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Publication numberUS3381989 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1968
Filing dateNov 18, 1965
Priority dateNov 18, 1965
Publication numberUS 3381989 A, US 3381989A, US-A-3381989, US3381989 A, US3381989A
InventorsJohn C Thomas
Original AssigneeJohn C. Thomas
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Binding means and method
US 3381989 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 7, 1968 J c. THOMAS 3,381,989

BINDING MEANS AND METHOD Filed Nov. 18, 1965 FIG. 2 2o W1r\\ I INVENTOR.

JOHN C. THOMAS I BY Wk. Mm;

.EL LQ ATTORNEY.

United States Patent 3,381,989 BINDING MEANS AND METHOD John C. Thomas, 451 Queensboro Lane, Haddonfield, NJ. 08033 Filed Nov. 18, 1965, Ser. No. 508,483 9 Claims. (Cl. 289-12) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention is essentially concerned with binding means and method wherein an elongated flexible tie is wrapped about a resiliently constrictable member with overlapping tie portions relatively slidable for engagement of a later wound tie portion beneath an earlier wound tie portion upon application of tension to maintain the tie in position.

This invention relates to means for binding, tying, lashing and the like.

While the device of the present invention has been primarily developed and employed for use in protective articles of clothing, such as gloves and boots, and will be illustrated and described hereinafter with particular reference thereto, it is appreciated that the advantageous features of the instant invention are capable of many varied applications, wherever the instant binding action is desired, as in a tourniquet, and many other applications which will be apparent to those skilled in various fields, and that all such applications intended to be comprehended herein.

It is an important object of the present invention to provide a unique binding or tying means wherein it is only necessary to wrap a tie member about an object being bound with some degree of tension in the tie memher, and the desired binding action automatically ensues.

It is a more particular object of the present invention to provide a binding or tying means of the type described which is extremely quick and simple to employ, substantially foolproof in use, and which may be effectively employed by unskilled personnel.

It is a more particular object of the present invention to provide a binding or tying means having the advantageous characteristics mentioned in the preceding paragraphs, wherein a flexible tie is wrapped about a resiliently constrictable member, so that a later-wrapped portion of the tie engages beneath an earlier-wrapped tie portion, and the resilient restoring force of the constricted member serves to maintain the engaging tie portions in firm holding relationship.

Other objects of the present invention will become ap parent upon reading the following specification and referring to the accompanying drawings, which form a material part of this disclosure.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter described, and of which the scope will be indicated by the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view showing a hand covering or mitten constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention, and partly broken away for clarity;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken generally along the line 2--2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a top view illustrating an initial stage in binding the wrist portion of a mitten about a wearer's wrist;

FIGURE 4 is a top view similar to FIGURE 3, but showing a later stage in the binding operation;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view showing the binding operation, as within the dashed lines of FIG- URE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a top view similar to FIGURES 3 and 4, showing a final stage in the binding operation;

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view illustrating a tourniquet constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

FIGURE 8 is a side view illustrating the tourniquet of FIGURE 7 in operative condition; and

FIGURE 9 is a side view illustrating a boot constructed in accordance with the teachings of the instant invention.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, and specifically to FIGURES 1 and 2 thereof, a hand covering in the form of a mitten is there generally designated 10, and includes a hand-receiving portion 11, and a generally tubular wrist-receiving portion 12. In its broad aspect, the hand covering 10 may be considered as a receptacle, container or bag, and it may be so employed, if desired, the instant binding means serving to bind the tubular part 12 closed.

However, as a mitten or glove, the hand covering 10 includes inner and outer fabric layers 13 and 14, and an intermediate layer of insulating padding 15, or the like. The composite of inner and outer fabric layers 13 and 14, and intermediate insulating layer 15 results in a resiliently compressible material. The tubular wrist part 12 may thus be considered as resiliently constrictable upon compression. Other materials may be employed having the resiliently compressible or constrictable characteristics.

An elongate flexible tie is generally designated 17, and has one end portion 18 suitably secured or anchored to the resiliently compressible hand covering or member 10. More specifically, the tie end 18 is anchored at the constrictable wrist part 12 of member 10, as by a securing piece 19 stitched to both the tie and tubular member or twist part 12, as by stitching 20. The other end 21 of tie 17, remote from the anchored end 18, is free or unsecured in the condition shown in FIGURE 1. In practice, the tie 17 is advantageously fabricated of a narrow striplike material, having a flat cross section as seen in FIGURE 2, and may have its external surfaces waxed for free sliding engagement with the external surface of outer mitten layer 14.

An initial stage of the binding or tying operation is illustrated in FIGURE 3, the hand covering 10 being in place upon the hand 22 of a wearer. The tie 17 is wound about the wrist part 12 of the hand covering in the direction of arrow 23. Continued winding of the tie 17 about the wrist portion 12 is shown in FIGURE 4, there being illustrated a first convolution 25 of the tie, a second convolution 26, and the beginning of a third convolution 27. In practice it has been found that satisfactory results may be obtained with as little as one and one-half convolutions of the tie 17, but two or more convolutions may be employed, as illustrated.

During the winding or wrapping operation shown in FIGURES 3 and 4, at least some tension is applied to the tie 17 by the winding hand 28 adjacent to the free end 21 of the tie. This application of tension adjacent to the free tie end 21 tends to tighten the later-wound portions relative to the earlier-wound portions, so that the later-wound portions slip or slide on the surface of wrist part 12 beneath the earlier-wound portions of the tie. Thus, the second convolution 26 slips beneath the first convolution 25, as indicated by the arrow 30, while the third convolution 27 slips beneath the second convolution 26, as indicated by the arrow 31. Upon the application of increased tension adjacent to the free end of tie 17, the wrist part 12 is resiliently constricted, see FIG- URE 6, radially inward of the wound tie convolutions, so that the trough of the constriction further aids in the sliding engagement of later convolutions beneath earlier convolutions. When the winding of convolutions 25, 26 and 27 has been completed, the free end 21 of tie 17 may be tensioned, as in the direction of arrow 32 in FIGURE 6 by the users hand 28 to complete the above-described relative sliding engagement of tie convolutions and resilient constriction of the wrist part 12. Upon release of the free tie end 21 by the hand 28, the resilient restoring force of the constricted wrist part 12 presses each convolution firmly against its next adjacent outer convolution to maintain the convolutions in firm holding engagement with each other and secure the firm binding action achieved in FIGURE 6 without further holding of the tie. When it is desired to remove the tie, the free tie end 21 may be wound in the opposite direction for quick and easy release of the binding action.

In the embodiment of FIGURES 7 and 8 is shown a tourniquet, generally designated 35, and including an elongate bandage 36 of resiliently compressible material, and an elongate flexible tie 37 having one end anchored or suitably secured, as at 38 to the bandage 36.

In use, it is only required that the bandage be partially wrapped about a patients limb, such as the leg 39 shown in FIGURE 8, and the tie 37 wound at least appreciably more than one time about the limb under tension sufficient to effect sliding engagement of a later-wound tie convolution portion into a constriction of the bandage and beneath an earlier-wound tie portion. Preferably the tie would pass over the bandage or more resilient material at least twice to achieve the described binding action. Of course, removal of the tourniquet 35 is quickly and easily elfected by mere unwinding of the tie 37.

While the device of FIGURE 7 has been described as a tourniquet, it will be readily understood that such device may be employed as a binding or tie means for any desired article or articles, say the lashing together of timber, or the like. For example, long lengths of timber may be lashed together by any desired number of loops merely winding the tie means directly about the timber and by engaging suitable resilient material in the final loops.

In the embodiment of FIGURE 9 there is shown a boot 40 in position on the foot of a wearer and having a leg part 41 of resiliently compressible material. A tie 42 has one end anchored to the leg part 41 and is wound thereabout under tension to secure the leg part closely about the wearers leg, in the same manner as described hereinbefore.

From the foregoing, it is seen that the present invention provides a binding or tying means which fully accomplishes its intended objects and is well adapted to meet practical conditions of manufacture and use under widely varying circumstances.

Although the present invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it is understood that certain changes and modifications may be made within the spirit of the invention and scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Binding means comprising a resiliently constrictable member, and an elongate flexible tie having one end anchored to said member, said tie being of relatively flat cross section and a length greater than the circumference of said member, said member being resiliently constrictable by the application of tension to the other end of said tie wound around said member, and said member and tie having relatively slidable surfaces for sliding engagement of a later-wound tie portion into a member constriction beneath an earlier-wound tie portion upon said application of tension, whereby the resilient restoring force of said member maintains said tie portions in firm holding engagement.

2. Binding means according to claim 1, said member being generally tubular for receiving therein a relatively incompressible article.

3. Binding means according to claim 1, said member comprising a receptacle having an open neck, said one tie end being anchored to said neck.

4. Binding means according to claim 1, said member having an elongate configuration for wrapping about an article.

5. Binding means according to claim 1, said member comprising a hand covering, said one tie end being anchored to the wrist portion of said hand covering.

6. Binding means according to claim 1, said member comprising a foot covering, said one tie end being anchored to the leg portion of said foot covering.

7. Binding means according to claim 1, said member colmpgising a bandage for application as a tourniquet to a 1m 8. In the method of binding, the steps which comprise: providing a resiliently constrictable member and an elongate flexible tie having one end anchored to said member; engaging said member about an article to be bound; winding the tie about said member at least more than once; and tensioning said wound tie to constrict said member and engage a later-wound tie portion beneath an earlier-wound tie portion; whereby the resilient restoring force of said member maintains said tie portions in firm holding engagement.

9. The method of binding according to claim 8, wherein said tensioning is effected by pulling the free tie end to effect lateral sliding of the later-wound tie portion between the earlier-wound tie portion and members.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,252,900 1/1918 Grinnell 2-169 LOUIS K. RI'MRODT, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1252900 *Jun 6, 1916Jan 8, 1918Brayton C GrinnellGlove.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4326299 *May 12, 1980Apr 27, 1982Bednar Robert MSoccer cuff
US5555561 *Jun 28, 1993Sep 17, 1996Traak, Inc.Cuff seal for anti-contamination protective garments
US5566394 *Apr 25, 1994Oct 22, 1996Flick; ConradDisposable, elastomeric glove
US5867832 *Dec 8, 1997Feb 9, 1999Liu; Fang YiDisposable vinyl glove having fastening belt
Classifications
U.S. Classification289/1.2, 2/162
International ClassificationA41F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41F1/00, A41D19/0048
European ClassificationA41F1/00