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Publication numberUS3384372 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1968
Filing dateAug 24, 1965
Priority dateAug 24, 1965
Publication numberUS 3384372 A, US 3384372A, US-A-3384372, US3384372 A, US3384372A
InventorsWilliam P Dickens
Original AssigneeIndiana University Foundation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Football dummy with protective handgrips
US 3384372 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 21, 1968 w. P. DICKENS FOOTBALL DUMMY WITH PROTECTIVE HAND GRIPS Filed Aug 24, 1965 INVENTOR WILL/AM P DICKENS United States Patent 3,384,372 FOOTBALL DUMMY WITH PROTECTWE HANDGRIPS William P. Dickens, Bloomington, lnd., assignor to Indiana University Foundation, Indiana Memorial Union,

Bloomington, Ind., a not for profit organization of Indiana Filed Aug. 24, 1965, Ser. No. 482,158 Claims. (Cl. 273-) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A new and unique football dummy comprises a preformed, generally cylindrical resilient foam core, 'a semiflexible outer sheath and semifiexible inner sheath, both sheaths being formed of vinyl-coated fabric, with at least two fully padded, protective handgrips being attached to the outer sheath.

This invention relates to football equipment and more particularly to a new and unique blocking dummy suitable for use in team football practices.

Conventionally, football blocking dummies have comprised canvas outer coverings stuffed with materials such as kapok, rags, hair, cotton, or the like. Such dummies are relatively heavy and bulky objects and, as a result, are difiicult to maneuver. A conventional dummy of sufficient size for use in an organized football practice is about 54 inches tall and 14 inches in diameter and weighs approximately 67 pounds. As such, the dummy lacks the maneuverability necessary for use in a modern, organized football team practice. In addition, such a dummy is so heavy that it cannot practicably be used in little league and junior high school football programs.

Professional and college football teams often travel large distances by air to play intersectional opponents. However, in so traveling a team has heretofore been unable to transport its own practices dummies because of their weight.

Furthermore, when a conventional dummy is subjected to continued use and abuse, the canvas outer covering eventually gives away and the stuffing utilized in the dummy pours through the opening in the canvas and is lost. In order to repair the dummy, it must be restuffed (in order to replace the stuffing that has been lost) and resewn. The use of reinforcing materials such as leather at appropriate points on the canvas in order to strengthen the dummy has merely served to prolong the useful life of such a dummy at the expense of further increasing the Weight thereof. Conventional dummies are also subject to damage if exposed to inclement weather, since they are not moisture resistant. Thus, the utility of conventional dummies is not as great as if they were strong and durable, yet relatively light in weight.

Accordingly, the dummies heretofore employed have presented problems of at least two varieties. Such dummies have been subject to wear after repeated use and when exposed to bad weather. Furthermore, the dummies are so heavy that their utility is minimized.

In accordance with the present invention, a new and unique football dummy has been developed in order to obviate the disadvantages inherent in the prior art structures. Briefly, the present invention comprises a preformed generally cylindrical resilient core; a semifiexible outer sheath having a generally cylindrical side wall structure and an interconnected bottom wall structure, the inside diameter of the side wall structure being substantially the same as the diameter of the core and the height of the side wall structure being substantially the "ice same as the height of the core; a semiflexible cover having a top wall structure and an interconnected generally cylindrical depending side wall structure, the inside diameter of the depending side wall structure of the cover being substantially the same as the outside diameter of the side wall structure of the outer sheath, the diameter of the core being large relative to the thickness of the wall structures of the outer sheath and cover, the core being disposed within the sheath and the cover being positioned over the open end of the sheath; and closing means detachably interlocking the cover and the outer sheath.

In addition, at least two handgrips are preferably attached to the side wall structure of the outer sheath and protective covering means may be employed to shield the handgrips. The described dummy may be reinforced by means of a semifiexible sheath having a generally cylindrical side wall structure and an interconnected top wall structure, the inside diameter of the side wall structure of the inner sheath being substantially the same as the diameter of the core and the outside diameter of the side wall structure of the inner sheath being substantially the same as the inside diameter of the previously described outer sheath. The inner sheath is fitted over the core before the core is positioned in the outer jacket.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a new and unique football dummy suitable for use in organized team practices.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a football dummy of the character described which is lightweight and easily transportable.

Yet another object is to provide a football dummy of the character described suitable for use in organized little league and junior high school football programs.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a football dummy of the character described that is extremely durable and, in addition, that is weather resistant.

A still further object is to provide a dummy of the character described, the component parts of which are reusable.

These and other objects, advantages, and features of the present invention will hereinafter appear, and, for purposes of illustration, but not of limitation, exemplary embodiments of the present invention are described in the accompany drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a front perspective view of a football dummy produced in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a generally vertical sectional view taken substantially through the center of the dummy illustrated in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3.3 in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially through the center of a dummy provided with a modified handgrip;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional view of the dummy and modified handgrip shown in FIGURE 4; and

FIGURE 6 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially through the center of a modified dummy produced in accordance with the present invention.

With reference to the drawings, a football dummy 10 is generally depicted in FIGURE 1. Dummy 10- comprises a generally cylindrical semifiexible outer sheath 12 and a cover 14. Outer sheath 12 comprises a generally cylindrical side wall structure 16 and an interconnected bottom wall structure 18. Cover 14 comprises a top wall structure 29 and an interconnected depending generally cylindrical side wall structure 22. The inside diameter of depending side wall structure 22 is substantially the same as the outside diameter of side wall structure 16 so that the cover 14 can be tightly fitted over the open end of sheath 12 as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2.

Sheath 12 and cover 14 are preferably formulated of a water resistant vinyl-coated fabric material (e.g., a 32 Ounce white vinyl coating over a 1.06 cotton twill backing). Although the sheath and cover may be made from other semiflexible covering materials (e.g., nylon cloth), use of the described vinyl-coated fabric material produces a dummy having especially preferred characteristics.

Positioned within the space defined by cover 14 and sheath 12 is a one-piece preformed resilient core 2 (see FIGURES 2 and 3). The core 24 is generally cylindrical and is adapted to completely fill the space defined by cover 14 and sheath 12.. Core 24 may be formed of any of the well-known polymer or rubber foams (cg, foam rubber or vinyl foam). However, polyurethane foam is especially preferred in that a particularly durable, yet resilient core may be obtained therewith.

The various parts of outer sheath 12 are sewn together in a conventional manner in order to form a durable, onepiece structure. Cover 14 is assembled in a similar man ner. If sheath 12 and cover 14 are fabricated from the previously described semifiexible vinyl-coated fabric, a durable, weather resistant protective covering for core 24- is provided.

Closing means are provided in order to detachably interconnect cover 14 and sheath 12. Thus, a first plu rality of eyelets 30 (see FIGURE 1) is provided in cover 14 and a second plurality of eyelets 32 (see FIGURE 2) is provided in side wall structure in of sheath 22 at points corresponding to eyelets 3% in side wall structure 22 of cover 14. A lace 3- (see FIGURES l and 2) is passed alternately through eyelets 3t 32, in order to firmly connect sheath 12 and cover 14 and is tied at an appropriate point (preferably inside sheath 12). In this manner, a unitary structure from which foam core 24- cannot be removed is formed.

Lace 34 may be untied for the purpose of disassembling the component parts of dummy 10. Thus, if the semifiexible fabric outer sheath is damaged, the foam core and cover may be reused simply by reassembling the dummy with a replacement outer sheath.

As shown in the drawings, a pair of handgrips 40 are attached to side wall structure 16 of sheath 12 in order to provide means for holding, lifting, and carrying dummy It). Each handgrip 4t} merely comprises a relatively narrow strip of flexible fabric (see FIGURES 1-3) which is sewn at its upper and lower ends to the side wall structure 16 in order to form a loop through which the holder may slip his hand in order to grasp the dummy.

A preferred form of handgrip t} embodying protective covering means is illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 5. Grip 50 comprises a semifiexible handle member 52, preferably formed of a semifiexible vinyl-coated broken twill fabric. Handle 52 has a generally L-shaped hollow center (see FIGURE 5) and is provided with a fiap 5 which extends along its upper and lower edges and along one side as well. Handle member 52 is attached to side wall structure 16 along flap 54 by conventional means (e.g., by sewing). A preformed resilient foam pad 56, formed of any of the previously described foam materials, is provided in the generally L-shaped hollow center formed in the handle 52 in order to provide the protective padding for a hand inserted in a gripping pocket 58.

In using the grip 50, a hand or fist is merely inserted into pocket 58, so that when a force impacts against the dummy, the holders hand is protected. Thus, grip 50 provides an added safety feature of the present invention.

While a typical dummy constructed in accordance with the present invention (e.g., dummy 1%? as illustrated FIGURES 1-3) is provided with two handgrips, an alter native arrangement involves the provision of three handgrips (each preferably in the form of protective grip 50) 4 at equidistant points on the circumference of outer sheath 16.

A modified dummy 60 is illustrated in FIGURE 6. Dummy 64 comprises an outer sheath 62 having a generally cylindrical side wall structure 64 and an interconnected bottom wall structure 66. An inverted inner sheath ea, having a generally cylindrical side wall structure 70 and an interconnected top wall structure 72, is also provided. A resilient foam core 74 is disposed within inner sheath 625. A pair of handgrips 82 are provided on outer sheath 62.

A cover 76, comprising a top wall structure 78 and a generally cylindrical depending side wall structure 80, is attached over the open end of sheath 62. A lace 84 is threaded through a plurality of eyelets (not shown) in order to interconnect cover 76 with outer sheath 62. In this manner, the core '74 is firmly covered and protected by the inner and outer sheaths.

The inside diameter of inner sheath 68 is substantially the same as the diameter of foam core '74, and the inside diameter of outer sheath 62 is substantially the same as the outside diameter of inner sheath 68. The inside diameter of cover 76 corresponds to the outside diameter of outer sheath 62. Thus, the various component parts of the dummy 6% smoothly fit together as shown in FIG- URE 6, and, when assembled, formv a strong, durable and useful piece of athletic equipment.

Utilization of inner sheath 68 in addition to outer sheath 62 provides a reinforced dummy having an increased useful life thereof. It is especially preferred that inner sheaths be provided for relatively large dummies.

The durability of dummies produced in accordance with the present invention is a substantial advantage thereof. The vinyl-coated fabric of the sheath and cover is, of course, subject to wear and tear (as is the canvas from which dummies are conventionally fabricated). However, when the outer sheath rips or tears, the interior core of the dummy is not lost due to the unitary nature of the resilient foam core.

In addition to the increasing durability and long life of the dummies of the present invention, the use of the preferred vinyl-coated fabric in producing the outer sheath serves to weatherproof the dummy. Thus, the dummy may be left out of doors in all sorts of inclement weather without incurring damage.

Another especial advantage of the dummies of the present invention is the maneuverability that results from their light weight. Thus, they may be employed in little league and junior high school football programs, as well as in high school, collegiate, and professional football programs. Conventional stuffed canvas dummies are so heavy as to be impracticable for use in football programs involving relatively young participants. Thus, the dummies produced in accordance with the present invention fulfill a need not met by conventionally employed dummies.

Also, dummies in accordance with the present invention may be produced in a number of sizes and relevant shapes depending on the use for which they are intended. For example, a dummy which might be employed by a little league or junior high school football team would stand approximately 52 inches high and would be 10 to 12 inches in diameter. Such a dummy would weigh approximately 5 pounds. Another (and slightly lar er) dummy which might be employed by college or professional football teams would stand 42 inches high, but would be 14 to 16 inches in diameter. Such a dummy would weigh approximately 8 pounds. Finally, a very large dummy (i.e., a dummy about 54 inches high and 14 to 16 inches in diameter) would weigh approximately 10 pounds. Conventional stuffed canvas dummies of about the same size would weigh roughly ten times more than the dummies of the present invention.

While several alternative forms have been described with reference to the features of the present invention, it should be understood that combinations of the described alternative forms may be employed without deviating from the teachings of the present invention. It should further be understood that various other changes, variations, and modifications in the structure and function may be effected without departing from the spirit and the scope of the present invention, as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A dummy adapted for use in practicing football comprising:

a generally cylindrical preformed resilient core;

a semiflexible outer sheath having a generally cylindrical side wall structure and an interconnected bottom wall structure, the inside diameter of the side wall structure being substantially the same as the diameter of the generally cylindrical core and the height of the side wall structure being substantially the same as the height of the core;

a semifiexible cover having a top wall structure and an interconnected generally cylindrical depending side wall structure, the inside diameter of the depending side wall structure being substantially the same as the outside diameter of the side wall structure of the outer sheath, the diameter of the core being large relative to the thickness of the wall structures of the outer sheath and cover, the core being disposed within the outer sheath and the cover being positioned over the open end of the outer sheath;

closing means for detachably interlocking the cover and the outer sheath;

a semifiexible handle member attached to the side wall structure of the outer sheath and having a generally L-shaped hollow center portion, the said handle member having a mounting flap formed around three sides thereof;

means attaching the said flap to the side wall structure of the sheath such that a gripping pocket is defined between the handle member and the side wall structure; and

a preformed resilient L-shaped pad disposed within the holly centers of the handle member.

2. A dummy, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the closing means comprises:

a first series of eyelets formed adjacent the lower edge of the depending side wall structure of the cover;

a second series of eyelets formed in the side wall structure of the outer sheath adjacent the first plurality of eyelets; and

lace means passing through the eyelets of the first and second series, the ends of the lace means being tied together.

3. A dummy, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the outer sheath and cover are fabricated from a vinyl coated fabric material and the resilient core is formed from a polymer foam.

4. A dummy, as claimed in claim 1, and further comprising a semiflexible inner sheath having a generally cylindrical side wall structure and an interconnected top wall structure, the inside diameter of the side wall structure of the inner sheath being substantially the same as the diameter of the resilient core and the outside diameter of the side Wall structure of the inner sheath being substantially the same as the inside diameter of the side wall structure of the outer sheath, the height of the side wall structure of the inner sheath being substantially the same as the height of the core, and the said inner sheath being disposed between the core and the outer sheath.

5. A dummy, as claimed in claim 4, wherein the inner sheath, outer sheath and cover are fabricated from a vinyl coated fabric material and the resilient core is formed from a polymer foam.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,574,046 11/1951 Logan 273 2,586,283 2/1952 \Vynn 27355 2,904,337 9/1959 Canning 27355 OTHER REFERENCES Premier Products, Winning Football, May 1964, pp.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2574046 *Jan 13, 1951Nov 6, 1951Roland F LoganPortable dummy for athletic training
US2586283 *Mar 25, 1949Feb 19, 1952Delmos Wynn HermanHandle for football dummies
US2904337 *Oct 30, 1957Sep 15, 1959Canning James RFootball dummy
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3576323 *Jun 13, 1968Apr 27, 1971Pellicer Emil StanleySilhouette fencing target with adjustable arm
US3599975 *May 17, 1968Aug 17, 1971Pellicer Emil StanleySilhouette fencing target
US3697068 *Sep 9, 1969Oct 10, 1972Tranly Walls And Mini Courts PNon-planar ball rebound wall
US4079936 *Nov 22, 1976Mar 21, 1978Schachter Robert SFoam bat
US4396190 *Apr 13, 1981Aug 2, 1983Wilkerson C WilliamWeighted device and method of making same
US4527796 *Sep 30, 1980Jul 9, 1985Critelli Thomas PMethod of filling an athletic bag with air and liquid
US5280905 *Apr 12, 1993Jan 25, 1994James MiccoElectronic football blocking and tackling dummy
US5335906 *Jul 17, 1992Aug 9, 1994Delker Charles LDummy apparatus for football practice
US5454560 *Apr 22, 1994Oct 3, 1995Pan; Shih-ChinMultipurpose base bag
US5503606 *Jan 17, 1992Apr 2, 1996Stephens; Thomas E.Training apparatus
US6261210 *Oct 14, 1993Jul 17, 2001Alexander Marinov LishejkovStriking device
US6918893Oct 2, 2002Jul 19, 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Multiple port fluid control valves
US6976974Oct 23, 2002Dec 20, 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Rotary manifold syringe
US7172572Feb 26, 2003Feb 6, 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Manifold system for a medical device
US8771152Dec 5, 2011Jul 8, 2014Frank B. SilvermanFitness bag and methods of use
US20040082904 *Oct 23, 2002Apr 29, 2004Eric HoudeRotary manifold syringe
WO1995010336A1 *Oct 14, 1993Apr 20, 1995Aleksander Marinov LishejkovKarate-and-boxing sack
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/444, 273/DIG.800, 273/DIG.500, 273/DIG.600
International ClassificationA63B69/34
Cooperative ClassificationY10S273/08, Y10S273/06, A63B69/345, Y10S273/05
European ClassificationA63B69/34F