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Publication numberUS3379018 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1968
Filing dateMay 14, 1965
Priority dateMay 14, 1965
Publication numberUS 3379018 A, US 3379018A, US-A-3379018, US3379018 A, US3379018A
InventorsFrentzel Herman C, Wenninger Robert E
Original AssigneeWenninger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoring structure
US 3379018 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,379,018 SHORING STRUCTURE Herman C. Freutzel, Milwaukee, Wis., and Robert E. Wenninger, 3810 Lakeside Road, Pewaukee, Wis. 53072; said Frentzel assiguor to said Wenniuger Filed May 14, 1965, Ser. No. 455,731 4 Claims. (CI. 61-41) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Disclosed herein is a shoring structure having a pair of lightweight plank members interconnected by expandable cross braces which are pivotally and removably connected to the plank members.

This invention relates to shoring or sheathing devices and particularly to an improvement in the cross braces for devices of this type which make them more readily adaptable to different width trenches.

There has been a recent trend toward the development of metal sheathing or shoring devices for use by contractors in holding up trench walls while laying pipe lines or the like. Under the present system of shoring a trench, wooden planks are used which are wedged into the trench by means of cross braces. These planks and braces must meet certain building code requirements and because of their limited life have to be replaced quite often. This means that a contractor must maintain a substantial number of planks and braces on hand at all times. Contractors also encounter a problem depending on the types of soil condition and the width of the trench in that the braces are generally usable only a minimum number of times and new braces must be cut each time a different type of trench is to be dug.

One of the principal objects of the present invention is to provide a universal type sheathing structure which is readily adjustable to a number of Width sizes. In developing a sheathing structure to meet the requirements it was determined that a rigid structure would be difiicult to handle and would be impossible to store or transport.

Another object of the present invention therefore is to provide an adjustable type sheathing structure which is easy to handle by one man.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved adjustable type sheathing structure which is light in weight so that it can be easily handled by a single man.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved sheathing and shoring device which can be adjusted by hand.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved sheathing structure which can be quickly and easily assembled and disassembled by the removal of the cross braces from the sheathing members.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved adjustable and collapsible type sheathing structure which has a long life whereby a contractor can maintain a limited number of the structures for any type trench.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide an improved adjustable and collapsible type sheathing or shoring structure which can be quickly and easily placed in the trench and removed during back filling.

These objects are accomplished by connecting a pair of light weight reinforced metal panels in a substantially parallel relation by means of adjustable type braces so that the distance between the panels can be readily varied to accommodate different width trenches. Each of the panels is formed from two identical type extrusions which are interlocked and secured together by a metal adhesive to form a rigid structure. The adjustable cross braces are provided with biased connectors at each end which can be readily snapped into connecting apertures on the side walls of sheath members. Each of the connectors is rigidly secured to one end of a threaded rod which is threaded into a tubular housing having reverse threaded nuts on each end. The tubular housing is of suflicient length and diameter to allow the user to grasp it with both hands to adjust the width between the panels without the necessity of using any adjustment tool. The use of a hollow tubular member which could be conveniently grasped with two bands was found to be particularly advantageous since it eliminates the necessity of providing an extra tool for making this adjustment.

Other objects and advantages will become more readily apparent from the following detailed description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view of the sheathing structure showing the two plank members in an operative position and one member (dotted) collapsed against the other member for handling.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of one end of the cross brace turned FIG. 2A is a sectional view of the other end of the cross brace.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 1 showing the interfitting arrangement of the extruded members.

Referring more particularly to the drawings and specifically to FIG. 1, the improved shoring structure includes a pair of light metal panels 10 preferably made of aluminum. The panels are interconnected by adjustable cross braces 14 which hold the planks in substantially a parallel relation. The distance between the panels can then be varied within the limits of the adjustments of the cross braces. The connecting brackets 12 on each end of the cross braces are designed to allow for pivotal motion of the cross brace on the panel. This arrangement makes it possible to collapse one of the panels against the other (as seen in phantom in FIG. 1) for easier carrying of the sheathing structure. When the panels are collapsed, the sheathing structure can be dropped into the trench until one panel rests on the bottom. The other panel is then allowed to drop down until the cross braces are pivoted to a horizontal position.

Each of the panels is formed from two identical extrusions 16 and 18 (FIG. 3). Each of the extrusions is provided with a flange 20 on one side wall and a groove 22 on the other side wall. As seen in FIG. 3, the sections are identical and on reversing one of them, they can be interengaged and can be welded, snapped or secured together by a metal adhesive to form a rigid panel. A rib 19 is provided within the extrusion to give it greater strength. A number of apertures 15 are provided in each of the end walls 17 of the panels for engagement by the connecting brackets on the cross braces. The panels can be made to any size with a six inch by two inch panel considered the most appropriate for this type of structure. The side walls and end walls are all flat and when disassembled from the cross braces can be easily stacked for storage and transportation.

The cross braces each include a pair of threaded rods 26 with a tubular guide member 28 rigidly secured to one end of each of the threaded rods. The tubular guide member is seated against L-shaped angle iron 30 and is held against the angle iron by two tarcuate metal strips 32 which are welded at 34 to the angle iron. The threaded rod 26 is positioned between the strips and can be moved through 90 with the tubular guide member being free to rotate on the angle iron.

Connecting plates 36 are secured to the ends of the angle iron which has a length slightly longer than the width of the plank. Each of the plates extend along the sides of the plank and have an aperture 38 which will be aligned with the apertures 15 in the panels. A second aperture 40 is providedin the connecting plate to support one leg 42 of U-shaped rod 44. The other leg 46 is positioned for movement into and out of aperture 38. A compression spring 48 is mounted on each of the legs 42 and is retained on the leg of the rod by washer 50. Leg 42 of the rod is positioned to move within the tubular guide member and can be pulled outward to clear leg 46 from the connecting plate. It should be apparent that the cross braces are connected to the panels by merely placing the angle iron against one surface of the plank and aligning apertures 38 with aperture 15. The U-shaped rods are then released, allowing leg 42 of the rod to enter apertures 38'and 15, looking the cross brace to the panel.

The other end of the threaded rods is screwed into hexagonal nuts 41 secured on the ends of tubular housing 43. A ring 52 is secured to the threaded rod 26 a short distance from the rod, approximately one inch, to prevent the rod from being extended too far out of the tubular housing. If extended too far, it would Weaken the cross brace.

The tubular housing is made of sufficient length to allow the user to grip it with both hands. It should be obvious that this will enable the user to exert considerable turning force for screwing the threaded rods into and out of the tubular housing. The diameter of the housing should be kept to a size which can be tightly gripped by the user. If it is considered necessary to be able to apply a much larger turning force to the tube, a radially extending bar can be secured to the tube or a Wrench used to tighten or loosen the nuts on the tubular housing.

When the shoring or sheathing device is completely assembled, it can be collapsed by merely moving one panel into engagement with the other. The guide tubes will rotate within the arcuate strips as the rods are moved through the space between the strips. Since the angle irons are not slotted, the connecting brackets must be connected to the panels in reverse order as shown in FIG. 1; that is, the angle irons must be turned to allow the threaded rods to rotate. If desired, the angle iron can also be slotted to allow for 180 of motion of the threaded rods.

After the shoring structure has been removed from the trench, the cross braces can be easily removed by pulling the rods 44 out of the apertures 38 and 15. Once the braces have been removed, the panels can be stacked in the same manner as any other board or plank. All of the panels are made exactly alike so that they are completely interchangeable.

The removable type cross braces as disclosed herein also provide the further advantage of being removeable while the shoring device is still in the trench. During back filling of the trench, the dirt or aggregate is filled in up to the lower brace which is then removed from the shoring structure allowing the trench to be filled up to the next brace. The planks are completely smooth on both sides so that they can be easily pulled from the trench. If the plank is generally wedged into the back fill, making it difiicult to remove from the trench, a handle can be mounted on the top of the plank to aid in pulling it out. Another aid would be to provide a hole in the plank of approximately 1 /2 inches in diameter a few inches down from the top of the plank which could be engaged by a hook or rod to pull the plank out of the trench.

Although only one embodiment of the present invention has been shown and described, it should be apparent that various changes and modifications can be made herein without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A sheathing structure for open trenches, comprising:

a pair of light weight elongate metal plank members having flat surfaces and substantially normally extending side walls,

expandable cross brace means for interconnecting the plank members, said cross brace means including a pair of threaded rods and a tubular member having hexagonal nuts secured to each end, said rods being threaded for simultaneous movement into the tubular member on rotation of the tubular member in one direction and out of the tubular member on rotation in the other direction,

stop means on each rod limiting the distance the rods can be extended out of the tubular housing, and

removable connecting means secured to the other ends of said cross brace means for connecting the cross brace means to the side walls of the planks, said connecting means includes a bracket secured to the ends of the cross brace members and having a length substantially equal to the width of the plank, a pair of curved rods mounted for reciprocal motion on the bracket with one end of the rods being movable into engagement with the side wall of the plank members to secure the cross braces to the plank members, whereby the planks and cross brace means can be easily assembled and disassembled.

2. A sheathing structure for open trenches comprising:

a pair of light Weight elongate metal plank members having fiat surfaces and substantially normally extending side walls,

expandable cross brace means for interconnecting the plank members, each of said means including a pair of threaded rods and a tubular member having nuts secured to each end, said rods being threaded for simultaneous movement into the tubular member on rotation of the tubular member in one direction and out of the tubular member on rotation of the tubular member in the other direction, and removable connecting means secured to the ends of said cross brace means for connecting the cross brace means to the side walls of the planks,

said connecting means includes a tubular member secured to the outer end of each of said threaded rods,

an angle iron having a length substantially equal to the width of the plank,

arcuate members holding the tubular member on the angle iron with the tubular member being rotatable on the angle iron,

end plates secured to the ends of the angle iron in position to overlap the sides of the plank,

U-shaped connecting rods mounted in said end plates with one leg extending into said tubular member and the other leg positioned for movement into engagement with the sides of the planks, and

spring means for biasing the connecting rods to the engaging position, whereby the planks and cross brace means can be easily assembled and disassembled.

3. A sheathing structure for open trenches, comprising:

a pair of light weight elongate metal plank members having flat surfaces and substantially normally extending side walls,

expandable cross brace means for interconnecting the plank members, and

removable connecting means secured to the ends of said cross brace means for connecting the cross brace means to the side walls of the planks, said connecting means includes a bracket secured to the ends of the cross brace members and having a length substantially equal to the width of the plank,

a curved rod having one end mounted for reciprocal motion on each end of the bracket with the other end of each rod being movable into engagement with the side wall of the plank members to secure the cross braces to the plank members.

5 6 4. A sheathing structure according to claim 3 wherein 3,029,607 4/ 1962 Millerbernd 6141 said bracket includes a tubular member pivotally mounted 3,224,201 12/ 1965 Brunton 61-41 on the bracket and rigidly secured to the cross brace 3,241,205 3/1966 Genin 24230 member whereby said plank members can be collapsed 3,281,164 10/1966 Reaser 24230 toward each other. 5

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,165,506 3/1964 Germany.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 536,347 5/1941 Great Britain. 587,274 7/1897 'Rue 61-39 X 135,989 2/1930 Switzerland. 755,044 3/1904 Rafield 24263 x 10 804,696 11/ 1905 Winterhoif 61-39 X JACOB SHAPIRO, Primaly Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US587274 *Jan 22, 1897Jul 27, 1897 Ditching-jack
US755044 *Dec 15, 1903Mar 22, 1904Myers S RafieldBox-pull.
US804696 *Nov 4, 1904Nov 14, 1905Friedrich Wilhelm WinterhoffApparatus for forming stays and for connecting struts.
US3029607 *May 1, 1959Apr 17, 1962Millerbernd Paul ADevice for preventing cave-ins
US3224201 *Aug 11, 1960Dec 21, 1965Speed Shore CorpShoring apparatus
US3241205 *Dec 17, 1962Mar 22, 1966Joseph Genin Marcel EmileLocking device for safety belt
US3281164 *Nov 2, 1964Oct 25, 1966Reaser Charles FTrailer hitch
CH135989A * Title not available
DE1165506B *Feb 14, 1959Mar 12, 1964Johann BodensteinVorrichtung zum Aussteifen der Waende von Baugraeben, Rohrgraeben u. dgl.
GB536347A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4536926 *Jan 4, 1983Aug 27, 1985Victor PantaleoSki clip holding device
US5544396 *Oct 17, 1994Aug 13, 1996Mekyska; ErichHolder for securing objects
US6821057Apr 5, 2000Nov 23, 2004Maksim KadiuMagnetic shoring device
US7048471Apr 15, 2003May 23, 2006Maksim KadiuShoring device
US7056067Oct 3, 2003Jun 6, 2006Max KadiuTrench shoring device
US7309191Mar 2, 2004Dec 18, 2007Max KadiuShoring system
US20030159956 *Feb 26, 2002Aug 28, 2003Woos Michael T.Display backing card
US20040005197 *Apr 15, 2003Jan 8, 2004Maksim KadiuShoring device
US20040170478 *Mar 2, 2004Sep 2, 2004Max KadiuShoring system
US20050074300 *Oct 3, 2003Apr 7, 2005Max KadiuTrench shoring device
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/282, 24/685, 24/523
International ClassificationE02D17/08, E02D17/06
Cooperative ClassificationE02D17/08, E02D17/083
European ClassificationE02D17/08, E02D17/08B