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Publication numberUS3380619 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1968
Filing dateAug 8, 1966
Priority dateAug 8, 1966
Publication numberUS 3380619 A, US 3380619A, US-A-3380619, US3380619 A, US3380619A
InventorsJohn R Boddie
Original AssigneeJohn R. Boddie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiator cap
US 3380619 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 30, 1968 J. R. BODDIE 3,380,619

RADIATOR CAP Original Filed May 11, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. JQHN R. QQDDEE April 30, 1968 J. R. BODDIE 3,380,619

RADIATOR CAP Original Filed May 11, 1964 2 Sheets sheet 2 INVENTOR. JQHN R. BODDEE,

United States Patent 3,380,619 RADIATUR CAP John R. Boddie, R0. Box 60308, Houston, Tex. 77060 Continuation of appiication Ser. No. 366,579, May 11, 1964. This application Aug. 8, 1966, Ser. No. 573,157 9 Claims. (Cl. 229-44) This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 336,579, now abandoned, filed May 11, 1964, and entitled, Radiator Cap.

This invention relates to radiator closures for liquid cooled, internal combustion engines, and more particularly to radiator closures for pressurized, internal combustion engine cooling systems.

Cooling systems of present day internal combustion engines generally are of the pressurized type inasmuch as it has been found that pressurization of cooling systems results in greater heat transfer efliciency. One of the greatest problems inherent in such pressurized cooling systems is the difliculty in checking the water level thereof. As soon as the radiator closure device is removed, the interior of the cooling system is reduced to atmosphen'c pressure and the liquid therein flashes, with the result that a tremendous amount of liquid immediately boils and bubbles out of the cooling system, Manifestly, there is inherent in pressurized cooling systems great danget of injury to service personnel, as well as an economic loss in the loss of antifreeze and corrosion inhibitor ordinarily used therein.

One object of the present invention is to provide a closure device for an internal combustion engine cooling system that permits the liquid level in the cooling system to be checked while the cooling system is under pressure.

Another object is to provide such a closure device that will prevent undue waste of cooling system protective liquids and that will permit service personnel to check cooling system liquid level without danger of personal injury.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a closure for an internal combustion engine cooling system comprises an elongated housing having an open end for extending into the radiator. Means is provided on the housing for latchingly and valvingly engaging the radiator to provide a relief valve for opening under pressure from within the radiator. Normally-closed valve means on the housing below the first means is provided for admitting water into the lower end of the housing, said valve means being held closed by a positive pressure differential from the exterior of the housing to the interior thereof. Also provided is a sealing cap for the open upper end of the housing for producing a pressure-tight seal thereon. Valve opening means is affixed to the sealing cap so as to extend into the housing for opening the valve means against differential pressure between the exterior and interior of the housing upon sealing of the cap to the upper end of the housing. When the sealing cap and valve opening means are removed, the liquid level in the housing is substantially the same as the liquid level within the radiator. However, the liquid level of the cooling system remains under pressure after the sealing cap has been removed.

Objects and features of the invention not evident from the above discussion will become apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of the invention taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a radiator and of one embodiment of a cooling system closure device in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along section 2-2 of FIG. 1;

Patented Apr. 30, 1968 FIG. 3 is a top view of the closure device, or cap 25, of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a top view of the housing 8 of FIG. 1 with the cap removed;

FIG. 5 is a view of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1 illustrating how the cooling system can be filled with liquid;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view of apparatus similar to FIG. 1 illustrating a modification of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a view taken along section 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a fractional view of a portion of split shims 50 of FIG. 6, illustrating a construction for interconnecting the sections thereof;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of another preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a top view of the radiator cap illustrated in FIG. 9;

FIGS. 11 and 12 are enlarged fragmentary views of portions of the apparatus of FIG. 9, more perspicuously illustrating the constructional details of the valves in housing 8A;

FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken along section 13-13 of FIG. 9; and

FIG. 14 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 13, with the cam member 67 in another operative position thereof.

With reference now to FIG. 1, reference numeral 1 designates a portion of the upper end of an internal combustion engine radiator, such as for an automobile, having a filling neck 10 comprising a cylindrical wall portion having a laterally turned upper flange 11 defining an upper aperture, and an inwardly turned lower flange or valve seat 3 defining a lower aperture 2. A downwardly turned flange or edge 12 terminates to the outer edge of the outwardly turned flange 11 in accordance with normal practice. The downwardly turned flange 12 includes a downwardly sloping edge 15, in accordance with normal practice, so as to permit tightening of a radiator cap thereon. The filling neck is provided with a relief tube or overflow spout 9. The construction described above is entirely conventional and is of the type found on many automobiles.

The radiator closure includes an elongated, cylindrical housing 8 that extends from above the upper aperture to below the lower aperture of the filling neck. Housing 8 is provided with a laterally turned flange 24 at its upper, open end, and a downwardly turned flange 24A provided with a tapered edge 24B, similar to the edge 11 of downwardly turned flange 12. Lug slots 26, most perspicuously illustrated in FIG. 4, are cut in the laterally turned flange 24 to accommodate lugs 22 of secondary cap 25, de scribed below. The housing 8 has. connected thereto means for valvingly engaging the interior of the filling neck above the lower aperture. As illustrated, this means comprises an annular flange 7 which may have an annular sealing means 5 of rubber or rubber-like mate-rial atfixed thereto. The flange 7 has an outer diameter intermediate the diameters of the upper and lower apertures so that the sealing means 5 aflixed thereto can engage the interior of the filling neck above the lower aperture in valving engagement. Under many circumstances the sealing means 5 can be dispensed with, particularly when the inwardly turned lower flange 3 is provided with an annular ridge on the upper surface thereof, as is found on many radiators. Thus, it can be seen that flange 7 comprises a movable valve member and flange 3 provides a lower fixed valve member.

An annular, primary cap or reaction member 17 is slidably aflixed to the housing -8. This primary cap is entirely similar in construction to many radiator caps in common use, with the exception that an opening is provided in the middle thereof for accommodating housing 8. The primary cap 17 is provided with :1 lug or inwardly turned tongue 13 for engaging the downwardly slanting surface or shoulder 15, so that the cap can be tightened on the radiator filling neck. An annular metal diaphragm functioning as a spring may be affixed to the inner edge of cap 17. However, this diaphragm can usually be omitted. A coil spring 31 is positioned between flange 7 and primary cap 17 so that when the primary cap 17 is tightened on the filling neck, flange 7 will be forced into valving engagement with inwardly turned flange 3. One or more shims can be positioned between flange 7 and spring 31, as shown in FIG. 6, to increase the pressure exerted by the spring on flange 7.

Below flange 7 in housing 8 there is provided a normaily-ciosed valve means 35 adapted, when opened, to admit water to the lower end of the housing. Preferably, the construction of this valve is such as to allow air to escape from the housing into the radiator beiow said lower aperture. The valve means is constructed so as to be urged or held closed by a positive pressure differential from the exterior of the housing 8 in the radiator to the interior of the housing. As illustrated, this valve means comprises a flapper valve pivotally aflixed to the housing 8 at a pivot flange 33. The valve member 34 is arcuate in shape so as to correspond to the contour of the housing 8. The housing 8 is provided with an opening 40 positioned so as to be covered by the valve member 34. Thus, it can be seen that the portion of the housing 8 around opening 40 functions as a fixed valve member. A sealing member 45, which may be of a temperature-resistant rubber or rubber-like material, may be aflixed to the valve member 34 so as to engage housing 8 around the opening 40. A central, inwardly projecting flange 36, having a pair of spring slots 37, 39 therein, is aflixed to or integral with the valve member 34 and projects through the opening 40. A pair of arcuate spring members 411 slip through slots 37, 39 and may be affixed to the flange 36 by solder ing or by a temperature-resistant glue such as epoxy resin. The spring members 41 engage the inner surface of the housing 8 so as to urge the arcuate valve member 34 against the housing.

A secondary cap 25, best illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3, is provided for the open upper end of housing 8. The cap has an inwardly turned lug or tongue 22 engaging the downwardly sloping surface 24B so as to be urged downwardly upon rotation thereof. A metal diaphragm or spring 23 is afiixed to the cap by means of a stud or rivet 29 and a flange or shoulder 29A. A sealing memher, which preferably is of temperature-resistant rubber or rubber-like material, is aflixed to the lower surface of spring 23 so as to engage the upper surface of laterally turned flange 24 and provides a pressure-tight seal for the upper end of the housing. Other pressure-tight constructions known to the art may be used, such as those making use of an annular ridge on the upper surface of flange 24 to be engaged by spring 23. Alternatively, a solid, annular sealing gasket may be provided between the cap 25 and the lateral flange 24, particularly where the flange 24 includes an annular ridge on its upper surface. Both of these types of pressure seal constructions for radiator caps are described in U.S. Patent No. 3,061,- 138, Edelmann et al.

A valve opening means for opening valve against differential pressure between the interiors of the cooling system and the housing 8 is provided which includes an elongated rod 27 integral with stud 29 and extending into the housing 8 at least to the level of valve 35. The cam member 42 is aflixed to the rod 27 by a set screw 44. The construction of the cam 42 and its relative positioning with respect to valve 35 is best illustrated in FIG. 2. The cam includes a camming surface for engaging flange 36 to open the valve 35 by rotation of cap 25 after the cap has reached the sealing position thereof. When the rod 27 and cam 42 are run into housing 8, the cam should be positioned so that flange 36 loosely engages the portion 42A of the camming surface. As the cap is rotated, the upper end of housing 8 is sealed and, with further rotation of the cap, valve 35 is opened when flange 36 engages the portion .213 of the carnming surface so that water can pass between the interior of the cooling system and the interior of housing 8.

When the pressure in the cooling system increases to a sufficiently high value to overcome spring 31, flange 7 and seal 5 will be forced off of the valve seat flange 3. Steam and water will be ejected from the system through overflow spout 9 and through the small annular space between primary cap 17 and housing 8.

In order to till the radiator with liquid, the cap 25 is removed. A fill-up hose 53 having a ball seal member affixed thereto is inserted in the open end of housing 8 so that the ball seal member 55 tightly engages the open upper end of the housing. When water under pressure is injected into the housing, valve 35 will be forced open so that water can flow therethrough into the interior of the radiator. As soon as water pressure is removed the valve 35 will be closed. Should there be no fill-up hose with a ball seal available, the cooling system can be filled with liquid by rotating primary cap 17 so as to remove the entire assembly including the p1 imary cap and housing 8 from the filling neck. After the cooling system has been filled, the entire assembly is replaced. When it is desired to check the water level in the radiator, it is only necessary to take off the cap 25. The valve member 35 will remain closed because of the pressure differential between the interior and exterior of housing 8. The water level in the housing will be substantially the same as the water level in the radiator. When the water level in the housing falls to a low level, the radiator can be filled as described above. Excess water remaining in the housing 8 after filling of the radiator will flow into the radiator housing as soon as the valve 35 is opened after replacement of secondary cap 25 on the upper end of housing 8.

In the modification of the apparatus described above shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, a centering spider 47 is aflixed to rod 27 between cam 42 and cap 25. The valve 35 is held closed by a wrap-around spring 49 afiixed to the exterior of valve 34 and extending around the housing 8. A pair of shims 50 are shown positioned on flange 7 for the purpose of increasing the radiator pressure required to force the flange '7 and seal 5 off of flange 3. The shims may be split and the sections thereof matingly engaged as shown in FIG. 8. Otherwise, the apparatus is as described above.

In FIGS. 9 through 14 there is illustrated another preferred embodiment of the invention. With reference to FIG. 9, it can be readily perceived that many of the constructional details are the same as those of the apparatus of FIG. 1. However, the elongated housing 8 is of somewhat different shape, having flat sides 8A and 8B rather than being substantially cylindrical as in the previously described embodiment. A vacuum relief valve 81 is provided in the upper portion of the housing member 8. This valve is for the purpose of preventing the collapse of radiator hoses when the radiator liquid cools, and can also be provided in the apparatus of FIG. 1 if such is deemed advisable. As best illustrated in FIG. 11, the valve comprises an annular plate 81A in the housing 8, having a conical valve portion 89 extending through a valve opening in housing 8 including a cylindrical valve seat 84- extending into housing 8. An annular sealing member 82 is aflixed to annular plate 81A for seating on valve seat 84. A substantially circular spring 85, conforming to the outer surface of housing 8 in the manner of the spring illustrated in FIG. 13, is soldered, glued, or welded to the portion 89 of conical valve portion 88 and is supported on the housing by projection or flange 87. Normally, the spring urges the valve against the valve seat 84. When the pressure in the housing 8 is sufliciently low, the spring 85 will be overcome to relieve the vacuum before the radiator hoses collapse.

In the lower end of the housing, below the flange 7, are a pair of vertically spaced-apart, poppet-type valve members 71A and 718 which are similar in construction to valve member 81, but oppositely positioned relative to housing 8 so as to be closed when the pressure in the housing is less than the pressure outside of the housing. The constructional details are illustrated in FIG. 12. The valves also have an annular plate, a substantially Conical valve portion 74, and an annular sealing member 72. The spring urging a valve into engagement with valve seat 73 has a flat portion 75A (see FIGS. 13 and 14) so as to conform to the contour of the flat housing portion 8B, and a tip 76 projecting into the conical valve portion 74. The springs are supported on projections or flanges 79 on housing 8 and claspingly engage the housing and the valve members.

The cam 67 for opening the valves 71A and 71B is substantially S shaped as illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14. In FIG. 13 the cam is shown in the valve opening position thereof, and in FIG. 14 is illustrated in the valve closing position thereof. Preferably, the middle portion 69 of the S cam is straight so that a flat, elongated rod 61 (see FIG. 9) can be affixed thereto or made integral therewith. Rod 61 extends from cap 25 to cam 67 and is affixed to cap 25 by welding, brazing, or gluing (see FIGS. 9 and The cam 67 is run into the housing 8 in the position illustrated in FIG. 14. When the cap is turned, the arcuate sections of the cam will force the valve members 71A and 71B open to allow water to enter the housing 8. Valve 71A permits water to flow freely into housing 8. If the water level in the radiator is slightly above valve 71A, no damage is done since only a slight pressure build-up in housing 8 will occur. Preferably, valve 71A is at or above the normal water level in the radiator.

The housing 8 may be unitary as illustrated, or may be constructed of telescopically engaging parts if construction will be made easier thereby. For example, the housing may be broken at flange 7, and the upper portion of the housing reduced in diameter so as to slide into the lower portion thereof. Another flange would be necessary on the upper housing portion to limit the engagement so as to prevent interference with the action of the valve opening cam. Alternatively, the two parts may be swaged together or press-fitted together.

While there has been shown and described what at present is considered to be the preferred embodiment of the invention, other modifications will be apparent to those skilled in the art which do not depart from the broadest aspects of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination:

an engine radiator of the pressurized liquid type;

an elongated housing engaging and extending into said radiator, said housing having an open upper end; normally closed valve means in the portion of said housing extending into said radiator; said valve means, when open, being adapted to admit water into the lower end of said housing, said valve means further being held closed by a positive pressure differential from the exterior of said housing to the interior thereof; a sealing cap for the open upper end of said housing for providing a pressure-tight seal thereon; and

valve-opening means aflixed to said sealing cap and extending into said housing for opening said valve means against differential pressure between the exterior and interior of said housing upon sealing of sa'id cap to the upper end of said housing.

2. A closure for an internal combustion engine radiator, comprising:

an elongated housing for extending into the radiator,

said housing having an open upper end;

first means on said housing for latchingly and valvingly engaging said radiator to provide a relief valve for opening under pressure from within said radiator;

normally closed valve means on said housing below said first means for admitting water, ,when opened, into the lower end of said housing, said valve means being held closed by a positive pressure dififerent'ial from the exterior of said housing to the interior thereof;

a sealing cap for the open upper end of said housing for providing a pressure-tight seal thereon; and

valve-opening means afiixed to said sea-ling cap and extending into said housing for opening said valve 'means against difierential pressure between the exterior and interior of said housing upon sealing of said cap to the upper end of said housing.

3. A closure for an internal combustion engine radiator having an open topped filling neck provided with a lower aperture communicating with the interior of the radiator, and an upper aperture having a larger diameter than said lower aperture and communicating with the atmosphere, comprising:'

an elongated housing having one open end for extending from above the upper aperture to below the lower aperture of said filling neck, and including first means for valvingly engaging the interior of said filling neck above the lower aperture;

normally closed valve means in said housing below said first means, adapted when open to admit Water into the lower end of said housing, said valve means being urged closed by a positive pressure dilferential from the exterior of the housing to the interior thereof;

an annular reaction member slidably mounted on said housing around said housing;

spring means around said housing engaging said reaction member for holding in valving engagement said first means for valvingly engaging th interior of said filling neck;

a sealing cap for the open end of said housing for providing a pressure-tight sea-l therefor; and

valve opening means afiixed to said sealing cap and extending into said housing for opening said valve means against pressure difierential between the exterior and interior of said housing.

4. A closure for an internal combustion engine radiator having an open topped filling neck provided with a lower aperture communicating with the interior of the radiator, and an upper aperture having a larger diameter than said lower aperture and communicating with the atmosphere, comprising:

an elongated housing having one open end for extending above said upper aperture and below said lower aperture;

a flange afiixed to the exterior of said housing between the ends thereof, having a diameter intermediate the diameters of the upper and lower apertures for valvingly engaging the interior of the filling neck above the lower aperture;

normally-closed valve means in said housing below said flange, adapted when opened to admit Water into the lower end of said housing and to allow air to escape from said housing into the radiator below said lower aperture, said valve means being urged closed by a positive pressure differential from the exterior of the housing to the interior thereof;

an annular reaction member slidably engaged around said housing for clamping to the upper aperture of the filling neck;

spring means between said annular reaction member and said flange for holding said flange in sealing engagement with said filling neck against fluid pressure from within said radiator;

a sealing cap for the open end of said housing for providing a pressure-tight seal therefor; and

valve opening means aflixed to said scaling cap and 7 extending into said housing for opening said valve means against pressure difierentia-l between the exterior and the interior of said housing.

5. A radiator cap as defined in claim 3 wherein said normally closed valve means comprises an opening in said housing, an arcuate valve member pivotal-ly affixed to said housing above said opening, and sealing means afiixed to said arcuate valve member for sealing engagement with said housing around said opening.

6. A radiator cap as defined in claim 3 wherein said normally closed valve means comprises an opening in said housing, an arcuate valve member pivo'tally affixed to said housing above said opening, sealing means aflixed to said arcuate valve member for sealing engagement with said housing around said opening, and spring means affixed to said arcuate valve member for urging said arcuate valve member against said housing.

7. A radiator cap as defined in claim 3 wherein said normally closed valve means comprises an opening in said housing, an arcuate valve member pivotally afiixed to said housing above said opening, sealing means affixed to said arcuate valve member for sealing engagement with said housing around said housing, spring means affixed to said arcuate valve member for urging said arcuate valve member against said housing, and a flange aiiixed to said, arcuate valve member extending into said housing through said opening, and wherein said valve opening means includes an elongated rod affixed to said cap for extending into said housing, cam means afiixed to said rod at a position thereon to engage said flange, said cam means having a contour to open said valve means after sealing of said sealing cap to said housing by rotation of said cap on said housing.

8. A radiator cap as defined in claim 3 wherein said normally closed valve means comprises first and second valve seats surrounding vertically spaced-apart openings in said housing, first and second vertically spaced-apart poppet-type valve members each having a portion extending through said openings into the housing, and spring means claspingly engaging said housing and said valves for urging said valve members onto said valve seats.

9. A radiator cap as defined in claim 3 wherein said normally closed valve means comprises first and second valve seats surrounding vertically spaced-apart openings in said housing, first and second vertically spaced-apart poppet-type valve members each having a portion extending through said openings into the housing, and spring means claspingly engaging said housing and said valves for urging said valve members onto said valve seats and wherein the valve opening means comprises a substantially S-shaped cam member, one of the arcuate portions of which is positioned to engage the valve means when the sealing cap is closed on the housing to open said valve means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/1963 Friend 220-44 10/1966 Holmes l4l3ll

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3071285 *Oct 7, 1959Jan 1, 1963Stant Mfg Company IncDepressed pressure cap
US3276488 *Mar 27, 1964Oct 4, 1966Holmes Allie BTank viewer and injection fitting
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3856058 *Oct 26, 1973Dec 24, 1974Gen ElectricLiquid dispenser having improved overfill protector
US3907153 *Feb 19, 1974Sep 23, 1975Gen Motors CorpFuel tank venting system
US3921412 *Jul 18, 1974Nov 25, 1975Rohr Industries IncVapor recovery apparatus employing dispensing nozzle with condensing capacity
US4712709 *Apr 28, 1986Dec 15, 1987Horvath Ronald FFuel-intake device for vehicle tank
US4747508 *Mar 9, 1987May 31, 1988General Motors CorporationFuel tank venting
US4811763 *Aug 26, 1987Mar 14, 1989Bayerische Motoren Werke AktiengesellschaftArrangement for filling fuel tanks of motor vehicles, especially of motorcycles
US4874020 *Oct 5, 1988Oct 17, 1989Whitehead Engineered Products, Inc.System for controlling the release of fuel vapors from a vehicle fuel tank
US4887652 *Mar 26, 1987Dec 19, 1989Whitehead Engineered Products, Inc.System for controlling the release of fuel vapors from a vehicle fuel tank
US4934417 *Sep 1, 1989Jun 19, 1990Whitehead Engineered Products, Inc.System for controlling the release of fuel vapors from a vehicle fuel tank
US5033517 *Sep 19, 1989Jul 23, 1991Whitehead Engineered Products, Inc.System for controlling the release of fuel vapors from a vehicle fuel tank
US5131439 *Oct 23, 1991Jul 21, 1992Whitehead Engineered Products, Inc.System for controlling the release of fuel vapors from a vehicle fuel tank
US5375633 *Mar 6, 1990Dec 27, 1994Whitehead Engineered Products, Inc.System for controlling the release of fuel vapors from a vehicle fuel tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/203.1, 220/240, 141/311.00R, 220/86.1, 220/212, 220/DIG.320
International ClassificationF01P11/18
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/32, F01P11/18
European ClassificationF01P11/18