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Publication numberUS3383121 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1968
Filing dateJun 22, 1965
Priority dateJun 22, 1965
Also published asDE1278814B
Publication numberUS 3383121 A, US 3383121A, US-A-3383121, US3383121 A, US3383121A
InventorsEugene A Singer
Original AssigneeAvery Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-adhesive copy label
US 3383121 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 May 14, 1968 E. A. SINGER SELF'ADHESIVE COPY LABEL Filed June 22, 1965 INVENTOR. ZZ/il/F /4 Emma BY AI'ZJZI/Z'L i' United States Patent 3,383,121 SELF-ADHESIVE COPY LABEL Eugene A. Singer, Monrovia, Calif., assignor to Avery Products Corporation, Pasadena, Calif., a corporation of California Filed June 22, 1965, Ser. No. 465,979 8 Claims. (Cl. 282-28) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A laminate construction in which the first layer may be a sheet of paper and the third layer is a sheet of material constructed to be impact sensitive in that it carries, in normally separate states, chemicals which intermix upon impact to produce a color change in the impact area in or on the third layer itself. The second layer of the construction is pressure-sensitive adhesive preferentially adhered to the first layer so that it separates with the first layer when the first and third layers are separated.

This invention relates to adhesive labels and, more particularly, to a multi-layer self-adhesive label wherein at least one layer of the label is fabricated of a material which is responsive to impact to produce a visible image of the area of impact.

In the preparation of address labels, it is often desired that a copy of the label be provided for retention as a record of the information contained in the label. A copy of the label can be obtained by using carbon paper where the label is printed in a typewriter, for example. In many cases, however, as where the address labels are used as in preparing address labels for magazines to be sent to subscribers or for tax forms to be sent to tax payers, the labels are prepared on high speed printers controlled by data processing computers Which supply the necessary information to the printers. Carbon papers are diflicult to use in such. printers because the carbon papers and the copy sheets are loose relative to the paper printed upon and cause the printer to jam.

Moreover, it is desirable that the address label be capable of being applied directly to a magazine, a magazine wrapper, or a tax form by automatic equipment shortly after the labels emerge from the printer. For this reason it is desirable that the label carry an adhesive, preferably a pressure sensitive adhesive. Carbon papers are most difficult to use advantageously with labels coated with pressure sensitive adhesive.

This invention provides a self-adhesive label which is usable in high speed printers. A label according to this invention has the feature that it provides a copy of the information printed upon the label itself without the use of carbon paper.

Generally speaking, this invention provides an adhesive label comprising a layer of impact sensitive material. The impact sensitive material carries chemicals which, when the material is subjected to impact, react to form a distinctive color in the area of impact. A layer of pressure sensitive adhesive is distributed over one side of the impact sensitive material and is releasably adhered to the impact sensitive material. Further, a label of label material is disposed over the surface of the pressure sensitive adhesive which is opposite from the impact sensitive material. The adhesive is substantially permanently adhered to the label material.

The above mentioned and other features of the present invention are more fully set forth in the following detailed description of the invention, which description is 3,383,121 Patented May 14, 1968 presented in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a portion of a label assembly adapted for use in tabulating type printers controlled by automatic data processing computers;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional elevation view taken along lines 2--2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 ;s an enlarged cross-sectional view of another label assembly according to this invention;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of another label assembly according to this invention;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross-sectional elevation view of still another label assembly according to this invention; and

FIG. 6 is an elevation view of yet another label assembly according to this invention.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show a label assembly 10, according to this invention, provided as an elongate strip of material 11 of indeterminate length and predetermined width. The label assembly includes a copy liner 12 and a plurality of labels 13 distributed in a pre-selected array over one side of the copy liner. Each label 13 includes a layer of label material 14 adapted to be embossed, imprinted or otherwise treated by some impact operation. In label assembly 10 the label material is comprised of sheets of paper adapted to receive printing and upon which a suitable form or design may be preprinted, if desired. In a presently preferred embodiment of label assembly 10, the paper from which layers 14 are fabricated weighs 21 pounds per ream of 17 inch by 22 inch paper. This paper preferably has a thickness of .0027i.0002 inch.

A layer of pressure sensitive adhesive 15 is disposed between a reverse side 16 of each label paper 14, i.e., the side of the paper toward copy liner 12, and the obverse side 17 of the copy liner, i.e., the side of the copy liner disposed toward label papers 14. The pressure sensitive adhesive is such that, when it is applied to a support surface after the label has been removed from the copy liner, the pressure sensitive adhesive does not become permanent for some time after the label has been applied. Preferably the layer of pressure sensitive adhesive has a thickness of 0010:.0002 inch. Preferably the pressure sensitive adhesive is type K3 adhesive manufactured by Avery Products Corp, the assignee of the present in vention. In order that the adhesive layer be adhered permanently to label papers 14 and separate cleanly from the copy liner, a coating of an attractant 18 for the adhesive is disposed over the reverse sides of the label papers and a coating of adhesive repellant 19 is disposed over the obverse side of the copy liner.

Copy liner 12 includes a layer of impact sensitive material 20. In label assembly 10, the copy liner is a multilayer assemblage which includes the impact sensitive material and a release liner 21 secured to the obverse side of the impact sensitive material to isolate the chemically treated impact sensitive material from the pressure sensitive adhesive. The obverse side of the impact sensitive material is the side thereof which is disposed toward labels 13. The release liner defines the obverse side 17 of copy liner 12. The release liner is secured to the obverse side of the impact sensitive material by a coating of adhesive 22 which extends over the entire areal extent of the impact sensitive material, as shown in FIG. 2.

Preferably the impact sensitive material 20 comprises a sheet of paper impregnated with two colorless chemicals which, when mixed together, react to form a third substance having a distinct and characteristic color. The two colorless chemicals are present in the paper in such a manner that they are normally isolated from each other. It is preferred that one of the chemicals be present in the paper in microscopic capsules which are ruptured when the paper is subjected to impact. The chemical contained in the capsules is thus caused to mix with the other colorless chemical in the area of impact to produce the colored third substance, thereby producing a visible image of the area of impact. Impact sensitive materials of the type described above are described in United States Patent 2,550,473, and Patent 3,020,171 describes a related material using encapsulated ink. In a presently preferred embodiment of label assembly 10, as well as in the other embodiments of the invention described herein, the impact sensitive material is a sheet of Action Brand Carbonless Paper manufactured by 3M Company, and is described in South African Patent 230/63.

It is preferred that release liner 21 be fabricated of a sheet of transparent glassine paper having a weight of 30 pounds per ream. The copy liner, i.e., the combination of the impact sensitive material and the release liner, preferably has a weight of 60 pounds per ream of 24 x 36 inch paper and has a thickness of 0089:0003 inch.

As shown in FIG. 1, labels 13 are disposed in columns aligned along the length of strip 11; adjacent labels in each column are aligned with each other to provide rows of labels transversely of the width of the strip. Each row of labels has opposite ends 24 and 25 spaced a predetermined distance inwardly of edges 26 and 27, respectively, of the copy liner. Outwardly of the ends of the rows of labels and adjacent each edge of the copy liner, the copy liner is provided with a plurality of uniformly sized, uniformly spaced holes 28 through its thickness. It is also preferred that strip 11 be folded back and forth upon itself in an accordian fold configuration. Accordingly, label assembly 10 is readily adapted for use in a high speed printer controlled by data processing computer or the like since the strip may be fed through the printer by engaging lugs of paper feed wheels in the holes provided along the margins of strip 11.

Labels 13 normally do not become separated from the copy liner unless the copy liner is bent away from the labels, but when the copy liner is bent sharply away from the labels the inherent stiffness of the labels causes the pressure sensitive adhesive to separate from the release liner.

Label assembly 10 has utility where a permanent copy is desired of the material imprinted upon labels 14. For example, the Internal Revenue Service may desire to provide each taxpayer-with a suitable tax return form bearing the taxpayers name and address, Social Security number and/or taxpayer number, as well as other information, printed in a characteristic type-face with magnetic ink. When the completed return is filed by the taxpayer, the Internal Revenue Service can pass the return through a data processing machine for processing. Such a proce dure cannot be implemented unless a convenient means of afiixing such information to the form sent to the taxpayer is available. Label assembly 10 provides an ideal means for implementing this procedure. Thus, before the forms are mailed to the taxpayer, the pertinent information associated with a given taxpayer is printed on a selected one of labels 14. Since the label is being processed in a high speed printer, the impact of the type hammer upon the label is transmitted through the adhesives and the release liner to impact sensitive material 20. The impact sensitive material itself provides a copy of the material imprinted upon the respective labels. Thereafter, the labels are separated from the copy liner and aflixed to the tax forms and mailed to the respective taxpayers. The labels also serve as address labels in mailing the forms to the taxpayer. The images which appear on the impact sensitive material provide the Internal Revenue Service with an accurate and permanent record of any material which appears on the labels affixed to the forms.

In order that the impact of a type hammer or the like on label papers 14 be transmitted through the label assembly to the impact sensitive material, it is preferred that the label assembly have the smallest possible thickness so that the energy of the impact on the paper will not be unduly absorbed before reaching the impact sensitive material.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional elevation view of another label assembly 30 according to this invention. Label assembly 30 includes a plurality of superimposed labels 31 and 32 supported on a release liner 33. Labels 31 are identical to labels 13 of label assembly 10, and, thus, for the sake of brevity, are not described again at this point. Labels 32, each of which is of the same size as labels 31 and is disposed between a respective one of labels 31 and release liner, include a layer of glassine 34 adhered to a sheet of impact sensitive material 35 by a coating of adhesive 36. A layer of pressure sensitive adhesive 37 is disposed between the impact sensitive material and the release liner over the entire areal extent of the reverse surface of the impact sensitive layer. In label assembly 30, as in label assembly 10, the reverse sides of the various layers of the label assembly are the sides of the layers most remote from the label papers. Similarly, the obverse sides of the respective layers are the sides of the layers disposed toward the label papers. Release liner 33 preferably is a sheet of paper bearing on its observe side a coating 38 of a material which is repellant to the pressure sensitive adhesive secured to the reverse side of the impact sensitive material. Label assembly 30 differs from label assembly 10 in that impact sensitive material 35 forms additional labels in the assembly. It will be understood that copy liner 12 of label assembly 10 may be used in label assembly 30 in place of release liner 33, if desired, without departing from the scope of this invention.

FIG. 4 shows another label assembly 40, also according to this invention including a layer of label paper 41 having an obverse side 42 and a reverse side 43. The reverse side of the label paper carries a coating of attractant 44 for a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive 45. The layer of pressure sensitive adhesive extends over the entire areal extent of the reverse side of the label paper and is disposed between the label paper and a layer of impact sensitive material 46. The obverse side 47 of the impact sensitive material carries a coating of a material 48 which is repellant to pressure sensitive adhesive 45. Thus, when label paper 41 is pulled away from the impact sensitive material, the pressure sensitive adhesive separates cleanly from the obverse side of the impact sensitive material.

Label assembly is similar to label assembly 10 except that the copy liner of assembly 46 is provided solely by the layer of impact sensitive material. No layer of glassine or other material isolating the chemical ingredients of the impact sensitive material from the pressure sensitive adhesive is used in label assembly 40. Accordingly, label assembly 40 is the preferred embodiment of a label assembly according to this invention when the chemical constituents of the pressure sensitive adhesive and the impact sensitive material are compatible with one another and do not produce an undesired reaction.

FIG. 5 illustrates another label assembly 50 according to this invention. Label assembly 50 bears the same relation to label assembly 30 as label assembly 40 bears to label assembly 10. Accordingly, label assembly 50 includes a plurality of superimposed pairs of labels 51 and 52 mounted to and carried by a release liner 53. Label 51 is identical to labels 13 and 31 of label assemblies 10 and 30, respectively, and to the combination of layers 41, 44 and 45 of label assembly 40. Accordingly, labels 51 are not described in detail at this point. Each label 52 comprises a layer of impact sensitive material 54 carrying on its obverse side a layer of material 55 which is repellant to the pressure sensitive adhesive of the adjacent label 51. The reverse side of the impact sensitive material is engaged with a layer of a material 56 which is an attractant to a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive 57 disposed between the impact sensitive material and release liner 53. Release liner 53 is like release liner 33 of label assembly 30 and preferably comprises a sheet of paper 58 extending across the entire width and along the entire length of the label assembly. Paper layer 58 carries a coating of a material 59 which is repellant to pressure sensitive adhesive 57. If desired, however, release liner 53 may be fabricated of a layer of impact sensitive material carrying a coating of pressure sensitive adhesive repellant material, if desired.

In the foregoing description of label assemblies 30, 40, and 50, it has been assumed that the label assemblies are provided in the same arrangement as label assembly so that the label assemblies are adapted for use in high-speed, computer-controlled printers. It is within the scope of this invention, however, that the labels be provided upon a strip of release or copy liner rolled into a coil 60* as shown in FIG. 6. Coil 60 includes a release liner 61 having an indeterminate length and a preselected width corresponding to the width of each of a plurality of identical labels 62 carried by the release liner. If desired, however, the release liner may be wider than the labels. The labels have their elongated lengths aligned with the length of the release liner and are spaced uniformly along the release liner. Labels 62 may be like any one of labels 13, 31, 41 or 51. Where labels 62 are similar to labels 13 or 41, the release liner is fabricated of an impact sensitive material and is like release liners 12 or 46, respectively.

It will be understood that the preferred weights and thicknesses of the various components of label assembly 10 are applicable to label assemblies 30, 40, and 50 even though these values have not been referred to in the description of the latter label assemblies.

There has been described above a novel self-adhesive, carbonless copy label which finds utility in myriad applications. An assembly of copy labels according to this invention is ideally suited for use in conjunction with highspeed printers controlled by computers or the like since such a label assembly does not cause the printer to become jammed, as is the case where carbon papers are used in such printers.

The invention has been described above by reference to several embodiments of the invention. These embodiments have been described in order that the true scope of the invention may be discerned. Workers skilled in the art to which this invention relates will appreciate that modifications and alterations in the label assemblies described may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. Accordingly, the foregoing description is not to be considered as limiting the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A laminate construction comprising a self-supporting sheet of impact sensitive material carrying at least one liquid substance contained in a multitude of minute capsules which rupture upon the application of impact thereto to release the substance to form a distinctive color in the sheet in the area of impact, a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive distributed over at least one side of the impact sensitive material, and a self-supporting layer of sheet material disposed over the pressure sensitive adhesive, the adhesive being releasably adhered to the impact sensitive material and substantially permanently adhered to the sheet material, the surface of the sheet material opposite from the adhesive being suited to receive printing as by a typewriter, :ball point pen and the like, the impact sensitive material responding to the force associated with printing upon the sheet material to produce therein images of matter printed upon the sheet material.

2. A laminate construction comprising a layer of impact sensitive paper carrying at least one liquid substance contained in a multitude of minute capsules which rupture upon the application of impact thereto to release the substance to form a distinctive color in the sheet in the area of impact, a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive distributed over one side of the impact sensitive paper, means between the adhesive and the impact sensitive paper for rendering the adhesive releasable from the impact sensitive paper, and a second layer of paper disposed over the pressure sensitive adhesive and to which the adhesive is substantially permanently adhered, the surface of the second paper layer opposite from the adhesive being suited to receive printing as by a typewriter, ball point pen and the like, the impact sensitive paper responding to the force associated with printing upon the second paper layer to produce therein images of matter printed on the second paper layer.

3. A laminate construction according to claim 2 wherein the means between adhesive and the impact sensitive paper comprises a coating over the impact sensitive paper which is repellant to the adhesive.

4. A laminate construction according to claim 2 wherein the means between the adhesive and the impact sensitive material is a layer of glassine paper secured to the impact sensitive paper.

5. A laminate construction comprising a layer of selfsupporting impact sensitive material having obverse and reverse sides and carrying at least one liquid substance contained in a multitude of minute capsules which rupture upon the application of impact thereto to release the substance to form a distinctive color in the Sheet in the area of impact, first and second layers of pressure sensitive adhesive distributed over the obverse and reverse sides of the impact sensitive material, respectively, means between the obverse side and the first adhesive layer rendering the first adhesive layer releasable from the impact sensitive material, the second adhesive layer being substantially permanently adhered to the impact sensitive material, a self-supporting release liner web disposed over the reverse side of the second adhesive layer and releasably adhered thereto, and a layer of paper disposed over the obverse side of the first adhesive layer, the first adhesive layer being substantially permanently adhered to the paper, the surface of the paper opposite from the first adhesive layer being suited to receive printing as by a typewriter, ball point pen and the like, the impact sensitive material responding to the force of printing upon the paper to produce therein images of matter printed on the paper.

6. A self-adhesive label construction comprising a strip of impact sensitive paper of selected width and indeterminate length carrying at least one liquid substance contained in a multitude of minute capsules which rupture upon the application of impact thereto to release the substance to form a distinctive color in the sheet in the area of impact, a plurality of pieces of paper of preselected size and shape disposed on the impact sensitive paper, a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive distributed over the side of each piece of paper toward the impact sensitive paper and substantially permanently adhered to the pieces, and a release coating over the side of the impact sensitive paper toward the pieces of paper rendering the adhesive releasable from the impact sensitive paper, the surfaces of the pieces of paper opposite from the strip being suited to receive printing as by a typewriter, ball point pen and the like, the impact sensitive paper responding to the force of printing upon the pieces of paper to produce therein images of matter printed on the pieces of paper.

7. A self-adhesive label construction according to claim 6 wherein the pieces of paper are rectangular in shape and are identical in size, the pieces of paper being spaced from each other and arranged on the impact sensitive paper in rows transversely of the width of the strip, each end of each row being spaced a selected distance inwardly of the adjacent edge of the strip, and a row of uniformly spaced holes through the strip along the length thereof between each edge thereof and the adjacent ends of the rows of pieces of paper.

7 8. A self-adhesive label according to claim 7 wherein the release coating comprises a sheet of glassine having a width substantially equal to the width of the strip secured to the strip along its length, the holes through the strip also being formed through the sheet of glassine.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 8 3,111,449 11/1963 Gold et a1. 16l- 406 FOREIGN PATENTS 503,426 6/1954 Canada.

JEROME SCHNALL, Primary Examiner.

ALEXANDER WYMAN, Examiner.

R. A. FLORES, Assistant Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification462/66, 206/390, 428/41.8, 40/638, 40/675, 283/81, 503/226, 503/200, 206/447, 462/69, 462/901
International ClassificationG09F3/02, B41M5/124, C09J7/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S462/901, B41M5/124, G09F3/0286, G09F3/0288
European ClassificationB41M5/124, G09F3/02B, G09F3/02C