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Publication numberUS3384438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1968
Filing dateOct 20, 1965
Priority dateOct 20, 1965
Publication numberUS 3384438 A, US 3384438A, US-A-3384438, US3384438 A, US3384438A
InventorsSherbondy William A
Original AssigneeWilliam A. Sherbondy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid wax applicator
US 3384438 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 21, 1968 w. A. SHEZRBONDY LIQUID WAX APPLICATOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 20, 1965 INVENTOR. WILLIAM A. SHERBONDY y 1968 w. A. SHERBONDY 3,384,438

LIQUID WAX APPLICATOR Filed on. 2' Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. WILLIAM A. SHERBONDY United States Patent 3,384,438 LIQUID WAX APPLICATOR William A. Sherbondy, 2517 Guilford Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 44118 Filed Oct. 20, 1965, Ser. No. 498,613 Claims. (Cl. 401139) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A liquid applicator device having a collapsible reservoir tank with slits in a flexible wall, the slits being openable by applying external pressure to the tank.

This invention relates generally to floor waxers, and more specifically to a new and improved valveless hand floor waxer having a collapsible reservoir tank.

An object of the invention is to provide a valveless hand floor waxer having a collapsible reservoir tank which is constructed to obtain even discharge flow and uniform application of the wax to the surface being covered.

Another object of the invention is to provide a valveless hand floor waxer having a collapsible reservoir tank which is adapted to serve as the original container in which the wax is sold.

A further object of the invention is to provide a valveless hand floor waxer as generally described in the previous paragraphs which has an integral handle socket and which may be provided with a filler opening that is defined by either the handle socket or by an optional filler spout.

A further object of the invention is to provide a valveless hand floor waxer including a collapsible reservoir tank which is constructed to controllably release a uniform flow of wax and which is provided with integral spreader structure for uniformly applying the wax.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved hand floor waxer having a valveless reservoir tank as generally described above and which is further characterized by a simplified, inexpensive construction.

The foregoing objects are attained by a new and improved construction comprising a combined reservoir and material dispensing tank having flexible, outwardly convex top and bottom walls. The handle is secured to the top wall of the tank. The bottom wall is provided with a plurality of self-closing fluid outlets in the form of thin, normally closed slits through which liquid wax can be controllably released onto the surface being covered. A separate applicator cloth attachment or the like is not required in the preferred embodiment. In use, the wax in the tank is dispensed directly onto the work surface by flexing the convex walls inwardly to open the normally closed slits. Spreaders for the wax are integrally united with the bottom wall between the rows of slits.

It has been found that the preferred construction of the reservoir tank of this invention achieves more even dispensing flow of the wax than could be obtained with prior art devices. Further, the tank construction is such that the flow can be easily controlled by foot or hand pressure applied to the tank by the user. Another important feature is that the spreaders cooperate in the new tank construction to obtain a moreuniform coverage and application of the wax to the floor than has been possible in the past.

The invention contemplates that the reservoir tank may serve as the original container in which the wax is sold to the user. This feature provides for added convenience to the user, since it is possible merely to attach the operating handle to a new container reservoir tank and to dis- Patented May 21, 1968 card the old one when the wax has been used up. Thus, the invention eliminates the inconvenience and necessity of refilling a wax reservoir.

It is also possible to refill the tank with wax, if this is desired. According to one embodiment, a filler opening is defined by the integral handle socket on the top wall of the tank. The handle serves as a plug for the opening and can be easily removed from the socket when it is necessary to introduce a new supply of wax. In another embodiment, the filler opening is defined by a separate, optional filler spout.

All of the above features are attained in a new waxer construction which can be inexpensively manufactured. As will be made more apparent, the collapsible, valveless reservoir tank, which may include the filler opening and the optional filler spout, can be simply molded as a onepiece plastic unit.

Still other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the preferred construction contemplated by the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a ve tical cross-sectional view of the construction shown in FIG. 1;

FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIGURE 4 is a vertical cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the invention; and,

FIGURE 5 is a vertical cross-sectional view of still another embodiment of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings, and to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 in particular, the floor waxer constructed according to the preferred embodiment of the invention is indicated generally by reference numeral 10. As shown, the waxer 10 includes a reservoir tank 11 and a connected handle 12.

The tank 11 is an elongated vessel having flexible, outwardly convex top and bottom wall portions 13, 14, respectively. As shown, the upper or top wall portion 13 is cambered and curves downwardly toward the ends 15 of the tank to blend with the bottom wall portion 14. Thus, the tank tapers from a zone of maximum crosssectional height midway between its ends 15 to zones of minimum cross-sectional height at the end portions.

The tank 11 is made of a suitable synthetic plastic,

s ch as polyethylene or the like. Preferably, the material is translucent so that the user can see the amount of wax remaining in the tank when the waxer has been used. The illustrated formation of the tank is such that it can be economically molded as a one-piece plastic unit by a simple blow molding operation.

A tubular handle socket 20 is formed integrally with the top wall portion 13 of the tank 11 between the ends 15. In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the handle socket 20 defines an opening 21 into the tank so that it can be filled with liquid wax or the like. The socket 20 is formed with internal threads and an end of the handle 12 is threaded into the socket.

The flexible bottom wall portion 14 of the tank 11 is formed with a plu ality of normally closed slits 26 which serve as self-sealing fluid outlets. The longitudinal slits 26 are arranged in spaced rows which extend between the end portions 15. As shown most clearly in FIG. 3. three such rows are provided, although a greater or lesser number may e formed depending on the size of the tank, the craracteristics of the liquid, and the specific use for which the device is intended.

The liquid dispensed from the tank 11 through the slits 26 is applied by spreaders 27. These spreaders 27 are preferably in the form of parallel strips which extend along the opposite sides of each row of slits. The spreaders 27 are formed of a porous material, such as polyurethane foam, sponge rubber, or the like, and are suitably secured to the bottom wall 14, as by pressure sensitive adhesive. In addition to applying the liquid wax, the spreaders serve to space the bottom wall portion 14 from the work surface so that a uniform flow of liquid is obtained from the slits when they are open.

The manner of using the waxer is both simple and effective. Pressure is applied to the tank 11 to flex the walls 13, 14 inwardly. The operating pressure may be exerted through the handle 12 or by pressing a foot on the top wall 13. The inward flexing of the walls causes the normally closed slits 26 to open and the wax to be expelled through the slits. The quantity of wax discharged in this manner can be controlled easily and effectively by simply varying the pressure which is exerted on the tank and the amount of flexing of its walls. Because of the formation of the tank 11 wherein its internal crosssectional height tapers from a maximum near the center to a minimum near the ends, there is obtained an improved, even flow and distribution of the wax over the work surface. The spreaders 27 enhance the uniform surface coverage and even flow of the wax through the slits by maintaining the slitted portion of the bottom wall spaced from the work surface.

As generally described above, the construction of the tank 11 is such that it is particularly adapted to serve as the original container in which the wax is sold. This feature is made possible by the self-closing action of the slits 26 which prevents wax in the tank 11 from being discharged when not in use. The weight of the liquid in the container tends to bow the bottom wall portion 14 outwardly and thus force the slits into firmly closed positions. When the wax in the container 11 has been used up, the container can be discarded and the handle 20 reconnected to a new one. However, if it is desired to re-use the tank, the handle can be easily threaded out of the socket 20 to permit wax to be introduced through the filler opening 21.

In the modified construction illustrated in FIG. 4, the top wall portion of the tank 36 is formed with an integral filler spout 37 which is separate from the handle socket 38. The filler spout 37 is suitably threaded and a suitable member 39 is provided for closing the spout.

The bottom wall portion 40 of the tank 36 is formed with normally closed slits 41. Spreader members may be united with the bottom wall portion 40 in the same manner as discussed above in conjunction with the embodiment of FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. Alternatively, a substantially continuous spreader member 42 of sponge rubber, plastic foam, or the like may be adhered over the outer surface of the bottom wall 40. As shown in FIG. 4, the continu us spreader member 42 is provided with slits 43 which are continuations of the tank slits 41. The slits 41 and 43 may be formed in the same operation after the member 42 has been secured to the bottom wall of the molded tank 36.

The modified construction shown in FIG. 5 is substantially the same as that shown above in connection with FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 except that it is provided with an additional applicator cloth 45 which is formed of any suitable material such as cotton, chenille, or the like. The applicator cloth 45 is wrapped around the bottom wall portion of the tank and is secured by protuberances 46, the cIUlh preferably being provided with cooperating eyelets. The protuberances 46 may be integrally molded with the top wall portion 13 0f the container. As will be seen from FIG. 5, the spreaders or runners 47 space the cloth 45 from the slits so that the liquid in the container is prevented from wicking through the slits and wetting the cloth when the waxer is not in use.

Many other modifications of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art in the light of the foregoing detailed disclosure. Therefore, it is to be understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention can be practiced otherwise than as specifically shown and described.

What is claimed is:

1. A liquid applicator device comprising a tank having a flexible wall, spreader means prortuding from said wall, said spreader means being formed of a porous liquid applicator material, and said wall including slits opening through said spreader means, said slits being openable to dispense liquid from said tank when said wall is flexed.

2. The applicator device as claimed in claim 1 wherein said tank is a one-piece molded plastic unit including an integral handle socket, said socket forming an opening into said tank so it can be filled with liquid.

3. The applicator device as claimed in claim 1 wherein said tank is a molded plastic member including a filler opening, and means normally closing said opening.

4. The applicator device as claimed in claim 3 wherein said closing means comprises a handle, said handle having an end threaded into said opening.

5. A valveless hand fioor waver comprising a collapsible reservoir tank, said tank having flexible outwardly convex top and bottom wall portions with opposite ends, said top wall portion being cambered so that the internal height of said tank tapers from a maximum midway between its ends to a minimum at the ends, said bottom Wall portion including a plurality of normally closed slits, said slits being openable by applying external pressure to said tank to fiex said wall portions inwardly, and means for securing a handle to project from said top wall portion.

6. The waxer as claimed in claim 5 including a plurality of parallel spreaders projecting from said bottom wall portion and extending between the ends of said tank.

7. The waxer as claimed in claim 5 including a substantially continuous spreader secured to said bottom wall portion, said spreader including openings disposed over said slits.

8. A valveless hand floor waxer comprising a collapsible reservoir tank, said tank having flexible, outwardly convex top and bottom wall portions with opposite ends, said top wall portion being cambered so that the internal height of said tank tapers from a maximum midway between its ends to a minimum at the ends, said bottom wall portion including parallel rows of spaced, longitudinally extending slits, said slits being openable to dispense wax from said tank by applying external pressure to flex said wall portions inwardly, means secured to said bottom wall portion to apply wax dispensed through said slits, said means being formed of a porous material, and a handle socket formed integrally with said top wall portion for securing a handle thereto.

9. The waxer as claimed in claim 8 wherein said tank and handle socket are a molded one-piece plastic unit.

10. The waxer as claimed in claim 9 including a filler spout formedintegrally with said top wall portion and spaced from said handle socket.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS ,989,201 1/1935 Kurtz et al. 401-186 2,186,140 1/1940 Kurtz 40l186 2,771,224 11/1956 Noerger 222-210 2,817,105 12/1957 Di Rubbo 401-207 3,214,783 11/1965 Perry et al. 401-28 3,226,761 1/1966 Adamsky 401-183 3,276,067 10/1966 Boyle et al. 40l--l86 CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner. E. L. ROBERTS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1989201 *Apr 8, 1933Jan 29, 1935Edward KurtzCleaner or applicator
US2186140 *Jan 12, 1938Jan 9, 1940Kurtz Leonard JCleaner
US2771224 *Feb 15, 1955Nov 20, 1956Arthur Boerger EarlHand carried liquid dispenser
US2817105 *Dec 6, 1954Dec 24, 1957Di Rubbo Helen LFloor waxing device
US3214783 *Feb 3, 1964Nov 2, 1965Garner And PerryLiquid soap dispenser
US3226761 *Nov 21, 1962Jan 4, 1966Adamsky WalterContainer applicator
US3276067 *Aug 15, 1962Oct 4, 1966Union Carbide CorpApplicator for dispensing liquids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3484171 *Jan 2, 1968Dec 16, 1969Bissell IncLiquid applicator for a surface
US4201491 *Jun 19, 1978May 6, 1980Truly Magic Products, Inc.Liquid applicator
US4971471 *Jan 5, 1990Nov 20, 1990Sloan David BDisposable mop
US4981384 *Apr 5, 1989Jan 1, 1991Taiyo, Ltd.Applicator
US6371675 *Dec 20, 2000Apr 16, 2002Becton, Dickinson And CompanySkin disinfectant applicator
US7090421 *Jun 24, 2003Aug 15, 2006Northrop Grumman CorporationApplicator assembly for coating fasteners
US8292536Mar 14, 2007Oct 23, 2012Ecolab Usa Inc.Method and apparatus of applying a floor product solution
WO2006090121A1Feb 17, 2006Aug 31, 2006Reckitt Benckiser Uk LtdA fluid applicator
WO2007106570A1 *Mar 15, 2007Sep 20, 2007Ecolab IncMethod and apparatus of applying a floor product solution
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/139, 401/186, 401/264, 222/490
International ClassificationA47L13/10, A47L13/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/30
European ClassificationA47L13/30