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Publication numberUS3385430 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1968
Filing dateJan 20, 1967
Priority dateFeb 10, 1966
Publication numberUS 3385430 A, US 3385430A, US-A-3385430, US3385430 A, US3385430A
InventorsDitlef Benzon-Petersen Boye
Original AssigneeAkerlund & Rausing Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compound package
US 3385430 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 28, 1968 B. D. BENZON-PETERSEN COMPOUND PACKAGE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 20, 1967 Fig. 2

y 1968 B. D. BENZON-PETERSEN 3,385,430

COMPOUND PACKAGE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 20. 1967 y 1968 B. D. BENZON-PETERSEN 3,385,430

COMPOUND PACKAGE Filed Jan. 20, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 United States Patent Oflice 3 Claims Cl. 206-65) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A plurality (four or six) of packed units are arranged in two parallel rows, with each unit being supported at least on one of its free sides by an elongated sheet of stiff material such as cardboard and being contacted on its remaining free sides by a wrapping sheet of easily foldable material, which wrapping sheet is swept around the two rows of units and fixed along its edges to the sheet of stiff material forming a closed generally parallelepipedic block. The central portion of the elongated sheet of stiff material is folded in between the two rows of units and is provided with registering apertures to form a handle. The wrapping sheet is made frangible, by a perforation line, in a plane dividing the two rows of packed units, so that the compound package can be broken along said perforation line and the so-separated rows of units turned 90 allochirally along a line coinciding with the base line of the handle.

The present invention refers to a compound package containing a plurality of generally parallelepipedic units. A plurality here implies a preferably even number which may be equal to two or higher. For the material of the package there is used an elongated sheet of cardboard or similar stiff material foldable at folding lines and a wrapping sheet of paper, plastics or similar easily foldable material.

The compound package according to the invention is characterized by the fact that the packed units are arranged in two parallel rows, that each unit at least on one of its free sides is supported by said stiff sheet and on the remaining free sides by the wrapping sheet which is swept around the two rows and fixed along its edges to the stiff sheet so as to form a closed, generally parallelepipedic block.

Preferably, the wrapping sheet is provided with a perforation line in the dividing plane between the two rows, whereby the block may be easily parted into two halves connected only by the stiff sheet. Alternatively, a tear-up tape may be provided for the same purpose. If it is desired to be able to divide the package into two completely detached halves, the stiff sheet is also provided with a tear-up perforation in said dividing plane.

If the stiff sheet is subdivided into six fields, of which the two outermost are intended to form end walls of the finished compound package and the two central ones are intended to be folded in between the two rows, and furthermore if the two central fields are provided with registering holes, a handle is obtained which is concealed in the package and which can easily be made accesible by breaking the compound package in the dividing plane between the two rows and turning these two rows through 90 in opposite directions around a line coinciding with the base line of the handle.

If the two central fields are separated by means of a tear-up perforation, the double handle may be subdivided into two single handles, i.e. one handle for each row.

The invention will be described more closely in the following with reference to the accompanying drawings,

3,385,439 Patented May 28, 1968 which by way of example illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIGURES 1 and 2 show the starting materials used for the package according to the invention, i.e. FIG. 1 shows an essentially stiff sheet of corrugated paper and FIG. 2 an easily foldable sheet of paper.

FIGURE 3 shows in perspective the finished package according to the invention, partly broken open to show interior structure.

FIGURE 4 shows the package according to FIG. 3 broken in the dividing plane between the two rows and with these two rows turned through around the base line of the handle.

FIGURES 5 and 6, finally, show various ways in which the package as broken according to FIG. 4 may be stacked.

As will be seen from FIGURES 1 to 4, the package according to the invention may consist of an elongated sheet 1, which by means of folding lines 2, 2', 2, 2 and a perforation line 3 is subdivided into six fields 4, 5, 6, 6, 5', 4. The sheet 1 should be made from a relatively stiff material, e.g. cardboard or corrugated paper.

The package furthermore includes an easily foldable wrapping. sheet 7 which is subdivided into halves by a perforation line 8. This sheet 7 may consist, for example, of paper, plastics or plastics coated paper.

As will be best seen from FIGURES 3 and 4, according to the invention, for example six individual generally parallelepipedic units 9 may be provided for wrapping up in two parallel rows. In FIGURE 3 the packages are indicated, for the sake of clearness, only by dash and dot lines 10. A handle 11 formed by the sheet fields 6, 6 and having handle apertures 12, 12' is folded in between the rows. Thereupon the sheet fields 4, 4 forming end walls are turned up. If then the wrapping sheet 7 is made of a size so as to cover only narrow edge portions 13 of the end walls 4, 4, this may be held in position during the whole of the wrapping procedure by means of suitable catch or support means, not shown.

Taking the finished package as shown in FIG. 3 and striking it for example against an edge 14 as indicated, the package is broken precisely at the tear-up or perforation line 8. The two halves may then be turned each through 90 in opposite directions about a line coinciding with the base line of the handle 11, i.e. the line which is struck aganst the edge 14. By this turning the position shown in FIG. 4 is obtained. This position is very suitable for stacking, for example for exhibition in the shop in whch the indvidual packages 9 are to be held for sale later. Various examples of stacking are shown in FIG- URES 5 and 6. Furthermore, this position is convenient for carrying the package home from the shop.

As will appear from FIGURES l and 3, the stiff sheet 1 may be provided with a tear-up perforation 3, whereby the two halves of the compound package may be completely separated from each other. The units 9 shown may thus also be sold in a group one-half as numerous as in the undivided compound package. As already mentioned, every compound package is to contain at least two rows of units 9. Furthermore, since each row is to contain at least one unit 9, it is easily seen that the package according to the invention may be arranged for the sale of one, two, three or more units 9 at a time.

Obviously, the invention is not limited to the example described above only but may be varied within the scope of the following claims. For example, each half compound package may contain more than one row, e.g. two, three or more rows depending upon how broad the in dividual units 9 are made. Moreover, each row may contain one, two or more layers. Furthermore, the stiff sheet 1 may be extended by two more fields which are intended to be turned up on to the top of the package shown in FIG.

3. This is for facilitating the stacking of the latter, when the individual units 9 are particularly damageable. If the stiff sheet as well as the Wrapping sheet are made from plastics coated material, the attachment of the Wrapping sheet to the stiff sheet may easily take place by sealing by means of simple heating pressure jaws spotwise or along lines to establish a series of seals s. Thereby, a very tight package is obtained, which is of particular importance in packing products sensible to moisture, such as washing agents or the like.

As a result of the invention a compound package is obtained, which in the position thereof shown in FIG. 3 is extremely suitable for stacking, e.g. in connection with the transportation thereof, and the whole smooth faces of which are well adapted for ornamentation. The same package, in the position shown in FIG. 4, is very suitable for stacking in connection with shop exhibition or the like or for being carried home from the shop. In the case of this stacking the ornamentation may also appear to advantage.

I claim:

1. A compound package comprising an elongated rectangular sheet of relatively stiff material, said sheet having first and second center fields interconnected by a fold line, said center fields being folded to lie against each other and being provided with co-registering finger openings to establish an initially concealed handle, third and fourth fields connected respectively to said first and second center fields by fold lines, and fifth and sixth fields connected respectively to said third and fourth fields by fold lines, said third and fourth fields being initially disposed at a right angle to said center fields, and said fifth and sixth fields being disposed at a right angle to said third and fourth fields thereby to initially establish two groups of three fields each disposed on opposite sides of the fold line between said center fields, each said group of three fields supporting a group of parallelepipedic units in direct contact therewith, the combined Wall dimensions of each group of parallelcpipedic units corresponding to the dimensions of each said group of fields thereby to establish a compound package assembly consisting of two halves and having an initial parallelepipedic configuration, and a wrapper of relatively flexible material wrapped around said compound package assembly, said wrapper material being in direct contct with all of those walls of said parallelepipedic units not in direct contact with the fields of each group and being adhered to said fifth and sixth fields which lie at opposite ends of said package assembly, and said wrapper being provided with a perforation line extending transversely across the same in alignment with the fold line between said center fields thereby enabling said wrapped compound package assembly to be broken open along said perforation to expose said center fields and establish the handle formed therefrom as the two halves of the compound package assembly are rotated 90 about the respective fold lines between said center fields and said third and fourth fields.

2. A compound package as defined in claim 1 wherein the fold line between said center fields is perforated to enable the two halves of the compound package to be separated.

3. A compound package as defined in claim 1 wherein said sheet of relatively stiff material and said wrapper material are plastic coated, and adherence of said wrapper to said fifth and sixth fields of said sheet of relatively stiff material is achieved by heat sealing the plastic coatings thereon together.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,046,484 7/1936 Ringler. 2,580,333 12/1951 Thomas 229-51 X 2,660,300 11/1953 Pauls 229-52 X 2,684,178 7/1954 Keeler 229-51 X 3,198,379 8/1965 Creeiman 22951 X 3,215,332 11/1965 Bess 22951 X RAPHAEL H. SCHWARTZ, Primary Examiner. LOUIS G. MANCENE, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2046484 *Sep 14, 1932Jul 7, 1936Carton Container CompanyDuplex container
US2580333 *May 28, 1949Dec 25, 1951Thomas Allen BDivisible carton
US2660300 *Jun 17, 1950Nov 24, 1953Olin Ind IncPackaging explosives
US2684178 *Feb 23, 1950Jul 20, 1954Keeler Frederick ADivisible carton
US3198379 *Jun 25, 1963Aug 3, 1965C W Zumbiel CompanyConvertible article carrier and storage unit
US3215332 *Dec 21, 1962Nov 2, 1965Weyerhaeuser CoCarton
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6129211 *Nov 7, 1997Oct 10, 2000Prakken; BouweRectangular shipping box and display container
US6932265Mar 20, 2003Aug 23, 2005Smurfit-Stone Container Enterprises, Inc.Box convertible to a display container and method of making same
US8424681 *Dec 19, 2006Apr 23, 2013Certainteed CorporationPackage box for specialty shingles
US8763889Jun 30, 2011Jul 1, 2014Lincoln Global, Inc.Stackable carton
EP0306600A2 *Mar 12, 1988Mar 15, 1989OSTMA Maschinenbau GmbHStackable package
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/746, 229/120.11, 229/120.9, 206/198, 206/510, 206/504
International ClassificationB65D5/46, B65D5/48, B65D75/38, B65D71/56, B65D71/00, B65D5/4805, B65D5/00, B65D5/54
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/46064, B65D5/5405, B65D5/46184, B65D2571/00339, B65D71/0014, B65D5/48002, B65D2571/00574, B65D75/38, B65D2571/0079, B65D5/001, B65D2571/0066, B65D5/5495, B65D2571/00487
European ClassificationB65D5/54G, B65D5/46B5, B65D75/38, B65D71/00B2, B65D5/54B, B65D5/46A6, B65D5/00B, B65D5/48A