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Publication numberUS3381849 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1968
Filing dateMay 26, 1967
Priority dateMay 26, 1967
Also published asDE1761464A1
Publication numberUS 3381849 A, US 3381849A, US-A-3381849, US3381849 A, US3381849A
InventorsGosta Karlsson Karl
Original AssigneeSprinter Pack Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stackable cups
US 3381849 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 7, 1968 K. G. KARLSSON STACKABLE CUPS Filed May 26, 1967 INVENTOR. KARL GOSTA KARLSSON ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,381,849 STACKABLE CUPS Karl Gosta Karlsson, Granna, Sweden, assignor to Sprinter-Pack AB, Halmstad, Sweden, a corporation of Sweden Filed May 26, 1967, Ser. No. 641,638 9 Claims. (Cl. 220--97) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A cup or like vessel is provided with a tab handle connected to the cup by a flange extending radially from the top at one point along the brim of the cup and having a projecting teat inside and extending from the bottom of the cup and partly up the side thereof, with the teat being positioned diametrically opposite said handle of another cup inserted into the first cup for stacking and with the handle flange of the inserted cup being supported by the brim of the cup into which it is inserted at a point diametrically opposite the teat to prevent lateral tilting when a plurality of such cups are stacked together.

The present invention relates generally to a vessel such as a drinking cup or other normally open-topped receptacle for liquid and, more particularly, to such vessels formed especially so that a large quantity thereof can be readily stacked.

Particularly with cups to be used in dispensing machines, ofiice canteens, amusement areas, and the like where a large quantity of such cups is used rapidly for dispensing beverages to a large number of people and where such facilities have limited storage capacities for maintaining a supply of such cups or other drinking vessels, it may be desired that such cups be stacked in large quantities without the stacks tilting over, and with the longitudinal extent of the cups or vessels being insertable into like cups or vessels almost the whole length thereof so as to enable the user to stack a large quantity of these cups or vessels in as small a space as possible.

More particularly, this invention relates to a particular mass produced inexpensive disposable cup having the characteristics for stacking a large quantity thereof and which are so constructed as to prevent lateral tilting of the cups when a large quantity thereof is stacked together.

In the past, when attempting to provide such cups, the cups were usually designed with a complicated ornamental or abutment design on the outside thereof which ornamental design or abutments interfitted with the cup being inserted into it so as to provide the proper support for the various insert cups and prevent lateral tilting. In addition, many such cups or vessels provided complicated handles or handle support structures for maintaining support when the cups were stacked. Obviously, such complicated abutment designs or ornamental designs for providing prevention of lateral tilting also increases the cost of producing such cups and reduces their ability to be stored compactly merely because the abutments make the cups larger circumferentially for storage purposes. In addition, these ornamental designs and abutments and configurations also inhibit the cleaning thereof and create a certain discomfort for the user in having to handle them. Furthermore, although these abutments or designs of various types produced the desired effect of preventing lateral tilting of the cups when stacked, they also inhibit Patented May 7, 1968 the insertion of one cup or vessel into the other as far as possible os as to reduce the number of cups that can be stacked together in a particular storage space.

According to this invention, by contrast, arrangements and constructions are provided for a cup or vessel which can be easily stacked in large quantities without lateral tilting of the stack and with the individual inserted ups in the stack being insertable into the adjacent cups or vessels in the stack almost the entire vertical extent thereof for providing the largest quantity of the stacked cups in the shortest space possible. Furthermore, these cups are preferably disposable and can be easily and cheaply mass produced, preferably by being injection molded from materials such as polystyrene.

Such arrangements or constructions in accordance herewith include a cup or like vessel having preferably a tab handle, as well understood, connected to the cup by a flange extending radially from the very top at one point along the brim thereof and having a projecting teat or abutment inside and extending from the bottom of the vessel and partly up the side thereof. Furthermore, the teat or projection is positioned diametrically opposite the handle flange with the teat providing a support for one side of the bottom of a like vessel or cup inserted therein and with the andle flange of the inserted cup being supported by the brim of the cup into which it is inserted diametrically opposite to the support provided by the teat or projection. With these two points of support, a large number of such cups can be inserted into each other or stacked to provide a large reserve of such cups for dispensing beverages as desired and with no lateral tilting of the stack. In addition, with such an arrangement, no ornamental or complicated abutment designs are necessary on the outside of the cup for maintaining a stack of such cups or vessels in a stacked or non-tilting position. With such an arrangement, only the vertical extent of the projection limits the insertion of one cup or vessel into another so as to provide for a large number of such stacked cups in as small a storage space as possible.

Accordingly, with the foregoing and other objects in view, this invention will be more particularly described, and other objects and advantages hereof will be apparent from the following description, the accompanying drawings, and the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a stack of cups embodying and for practising this invention, and showing the uppermost cup in the stack with its associated teat, and showing the handles of the cups beneath it in the stack in phantom lines;

FIG. 2 is a vertical section along the line 11-11 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a vertical section along the line III-HI in FIG. 2.

Referring to the drawings, in which like reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views thereof, one construction or arrangement embodying this invention is indicated as including disposable plastic coffee cups adapted to be stacked, and, preferably, mass produced by injection molding from polystyrene.

As indicated in FIG. 2, three cups are shown stacked together, with cup 10 being the bottom cup, and with cup 20 inserted therein, while cup 30 is inserted in cup 20. The cups have a bottom 11 with preferably an indentation 12 therein. As well understood, although not necessary, the side walls 16 thereof are tapered slightly outwardly from the bottom 11 to the brims thereof, and may be formed in virtually any ornamental design desired. Preferably, the cups have a tab handle, as is well known,'

although this invention is not limited to a tab handle as such. The handle is connected to the very top of the cup at one point along the circumference thereof by a flange 25 with the top of the flange 26 and the top of the handle being generally horizontal and coinciding with the adjacent brim of the cup. Further, preferably, the flange, the handle, and the cup are of one composite part.

With the flange construction as stated above, there is provided beneath the flange and between the cup and the tab handle therefor a space 18 which gives access to the cup immediately below in the stack so as to provide as great insertion as possible of one cup into another in the stack.

Positioned diametrically opposite the handle flange on the cup is a teat or projection 19 disposed inside the cup and extending from the bottom thereof and partially up the side wall. This teat or projection is preferably formed as an extension of the wall 16. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, a cup 20 exactly like cup is inserted into cup 10 with the bottom 21 thereof resting on the top of the teat or projection 19 of cup 10. In addition, the bottom 26 of the handle flange on cup 20 provides a bearing surface resting against the brim of cup 10 for providing a second supporting point for cup 20 inserted into cup 10.

With such an arrangement, therefore, cup 20 is supported. at two diametrically opposite positions along its circumference, and specifically with its base resting on projection or teat 19 of cup 10 and with the bottom 26 of its handle flange resting diametrically opposite thereto on the brim of cup 10. In this manner, cup 20 is inserted into cup 10 and rests on these two supports without lateral tilting between the two cups (as might occur if the cups were supported only by the handle flange). Also, cup 20 is not inserted into cup 10 to such an extent as to become wedged therein thus preventing the situation where the cups in a stack become wedged together and make it difficult for the user to withdraw one cup from the other for use.

As noted in the drawings, cup 30 with handle 31 thereon is shown as inserted into cup 20 in the same manner and with the bottom of cup 30 resting on the projection or teat 29 of cup 20. As shown in FIG. 1, cup 30 has a bottom 36 with the indentation 35 therein, and with the tapering side wall 38 extending from the bottom 36 to the brim 37 thereof. Further, cup 30 has a projection 32 identical to the projections 19 and 29 of cups 10 and 20 respectively, with the projection extending from the bottom 36 of cup 30 and partially up the wall 38 of cup 30. Although only three cups are shown as stacked together, it is obvious that a large number of such identical cups can be stacked together and without any lateral tilting between them and further without any wedging or sticking making separation diflicult after being stacked.

Preferably, the projection or teat 19 has a vertical extent the same as the vertical extent of the handle flange. In this manner, the extent of the projection and flange determine the limit of insertion of one cup into another. With such an arrangement, as is apparent from the drawings, a substantial portion of the vertical extent of the cups is insertable into each other. With such an arrangement, therefore, a large number of cups can be inserted into each other and stacked in a relatively short storage space.

Furthermore, with such a simple construction, a huge quantity of identical such cups can be mass produced for disposable use, and with such a simplified design, such cups are much more easily adaptable for use in dispensing machines where the more simplified the design of the cup being used, the easier it is to adapt the machine to their use. Furthermore, such cups can be easily and inexpensively produced by injection molding of polystyrene.

Such cups may be quite preferable to plastic coated paper cups, especially for use with hot beverages, thus eliminating the objectionable paper or plastic taste associated with such plastic coated paper cups.

Accordingly, a cup or vessel is provided in accordance herewith which is of very simple construction with a large number of such cups being stackable without any lateral tilting and with each cup being insertable into its adjacent cup a substantial distance of the vertical extent of the cups or vessels so as to provide a stack of such cups in a much larger quantity for a given storage space than those of the prior art. In addition, such cups eliminate the need for any ornamental or abutment designs extending from the outside walls thereof which ornamental or abutment designs increase the cost of producing such stackable cups and reduce the extent of insertion of one cup into another. Furthermore, the cups produced in accordance herewith are quickly, cheaply, and easily produced in large quantities, preferably by being injection molded of polystyrene, for use in such places as amusement parks, restaurants, and the like, where large quantities of such cups are needed for dispensing a variety of beverages to large crowds of people in a relatively short period of time.

While the constructions and forms herein described constitute a preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to this precise construction and form, and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A drinking cup and the like of the character described adapted to be stacked with a plurality of like cups without lateral tilting between adjacent cups in the stack and having a bottom portion and an upwardly extending outwardly sloping side Wall, the combination which comprises a handle flange extending radially from one point along the circumference of said cup adjacent the top thereof, a handle connected to said flange, and a teat disposed at the inside bottom of said cup at a point diametrically opposed from said handle flange and extending partially up the inside of said side wall, said teat extending radially into said cup sufficiently to engage the bottom of another like cup nested therein to prevent said tilting.

2. A cup as described in claim 1 in which said cup, said handle flange and said handle are comprised as a single unit.

3. A cup as described in claim 1 in which said upper edge of said handle flange and said handle extend substantially horizontally in a straight line from the top of said cup.

4. A cup as described in claim 3 in which said handle is a tab handle.

5. A cup as described in claim 1 in which said teat extends vertically from the said bottom of said cup up the side wall thereof.

6. A cup as described in claim 5 in which the vertical extent of said handle flange and said teat are substantially equal.

7. A cup as described in claim 6 in which said bottom has a circular indentation disposed centrally thereof.

8. A plurality of drinking cups and the like of the character described adapted to be stacked and nested together substantially without lateral tilting between adjacent cups in the stack, each of said plurality of cups having a bottom portion and an upwardly extending outwardly sloping side wall and being inserted one into another to form said stack, the combination which comprises a handle flange extending radially from the circumference of each of said plurality of cups and adjacent the tops thereof, with the flange on one cup supporting said cup by engagement with the top edge of another cup in which it is nested, a handle connected to each of said handle flanges, and a teat disposed within each of said 5 cups at the bottoms thereof at a point diametrically opposite said handle flange and extending vertically from said bottom portion for engaging the bottom of another of said cups nested therein to prevent said tilting.

9. A stack of cups as described in claim 8 in which each of said teats extends vertically from the said bottom of each of said cups and partially up the side Walls thereof and in which the vertical extent of said handle flanges and said teats are substantially equal.

6 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,854,790 10/1958 Hartung.

2,858,041 10/1958 Robinson 22097 X 2,932,437 4/1960 Wilcox 22097 X 2,937,783 5/1960 Press et a1 220-97 X THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

G. E. LOWRANCE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2854790 *Jul 26, 1957Oct 7, 1958Hartung Richard ELockproof flower pots
US2858041 *Jun 5, 1956Oct 28, 1958Robinson Aviat IncAnti-splash vessel for liquids
US2932437 *Mar 14, 1957Apr 12, 1960Sealright Oswego Falls CorpCup
US2937783 *May 6, 1957May 24, 1960Fed Tool CorpDrinking cup
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3612346 *Mar 4, 1969Oct 12, 1971Schneider Jack MPlastics containers
US3880281 *May 19, 1972Apr 29, 1975Andre TaddeiDental products
US4049187 *Feb 25, 1976Sep 20, 1977Mobil Oil CorporationThermoformed hot drink cup
US4630744 *Sep 3, 1985Dec 23, 1986Thermo-Serv, Inc.Container with registration rib
US4746057 *Mar 25, 1986May 24, 1988Wagner Otto WFinger-stabilized eating plate
US5137316 *Apr 5, 1991Aug 11, 1992Plastofilm Industries, Inc.Stackable plastic scoop
US7753206Jul 19, 2006Jul 13, 2010Zyliss Usa CorporationNestable measuring cups
US8714011 *Jun 29, 2012May 6, 2014Progressive International CorporationSnap-fit measuring container
US9010759 *Nov 28, 2012Apr 21, 2015Sean Michael McDonnellDrinking game cup or attachment with magnetic alignment pad
US20030005624 *May 3, 2002Jan 9, 2003Paul GiampavoloFlower bouquet holder and display stand
US20080017540 *Jul 19, 2006Jan 24, 2008Zyliss Usa CorporationNestable measuring cups
US20120273380 *Jun 29, 2012Nov 1, 2012Progressive International CorporationSnap-fit measuring container
US20130134677 *Nov 28, 2012May 30, 2013Sean Michael McDonnellDrinking game cup or attachment with magnetic alignment pad
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/520, 229/400, D07/533
International ClassificationB65D1/22, B65D1/26, A47G19/23, A47G19/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47G19/23, B65D1/265
European ClassificationA47G19/23, B65D1/26B