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Publication numberUS3379198 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1968
Filing dateJun 9, 1965
Priority dateJun 9, 1965
Publication numberUS 3379198 A, US 3379198A, US-A-3379198, US3379198 A, US3379198A
InventorsKallianos Andrew G, Mold James D
Original AssigneeLiggett & Myers Tobacco Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coherent tobacco strip and the process for preparing the same
US 3379198 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,379,198 COHERENT TOBACCO STRIP AND THE PROCESS FOR PREPARING THE SAME James D. Mold and Andrew G. Kallianos, Durham, N.C., assignors to Liggett 8: Myers Tobacco Co., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New Jersey No Drawing. Filed June 9, 1965, Ser. No. 471,493

18 Claims. (Cl. 131140) This invention relates to improved coherent tobacco strip for incorporation in smoking tobacco articles. More particularly, this invention relates to the treatment of the components of coherent tobacco strip for the purpose of increasing the strength of the sheet and/or effecting a reduction in the irritation factors involved in the smoking of tobacco articles containing this product.

Coherent tobacco strip hereinafter called (CTS) is typically composed of tobacco fines, ground stems or other fibrous materials, and humectants which are bound with an adhesive material into a continuous sheet which can then be cut and blended with natural leaf tobaccos for the manufacture of cigarettes. Processes for the preparation of CTS are disclosed in US. Patents 2,708,175 issued May 10, 1955; 2,845,933 issued Aug. 5, 1958; and Re. 24,424 issued Feb. 4, 1958, all of which patents are assigned to Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.

Cigarettes manufactured solely from CTS possess smok ing qualities which are judged undesirable both in terms of taste and irritation factors when compared to cigarettes manufactured from natural leaf tobacco. Such irritation is primarily noted in the mouth, nose and throat. These undesirable characteristics of CTS limit the extent of its use in commercial cigarettes. Reduction of the irritation would produce a bland product which could then be incorporated into the cigarette blend as such to produce a smoke of milder characteristics or which could be appropriately flavored prior to blending with the natural leaf tobacco. Moreover, the processing of CT S for incorporation into smoking tobacco articles involves considerable mechanical handling of these materials with the resultant problem of fragmentation which is undesirable for the economic manufacture of cigarettes. Strenghtening of the CTS would help reduce the fragmentation of the strip and thereby alleviate some of the problems involved in handling these materials.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a process for improving the smoking qualities of CTS by decreasing the irritation effects in the smoke.

It is another object of this invention to provide a process for producing CTS which has improved physical properties resulting in an increased flexibility strength and tensile strength so that it will fragment less during the customary handling associated with the manufacture of smoking tobacco articles.

It is a further object of this invention to provide CTS compositions which have reduced irritation effects when said compositions are incorporated in smoking articles.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide CTS compositions of increased flexibility and tensile strengths.

These and other objects will be apparent from the detailed description which follows.

In accordance with this invention, there is provided a process for the preparation of an improved CTS which comprises thoroughly mixing a quantity of tobacco fines, ground stems or other fibrous materials, at least one humectant, and an adhesive substance with a sufficient quantity of water, heating said mixture in a reactor under steam pressures of up to 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of time up to 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding 225 F. in the ground tobacco and recovering the treated CTS.

When the CTS components are subjected to this treatment and then manufactured into a sheet, the resultant product possesses improved physical properties resulting in increased flexibility strength and tensile strength and, upon smoking in the form of a suitable tobacco article, produces a sensation judged to be more desirable in terms of taste and lower irritation factors than is the case for CTS produced by conventional procedures. It is an essential feature of this invention that the adhesive substance be incorporated in the mixture of ingredients prior to the autoclaving treatment in order to realize the benefits from increased flexibility strength and tensile strength, although this is not a necessary feature with regard to the benefits in reduced irritation of the smoke.

The humectants which may be employed in this invention are any of the conventional humectants such as glycerin, propylene glycol, etc. Guar gum is the adhesive material which is preferred for use in the processes and compositions of this invention.

Broadly speaking, parts of the damp CTS compositions of this invention will comprise about 45 to 60 parts of tobacco fines and ground stems or other fibrous materials, preferably about 50 to 55 parts by weight; about 1 to 8 parts by weight of hurnectant, preferably about 2 to 5 parts by weight, and about 1 to 10 parts by weight adhesive material, preferably about 2 to 8 parts by weight with the balance of said composition being water.

In carrying out the process of this invention, the CTS ingredients are thoroughly mixed and placed in a suitable reactor such as an autoclave which is kept under steam pressure of from about 8 to about 20 pounds p.s.i., with the preferred pressure being about 16 p.s.i.g. The CTS is autoclaved for about 10 to 20 minutes and the temperature at the center of the tobacco mass in the autoclave is controlled such that it is maintained in the range of about to 225 F.

Generally in the manufacture of CTS, about 9 parts of water is used for every 10 parts of tobacco fines employed in the mix. In carrying out the process of this invention, it may be desirable in some instances to use less than the normal amount of water in the mix in order to compensate for the extra water which may condense in the mix during the autoclaving. The diminution in the amount of water charged to the autoclave is dependent on the nature of the vessel, time of treatment, temperature, pressure etc., as will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the detailed examples set forth below.

We have found that if the adhesive is added to the other CTS components prior to autoclaving the components, the CTS sheets have increased flexibility strength and tensile strength, as well as improved smoking characteristics. If the adhesive is added either after the autoclaving step or left out of the composition entirely, the CTS exhibits improved smoking characteristics, i.e., a reduction in the irritation in the smoke, but does not possess the improved flexibility and tensile strength.

It will be appreciated that the optimum conditions of treatment for maximum benefits in improved taste and reduced irritation of the smoke of the product are not necessarily coincidental with those resulting in maximum sheet strength, Generally speaking, the maximum conditions of treatment, i.e. higher temperatures, times, pressures, etc. maximize the increase in the sheet strength but do not appreciably effect a reduction in irritation of the smoke. The minimum conditions of treatment, i.e. lower pressures, times, temperatures, etc. maximize the improvement in the reduction in irritation of the smoke but do not appreciably improve the sheet strength. The conditions of treatment are chosen with a view to the specific composition desired keeping in mind the smoking composition into which the CTS is ultimately to be incorporated.

For a more detailed description of the invention, reference should now be had to the following examples.

Example 1 A sample consisting of 726 grams of powdered tobacco and stem materials, 83.2 grams of guar gum, 64 grams of alpha cellulose, 48 ml. of humectant glycols, and 350 ml. of water was prepared. All of the components were mixed thoroughly. The resulting moist mix was placed in a 3-liter flask and treated in an autoclave for 20 minutes at a gauge reading 16 p.s.i. of steam pressure. It was determined that under these conditions the maximum temperature attained at the center of the tobacco mass was 205 F and at the surface, 225 F. After cooling, the material was admixed with an additional 125 ml. of water and manufactured into CTS by a process previously described. After appropriate moisture equilibration, the sheet was cut and manufactured into cigarettes without admixture of any out tobacco. These were evaluated rganoleptically. It was noted that the cigarettes smoked bland, and had lost much of the undesirable harshness, such as mouth coating and nose and throat irritation, normally found for cigarettes made from untreated CTS. The smoke from the treated product had a milder, sweeter taste.

Example 2 A mixture composed of 1820 grams of powdered tobacco and stem materials was admixed with 1000 ml. of water, placed in two 3-liter flasks and treated with steam under pressure under similar conditions to those noted for Example 1. After cooling, the mixture was mixed with 207.5 grams of guar gum, 160 grams of alpha cellulose, 145 ml. of humectant glycols, and an additional 500 ml. of water. The resultant wet mix was rolled into a coherent sheet by the previously described process and dried quickly to conditions for cutting and cigarette manufacture. Sample cigarettes prepared with the treated prod uct were evaluated organoleptically and were judged to smoke milder with less throat and nose irritation than the regular CTS sample. The smoke though possessing typical CTS taste, was more fully balanced than normal CTS.

Example 3 A 7.5 pound sample of regular, production wet CTS mix, similar to that described in Example 1, and containing all of the ingredients required for the manufacture of a coherent sheet with the exception that only 80-90% of the normal water content was present, was obtained directly from the factory CTS production line. This mixture was placed in a glass battery jar 8 inches in diameter Example 4 A mixture composed of 1820 grams of powdered tobacco and stem materials was admixed with 1000 ml. of

water and treated in a container as described in Example 3. After cooling, the product was mixed with 207.5 grams of guar gum, 160 grams of alpha cellulose, 145 ml. of humectant glycols, and an additional 500 m1. of water. The resulting wet mix was rolled into a continuous coherent sheet as previously described Cigarettes manufactured from this sample were judged to have a taste typical of untreated CTS with decreased nose and throat irritation. This sample was preferred over the untreated control but not over the sample prepared as in Example 3.

Example 5 A 7.5-pound sample of regular production wet CTS mix, similar to that described in Example 3, and containing all of the ingredients required for the manufacture of a coherent sheet, with the exception that only -90% of the normal water content was present, was obtained directly from the factory CTS production line. This mixture was placed in stainless steel trays to a depth of only 1 inch. The loaded trays were treated. in an autoclave for 20 minutes at a gauge reading of 16 p.s.i. of steam pres sure. It was determined that under these conditions the tobacco mass attained a temperature of 225 F. throughout. After cooling, the material was rolled to form a coherent sheet as previously described for the preparation of CT S. Cigarettes manufactured from this treated product were judged by organoleptic testing to possess a bitter taste with typical CTS character. This sample was rejected as less desirable than the regular production CTS.

Example 6 Samples of regular production wet CTS mix containing all of the ingredients required for the manufacture of a coherent tobacco sheet, with the exception that only 80- 90% of the normal water content was present, were placed in glass battery jars and treated in batches of 15 pounds each as described in Example 3. Sufiicient wet CTS mix was treated in this way over several days to produce about 450 pounds of finished sheet by the usual process. A portion of the sheet prepared from the treated CTS mix was blended with strip tobacco and manufactured into mm. non-filter cigarettes by standard factory operations. The level of content of the treated CTS was twice that used for comparable cigarettes prepared with CTS not treated by the method of the present invention. A sample of regular production 85 mm. non-filter cigarettes was prepared using untreated CTS at the normal level (one-half of that used above). The overall smoking qualities and acceptability for these two samples were compared by an expert smoke flavor panel. The flavor profile for the cigarette incorporating the treated CTS at twice the normal level showed a slight broadening of the smoke flavor spectrum and an apparent decrease in mouth and throat irritation factors.

These cigarettes were next presented to a consumer smoking panel for comparison. The sample cigarettes containing CTS treated by the procedure of this invention at a level twice that present in the control, production cigarette was preferred by a ratio of 1.6 to 1.0. An analysis of the individual smokers comments indicated that the majority of those who preferred the sample containing treated CTS based their preference on both improved taste and lessened irritation.

Samples of the CTS were tested for flexibility and tensile strength and the results of these tests are set forth below.

TABLE I. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CIS SAMPLES [Flexibility strength, kgmJem Thickness of test Sheet, mm 0.09 0.10 0.11 0. 12 0.13 Average Values CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as described in Example 6:

Preparation 1:

With grain 39.5 36.4 34.9 31.8 35.6 Against grain 16. 3 11. 7 3. 3 14. 5 11.; Preparation 2:

With grain 36.5 37. 7 34.2 27.8 34. 0 Against grain 0. 6 8. 7 4. 5 3. 4 Control sample C'IS sheet prepared from the same mix as used for Example 6 but not treated by the process of this invention:

With grain 30. 1 24.4 24.1 25. 5 21.1 25. 0 Against grain 0. 6 0.7 0.7 0.9 4. 8 1. 5

TABLE II [Tensile strength, kgmJcmfl] Thickness of test sheet, mm 0. 09 0.10 0. 11 0.12 0.13 Average Values CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as described in Example 6:

Preparation 1:

With grain 55. 6 52.0 35. 5 49.1 53. 3 Against grain 30. 6 35.4 36.2 39. 0 35. 3 Preparation 2:

With grain 51. 7 33. 6 45.9 41.0 42. 3 42. 9 Against grain 49. 3 30.4 30. 6 34. 3 31.0 36. 3 Control samples of CTS sheet without treatment by the process of this invention:

With grain 41. 0 37.8 36. 3 37. 2 38.9 38. 2 Against grain 26.4 24.1 22. 3 21. 7 21.2 23.1

Example 7 cigarette containing untreated CTS at the same level (two times the production level) a great preference was obtained for the product containing the treated CTS.

Samples of the treated CTS used for the above preparation were evaluated by the testing group for physical characteristics. All samples showed exceptionally high flexibility and tensile strengths. This data is set forth below.

TABLE III.PIIYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CTS SAMPLES [Flexibility strength, kgrnjcmfl] Thickness of test sheet, mm 0.09

0.10 0.11 0.13 0.14 Average Values With grain Against grain Preparation 4:

With grain Against grain Control sample CTS sheet prepared from the same mix as used for Example 7 but not treated by the process of this invention:

With grain 30. Against grain 0.

0. 14 Average Values TABLE IV [Tensile strength, kgmJcmJ} described in Example 7:

Preparation 1:

Thickness of test sheet mmIIIIIIIII- CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as 0. 14 Average Values TABLE VI [Tensile strength, kgnL/emfi] described in Example 8:

Preparation 1:

Thickness of test sheet, nmi.

CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as With grain.

Against grain Preparation 2:

With grain Against grain. Preparation 3:

With grain....

Against grain Control sample CTS sheet prepared from is same mix as used for Example 8, preparations 1 and 2, but not treated by the process of this invention:

Control sample CTS sheet prepared from the same mix as used for Example 8, preparations 3, but not treated by the process of this invention:

With grain..-

Against grain CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as described in Example 8:

Preparation 4:

With grain Against grain. Control sample CTS sl same mix as used for Example 8, preparation 4, but not treated by the process of this invention:

Against grain CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as described in Example 8:

Preparation 5:

oml 43 &2 33

With grain-.

Against grain Preparation 6:

Against grain Preparation 7:

With grain pie 8, preparations Against grain. Control sample CTS sheet same mix as used for Exam 5 and 6 ,but not treated by the process of this invention:

With grain.

Against grain.

Control sample CTS sheet prepared from the same mix as used for Example 8, preparation 7, but not treated by the process of this invention:

With grain Against grain.

iength of the CTS sheetproduced samples were compared to similar measurements for CTS sheet processed from the same 10.4 Average Values inch. The loaded trays were treated in an autoclave for Example 9 20 minutes at 16 p.s.1. of steam pressure. Under these 011 Wet CTS treatment conditions the total tobacco mass reached a temperature of 225 F. Measurements of relative flex 0 bility and tensile str from these treated mix without the treatment of this invention. These data are set forth below:

TABLE VlL-PHYSIOAL PROPERTIES OF CTS SAMPLES [Flexibility strength, kgm./em.

described in Example 9:

Preparation 1 1110):

A 5.5-pound sample of "regular product mix, similar to that described in Example 1, and con- Thickness oi test sheet, mm

CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as taining all of the ingredients required for the manufacture 5 of a coherent sheet, with the exception that 65-85% of the normal water content was present, was obtained directly from the factory CTS production line. This mixture was placed in stainless steel trays to a depth of one Against grain Preparation 2 (65% H O):

Against grain Preparation 3 I110);

Against grain Preparations I120):

With grain..

Against grain Preparation 5 E 0):

TABLE VIII [Tensile strength, kgmJemfi] Thickness of test sheet, mm 0. O9 0. 10 0.11 0.12 0.13 0. 14 Average Values CTS sheet prepared from materials treated as described in Example 9:

Preparation 1 (65% B With grain 53. 0 52. 6 49. 9 48. 3 47. 1 50. 2 Against grain 33. 1 33. 6 24. 2 29. 1 30. 4 30.1 Preparation 2 (65% Hz With grain 46. 1 43. 8 42. 3 42. 6 43. 7 Against grain 26. 0 34. 8 30. 3 29. 9 30.3 Preparation 3 (75% E20):

With grain 45. 2 52.1 49. 7 50. 9 49. 5 Against grain 34. 7 30. 7 31. 0 35.8 33. 0 Preparation 4 (80% E 0) With grain 49. 6 46. 7 46. 6 48. 4 Against grain 36.1 34. 3 34.2 34. 2 Preparation 5 (85% E) With grain 48. 7 51. 7 44.8 48. 1 47. 4 Against grain 38. 8 38. 6 34. 8 34.0 34. 6 Control sample CTS sheet prepared from the same mix used for Example 9, but not treated by the process of this invention With grain 39. 7 40. 7 39. 2 38. 4 35. 1 36. 4 38. 2 Against grain. 26. O 23. 0 20. 3 22. 3 18. 9 24. 9 22. 6

Having thus provided a written description of the present invention and provided specific examples thereof, it should be understood that no undue restrictions or limitations are to be imposed by reason thereof but that the present invention is defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A process for producing improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties which comprises thoroughly mixing tobacco fines, humectant and Water in a reactor, heating said mixture under pressures of up to about 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of up to about 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

2. A process for producing improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties which comprises thoroughly mixing in an autoclave tobacco fines, humectant and about 65 to 85% of the water normally employed in producing coherent tobacco strip, heating said mixture under pressures of up to about 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of up to about 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

3. A process for improving coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation characteristics and increased flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing tobacco fines, at least one humcctant and guar gum with water in a reactor, heating said mixture under steam pressures of up to about 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of up to about 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

4. A process for producing coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties and increased flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing in an autoclave tobacco fines, at least one humectant, guar gum and about 65-85% of the water normally employed in producing coherent tobacco strip, heating said mixture under steam pressures of up to about 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of time of up to about 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

5. A process for producing improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation effects which comprises thoroughly mixing about 45 to 60 parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 1 to 8 parts by weight of at least one humectant with the balance of said composition being water, heating said mixture in a reactor under steam pressures of up to about 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of time up to about 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

6. A process for producing improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation effects which comprises thoroughly mixing in an autoclave about 50 to 55 parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 2 to 5 parts by weight of at least one humectant, and about 29 to 40 parts water, heating said mixture under steam pressures of up to about 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of time up to about 20 minutes at tempeartures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

7. A process for producing improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties and increased flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing about to 60 parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 1 to 8 parts by weight of at least one humectant, and about 1 to 10 parts by weight of guar gum with the balance of said composition being water, heating said mixture in a reactor under steam pressures of up to about 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of time up to about 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

8. A process for producing improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties and increased flexibility strength which comprises mixing in an autoclave about to parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 2 to 5 parts by weight of at least one humecrant, about 2 to 8 parts by weight of guar gum and about 29 to 40 parts water, heating said mixture under steam pressures of up to about 20' p.s.i.g. for a period of time up to about 20 minutes at temperatures not exceeding about 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

9. A process for producing an improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties which comprises thoroughly mixing about 45 to parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 1 to 8 parts by weight of at least one humectant with the balance of said composition being water, heating said mixture in a reactor under steam pressures of about 8 to 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of about 10 to 20 minutes at temperatures in the range of about to 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

10. A process for the preparation of an improved tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties which comprises thoroughly mixing in an autoclave about 50 to 55 parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 2 to 5 parts by weight of at least one humectant with about 29 to 40 parts water, heating said mixture under steam pressures of about 8 to 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of about 10 to 20 minutes at temperatures in the range of about 170 to 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

11. A process for the preparation of an improved tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties and increased flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing about 45 to 60 parts by Weight of ground tobacco fines, about 1 to 8 parts by weight of at least one humectant, about 1 to 10 parts by weight of guar gum with the balance of said composition being water, heating said mixture in a reactor under steam pressures of about 8 to 20 p.s.i.g. for a period of about 10 to 20 minutes at tempera tures in the range of about 170 to 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

12. A process for the preparation of an improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties and increased flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing about 50 to about 55 parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 2 to about 5 parts by weight of at least one humectant, about 2 to 8 parts by weight of guar gum with the balance of said composition being water, heating said mixture in a reactor under pressures of about 8 to 16 p.s.i.g. for a period of about to about 20 minutes at temperatures in the range of 170 to 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip.

13. A process for the preparation of an improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation properties and increased flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing about 45 to 60 parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 1 to 8 parts by weight of at least one humectant, about 1 to 10 parts by weight of guar gum with the balance of said composition being water, heating said mixture in a reactor under steam pressures of about 8 to 20 parts p.s.i.g. for a period of about 10 to 20 minutes at temperatures in the range of about 170 to 225 F. and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip, the temperatures, pressures and time in the upper part of the ranges being employed if it is desired to maximize the increase in flexibility strength of the CTS and the lower range of temperatures, times and pressures being employed if it is desired to maximize the reduction in irritation properties of the CTS.

1 4. A process for the preparation of an improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation effects and increased flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing in an autoclave about 50 to 55 parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 2 to about 5 parts by Weight of at least one humectant, about 2 to about 8 parts by weight of guar gum with the balance of said composition being water, heating said mixture under steam pressures of about 8 to about 16 p.s.i.g. for a period of up to about 20 minutes at temperatures in the range of about 170 to 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip, temperatures, pressures and times in the upper part of the ranges being employed if it is desired to maximize the flexibility strength of the CTS while temperatures, times and pressures in the lower part of the ranges are employed if it is desired to maxi mize the reduction in irritation properties of the CTS.

15. A process for the preparation of an improved coherent tobacco strip having reduced irritation characteristics and improved flexibility strength which comprises thoroughly mixing in an autoclave about to parts by weight of ground tobacco fines, about 2 to about 5 parts by weight of at least one humectant, about 2 to about 8 parts by weight of guar gum with about 29 to 40 parts water, heating said mixture under steam pressures of about 8 to 16 p.s.i.g. for a period of about 10 to about 20 minutes at temperatures in the range of about to 225 F. in the ground tobacco and sheeting the mixture to produce a coherent tobacco strip, the higher temperatures, pressures and time being employed if it is desired to maximize the flexibility strength of the CTS While the lower times, temperatures and pressure ranges are employed if it is desired to maximize the reduced irritability characteristics of the CTS.

16. An improved coherent tobacco strip produced by the process of claim 9 and having reduced irritation properties when incorporated in a smoking tobacco article.

17. An improved coherent tobacco strip produced by the process of claim 11 and having increased flexibility strength and having reduced irritation characteristics when incorporated in a smoking tobacco article.

18. A smoking tobacco article having improved smoking characteristics and reduced irritation characteristics comprising a mixture of natural tobacco and coherent tobacco strip prepared by the process of claim 13.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,613,672 10/1952 Sartoretto et al. 131-140 X 2,708,175 5/1955 Samfield et al. 131140 3,020,179 2/1962 Hess 131140 SAMUEL KOREN, Primary Examiner.

MELVIN D. REIN, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2613672 *Jul 11, 1946Oct 14, 1952Int Cigar Mach CoTobacco sheet material and method of producing the same
US2708175 *May 28, 1954May 10, 1955Brock Brantley AComposition of matter consisting chiefly of fragmented tobacco and galactomannan plant gum
US3020179 *Dec 29, 1959Feb 6, 1962Gen Cigar CoTobacco treatment and product therefrom
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3968804 *May 20, 1974Jul 13, 1976Amf IncorporatedExtruded tobacco sheet
US4681126 *Jul 28, 1986Jul 21, 1987Brown & Williamson Tobacco CorporationProcess for manufacturing reconstituted tobacco
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/370, 131/355
International ClassificationA24B15/14, A24B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24B15/14
European ClassificationA24B15/14