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Publication numberUS3383503 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1968
Filing dateSep 19, 1966
Priority dateSep 19, 1966
Publication numberUS 3383503 A, US 3383503A, US-A-3383503, US3383503 A, US3383503A
InventorsJames E Montgomery
Original AssigneeJames E. Montgomery
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Earring with flashing electric bulb
US 3383503 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ay 14, 1968 J. E. MONTGOMERY 3,

EARRING WITH FLASHING ELECTRIC BULB Filed Sept. 19, 1966 INVENTOR. JAMES E- MON TGOMERY A TTORNEY nit 3,383,503 EARRING WXTH FLASHING ELECTRIC BULB .iarnes E. Montgomery, 1933 Garden Drive, Burlingarnailaiif. 94010 Sept. 19, 1966, Ser. No. 8i),236

3 Ciaims. (Cl. 240-59) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE As the cardinal object of this invention, it is proposed to provide an earring having a flashing bulb that will flash on and oil in response to movements of the wearers head, the entire ensemble being made so that it may be worn without discomfort to the wearer, and the power source for the bulb being arranged to be concealed in the wearers hair.

More specifically stated, it is proposed to provide an ear clasp engageable with the lobe of a wearers ear, this clasp having a chain secured thereto so as to hang freely therefrom, a miniature bulb being supported on the lower end of the chain. Moreover, a hair clip is attachable to the wearers hair and concealable therein, this clip having a miniature battery mounted thereon. The electrical circult for connecting the battery to the bulb includes the chain, and when the links of the chain contact with one another or adjacent links are separated, the bulb will flash on and oil, respectively, in response to movements of the wearers head.

Other objects and advantages will appear as the specification continues, and the novel features of the invention will be pointed out in the appended claims.

DRAWING For a better understanding of the invention, reference should be had to the accompanying drawing, forming part of this specification, in which:

FIG. 1 is an assembly view of my earring with flashing electric bulb;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of the hair clip and battery for providing the power source for the electric bulb; and

FIG. 3 is a wiring diagram.

While I have shown only one embodiment of the in vention, it should be understood that various changes, or modifications, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the drawing in detail, I have shown an ear clasp designated generally at A engageable with the lobe of a wearers ear. It has an outer bracket 10 arranged to be placed on the outside surface of the ear lobe, and an inner lever 11 and adapted to be placed in back of the lobe, the lever 11 being hinged at 12 to the bracket it and a spring 13 yieldingly urges the upper tip of the lever toward the bracket in the conventional manner.

It will be noted that pendant means B is secured to the ear clasp A to hang freely therefrom, and this pendant i States Patent 3,383,563 Patented May 14, 1968 ice means consists of a chain having a plurality of interconnected links 14. The upper link of this chain is attached to an eyelet 15 on the bracket 15, and a miniature electric bulb C is supported on the lower end of the chain for swinging movements.

An enlarged protective ornamental shell D surrounds the electric bulb C to enclose the latter, this shell being swingable with the pendant means B. Also, a dome cap 16 is secured over the upper portion of the shell and fixed thereto, this cap being attached to the lower link of the chain, and the bulb C being supported from this cap.

The filament wire 17 has a lead 18 that is connected to the lower end of the chain or pendant means B, while the second lead 19 is connected to a wire 24 which is woven through the links 14 of the chain (see FIG. 1). Of course, the wire 20 is covered with insulation.

As disclosed in FIGS. 1 and 2, a hair clip E is provided and it is dimensioned to be concealed in the wearers hair and attached thereto. This hair clip is conventional, and it includes an upper finger 21 and a lower finger 22, these fingers being fulcrumed together at 23 and yieldingly urged toward one another by a spring 24. A battery of miniature size is designated at 25 and is mounted on the clip for support thereby.

The electrical circuit for connecting the battery 25 to the bulb C includes one wire 26 that leads from the positive of the battery to a male part 27 of a plug connector F (see FIG. 1). A second wire 28 leads from the negative of the battery to the male part 27 of this same plug connector. The female part 29 of the plug connector F has a wire 30 that leads to the metal bracket 10 of the ear clasp A, and as previously mentioned this bracket is connected to the top of the chain pendant means B. The wire 24) from the lead 19 is connected to the female part 29 of the plug connector.

It will be apparent from the foregoing details that the circuit from the battery 25 to the blub C is completed when the adjacent links 14 remain in contact with one another and the circuit is broken when adjacent links 14 are moved out of contact with each other.

The plug connector permits the hair clip E and its battery 25 to be disconnected from the earring clasp A and its electric bulb C, and at this time the battery may be recharged. Also, the disconnection thus afforded facilitates packaging of the items.

The ornamental shell may be made from glass that is coated with tinted plastic, or the glass may be tinted instead. The hair clip Power Pack E shall be covered with a latex or plastic in three shades, corresponding with the three basic shades of hair.

I claim:

1. In an earring with flashing electric bulb:

(a) an ear clasp engageable with the lobe of a wearers ear;

(b) swingable pendant means secured to the ear clasp to hang freely therefrom;

(c) a miniature electric bulb supported on the lower end of the pendant means for swinging :movements;

((1) a hair clip attachable to the wearers hair and dimensioned for concealment therein;

(e) a miniature battery mounted on the clip for support thereby;

(f) and an electrical circuit connecting the battery to the bulb to illuminate the latter, and including means to temporarily complete and break the circuit in response to movements of the wearers head, whereby the bulb will flash on and off, respectively;

(g) the pendant means consisting of a chain having a plurality of interconnected links and this chain forming part of the electrical circuit, the circuit being completed when adjacent links remain in contact with 3 4 one another and the circuit being broken when adjaspouse to movements of the wearers head, whereby cent links are moved out of contact with each other. the bulb will flash on and off, respectively; 2. The earring with flashing electric bulb, as set forth (g) an enlarged protective ornamental shell surroundin claim 1; ing the electric bulb to enclose the latter, the shell (h) and in which the electrical circuit includes a Wire 5 being swingable with the pendant means;

that is woven through the links of the chain. (h) and a dome cap secured over the upper portion 3. In an earring with flashing electric bulb; of the ornamental shell and fixed thereto, this cap (a) an ear clasp engageable with the lobe of a wearers being attached o the l r e d of the pendant means, and the bulb being supported from the cap.

(b) swingable pendent means secured to the ear clasp 1() to hang freely therefrom; References cued (c) a miniature electric bulb supported on the lower UNITED STATES PATENTS end of the pendant means for swinging movements; 2 123 399 9 1933 Bamhart 2 5 (d) a hair clip attachable to the Wearers hair and 2,546,945 3/1951 Gafiield 240-6.4 dimensioned for concealment therein; 2,733,302 1/1956 Geib et al. 339-l1 XR (e) a miniature battery mounted on the clip for sup- 98,1 8 7/ 19 7 Di Lizio et a1 2406.4 port thereby; 2,854,563 9/ 1958 Catching 240--6.4

(f) an electrical circuit connecting the battery to the bulb to illuminate the latter, and including means to NORTON ANSHER Primmy Examiner temporarily complete and break the circuit in re- J. W. PRICE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2128899 *May 19, 1937Sep 6, 1938Barnhart William SFishing bobber
US2546945 *Oct 3, 1947Mar 27, 1951Raymond N MatsonIlluminated earring
US2733302 *Jul 26, 1950Jan 31, 1956 Microphone mounting for hearing aids
US2798148 *Aug 17, 1953Jul 2, 1957Lizio Alexander DiTwinkling electric illuminated ornament
US2854563 *Jun 3, 1955Sep 30, 1958James W CatchingIlluminated jewelry
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3501628 *Jul 28, 1967Mar 17, 1970William A MaddenIlluminated hair ornament
US3521049 *Sep 27, 1967Jul 21, 1970Gordon W YoungSelf-luminous jewelry
US3624384 *Nov 29, 1968Nov 30, 1971Ledingham Gordon RIlluminated earring
US3689758 *May 23, 1969Sep 5, 1972Power Don WLighted earring
US3805047 *Jul 6, 1972Apr 16, 1974Dockstader RFlashing jewel pendant
US3866035 *Oct 1, 1973Feb 11, 1975Avco CorpCostume jewelry with light-emitting diode
US3968357 *Oct 29, 1975Jul 6, 1976Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc.Illuminated earring which is switched on by securement to the ear
US3984674 *Jan 21, 1975Oct 5, 1976Gilles GuettaIlluminated decorative items
US4170036 *Aug 7, 1978Oct 2, 1979Howard SusselArticle of jewelry with flashing diode
US4262324 *Aug 30, 1979Apr 14, 1981Hermine MurphyOrnamental neckwear
US4271457 *Mar 20, 1979Jun 2, 1981Martin Danny WIntermittent light circuit body movement actuated jewelry
US4337504 *Aug 25, 1980Jun 29, 1982Simpson Colin V MElectronic earring
US4623206 *Dec 28, 1984Nov 18, 1986Fuller James TSpring battery retainer
US5285586 *Jun 26, 1992Feb 15, 1994Goldston Mark RAthletic shoe having plug-in module
US5477433 *Apr 1, 1994Dec 19, 1995Ohlund; Stephen K.Illuminated necklace
US5497307 *Jun 28, 1995Mar 5, 1996Bae; Tae H.Illuminating jewelry
US5680718 *Dec 20, 1994Oct 28, 1997First Choice Trading LimitedIlluminable hat
US6012822 *Nov 26, 1996Jan 11, 2000Robinson; William J.Motion activated apparel flasher
US6341874Jan 21, 2000Jan 29, 2002Robert S. RubinCombination safety strobe device
US6626009Sep 19, 2000Sep 30, 2003Calypso Worldwide Marketing, Inc.Electrically powered article of jewelry comprising an illumination source, a translucent ornament detachably coupled to source such that different ornaments can be used with battery coupled to one of electrical leads
US7064498Mar 13, 2001Jun 20, 2006Color Kinetics IncorporatedLight-emitting diode based products
US7186003Mar 13, 2001Mar 6, 2007Color Kinetics IncorporatedLight-emitting diode based products
US7568364 *Sep 30, 2003Aug 4, 2009Jacqueline Evynne Breuninger BuskopAdvertising device for produce and candy vendors
US7659674May 1, 2007Feb 9, 2010Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc.Wireless lighting control methods and apparatus
US8550652 *May 24, 2011Oct 8, 2013Shen-Ko TsengLight-emitting decoration
US20110292642 *May 24, 2011Dec 1, 2011Shen-Ko TsengLight-emitting decoration
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/104, 362/802
International ClassificationF21V33/00, F21L14/00, A44C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00, A44C15/0015, F21L14/00, Y10S362/802
European ClassificationF21V33/00, F21L14/00, A44C15/00C