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Publication numberUS3385366 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1968
Filing dateJan 6, 1966
Priority dateJan 6, 1966
Publication numberUS 3385366 A, US 3385366A, US-A-3385366, US3385366 A, US3385366A
InventorsElliston Thomas L
Original AssigneeOtis Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Retrievable well packer
US 3385366 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. ELLIST ON RETRIEVABLE WELL PACKER May 28, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 6, 1966 y 8, 968 T. L. ELLISTON 3,385,366

RETRIEVABLE WELL PAGKER Filed Jan. 6, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Thomas L. Elliston Q'EKIII/ Fig 5 BY $44 w/ ym May 28, 1968 T. 1.. ELLISTON RETRIEVABLE WELL PACKER 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 6, 1966 Fig.6

INVENTOR homes L.Ellisron BY Wmm United States Patent 3,385,366 RETRIEVABLE WELL PACKER Thomas L. Elliston, Dallas, Tex., assignor to Otis Engineering Corporation, Dallas, Tex., a corporation of Delaware Filed Jan. 6, 1966, Ser. No. 519,091 14 Claims. (Cl. 166-134) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLGSURE A well packer having an outer sleeve or mandrel provided with anchoring and sealing means movable to anchoring and sealing engagement with a well casing and an inner tubular mandrel slidable in said outer sleeve in sealing relationship therewith after the outer sleeve has been anchored in sealing position, said inner mandrel having means for adjusting the seal means between the outer sleeve and the inner mandrel without removing the packer from the well.

This invention relates to well tools and more particularly to well packers.

An object of this invention is to provide a well packer for sealing between an inner flow conductor, such as a string of tubing telescoped, in an outer flow conductor, such as a well casing, which permits longitudinal movement of the string of tubing relative to the casing while sealing therebetween to accommodate changes in the length of the string of tubing due to temperature changes.

Another object is to provide a well packer having a tubular elongate mandrel, connectable in a string of tubing to constitute a section thereof, a main sleeve mounted on the main mandrel having anchoring and sealing therebetween to accommodate changes in the gagement with the well casing to anchor the main sleeve to the casing and to prevent fluid flow between the main sleeve and the well casing, upon predetermined longitudinal movement of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve, andseal means for sealing between the main sleeve and the mandrel wherein the main mandrel is movable longitudinally relative to the main sleeve after the anchoring and sealing means have been expanded.

Still another object is to provide a well packer of the type described where the mandrel and the main sleeve are provided with means for increasing the compression of the seal means by predetermined longitudinal and rotational movement of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve whereby any wear of the seal means due to movement of the mandrel through the main sleeve may be compensated for.

Another object is to provide a well packer of the type described wherein the packer is provided with means for releasing the anchoring and sealing means from anchoring and sealing engagement with the well casing to permit removal of the packer from the well casing.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the reading of the following description of a device constructed in accordance with the invention, and reference to the accompanying drawings thereof, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a vertically, partly sectional view of the upper portions of the well packer embodying the invention showing the well packer in position for running into a well casing;

FIGURE l-A is a view similar to FIGURE 1, being a continuation thereof, showing a middle portion of the well packer;

FIGURE 1-3 is a view similar to FIGURE 1-A, being a continuation thereof showing the lower portion of the well packer;

"a continuation thereof, showing the lower portions of the 3,385,366 Patented May 28, 1968 FIGURE 2 is a sectional view 'taken on line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken on line 44 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIGURE l-A;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken on line 66 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary planar developmental View of the mandrel of the well packer showing the external J-slots thereof;

FIGURE 8 is a vertical partly sectional view of the upper portions of the well packer showing the anchoring and sealing means of the main sleeve in expanded and anchoring engagement with a well casing prior to the upward movement of the mandrel to its intermediate op erative position relative to the main sleeve;

FIGURE 8A is a vertical partly sectional view, with some parts broken away, showing the middle portions of the packer and is a continuation of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 8-B is a view similar to the FIGURE 8-A, being a continuation thereof, showing the lower portions of the packer;

FIGURE 9 is a vertical view of the upper portions of the well packer with the elements of the packer in the positions assumed thereby during the removal of the packer from the well; and,

FIGURE 9-A is a view similar to FIGURE 9, being packer.

Referring now to the drawings, the packer 20 embodying the invention includes a tubular mandrel 21 having a top or latch section 22, a middle section 23 and a bottom or clutch section 24. The mandrel is connectable in a string of tubing to constitute a section thereof, the upper end portion 26 of the bore of the top mandrel section being enlarged and threaded to receive the lower threaded end portion of an upper tubing section 27 and the lower reduced end portion 28 of the bottom mandrel section being externally threaded for connection in the internally threaded top end portion of a lower tubing section 29. The upper end portion of the middle mandrel section is threaded, as at 31, in the lower end of the top mandrel section and its lower end portion is threaded, as at 32, in the upper end of the bottom mandrel section.

A tubular main sleeve disposed on the mandrel includes a top latch section 36 having an internal annular stop shoulder 37 engageable with the downwardly facing external annular shoulder 38 of the top mandrel section 22 to limit upward movement of the main sleeve on the mandrel. Upward movement of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve is limited by the engagement of its external annular upwardly facing shoulder 40 with the bottom end surface of a retainer ring 41 and releasably secured in the upper end of the latch sleeve section 36 by a plurality of shear screws 42 which extend through threaded bores 43 of the latch sleeve section into radial apertures 47 of the retainer ring. The shear screws will shear to permit upward movement of the retainer ring when a predetermined upward force is' exerted on the mandrel while the main sleeve is held against upward movement.

Rotational and upward longitudinal movement of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve after the shear screws 42 have been sheared is controlled by the engagement of three circumferentially spaced inwardly extending lugs 50 of the latch sleeve section with the surfaces of the top mandrel section defining external circumferentially spaced J-slots 51 thereof. The lugs are welded in suitable apertures of the latch sleeve section. counterclockwise rotation of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve, FIGURE 3, when the lugs are in the upper horizontal leg portions 52 of the J-slots is limited by the engagement of their side surfaces 53 with the vertical surfaces 54 of the top mandrel section defining the ends of the longitudinal leg portions of the J-slots. Clockwise rotation of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve is limited by the engagement of the opposite side surfaces 55 of the lugs with the vertical surfaces 56 of the main sleeve which with its vertical surfaces 57 define the vertical downwardly opening leg portions 58 of the J-slots. When the lugs are in the horizontal leg portions 52 of the J-slots, as illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 3, upward movement of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve is limited by the engagement of the horizontal surfaces 59 defining the lower ends of the horizontal leg portions of the J-slots with the bottom surfaces 60 of the lugs. The mandrel is movable upwardly relative to the main sleeve when it is rotated in a clockwise direction to position the vertical leg portions 58 of its slots in vertical alignment with the lugs 50.

A slip assembly 62 mounted on the main sleeve includes a tubular slip carrier 63 whose upper end portion 64 of enlarged bore is threaded on the intermediate externally threaded portion 65 of the latch sleeve section 36. The slip carrier has a plurality of longitudinal circumferentially spaced downwardly opening slots 66 into which extend the shanks 67 of the slips 68 supported by the slip carrier. The slip carrier has an internal annular recess 70, which opens outwardly to the longitudinal slots 66, in which are disposed the horizontal oppositely extending retainer lugs 71 at the upper ends of the slip shanks. The retainer lugs are engageable with the internal surface 73 of the slip carrier at opposite sides of the Ion? gitudinal slots to limit outward movement of the upper end portion of the shanks. The bottom surfaces 75 of the retainer lugs are engageable with the upwardly facing annular shoulder 76 of the slip carrier defining the lower end of its internal recess to limit downward movement of the slips therein. U ward movement of the slips is limited by the engagement of the top end surfaces 78 of the shanks with the downwardly facing shoulder 79 of the slip carrier defining the upper end of the internal recess 70. The top ends of the lugs are provided with internal bosses 80 which are engageable with the outer surface of the middle main sleeve section 82. The lower ends of the slips are held in their inner retracted positions illustrated in the FIGURE 1 when the slip carrier is in the upper position as the main sleeve illustrated in FIGURE 1 by drag springs 84 which extend through the longitudinal slots 66 of the slip carrier. The upper end portions of the spring are secured to the slip carrier by screws 84 and their lower portions extend into the longitudinal external slots 85 of the slips. The drag springs 84 have middle arcuate portions 86 which extend outwardly of the outer surface of the slip carrier to engage the internal surfaces of a well casing C in which the packer is installable and thus yieldably resist both rotational and longitudinal movement of the slip carrier in the well casing.

The slips are provided with external upwardly facing teeth or serrations 87 engageable with the internal surfaces of the casing to prevent upward movement of the slips in the casing when the slips are moved radially outwardly to their extended positions by the engagement of their arcuate cam surfaces 89 with the downwardly and outwardly extending arcuate surfaces 90 of the bosses 91 on the upper ends of the resilient fingers 92 of an expander 94. The lower end portion of the expander is telescoped in the upper enlarged portion 95 of the bore of a tubular lock sleeve 96. The locking sleeve has an internal annular recess 98 in which are received the latch bosses 99 of the fingers 92. The engagement of the top upwardly facing shoulders of the latch bosses 99 with the internal annular downwardly facing shoulder of the lock sleeve defining the upper end of the latch recess releasably holds the expander against upward movement relative to the locking sleeve when the fingers are held in their outer expanded positions by a wedge ring 101 disposed about the middle main sleeve section. The expander and the wedge ring 101 are releasably secured to one another by three pins 102a, 10212 and 102C and to the main sleeve section by the two shear pins 10211 and 1020 which extend through suitable aligned apertures in the expander fingers, the wedge ring and the main sleeve section 82.

A packing assembly disposed on the main sleeve section 82 includes a coil 111 of a high temperature resistance sealing substance, such as an asbestos impregnated with a suitable sealing compound and expandable anti-extrusion rings 112 and 113. A tubular packing protector 115 is disposed about the packing assembly 110 and about the lower reduced end portion 117 of the lock sleeve 96. Upward movement of the packing protector relative to the main sleeve is limited by a plurality of dogs 118 slidable in longitudinal slots 119 of the lock sleeve whose internal upwardly facing shoulders 120 engage the downwardly facing annular external shoulder 121 of a snap ring 122. The inner portions of the snap ring are disposed in an external annular recess 124 of the main sleeve section 82 which is thus secured against longitudinal movement in the main sleeve. The dogs 118 are secured to the sleeve and to the snap ring 122 by shear screws 126. The shear screws 126 shear to permit upward movement of the retainer ring, and therefore of the mandrel, relative to the main sleeve when upward force is exerted on the main mandrel while the dogs are held against upward movement. The heads of the screws extend into the enlarged outer portions of the apertures of the dogs and ensure that the screws will not shear between the dogs and the packing protector 115.

The middle main sleeve section 82, whose upper end portion is threaded in the lower end portion 130 of the latch main sleeve section 36, has a reduced lower end portion 131 telescoped in an expander section 132 of the main sleeve and releasably secured thereto by a plurality of shear screws 133 which extend through suitable threaded apertures in the expander sleeve section into suitable apertures of the middle main sleeve section. Downward movement of the middle main sleeve section relative to the expander sleeve section is limited by the engagement of its external annular downwardly facing shoulder 134 with an upwardly facing top annular shoulder 135 of the expander sleeve section. A- plurality of balls 136 are disposed between the bottom end surface of the sleeve section 130 and the upwardly facing internal annular shoulder 137 of the slip carrier 63 to facilitate the release of the slip carrier from the main sleeve.

The expander sleeve section has an upwardly convergent frusto-conical expander surface 138 which radially expands when the main sleeve, the packing assembly 110 and the packing protector and the locking sleeve 96 move upwardly relative to the packing assembly 110.

The main sleeve also includes a bottom or slip carrier section 138 whose upper reduced end portion 141 is threaded in the lower end portion 142 of enlarged internal diameter of the bore of the expander sleeve section 132. A plurality of slips 144 are carried by the bottom main sleeve section and are held in their retracted positions by a resilient split retainer ring 145 which is disposed in their aligned external recesses 146. The upward movement of the slips on the bottom sleeve section is limited by the engagement of their lower internal flanges or hooks 148 with the annular bottom shoulder or surface of the external annular flange 149 of the bottom sleeve section. Downward movement of the slips on the inner sleeve is limited by the engagement of their bottom end shoulders or surfaces with an upwardly facing annular shoulder 151 of the bottom sleeve section. The slips have arcuate upwardly and outwardly inclined cam shoulders or surfaces 152 which are cngagcable by the t'rusto-conical expander or cam surface 154 of a tubular expander 155 disposed about the sleeve and releasably secured thereto by a plurality of shear pins 157 which extend through suitable aligned apertures in the expander 155 and the expander sleeve section 132.

The slips have downwardly facing teeth or serrations 158 which are adapted to engage or bite into the internal surfaces of the well casing when the slips are moved outwardly to their expanded positions to prevent downward movement of the slips. Downward movement of the main sleeve relative to the expander is prevented by a plurality of latch members 160 which are segments of a ring, whose internal surfaces have upwardly facing teeth or serrations 161, and whose outer inwardly downwardly convergent surfaces 162 engage the downwardly and inwardly inclined annular carn surface 164 of the expander. The latch segments 161 are biased toward wedging engagement with the bottom main sleeve section 133 and the expander 155 by a spring 16-7 whose bottom end engages the top surfaces of the wedge segments and whose top end engages an internal downwardly facing annular shoulder 168 of the expander 155. A seal assembly 170 which seals between the bottom sleeve section 14-0 and the middle mandrel section 23 includes an upper bearing ring 171 which is engageable with the downwardly facing annular shoulder 172 of the bottom sleeve section to limit upward movement of the assembly relative to the bottom sleeve section, an upper anti-extrusion ring 173, a plurality of expansible annular sealing elements 174, a lower antiextrusion ring 175 and a lower bearing ring 176. The packing is longitudinally compressible by a tubular compressor 178 whose top end shoulder or surface 179 engages the bottom surface of the lower bearing ring. The compressor has external threads 180 which are engageable with the internal threads 182 of the bottom sleeve section. A nylon wedge or slug ring 184 is secured in a suitable recess of the compressor and has an outer end portion which wedges between the threads of the compressor and the bottom sleeve section 140 to resist rotation of the compressor. A vent port 186 is provided in the compressor above its threads to permit escape of any fluid which may be trapped between the packing compressor and the bottom sleeve section below the seal assembly and above the threads.

The packing compressor has a plurality of circumferentially spaced dependent clutch teeth 190 which are adapted to mesh with similar upwardly extending circumferentially spaced clutch teeth 191 of the bottom mandrel section 24 so that the seal assembly 17%) may be compressed by rotating the mandrel when the clutch teeth 190 and 191 are in meshed relationship.

The well packer is particularly adapted for use in well installations wherein the string of tubing, to which the packer mandrel is connected and of which it constitutes a section, is to be subjected to appreciable changes in temperature which cause the length of the tubing to vary appreciably due to expansion and compression, as for example, in wells where steam injection operations are to be performed, and it is therefore desirable that the packer mandrel be free to move relative to the main sleeve 35 and the packing assembly 110' as such changes in the length of the tubing occur.

When the packer is to be installed in a well, the op posite ends of the mandrel are connected to the upper and lower tubing sections 27 and 29, and the various elements of the packer are connected to one another in the positions illustrated in FIGURES 1, 1A and 1B, wherein the upper and lower slips are held in their retracted positions and the packing protector 115 is telescoped over the packing assembly 110. As the packer is inserted into the upper end of the well casing and the drag springs 84 move into the casing, their middle arcuate portions 86 are flexed resiliently inwardly and thereafter frictionally engage the internal surfaces of the well casing as the packing is lowered therethrough. When the packer is moved to the location in the casing where it is desired that it be anchored and set, the upper end of the string of tubing at the surface, and therefore the mandrel 21 is rotated in a clockwise direction, as seen from above, the engagement of the vertical surfaces 56 of the top mandrel section at its J-slots with the side shoulders 55 of the lugs 50 causes rotation of the main sleeve with the mandrel relative to the slip carrier 63 since the rotation of the slip carrier is resisted by the drag springs which are in frictional engagement with the internal surfaces of the casing. Such rotation of the main sleeve relative to the slip carrier now causes the slip carrier to move downwardly on the main sleeve as its threaded portion 64 is unscrewed from the threaded portion 65 of the top main sleeve section 26 since the upward movement of the main sleeve on the mandrel is limited by the engagement of the main sleeve shoulder 37 with the mandrel shoulder 38. When the threaded portion 64 of the sleeve carrier is disengaged from the threaded portion 65 of the top sleeve section 36, the string of tubing is moved upwardly at the surface moves the mandrel upwardly relative to the main sleeve 35 until the mandrel shoulder 40 engages the retainer ring 41 if it is not already in engagement therewith. The main sleeve then moves upwardly with the mandrel relative to the slip carrier 63 and the slips 68. This upward movement of the main sleeve with the mandrel causes the cam shoulders of the expander 96 to move into engagement with the cam shoulders or surfaces 89 of the upper slips 68 and since upward movement of the slip carrier and the slips is resisted by the drag springs, the slips are moved radially outwardly from their retracted positions illustrated in FIGURE 1 to their expanded positions illustrated in FIGURE 6-A. The upwardly facing teeth 87 of the upper slips engage the internal surfaces of the well casing and hold the slip against further outward and upward movement in the casing. When the radially outward movement of the slips is thus arrested, upward movement of the expander and the locking sleeve 96 is arrested. As the upward movement of the tubing string and the mandrel is continued, the two shear pins 1032b and 1020 shear between the mandrel and the wedge ring permitting upward movement of the mandrel relative to the expander 94 and the locking sleeve 96. The wedge ring is still secured to the expander since a greater force is necessary to shear the three shear pins 102 be tween the expander and the wedge ring than that required to shear only the two shear pins 102b and 1020 between the mandrel and the wedge ring.

The packing assembly is now held against upward movement with the main sleeve since the bottom end shoulder of the locking sleeve 96 engages the upper antiextrusion ring 112 of the packing assembly 110. The dogs 118 remain connected to the retainer ring 122 thus causing the packing protector to move upwardly with the main sleeve. As the packing protector 115 thus moves upwardly and progressively out of telescoped position over the packing assembly, the frusto-conical expander surface 133 of the expander main sleeve section 132 moves into and through the packing assembly and expands it radially outwardly toward sealing engagement with the internal surfaces of the casing. The lower end of the locking sleeve and of the packing protector moves above the upper antiextrusion ring 112 of the packing assembly 110. When after the bottom end of the locking sleeve moves above the upper anti-extrusion ring 112, the top surfaces of the dogs 118 move into engagement with the downwardly facing shoulders 195 of the locking sleeve defining the top ends of its longitudinal slots 119 whereupon further upward movement of the dogs and of the packing protector 115 is arrested. The shear screws 128 then shear to permit upward movement of the main sleeve and, as it moves upwardly with the mandrel relative to the packing assembly which is disposed about the expander main sleeve section 132 below its conical surface 138, the top annular shoulder 197 of the expander moves into engagement with the lower anti-extrusion ring 113. Continued upward movement of the main sleeve now longitudinally compresses the packing assembly and causes it to expand furthcr radially into sealing engagement with the expander main sleeve section 132 and the internal surfaces of the well casing. The anti-extrusion rings being of a somewhat harder substance than the packing element 111 bridge the annular gaps between the well casing and the packing protector and the expander 155 to prevent extrusion of the softer element 111 therethrough.

When the packing assembly is fully compressed, the expander 155 is held against further upward movement and the shear pins 157 shear to permit further upward movement of the main sleeve relative to the expander 155. The main sleeve together with the lower slips 144 is thus moved upwardly relative to the expander 155, the split ring 145 resiliently enlarging or opening to permit the radial outward movement of the slips as they are moved radially outwardly due to the camming engagement of their internal cam surfaces 152 with the expander or cam surface 154 of the expander 155. Upward movement of the mandrel and the main sleeve is continued until the outward movement is arrested by the casing of the slips and the engagement of their bottom end shoulders with the shoulder 151 of the bottom mandrel section prevents further upward movement of the main sleeve. The gripping engagement of the downwardly facing teeth 158 of the slips with the casing now prevents downward movement of the slips in the casing. Continued upward movement of the string of tubing and the main mandrel now causes the shear screws 42 to shear and the retainer ring moves upwardly with the main mandrel out of the top main mandrel section 36 to permit such upward movement of the mandrel relative to the main sleeve.

The main mandrel may be moved upwardly relative to the main sleeve since the downwardly opening vertical legs 58 of the J-slots are in alignment with the lugs 50.

The main sleeve now is held against movement in the casing due to the engagement of the upwardly facing teeth 87 of the upper slips 68 and the downwardly facing teeth 158 of the lower slips 144 with the well casing since the slips hold the two expanders 94 and 155 against movement away from each, upward movement of the main sleeve is now prevented by the lower slips and its downward movement is prevented by the latch lugs 160. The packing assembly is of course held in longitudinally compressed and radially expanded sealing positions by the expanders.

The inner seal assembly 170 now seals between the main mandrel and the main sleeve so that no fluids may flow upwardly exteriorly of the main mandrel. The mandrel may be moved upwardly a sufficient distance to permit the tubing to move longitudinally as required due to its contraction and expansion with changes in temperature, the middle mandrel section 23 sliding past the seal assembly 170. If the seal between the main sleeve and the mandrel provided by the seal assembly begins to fail due to wear of the seal assembly due to such movement of the mandrel relative thereto, the string of tubing in the mandrel are lifted until the clutch teeth 191 of the bottom mandrel section mesh with the clutch teeth 190 of the seal assembly compressor 178 whereupon rotation of the string of tubing at the surface also causes rotation of the compressor 178 and its upward movement into the bottom mandrel section to compress further the seal assembly and move it into seal right relationship with the mandrel section 23 and the bottom main sleeve section 138.

It will thus be apparent that the seal assembly 170, which is subjected to wear due to the movement of the mandrel section 23 relative to the main sleeve which is rigidly secured to the well casing, may be further compressed as required whenever it begins to fail to seal properly between the main mandrel and the main sleeve.

Should it thereafter be desired to remove the packer from the well casing, the string of tubing is lowered in the well and rotated as required to cause the downwardly opening vertical leg portions 58 of the I-slots 51 to move into alignment with the lugs of the top main sleeve section 36, whereupon the tubing and the mandrel is lowered further through the main sleeve until the mandrel shoulder 38 engages the upwardly facing shoulder 37 of the main sleeve. A counterclockwise rotation (figure) is then imparted to the string of tubing and the mandrel to cause the lugs 50 to be positioned in the horizontal portions 52 of the J-slots. Upward movement then imparted to the string of tubing and the main mandrel causes the upwardly facing surfaces 59 of the top mandrel section at its J- slots to engage the bottom surfaces 60 of the lugs 50. Further upward movement then imparted to the string of tubing and the mandrel causes an upward force to be exerted on the main sleeve and the shearing of the screws 133 so that the top main sleeve section and the middle main sleeve section 82 are moved upwardly with the mandrel.

The ring 122 moves upwardly with the main sleeve relative to the expander 94 which is held against upward movement by the upper slips and its top annular surface engages the bottom surface of the wedge ring 101. The shear pins 102 then shear to permit the wedge ring to be moved upwardly with the main sleeve section 82 and out of engagement with the internal surfaces of the fingers 92 of the expander 94. When the rings 122 and 101 move above the upper ends of the fingers, the fingers are freed to flex resiliently inwardly to permit the lower ends of the slips 68 to be moved radially inwardly by the drag springs 84. As the upward movement of the mandrel 21 and the top and middle main sleeve sections 36 and 82 continues, the wedge ring 101 and the ring 122 move upwardly above the top end of the expander 94 until the top end surface of the wedge ring engages the downwardly facing surfaces of the top end flanges of the slips 68. Thereafter, the slips and the slip carrier 63 move upwardly with the mandrel above the expander 94, as shown in FIGURES 9 and 9A. As the slips and the slip carrier move upwardly with the mandrel, the packing assembly retracts radially and expands resiliently longitudinally since the locking sleeve 96 of the expander 94 are now freed to move upwardy and are moved upwardly by the resilient force of the packing assembly. Continued upward movement of the string of tubing and the main mandrel, then brings the bottom or clutch section 24 of the mandrel into engagement with the tubular compressor 178. The bottom slip carrier section 138 of the main sleeve, the lower slips 144, the lower expander 155, the main sleeve section 132, the packing assembly 110 and the locking sleeve 96 now have an upward force exerted thereon which causes them to move upwardly. The downwardly facing teeth 158 of the lower slips 144 slide along the internal surfaces of the well casing to permit such upward movement of the slips even though the slips are held against radial retraction by the expander 155. The components of the packer are now in the positions illustrated in FIGURES 9 and 9A and may be removed with the string of tubing from the well casing.

It will now be seen that the well packer 20 includes an elongate tubular mandrel 21 which is connectable in a flow conductor to constitute a section thereof, a main sleeve 35 disposed about the mandrel and having external seal and anchoring means, which are the upper and lower slips 680 and 144, their expanders 94 and and the packing assembly 110 which anchors the mandrel against movement in either longitudinal direction in the well casing and seals between the main sleeve and the well casing, a seal assembly which seals between main sleeve and the mandrel, and means such as the compressor 178 and the clutch teeth 191 for compressing the seal assembly upon upward and then rotational movement of the main mandrel relative to the main. sleeve.

It will further be seen that the mandrel and the main sleeve are provided with co-engugeable means, such as the mandrel shoulder 40, the ring 41 and the shear screws 42 which release the mandrel for upward movement relative to the main sleeve after the seal and anchoring means carried by the sleeve has been set in anchoring and sealing position to an intermediate position wherein the mandrel is free to move longitudinally relative to the main sleeve.

It will further be seen that the length of the mandrel is considerably greater than the length of the main sleeve so that the mandrel may move longitudinally relative to the main sleeve when it is in such intermediate position as required due to the elongation and contraction of the string of tubing in which the main mandrel is connected.

It will further be seen that the packer includes means, such as the J-slots 51 and the lugs 50 which permit reconnection of the mandrel to the main sleeve section 36 when it is desired to remove the packer, in order that subsequent upward movement of the mandrel result first in the release of the upper slips for movement to their retracted positions and their upward movement from their expander 94.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory only, and changes in the details of the construction illustrated may be made by those skilled in the art, within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A well packer including: a tubular mandrel connectable in a flow conductor to constitute a section thereof; a sleeve disposed about said mandrel, said sleeve and said mandrel having means for securing said sleeve in a predetermined intermediate longitudinal position on said mandrel releasable upon predetermined longitudinal and rotational movement of said mandrel relative to said sleeve for permitting upward movement of said mandrel relative to said sleeve; radially expandable anchoring and sealing means carried by said sleeve for sealing between said sleeve and a well casing comprising upper and lower anchor means and a sealing means disposed between said anchor means; seal means for sealing between said mandrel and said sleeve; and means operable by said mandrel for increasing the force of sealing engagement of said seal means with said mandrel and said sleeve.

2. The well packer of claim 1 wherein said upper anchor means is releasable upon predetermined rotational movement of said main sleeve relative to said anchor means for movement to its expanded position to engage a well casing and prevent upward movement of said sealing means, said sleeve having means for expanding said sealing means upon upward movement of said sleeve relative to said upper anchor means and said sealing means, said lower anchor means being movable to expanded position to prevent downward movement of said seal means upon upward movement of said sleeve when said sealing means is in expanded position.

3. The well packer of claim 2 wherein said main sleeve includes an upper portion and a lower portion, said upper portion being releasable from said lower portion for upward movement relative to said lower portion thereof, said upper anchor means being released for movement to retracted position upon predetermined upward movement of said upper portion of said sleeve relative to said upper anchor means.

4. The well packer of claim 3, and protector means releasably secured to said sleeve and initially disposed about said sealing means, said protector means being movable to inoperative position to permit radial expansion of said sealing means.

5. A well packer including: a tubular mandrel connected to a flow conductor to constitute a section thereof; a sleeve disposed about said mandrel, said sleeve and said mandrel having coengageable means releasably securing said sleeve in a predetermined intermediate longitudinal position on said mandrel, said coengageable means being releasable upon predetermined longitudinal and rotational movement of said mandrel relative to said sleeve to permit upward movement of said mandrel relative to said sleeve; upper anchor means carried by said sleeve movable to radially expanded position upon longitudinal upward movement of said sleeve relative to said upper anchor means; sealing means carried by said sleeve below said upper anchor means, said sleeve comprising expander means for radially expanding said sealing means upon upward movement of said sleeve relative to said upper anchor means; lower anchor means carried by said sleeve below said expander means movable radially outwardly to expanded position; seal means sealing between said mandrel and said sleeve; compressor means secured to said sleeve for compressing said seal means between said mandrel and said sleeve when said compressor means is rotated in a predetermined direction relative to said sleeve, said compressor means and said mandrel having means coengageable when said mandrel is moved to an uppermost position relative to said sleeve for causing rotation of said compressor means to rotate with said mandrel.

6. The well packer of claim 5, and means preventing downward movement of said sleeve relative to said lower anchor means.

7. The well packer of claim 5, wherein said upper anchor means comprises a slip carrier on said sleeve, said slip carrier and said sleeve having means holding said carrier in an upper position on said sleeve releasable to permit upward movement of said sleeve relative to said slip carrier upon rotation of said sleeve relative to said slip carrier, drag means extending radially outwardly of said slip carrier, upper slips carried by said slip carrier and movable radially outwardly, and an upper slip expander means movable upwardly with said mandrel relative to said upper slips for moving said upper slips radially outwardly, said upper slip expander means limiting upward movement of said sealing means.

8. The well packer of claim 7, wherein said lower anchor means comprises radially outwardly movable lower slips on said sleeve, lower slip expander means for moving said lower slips radially outwardly upon upward movement of said lower slips and said sleeve relative to said lower slip expander means, said lower slip expander means engaging the lower end of said sealing means whereby said sealing means is longitudinally compressible between said upper and lower slip expander means.

9. The well packer of claim 8, and means preventing downward movement of said mandrel relative to said lower slip expander means.

10. The well packer of claim 9, wherein said sleeve has upper and lower sections releasably secured to one another above said expander means, said upper section and said upper slip expander means having means coengageable upon upward movement of said upper section relative to said lower section for releasing said upper slip expander means from position holding said upper slips in expanded position.

11. The well packer of claim 7, and a tubular protector disposed about said sealing means and secured to said mandrel for upward movement with said mandrel to position above said sealing means.

12. The well packer of claim 11, wherein said lower anchor means comprises radially outwardly movable lower slips on said sleeve, lower slip expander means for moving said lower slips radially outwardly upon upward movement of said lower slips and said sleeve relative to said lower slip expander means, said lower slip expander means engaging the lower end of said sealing means whereby said sealing means is longitudinally compressible between said upper and lower slip expander means.

13. The well packer of claim 12, and means preventing downward movement of said mandrel relative to said lower slip expander means.

14. The well packer of claim 13, wherein said sleeve has upper and lower sections releasably secured to one another above said expander means, said upper section 11 12 and said upper slip expander means having means co- 2,929,453 3/1960 Conrad 166134 engageable upon upward movement of said upper sec- 2 993 073 19 1 Clark et 1 1 tion relative to said lower section for releasing said upper 3,109,490 11/1963 Baker X sllip expanderdgeans fifrom position holding said upper 3,131,764 5/1964 Muse et aL 166 123 P051 5 3,256,437 6/1966 Muse 166-139 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Exammer.

2,837,166 6/1958 Breaux 166 123 X DAVID BROWNEXamiIwP- 2,906,344 9/1959 Clark 166140l0

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3603392 *Sep 15, 1969Sep 7, 1971Schlumberger Technology CorpWell packer anchor
US3631925 *Mar 26, 1970Jan 4, 1972Schlumberger Technology CorpRetrievable permanent well packer
US3797572 *Aug 28, 1972Mar 19, 1974Baker Oil Tools IncApparatus for selective formation treatment
US4296806 *Oct 5, 1979Oct 27, 1981Otis Engineering CorporationHigh temperature well packer
US4408662 *Jul 27, 1981Oct 11, 1983Sooner Oil Tools, Inc.Retrievable packer for oil well casing
US4572290 *Feb 6, 1984Feb 25, 1986Arrow Oil Tools Inc.Mechanical setting tool
US4665977 *Feb 19, 1986May 19, 1987Baker Oil Tools, Inc.Tension set seal bore packer
USRE31933 *Apr 4, 1983Jul 2, 1985Otis Engineering CorporationHigh temperature well packer
EP0155412A2 *Sep 22, 1980Sep 25, 1985Otis Engineering CorporationHigh temperature well packer
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/134, 166/124, 166/139
International ClassificationE21B33/129, E21B33/12
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/1292, E21B33/1208
European ClassificationE21B33/12F, E21B33/129F2