said second control device requiring a second signal in addiion to said signal which said second coin tester causes to be applied to said control device, and said coin'responsive element responding to a coin of either of said predetermined denominations to supply said second signals to said control devices.

9. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that has a sensor disposed adjacent a path for coins, a second coin tester that has a second sensor disposed adjacent said path for coins, the first said sensor and said second sensor being spaced apart along said path, a control device, and a second control device, the first said coin tester responding to a coin of a predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be supplied to the first said control device, said second coin tester responding to a coin of a second predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to said second control device, the first said coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of said second predetermined denomination, said second coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of the first said predetermined denomination, the spacing apart of said sensors of said coin testers along said path substantially completely preventing interaction between said sensors, and a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path, the first said control device requiring a second signal in addition to said signal which the first said coin tester causes to be applied to said control device, said second control device requiring a second signal in addition to said signal which said second coin tester causes to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive element responding to a coin of either of said predetermined denominations to supply said second signals to said control devices, said coinresponsive element being spaced from said sensors of said coin testers so a coin of either of said predetermined denominations will successively move past the first said sensor, said second sensor, and said coin-responsive element.

10. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that has a sensor disposed adjacent a path for coins, a second coin tester that has a second sensor disposed adjacent said path for coins, the first said sensor and said second sensor being spaced apart along said path, a control device, and a second control device, the first said coin tester responding to a coin of a predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to the first said control device, said second coin tester responding to a coin of a second predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be supplied to said second control device, the first said coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of said second predetermined denomination, said second coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of the first said predetermined denomination, the spacing apart of said sensors of said coin testers along said path substantially completely preventing interaction between said sensors, and a coin-sizing gauge that is disposed adjacent said path ahead of said sensors, whereby a coin of either of said predetermined denominations will successively move past said coin-sizing gauge, the first said sensor and said second sensor.

11. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that has a sensor disposed adjacent a path for coins, a second coin tester that has a second sensor disposed adjacent said path for coins, the first said sensor and said second sensor being spaced apart along said path, a control device, and a second control device, the first said coin tester responding to a coin of a predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to the first said control device, said second coin tester responding to a coin of a second predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to said second control device, the first said coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of said second predetermined denomination, said second coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of the first said predetermined denomination, the spacing apart of said sensors of said coin testers along said path substantially completely preventing interaction between said sensors, and a coin-responsive element that is disposed adjacent said path, the first said control device requiring a second signal in addition to said signal which the first said coin tester causes to be applied to said control device, said second control device requiring a second signal in addition to said signal which said second coin tester causes to be applied to said control device, said coin-responsive element responding to a coin of either of said predetermined denominations to supply said second signals to said control devices, said signal which the first said coin tester causes to be applied to the first said control device normally being maintained until said coin-responsive element responds to a coin of the first said predetermined denomination to supply said second signal to the first said control device, but being removed when said coin-responsive element responds to a coin of the first said predetermined denomination to supply said second signal to the first said control device, said signal which said second coin tester causes to be applied to said second control device normally being maintained until said coin-responsive element responds to a coin of said second predetermined denomination to supply said second signal to said second control device but being removed when said coin-responsive element responds to a coin of said second predetermined denomination to supply said second signal to said second control device.

12. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that has a sensor disposed adjacent a path for coins, a second coin tester that has a second sensor disposed adjacent said path for coins, the first said sensor and said second sensor being spaced apart along said path, a control device, and a second control device, the first said coin tester responding to a coin of a predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to the first said control device, said second coin tester responding to a coin of a second predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to said second control device, the first said coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of said second predetermined denomination, said second coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of the first said predetermined denomination, the spacing apart of said sensors of said coin testers along said path substantially completely preventing interaction between said sensors, said signal which the first said coin tester causes to be applied to the first said control device being a continuing signal, said signal which said second coin tester causes to be applied to said second control device being a continuing signal, the first said coin tester responding to said actuation thereof to remove any signal which said second coin tester caused to be applied to said second control device, and said second coin tester responding to said actuation thereof to remove any signal which the first said coin tester causes to be applied to the first said control device.

13. A coin-handling device that comprises: a coin tester that has a sensor disposed adjacent a path for coins, a second coin tester that has a second sensor disposed adjacent said path for coins, the first said sensor and said second sensor being spaced apart along said path, a control device, and a second control device, the first said coin tester responding to a coin of a predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to the first said control device, said second coin tester responding to a coin of a second predetermined denomination in said path to become actuated and thereby cause a signal to be applied to said second control device, the first said coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of said second predetermined denomination, said second coin tester being substantially insensitive to coins of the first said predetermined denomination, the spacing apart of said sensors of said coin testers along said path substantially completely preventing interaction between said sensors, and a credit accumulator that receives credit-accumulating signals from said control devices, said credit accumulator having a sales price set therein, said credit accumulator acting whenever the credits accumulated thereby differ from said sales price by a value less than the value of a coin of said second predetermined denomination to disconnect said second coin tester from said second control device, whereby the total value of inserted coins cannot exceed said sales price.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Kitsee.

Chester.

Bottome.

Mullen et a1.

Munz et a1.

Timms 10 WALTER SOBIN, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3498437 *May 1, 1968Mar 3, 1970Omron Tateisi Electronics CoCoin detecting system
US3506103 *Jun 11, 1968Apr 14, 1970Alexander KuckensCoin tester using electromagnetic resonant frequency
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US5988349 *May 22, 1992Nov 23, 1999Imonex Services, Inc.Apparatus and method for separating and rejecting coins
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Classifications
U.S. Classification194/319
International ClassificationG07F5/22, G07F5/20, G07D5/08, G07D11/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00, G07F5/22, G07F5/20
European ClassificationG07D5/00, G07F5/20, G07F5/22