Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3387081 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1968
Filing dateMay 5, 1967
Priority dateMay 6, 1963
Also published asDE1290567B, DE1297134B, DE1462028A1, DE1462028B2, US3387085
Publication numberUS 3387081 A, US 3387081A, US-A-3387081, US3387081 A, US3387081A
InventorsBradbury Wilburn F, Kleinschmidt Edward E, Kurt Taubmann
Original AssigneeScm Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telegraphic progressive printing system
US 3387081 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 June 4, 1968 E. E. KLEINSCH MIDT ET AL TELEGRAPHIC PROGRESSIVE PRINTING SYSTEM 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Original Filed May a, 1963 INVENTORS EDWARD E.K,LE.INSCHMIDT wmaunu F. moaunx KURT TAUBMANN firmed n June 4, 1968 E. E. KLEINSCHMIDT E L- 3,387,081

TELEGRAPHIC PROGRESSIVE PRINTING SYSTEM Original Filed May 6, 1963 e Sheets-Sheet f;

IN V EN TORS EDWARD E. KLE INSCHMIDT WILBURN F. BRADBURY KURT TAUBMANN June 4, 1968 msc m ET AL 3,387,081

TELEGRAPHIG PROGRESSIVE PRINTING SYSTEM Original Filed May 6, 1963 e Sheets-Sheet s INVENTORS EDWARD E. KLEmscHMm'r WILBURN F. BRADBUKY KURT TAUBMANN BY W fiffPRl/EY 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 MATR\X LINES CAR. RETURN .L.lNE FEED O 7.9 500 3:0 *5 GROUP 33. 34. 35.

6 360 5e. 51 3a. 39. 40.} 4|. 42.0 gs-mm }*1 GROUP T w r mmv w M R k U 0 m WD 4 IL RA KB M CE U Dmm RU A T w L R wm E Y B June 4, 968 E. E. KLEINSCHMIDT ET AL TELEGRAPHIC PROGRESSIVE PRINTING SYSTEM Original Filed May 6, 1963 June 1968 E. E. KLEINSCHMIDT ET AL TELEGRAPHIC PROGRESSIVE PRINTING SYSTEM 6 Sheets-Shae :5

Original Filed May 6. 1963 INVENTOR5 fDM/ARD E K1. E/NSCHM/DT W/LBURN F. BRADBURY N m a m 3.2: m NQWQMNQJ mokqnraziOu Nm KURT TA UBMANN W ATTORNEY June 4, 1968 E, E. KLEINSCHMIDT ET AL 3,387,081

7 TELEGRAPHIC PROGRESSIVE PRINTING SYSTEM I Original Filed May 6. 1963 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 svaNAL nova-C. (2010.0)

INVENTORS' EDWARD E. KLHNSCHMIDT WILBURN F. BRADBUKY KURT TAUBMANN United States Patent 3,387,081 TELEGRAPHIC PROGRESSIVE PRINTING SYSTEM Edward E. Kleinschmidt, Salisbury, 'Conn., and Wilburn F. Bradbury, Northbrook, and Kurt Taubmann, Lake Blulf, Ill., assiguors to SCM Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Original application May 6, 1963, Ser. No. 278,241, now Patent No. 3,324,240, dated June 6, 1967. Divided and this application May 5, 1967, Ser. No. 636,489

11 Claims. (Cl. 178-4) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE There is disclosed a telegraphic progressive printing system with a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communications channel connecting the two units. A diode matrix system and commutator device in the transmitter unit originate and transmit each signal with its pulse units in a predetermined order representing the symbol being transmitted. The signal comprises a multiplicity of sequential intra-signal pulse units including initiating start and terminating stop pulse units and a multiplicity of symbol pulse units equal in number to a predetermined number of blocks constituting a grid block arrangement of a symbol encompassing rectangular space, each specific symbol to be transmitted comprising pulse units corresponding to specific grid block locations in the symbol rectangular space which, when visually reproduced in a symbol rectangle space on a record medium will depict the specific symbol. The receiving recording unit receives the signal and has means for recording by progressive scribing or transcription printing, the symbol represented by the signal, and provision for starting the scribing of the symbol upon receipt of the start pulse unit. There are means for stopping the recording means after each symbol recordation.

This is a division of copending US. patent application Ser. No. 278,241, filed May 6, 1963, now Patent No. 3,324,240, patented June 6, 1967.

This invention pertains to automatic telegraphic systems and apparatus and more particularly to systems whereby transmitted logic is printed in directly legible symbols representative of characters of a language as well as special codes or telegraphic codes. Each symbol is progressively formed by a plurality of printing operations and will be referred to as telegraphic symbol printing.

The transmitting and receiving apparatus of this present invention is especially useful in conjunction with radio signaling systems as well as the usual telegraphic signaling channels. The invention does not use type, rather it specifically pertains to that form of telegraphic system wherein each character or symbol is divided into a predetermined number of units, transmitted as such, received and progressively printed in a predetermined timespace pattern on a full page of paper (rather than on tape) until a representation of the character being transmitted has been formed thereon. It is not a facsimile system per se in that pro-scanning of a symbol is not utilized.

In previously known facsimile apparatus, the paper was moved continuously at a specific speed as was the printing mechanism and in certain models this relationship caused the printed matter to trail off toward the lower edge of the paper. Later modifications had the printing mechanism mounted angularly canted in respect to the continuous movement of the paper but difficulty was still encountered in synchronizing the printing speed with the continuously moving paper and therefore the printed matter still had a tendency to frequently trail off in an upward or downward slant. Thus, an acceptable, easily read copy was still difiicult to obtain without constant readjusting of the receiver mechanism and controls.

In the present invention no definite code is used, no prescanning is necessary and the transmitted signals from an electronic keyboard come in on the line to the receiver and are printed directly on the paper. The incoming signal (which in the exemplary embodiment includes forty-eight (48) units) pulses a hammer magnet and the print hammer strikes the paper through an inked ribbon and prints small dots in a predetermined order to form specific symbols or characters on the paper corresponding to specific signals. By using a stop-start principle, each letter is printed in its own prescribed area in straight lines across the page as occurs with a standard typewriter. This invention also incorporates standard functions similar to those which are basic to telegraph printers, e.g., carriage return, line feed and automatic end-of-line carriage return.

The system and components of the present invention will satisfy a demand for inexpensive telegraphic systems capable of satisfactorily utilizing voice frequency installations, e.g., telephone or radio. Because its signals have 48 pulse points and thirty-five of those are used in the process of forming each symbol or letter character, interruption by normal static pulses should not completely obliterate the unit symbol or cause a wrong symbol to be printed. Such a system can be extremely useful to provide a small, page message, reproducer for police or military vehicles or the like. Furthermore, any type of letter or figure and most other symbols can be printed on a standardized receiver merely by rearranging the unit pulses in each signal in a desired pattern.

Another important object resides in the provision of a novel telegraphic system which is completely compatible with radio and carrier frequency transmission and the receiver recorder of which can be used in conjunction with a standard broadcast radio receiving set to record intelligence, received thereby, in legible form. The system may be used as well for transmitting over telephone, power and similar existing circuits without interfering with the normal functions of such circuits.

Still another object resides in the provision of a novel synchronization method for a telegraphic progressive printing system wherein the speed of the receiver is independent of the speed of the transmitter and can be adjusted without any interference with the speed or operation of the transmitter by an operator as he makes visual observation of the printed image, thus eliminating the need for synchronization pulses in the transmitted signals.

Further objects of this invention will become apparent from the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective drawing of a telegraphic progressive print receiving unit constructed in accord with this invention, the cover being removed to illustrate the working mechanism and the general location of the major components;

FIGURE 2 is a reduced size perspective view of a complete keyboard transmitting unit constructed in accord with the present invention;

FIGURE 3 is a reduced size perspective view of the receiving unit shown in FIGURE 1, in this instance, the cover being included;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a detail portion of the power train for the receiving unit, showing the main drive motor and gear train to the vaned drum;

FIGURE 5 is a detail drawing illustrating the dot construction of the letter B as printed in various configurations depending upon the speed of the receiver in relation to the intra-pulse speed with-in an incoming multiple pulse signal;

FIGURE 6 is a cut away perspective view illustrating the principal components in the keyboard transmitting unit;

FIGURE 7 is a diagrammatic drawing showing, in cle- 'va-tion, a single key and switch assembly of the keyboard unit and broadly illustrates the concept by which the key controlled switching system connects to set up the matrix group which in turn connects a current source to selected segments of the commutator. A portion of a monitoring receiving printer is also illustrated in this figure;

FIGURE 8 is a vertical cross-section illustrating the transmitter commutator, its drive power input train and its relationship to the transmitter start-stop magnet;

FIGURES 920 are detail views illustrating components in the receiver as follows:

FIGURE 9 is a detail plan view showing the print hammer assembly and its relation to the vaned drum;

FIGURE 10 shows a small detail of the print hammer carriage screw in plan view and illustrates the lower end of the print hammer mechanism release lever engaging the stud which cams the lever back into engagement with the carriage screw;

FIGURE 11 is a front elevation detail view of the print hammer assembly and the vaned drum, and shows the structure by which the hammer assembly is attached to the carriage screw;

FIGURE 12 is another front elevation detail showing components omitted from FIGURE 11, illustrating the print hammer assembly return spring and the monorail assembly used to transport the print hammer assembly;

FIGURE 13 illustrates left-hand side details of the print hammer assembly, the monorail carriage and associated operating members, the print hammer assembly being illustrated as it would be connected to the carriage screw during normal travel, the carriage return and line feed solenoid being de-energized;

FIGURE 14 illustrates left-hand side details (as in FIGURE 13) but shows the carriage return and line feed solenoid in an energized condition and the print hammer assembly as it would appear during the carriage return condition;

FIGURE 15 illustrates details which are located on the right-hand side of the machine and shows the paper feed mechanism in an engaged condition and also shows the start-stop mechanism in the stop position;

FIGURE 16 is ar iglrt-hand detail view similar to FIG- URE 15, showing the start-stop magnet de-energized, the start-stop mechanism in a neutral position, the paper feed mechanism disengaged and its solenoid de-energized.

FIGURE 17 is a partially sectioned front elevation of the vaned drum and the manual paper feeding mechanism;

FIGURE 18 is a view similar to FIGURES 15 and 16, showing the start magnet switch open, the carriage returnline feed switch open and the associated mechanism in an operative position;

FIGURE 19 is similar to FIGURE 18 and shows the start-stop switch closed, the start-stop magnet energized and the carriage return-line feed switch closed;

FIGURE 20 is a view similar to FIGURE 19 with the machine shown in the stop position with the start-stop switch closed, the start-stop magnet energized and holding, and the carriage return-line feed switch open. This figure also shows the coincidence adjustment mechanism which is used to synchronize the machine with the incoming signal;

FIGURE 21 represents the transmitter commutator in elevation from the left side (see FIGURE 6), and shows the segments which are wired from the matrix components representing the letter E and also identifies the segments which control the various functions;

FIGURE 22 is a schematic drawing showing three groups of commutator segments: the fifth group, the last group which controls the functions and the first group;

FIGURE 23 is a schematic layout of the 48 segments of the commutator, a portion of an exemplary diode matrix group and several of the key switches. The matrix portion shown is wired to the proper commutator segments and to selected key switches to result in transmission of the letters M, H, B, E, S, V and X when the appropriate key switch is closed;

FIGURE 24 is a block representation of the letter E and K, the shaded squares being those units which must be printed to effect progressive printing of the letter, the shaded squares being numbered in the order of their progressiv recording on the paper;

FIGURE 25 is an enlarged plan view of the print hammer assembly;

FIGURE 26 is a schematic wiring diagram for the reciver and includes the carriage return-line feed operating circuit;

FIGURE 27 is an enlarged view of the vaned drum and the print hammer illustrating their relationship before printing; and

FIGURE 28 is an enlarged view of one drum vane and the hammer blade illustrating schematically the seven positions on the print hammer which eifect printing of selected ones of the seven dots in each of the five vertical rows to result in the letter E.

GENERAL OPERATION A basic telegraphic progressive printing system (see FIGURES 1-3 and 7) includes a transmitter unit 30 (FIG- URE 2) and a receiver unit 32 (FIGURES 1 and 3). Each unit will be connected to a power source (not shown) furnishing electrical power, e.g., volts AC and 12 volts DC, for drive power and signal power. The output signal line. from the transmitter unit can be connected by direct line, e.g., a power circuit or telephone line, to the input of th receiver unit or by radio equipment through a radio channel. The power supply circuits to the transmitter unit 30 and the receiver unit 32 are turned on by respective ON-OFF switches 33 and 34, whereupon the system will be ready for operation.

In the receiver 32, when switch 34 is on the receiver motor 36 is energized as is also the receiver start-stop magnet 37 which immediately blocks all functioning activities of the receiver 32 until the first incoming pulses (start pulses) of a transmitted character signal are received from transmitter 30 as will be explained in greater detail hereinafter.

The receiver 32 now is ready to receive the first of the incoming pulses of a signal which will occur when a key on the transmitter unit keyboard 39 is depressed. Referring to FIGURE7, when a key 38 is depressed it will move down along vertical guide slots in a comb 40, also being guided in a pantograph manner by two pivoted levers 41 and 42. The key unit is moved downwardly against the biasing force of a spring 43 which is connected to a lug on the lower lever 42, and urges the key pantograph unit in 2. CW direction. When released, the key 38 returns under spring bias to its normal position whereat a lower key lug abuts a bumper strip 44, made of a material such as felt, cork, rubber or foam plastic.

When the key is depressed and the lower lever 42 of the pantograph linkage for key 38 moves CCW against the force of spring 43, its projected right-hand lever arm 46 pushes upward against one arm of an associated switch operator lever 47 causing the lever to rotate CW, so a second arm 48 of the operator lever in turn will engage and cause two associated leaf switches 49 and 50 to close in respective, sequential order although closure is almost simultaneous. The first (upper) switch 49 closes a circuit to a diode matrix bank 51, setting up a predetermined circuit through selected diodes in accord with the key which was depressed. The second switch 50 closes a circuit to the transmitter starting mechanism which will be discussed hereinafter.

The diode matrix bank 51 in the transmitter unit can be Wired to form characters of any language using English letters and many other foreign language characters and symbols, so long as they can be formed within the established limits of the squares in the symbol blocks as shown in FIGURE 24. If desired, these limits can, of course, be expanded by making certain changes and modifications in the exemplary mechanisms and circuits and will fall within the confines of this present invention.

The various symbol keys on the keyboard are similar and each will operate two leaf switch units, the first of which in each case connects a circuit to a desired specific matrix diode pattern associated with the specific key and the second of which energizes the transmitter start magnet. In addition to the keyboard, transmitter 30 incorporates a motor driven commutator, by which the key selected matrix diode circuits are energized in a predetermined order and timed relationship, and a commutator start-stop magnet and mechanism.

The transmitter commutator 52 can be seen in FIG- URES 6, 7 and 8 (it is also represented in FIGURE 23) and, in the exemplary embodiment herein described, consists of forty-eight individual stationary segments 53 arranged in a ring on a dielectric base 80 and having no electrical connection between each other. If more complex characters or more functions are needed, or if more time were needed to accomplish the existing functions,

additional segments 53 may be added to the commutator. Each segment 53 of commutator 52 is directly connected via an individual line 54 to the diode matrix bank 51 (only one line 54 being depicted in FIGURE 7). The connections will be explained in more detail hereinafter with reference to FIGURE 23.

After the first switch 49, the matrix switch, associated with'a depressed key is closed and has set up the desired diode pattern in the matrix bank 51, the second switch 50 is closed and completes a circuit sending current through a one-shot multivibrator 55 (FIGURE 7) to a transmitter starting magnet 56, which, when energized, attracts the armature 57 shown in FIGURE 6, moving it in a CCW direction until its blocking end 58 moves out the path of a commutator shaft blocking lever 59. With the blocking armature removed from its path, blocking lever 59 and commutator shaft 60 will start rotating due to drive force transmitted through a slip clutch 61 which includes a gear 62 driven by a worm 63 rotated directly from the transmitter motor 64.

Attached to the right end of and rotating with the commutator shaft 60 is a wiper arm 65 which in turn is fixed to a wiper disc 66 also rotating with shaft 60. Working in sliding contact relationship with the rotational wiper disc 66 is a brush contact 67 (FIGURES 7 and 8). It is through this brush contact 67 that electrical pulses are sent over an output line to the transmitter amplifier 68. The amplified pulses are sent out over the telegraphic network to the aforedescribed receiver start-stop magnet 37 and thence on into the coil of the print hammer operating magnet 69 after certain switching operations have been performed which will be explained later in the text. Note, the rotational speed of the segment wiper 65 is such that it will make a complete rotation before the key operated matrix switch can open upon release of the depressed key.

The basic signal for the system is a character or symbol block made up of forty-eight individual pulse units which, for convenience, can be referred to as mark or space. Each pulse unit corresponds to a segment 53 of the commutator 52. Shown in FIGURE 24, the signal pulse units are arranged in six vertical rows of eight pulse positions or squares in a rectangular block. Thirty-five squares (or pulse units) of the signal block are used to form the actual character or symbol while the remaining thirteen squares are used in the performance of or to effect the various functions such as character spacing, line feed, carriage return, stop and start. This is more clearly illustrated in FIGURE 22 where each numbered commutator segment corresponds to the same number in the squares of the character or symbol block (FIGURE 24).

As stated hereinbefore, the diodes in the matrix bank 51 are wired to set up circuits to the appropriate commutator segments for desired characters and symbols in accord with a depressed key and each of these characters will be printed on a page of paper 70 in one or more printing sequences passing down from square to square from the top to bottom of each vertical row starting in, the first row in a character block progressing through the first five rows from left to right. This, too, will be more fully explained hereinafter.

RECEIVER After the transmit starting magnet 56 is energized to unblock the commutator shaft 60, the wiper arm 65 begins to move around the inside of the commutator 52 (see FIGURE 21). During initial movement the wiper arm 65 moves off of the stop segment #41 (see FIGURE 23), which has a positive signal potential applied thereto, and moved on to the dead start segments #42 and #43. Since the wiper is connected to the transmitter output the signal will commence with two space or no-current pulses and power is instantly removed from the receiver start-stop magnet 37. The receiver stop lever 72 (FIG- URES 18, 19 and 20) will immediately pivot CW on its pivot pin 73, under bias force of a spring 74 so its blocking arm 75 will instantly move out of the path of a stop cam 76 on the receiver function shaft.

During this time, the receiver motor 36 is, of course, running and transmitting drive power through a worm 78 to a worm wheel 79 secured on a transfer shaft 80 (FIG- URE 4). On the opposite end of transfer shaft 80 is a gear 81 meshed with a larger gear 82 which is part of a slip clutch 84. 'By means of the gearing described, rotational power is transmitted to a vaned drum 86 which, like the driven components of slip clutch 84, is non-rotatably attached to the function shaft '87.

'On the opposite end of the receiver unit drum shaft 87 is secured another large gear '88 (see FIGURES 1 and 11) which is meshed With a small gear in a 4:1 ratio. Gear 90 is non-rotatably fixed on a carriage screw 92 and imparts rotational movement thereto (see FIG- URES 15 through 20) whenever the drum shaft 87 rotates. By appropriate timing, the time period for a complete signal cycle is made equal to a one-fourth revolution of the drum shaft 87 and therefore, when gear 88 makes a one-fourth revolution, the carriage screw gear 90 and of course the carriage screw 92 itself will make one complete revolution. If no further logic is transmitted, the drum shaft 87, gear 88, gear 90 and carriage screw 92 will be blocked at the end of the signal cycle by the start-stop magnet stop lever 72 in a manner as will now be described.

Referring to FIGURE 20, the receiver start-stop magnet 37 is illustrated in an energized condition, which pulls the stop lever 72 CCW and holds it with its blocking lug 75 positioned in the path of rotation of drum shaft stop arm 76. This stops the rotation of the drum and the carriage screw 92 and thus prevents the receiver 32 from further printing cycle operations. During periods when no logic is being transmitted, this receiver stop condition will be maintained because current is being channeled through the stop segment of the commutator 52, through the contacts 94 of a DPST switch 96 and from there to the receiver start-stop magnet 37. The start of transmission of the next character, as has been described hereinbefore, causes the transmitter wiper arm 65 to move onto the start segments #42 and 43 (FIGURE 21), thereby breaking the circuit and removing the current flow to the receiver start-stop magnet 37, whereupon the stop lever 72 is released and will immediately rotate CW biased by its spring'74.

During the receiver print operation cycle, when the stop 7 lever 72 is released as shown in FIGURE 18, and rotates CW, a control edge of a top finger 77 moves away from abutment with a switch camming button 98 of DPST switch 96 permitting its movable contact arm 100 to spring in a CW direction, opening switch contacts 94 in the receiver start-stop magnet circuit and immediately cutting off the current to the start-stop magnet 37. The same movable switch arm 100 simultaneously closes contacts 102 to connect the receiver circuit to the print hammer magnet 69 (see FIGURE 26).

Looking at FIGURE 21, the transmitter wiper arm 65, continuing its rotational cycle, moves on past the two dead start segments 42 and 43 and makes contact with the #1 segment of the commutator. If a potential has been placed on this segment by the matrix 51 which has been conditioned by the depressed key, that started the transmission signal cycle, e.g., the #1 segment will be energized in the case of letter E, the receiver circuit to the print hammer magnet 69 is pulsed as the wiper contacts the #1 segment. Such a pulse will occur in a closed circuit from the diode matrix 51 to the #1 segment of the commutator 52, thence through the wiper arm 65 to the wiper disc 66, through the brush contact 67 over the communication lines, or network, to the receiver 32 and finally to the print hammer magnet 69. The print magnet armature 104 (see FIGURE 25) is instantly drawn against the force of its bias spring 107 in a CW motion until its pole end 106 is floating in the air gap between core ends 108 and 110 of the print hammer electro-magnet 69. The floating action is a unique feature in this type of printing mechanism. Note, a sharp impact will occur when the print hammer 112 is operated to strike the inked ribbon 114 and then record paper 70 against a drum vane, yet the gap between magnet core ends 100 and 110 and the armature pole end 106 provide a magnetic flux resilience which provides freedom to the print hammer enabling it to rebound on impact. This relationship eliminates the need for strict tolerances that would otherwise be necessary in the hammer-armature combination and also effectively eliminates the tendency of the print hammer 112 to cut into the paper 70. To provide an adjustment of the travel of the print hammer 112 a small hammer abutment limit screw 113 is located at the spring biased hammer limit position.

Thus, as a result of a current pulse through the #1 commutator segment, the print hammer armature 104 swings on its pivot 105 toward the print hammer magnet 69, and the thin print hammer head 112 which may be designated as a line-shaped hammer or hammer head, attached to the armature 104, is moved toward the vaned drum 86. The head 112 first strikes the inked ribbon 114 and presses it against the paper 70 and the paper 70, in turn, is pressed against a vane 116 of the vaned drum 86 with a resultant printing of a small dot on the paper 70. Each consecutive print operation a segment of the commutator 52 is contacted by the wiper arm 65 and, if potential has been supplied to that segment by the matrix, the completed circuit sends a pulse to the print hammer magnet 69 and the aforedescribed printing operation is repeated until a completed character, such as shown in FIGURE 24, is formed. Complete character formed by specific timing of the printing of dots will be more fully described hereinafter with reference to the vane on the vaned drum 86.

The vaned drum 86 desirably has a small periphery and comprises a flanged core 118, shown in FIGURES 17 and 27, around the periphery of which four equally spaced apart groups of five equally spaced apart vanes 116 have been secured. The core flange may be slotted and the vanes brazed in the slots. Between each group of five vanes 116 there is a blank space 120 which is twice the distance between vanes in a group. Space 120 is provided to accomplish the desirable slight spacing between letters, and to provide a non printing portion of a signal cycle permitting carriage return, stopping and starting functions of the receiver 32. Only one group of five vanes is used in conjunction with the printing of one symbol or character, and since the exemplary mechanism is arranged to provide a physical space between each symbol equal to one of the five vertical rows of blocks in a character signal, the spacing between groups of vanes is double the spacing between vanes within a group.

As has been previously described, during a receiver print cycle the vaned drum 86 rotates the carriage screw 92 and also rotates through gears 88 and 90. Due to rotation of the carriage screw 92, the print hammer carriage 122 will undergo a gradual movement to the right throughout a printing cycle and while dots are being printed in the selected squares to form the character represented by the signal which initiated the print cycle.

Referring to FIGURES 24, 27 and 28, the first row of the letter E (FIGURE 24) is printed by cooperation between the print hammer head 112 and the first vane of a group of vanes 116 (FIGURE 27), the first vane being designated by the reference character Z. Through proper synchronization, the first vane Z arrives at the proper position near the top of the thin print hammer head 112 (see FIGURE 28) at the precise instant that the print hammer magnet 69 is pulsed for the first printed dot at the top of the first row. As shown in FIGURES 27 and 28, any dot required in the first row for any symbol of character will be printed on the Z vane 116 from the top down. In the exemplary letter E, all seven dots in the first row are printed, forming a straight line.

It is here noted that when adjacent segments of the commutator 52 are consecutively energized, the print hammer head 112 remains pressed against the inked ribbon 114 and will tend to draw a line on the paper instead of printing a row of dots (see FIGURE 5 When the first vane Z has moved past the print hammer, one sixth of a print cycle is completed and the carriage screw 92 has rotated one sixth of a revolution moving the print hammer assembly at a constant speed through one sixth of the width of a block (or the width of one row of dots). This increment of travel aligns the print hammer head 112 to start to print at the top of the second row, of the letter B. The commutator wiper arm 65 passing from segment #7 in the first print row has moved on to the dead segment #8 between segments 7 and 8 and thence on to pulse the second row segments #8, #11 and #14 of the commutator 52 and the print hammer magnet 69 is concurrently pulsed according to the energized segments.

The second row of dots will be printed by cooperation between hammer head 112 and the second of vanes 116 which is designated as Y in FIGURE 27. It will not print in the first or extreme top space (see top of FIGURE 24) because of the dead commutator segment #8 but it will print dot #8. There will be no printing in the next two squares or spaces because the print magnet 69 receives no pulses. Then another dot is printed in square #11, two more spaces are skipped and finally the dot in square #14 is printed. The print hammer assembly, which is still being constantly moved to the right by the carriage screw, now aligns the print hammer 112 to print the third row of dots in cooperation with the third of the group of vanes 116, which is designated by the letter X in FIG- URE 27. The wiper arm 65 makes contact, first with a dead segment #15,, and then with matrix conditioned segments #15, #18 and #21 of the commutator 52, pulsing the print hammer magnet 69 at appropriate times and the specific dots in the third row are printed in the manner previously described. The wiper arm 65 contacts a dead segment #2 and proceeds to pass matrixed conditioned segments #22, #25, and #28, the print hammer magnet 69 being again pulsed at appropriate times to print the specific dots in the fourth row, this time in cooperation with the fourth of the group of vanes 116, designated by the letter W.

Finally, the wiper arm 65 contacts the final group of print operating segments which have two energized segments #29 and #35; the final corresponding portions of the letter B are printed in cooperation with the fifth and last of the group of vanes 116 which is designed by the letter V.

This will complete the forming of the letter B, it being noted that five vanes 116 (or one complete group) were used to form the single letter E. Thus, it becomes evident that for every complete revolution of the vaned drum 86, which has four groups of five vanes, four characters can be formed from printed dots.

Clearly depicted in FIGURE 11 (and as will also be apparent in FIGURES 9 and 25), a slight angular bend 134 has been formed in the vertical support plate of the print hammer carriage 122. This places an angular cant on the print hammer head 112, which in conjunction with the constant travel of the print hammer head and relative rotation of the vaned drum, will assure that the dots in each row of a character will be vertical. Without canting the print hammer head 112 as shown, all printed characters would be very noticeably inclined to the left. On the other hand, if it is desired that the vertical aspect of the characters should incline or slant to the right, the print hammer could be canted still further. Whether or not the vertical alignment is used, the horizontal aspect, i.e., horizontally parallel points in a letter, will depend upon achieving synchronization between receiver speed and transmitter speed, to be hereinafter discussed.

After the wiper 65 has moved off of segment number thirty-five of the commutator 52, the wiper arm 65 contacts a blank segment 36,, and concurrently the receiver stop lever 72 (see FIGURE 19) is mechanically carnmed CCW to its stop position, i.e., toward the receiver startstop magnet 37, by a lug 138 on the carriage screw shaft which engages a spring leaf arm 140 on the upper stop lever lug 77. The CCW movement of stop lever 72 causes contacts 94 of the receiver switch 96 to close and complete the circuit through the coil of the receiver start-stop magnet 37.

Bearing in mind that the mechanical camming action of this instant is still holding the start-stop switch 96 closed, the commutator wiper arm 65 will next contact segments #36, 37 and 38 (the carriage return-line feed segments) and if current is present on those segments, a circuit through a carriage return-line feed switch 142 on the receiver and shown in FIGURES 18, 19 and 20, which has, at this point (FIGURE 19), been closed by a lug 232 of a four lobe ca-m 230 fixed on the function shaft 87, will be pulsed. Note that segments #36, 37 and 38 will be energized if a carriage return function is called for from the keyboard transmitter 30. Also, if itis desired that the carriage return-line feed operation be performed automatically, a switch 144 shown in FIGURE 12 and to be hereinafter described in further detail, will put the conjoint CRLF functions into operation. For simplicity, carriage return and line feed will hereinafter be designated simply as CR and LF.

PRINT HAMMER CARRIAGE FEED AND RETURN With reference to FIGURES l1 and 12, a print hammer carriage 122 mounts and moves the print hammer assembly from left to right, during each signal cycle, including any printing operations, by means of the aforedescribed carriage screw 92 in cooperation with a carriage mounted drive lever 145 pivotally secured to the print hammer carriage 12.2. The lever 145 is shiftably mounted on the carriage and is adapted to engage and ride in the threads of the carriage screw 92. The main body of the carriage 122 is a plate member 124 which has an upper portion carrying the print hammer magnet 69 and its armature, a lower portion carrying a guide sleeve 126 slidably disposed over the carriage screw 92, and a 'midportion which is secured to a roller suspension plate 128 which mounts three small grooved wheels 146, 148 and 150. The three wheels straddle a monorail 152 as shown in FIGURE 12.

Print hammer carriage 122 will move to the right along the monorail 152 during the printing operation and when it comes to the end of a completed printed line, the lower wheel 148 will engage and close the automatic CR and LF switch 144 (FIGURE 12). Closing of switch 144 sends current to the CR-LF solenoid (FIGURE 18), energizing it and pulling the solenoid plunger 154 down (see FIGURE 14), which causes a lever 156 which is fixedly secured on a pivotally mounted shaft 158 to rock in a CCW direction against the biasing force of a spring 160. Attached rigidly to the opposite end of the lever shaft 158 is another lever arm 162 to which is pivotally fixed a long wire push rod 164. Rod 164 extends forward to a carriage return tripping bail 166 which is pivotally mounted in the receiver frame below the carriage 122 and in front of the carriage drive lever 145. When solenoid operated lever arm 16-2 operatively moves COW, it shifts the push rod 164 to the right which pushes the tripping bail 166 causing it to pivot in a CCW direction. Pivoting of trip bail 166 causes the operating bail edge 168 to push against a cam portion 169 of the drive lever causing it to pivot CW on its pivoting pin 172, which removes its upper screw engaging tooth 174 from engagement with the carriage screw 92. The drive lever 145 includes a detent point 176 which cooperates with a mating detent point 178 on a detent lever 180 in a manner enabling the drive lever to be detained either in or out of engagement with the carriage screw 92. The detent lever 180 and drive lever 145 are biased toward each other by a spring 182.

Upon the carriage completing a return movement to the left-hand margin, the drive lever 145 will be pivoted CCW to reengage the carriage screw. The reset movement is accomplished by an inclined camming edge 184 of a cam slide 169 on the lower arm of the lever striking a fixed stud 186, see FIGURE 10. The positive camming engagement between lever 145 and stud 186- overrides the detent action of detent lever 180. The reset movement of drive lever 145 is rendered possible, even though the CR-LF solenoid 130 might be still energized, by a cut-out portion 183 in the left hand end of the drive lever tripping bail 1-66, see FIGURE 11. Upon being reset, the tooth 174 of drive lever 145 once again engages between the threads of the carriage screw 92 and the print hammer carriage 122 is ready to again move the print hammer 112 across another line of the page as further signals are received.

The power to provide the carriage return function is derived from a coiled tension spring 188, shown in FIG- URE :12, one end of which is anchored to a receiver frame member 190, the other end being secured to a cable 192 which passes over to the left side of the receiver 32, around an idler pulley wheel 194 and back to an anchor lug extension 196 on the print hammer carriage plate 124. As the print hammer carriage 122 moves to the right under the power of rotating carriage screw 92, it pulls the cable 192 which stretches and stores return power in the coil spring 188. Thus, the instant that drive lever 145 on the print hammer carriage 122 is tripped and released from the carriage screw 92, the hammer carriage 122 will be snapped back, by the spring 188, to the left hand, start-of-line position.

AUTOMATIC FEED LINE Automatic line feed occurs simultaneously with a carriage return operation, whether instigated by a received signal or accomplished mechanically upon the carriage reaching an end-of-line position. In either mode, CR and LF is initiated by the same solenoid 130.

Referring now to FIGURES l5, l6 and 17, when the CR-LF solenoid 130 is pulsed and its plunger 154 is pulled down, the aforedescribed lever 156 (as now viewed by its opposite side) is rotated in a CW direction around its pivot 158. A pawl 198, carried on an arm of lever 156, is moved forward and upward, being forced to rotate slightly in a CCW direction by a biasing spring 200 connected between it and the lever 156. Spring 200 forces the lower end 202 of the pawl 198 to slide against a guide 204 (FIGURE thus restricting the movement of the pawl 198 to a degree that the toothed end 266 of the pawl will engage a tooth on a line feed ratchet wheel 208 and index it only one position or the equivalent of one line space. A detent 216 for the line feed ratchet wheel 208, is provided to insure against over-traveling more than one line for each solenoid operation. After the solenoid 139 is de-energized, its plunger 154 will move upward, the lever 156 will rotate CCW and will reset the pawl 198 into a position from whence it can engage the next tooth of the ratchet wheel 208 when the solenoid 130 is again energized.

Turning to FIGURE 17 and with additional reference to FIGURE 1, the line feed ratchet 'wheel 20-8 is nonrotatably fixed to a shaft 212 paralleling and below the drum with one end projected to an exterior location on one side of the covered receiver 32. A manual operating knob 214 is fixed on the projected end of the shaft 212 to enable an operator to manually turn the shaft 212 for feeding as much paper 70 as desired out of the receiver 32. Upon rotation of shaft 212 paper record feeding is accomplished through two gears 216 and 218 non-rotatably secured on the shaft 212 and respectively meshing with two additional gears 220 and 222 which are rotatably mounted on the vaned drum shaft 87 adjacent the ends of the vaned drum 86. The rotatably mounted gears 220 and 222 at the ends of drum 86 have rubber rims 224 and 226 and pressed against each rubber rim is a small, spring loaded roller 228, one of which can be seen in FIGURE 11. A roll of record paper 70 is supported at the rear of the receiver 32, the paper 70 being fed from the supply roll under the vaned drum 86, up in front of drum 86 and behind the ink ribbon 114, between the two rubber rims 224 and 226 and the two spring loaded rollers 228 and out through the top of the receiver. Thus, when feed shaft 212 is turned, either by the solenoid operated pawl 198 and ratchet 268 or by the manual knob 214, record paper 7t) will be fed out of the receiver 32.

To accomplish the conjoint CR-LF function as a result of a signal from the transmitter keyboard 39, the key-board includes a key and an associated dual switch assembly for CR-LF, similar to key 38 and associated switches 49 and shown in FIGURE 7. Depressing the CR-LF key will cause the lever 42 for that key to rotate COW and its end '46 causes an associated switch operating lever 47 to rotate CW, closing the associated first switch 49' (see FIGURE 23) to the diode matrix bank 51. Switch 49, when closed, completes :a circuit placing positive potential on commutator segments #36, #37 and #38, the three segments which control the CRLF functions. The second CRLF key operated switch 50, which is in parallel with all of the second key operated switches 50 (see FIGURE 7), is then closed to start the transmitter wiper arm in the same manner as hereinbefore described.

Because the CR-IJF key operated switches do not control any circuits in the diode matrix, all of the print operating commutator segments #1#35 will be dead and the transmitter commutator wiper 65 will therefore pass over the print segments #1# 35 without effect but when it engages segment #36, it will close a hot circuit to the receiver CR-LF switch 142 shown in FIGURES 18, 19, 20 and 26. The receiver switch 142 is operated four times by a cam wheel 230 during each revolution of the receiver drum shaft 87. The cam Wheel 238 is nonrota-tably fixed to the drum shaft 87 in such a manner as to cause one of the four cam projections 232 to close the CR-LF switch 142 the instant the last vane 116 of the associated one of the four groups around the periphery of the vaned drum 86 passes beyond the printing range of the print hammer 112. Cammed closure of the receiver switch 142, coinciding with the Wiper 65 contacting the commutator segment #36, completes the circuit between the CR-LF switch on the transmitter keyboard 39 and the receiver 32, the receiver CR-LF solenoid 130 is energized and the mechanical CR-LF functions are accomplished, as has been previously described in conjunction with FIGURES l3, 14, 15 and 16.

In further describing the CR-LF solenoid operation, reference is made to the FIGURE 26 circuit diagram. If the receiver stop lever 72 is in the stop position, as shown (same as FIGURE 20), contacts 94 of switch 96 will be closed. If a CR-L'F pulse is transmitted it comes in on the signal line 270, through closed contacts 94 of switch 96, on through line 272 to the start-stop magnet 37 which, when energized, stops the receiver 32 from printing. Current in line 272 is also applied to the CRLF switch 142, which at this stage is closed by the cam wheel 230, and thence through line 274 to energize the coil of a control relay 276 which has one side connected through line 278 to negative. Energizing of the control relay 276 is an instantaneous action which would, in itself, not allow enough time for the CR-L-F solenoid 130 to effectively operate. Therefore, a holding coil 280, incorporated with the control relay 276, will hold the relay contacts 232 closed for a longer period of time, allowing the CRLF solenoid 130 ample time in which to operate effectively. While the holding coil 280 is energized and is holding the relay contacts 282 in the closed position, current is building up in the holding circuit which includes a capacitor 284 and will continue to build up until the capacity of the capacitor 284 has been reached. When this point has been reached, the current stops flowing through capacitor 284, whereupon the holding coil 28%? releases the relay, its contacts 282 go to normal releasing the CR-LF solenoid 130 and simultaneously connecting a resistor 288 across the capacitor. The built-up current in capacitor 284 is dissipated to line 286 through resistor 288. The three commutator segments #36, #37 and #38 shown in FIGURE 23 are energized on a CRLF signal to permit sufiicient energizing time to assure operation of the control relay 276. Likewise, the three segments #39, #40 and #41 are all energized to assure energizing the receiver startstop magnet for stopping of the receiver.

As has been hereinbefore described, once the CR-LF solenoid is energized, the print hammer carriage 122 with the print hammer 112 will be mechanically shifted back to the left side of the paper 70, the paper will have been simultaneously stepped one line space, and the receiver 32 is in condition to receive the next transmitted signals from the keyboard transmitter 36.

RECEIVER SYNCHRONIZATION Throughout the operation, complete synchronization between the keyboard transmitter 30 and the receiver 32 must be closely maintained. A signal representing a symbol to be transmitted is originated at the keyboard transmitter 39 by depressing a key 38 which first, instantly gets up a representation of that symbol in the diode matrix group 51 by placing a potential through predetermined diodes in the matrix, on selected segments of the transmitter commutator 52. This is followed instantaneously by closing the circuit to the transmit starting solenoid 56 to release and permit rotation of the wiper arm 65. As the wiper arm rotates, the pulses from the matrix selected segments are then transmitted to the print hammer magnet '69 of the receiver 32.

If the keyboard transmitter 30 and the receiver 32 are not propery synchronized, the print hammer 112 and the first vane 116 of a group of five vanes on the vaned drum 86 to be used as the print hammer platen for the first row of squares of the transmitted symbol, will not be in proper alignment and, consequently, portions of the printed characters would not be printed. This situation would make the incoming message very hard to read if not totally illegible.

In the exemplary embodiment, each character or other symbol is formed within the bounds of a block area which is divided into 48 units or squares, 8 units high and 6 units wide. This arrangement provides an extra vertical row for a blank interval between each letter as well as providing an extra top line of squares for a blank interval between each line of print. Thus 35 units or squares of the block area are available for forming the actual symbol, 7 units high and units wide. Referring to FIGURE 28, if the first vane of a group of vanes 116 was to rotate too far past the top edge of the hammer toward the center of the hammer head 112 before the print hammer magnet :69 received the first row pulses from the commutator 52 in the keyboard transmitter 30, it could cause the print hammer 112 to record the number one print pulse 234 (FIGURE 24) late, for example, in the print area for the number two pulse. The number two pulse 236 would then fall in the area for the number three pulse 238, number three pulse 238 would fall in the area for the number four pulse 240, etc. The number seven pulse 242 would, of course, be printed by the top of the hammer head 112 on the second vane in the group of vanes 116 in the desired blank space 243, at the top of the second row of square positions. This pattern would continue throughout the printing of the character which, if it happened to be the letter B, would cause the complete lower bar 244 to be lost and printed above the normal character position. If this pattern were to continue it is easily seen that any incoming message could appear somewhat confusing if synchronization were not immediately adjusted.

Synchronization involves two aspects, (1) position of vane groups relative to the complete signal and (2) speed of receiver relative to speed of transmitter.

Vane position synchronization is an aspect wholly Within the receiver and is controlled by an orientation device 246, shown in FIGURE 20, a movable support plate then can be adjustably swung a limited amount CW or CCW around its pivot point which is on the right end of the carriage feed screw 92. By loosening two clamping screws 248 (which may, if desired, have knobs for easy manipulation), the orientation plate 246, when moved to the left for example, within the limits of two arcuate slots 250 in plate 246 causes the stop lever 72 and its pivot pin 73, the start-stop magnet 37 and switch 96 to move with it. The stop lever 72 and its blocking arm 75 will thereby be swung CW away from the stop cam 76. As the foregoing direction of adjustment occurs, the slip clutch 84 on shaft 87 (FIGURE 4) which carries the vaned drum 86, then causes the gap or slack to be taken up through a small increment of rotation of the gears 88 and 90- (FIGURES l8 and 20) thus keeping the stop cam 76 flush against the blocking arm 75 at all times.

The vaned drum 86 being fixed to shaft 87 will rotate as the shaft 87 rotates to take up the adjustment gap, thus repositioning the first vane 116 of the first group in a downward direction to be printed on accordingly in relation to the print hammer 112.

If the orientation plate 246 were moved to the right, the blocking lever arm 75 pushing against the stop cam 76, would force the stop cam, carriage screw and carriage screw gear 90 to rotate CCW. The carriage screw gear 90, being meshed with gear 88 would rotate function shaft gear 88 CW and it, in turn, being fixed to shaft 87 would rotate the shaft 87 CW, overriding slip clutch 84. Thus, adjustment operation would also reposition the vanes 11 6 but move them up in relation to print hammer 112.

Thus, through the adjustment of the orientation plate 246, the print hammer 112 and the leading vane 116 of any one of the four groups of vanes around the periphery of the vaned drum 86 can be exactly synchronized with the incoming start pulses from the keyboard transmitter 30, and this will inherently adjust and synchronize all four groups of vanes.

If tension on the slip clutch 84 would always remain constant, no adjustment of vane position synchronization would probably ever be needed but, due to the construction of the slip clutch 84, a certain amount of wear is inevitable over long periods of time. So, from time to time, the slip clutch 84 will need adjusting which, in turn, will call for an adjustment of the orientation device 246. The calibrations 251 on the lower edge of the orientation device 246 aid the operator in making finer adjustments.

The second synchronization aspect, speed of the receiver 32, correlates the receiver and transmitter and must also be held under close control so that receiver speed does not vary to any degree with the transmission speed of the pulse units within a signal originating from the keyboard transmitter 30. Receiver operating speed is controlled by a simple rheostat, the control knob 252 or" which is seen on the front panel of the receiver 32 in FIGURE 1. The rheostat (not shown) controls the speed of the receiver motor 36 which is a DC shunt wound motor. This, in turn, through the drive train consisting of worm 78, gears 79 and 81 and the slip clutch 84, con trols the speed of rotation of the vaned drum 86 and, of course, all other receiver functions associated therewith.

The operator can tell precisely by visual observation whether or not the receiver 32 is functioning at a proper speed relative to the transmission speed within an incoming signal. Turning to FIGURE 5, three representations of a receiver printed letter E are shown, the first is a normal E, that is, it is symmetrically perfect, denoting that synchronization of receiver speed is in perfect accord with transmitter speed. The second fast E denotes that the receiver 32 is running too fast for the incoming pulses in the transmitted signal, consequently forming the characters with a distinct upward slant. The third slow E denotes a receiver 32 is running too slow for the speed of the pulses in the transmitted signal, thus forming all characters with a distinct downward slant. In either case, the operator can correct any speed deviation in the reception by a simple adjustment of the aforementioned speed control knob 252.

INK RIBBON DRIVE The ink ribbon 114, as shown in FIGURE 1, is driven by a small continuous bead chain 254 which operates between a small sprocket 256 and a larger sprocket 258, the latter having four times as many bead sockets as the small sprocket. The small sprocket 256 is attached to a large gear 260 both of which are rotatably mounted on the line feed shaft 212, the gear 268 being rotated by a meshing gear 262 which, by virtue of being non-rotatably fixed to the shaft 87, derives drive power from the receiver motor 36. The large chain sprocket 258 is fixed to the end of a ribbon drive shaft 264, and because of the 6:1 ratio between the bead chain sprockets 256 and 258, the inked ribbon 114 will travel very slowly across the printing area and moves only when the drum shaft 87 is being rotated. The ribbon drive shaft 264, through associated gear mechanism, drives either one of the two ink ribbon spools 266 and 268. The gear mechanism is of the reversible type, similar to many mechanisms commonly known and used in the art. Since its specific construction is not per se a part of this invention, it will not be further described.

The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiment is therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A telegraphic progressive printing system comprising: a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communication channel connecting the two units;

(a) said transmitter unit comprising a plurality of symbol selecting means, and means responsive to selection of any of said plurality of symbol selecting means for translating said selection into a symbol representative single electrical transmission signal comprising a multiplicity of sequential intra-signal pulse units including an initiating start pulse unit, a terminating stop pulse unit, and a multiplicity of intermediate pulse units equal in number to a predetermined number of blocks constituting a grid block arrangement of a symbol encompassing rectangular space, each specific symbol to be transmitted comprising a predetermined order of distinct symbol pulse units of said intermediate pulse units corresponding to specific grid block locations in the symbol rectangular space which, when visually reproduced in a symbol rectangle space on a record medium, will depict the specific symbol; and

(b) said receiving recording unit comprising means for receiving said signal and means for recording by pregressive transcription printing, the symbol represented thereby, including means in the receiving means for causing the initial start pulse unit of said signal to start the recording means, and means responsive to a stop pulse unit comprising portions of said receiving means and portions of said record ing means for stopping said recording means after each symbol recordation so that the beginning of the recordation of the subsequent received symbol representing signal will begin at a uniform distance from the terminal point of the rectangular space for the preceding recorded symbol.

2. A telegraphic progressive printing system as defined in claim 1, wherein:

(a) said transmitter unit includes a cycling means operated through a single cycle at a predetermined speed to transmit each signal; and

(b) said recording means includes (1) a plurality of lateral line platen means and hammer means with an upright line hammer device, both means being mounted for shiftable movements in paths substantially normal to each other only during the period when a signal is received, and each of said plurality of line platen means and said hammer device being capable of a plurality of relative movements toward each other during reception of a signal by said receiving means,

(2) power drive means including portions of said starting and stopping means and means connected to power drive said platen means and said hammer means at a constant speed rate and also including means to variably adjust said constant speed rate, and

(3) means interconnecting said starting means, said stopping means and said means connected to drive said platen means enabling orientation of the means to start the recording means with the relative positions of said platen means and said hammer means.

3. A telegraphic progressive printing system comprising: a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communication circuit connecting the two units;

(a) said transmitter unit comprising means for transmitting any of a plurality of symbols as a symbol representative single electrical signal comprising a multiplicity of sequential intra-signal pulse units with an initial start pulse unit and a multiplicity of other pulse units equal in number to a predetermined number of blocks constituting a grid block arrangement of a symbol encompassing rectangular space, said other pulse units including symbol pulse units elfective to enable progressive scribing of a 16 printed symbol representative of the transmitted signal; and

(b) said receiving recording unit comprising means for recording by progressive transcription printing the symbol represented by a received signal from said transmitter unit and including means for causing said initial start pulse unit of said signal to start the recording means, and means for stopping said recording means after each symbol recordation so that the beginning of the recordation of the subsequent received symbol representing signal will begin at a uniform distance from the terminal point of the rectangular space for the preceding recorded symbol.

4. A telegraphic progressive printing system for transmitting data information electrical signals on communication channels, including voice frequency channels, each signal comprising a multiplicity of selectively spaced sequential pulse units including an initiating start pulse unit with a multiplicity of other pulse units equal in number to a predetermined number of blocks in a grid block arrangement of a symbol rectangle, each specific symbol to be transmitted comprising a predetermined order of distinct symbol pulse units for specific grid blocks in the symbol rectangle which, when visually reproduced in a symbol rectangle space on a record medium, will depict the specific symbol, comprising:

(a) means including a multiple unit commutator device and a diode matrix with a plurality of output leads individually connected to individual units of said commutator device in a predetermined order, and a plurality of actuable means, each representing a specific data communication symbol, for selectively energizing portions of said diode matrix to apply potential on specific ones of said output leads according to the specific grid blocks representing a symbol and operating said commutator device through a readout cycle of all said commutator units during a period of energization of said diode matrix;

(b) means connected to said commutator device for transmitting a signal comprising pulse units corresponding to the sequential potentials on said commutator units during each cycling of said commutator device; and

(0) receiver means connected via a communication channel to the transmitted output of said transmitter means for receiving said signals and operable through a cycle for each received signal representing a symbol to print, by progressive transcription, portions of said symbol, in selected blocks of a grid block arrangement within a symbol rectangle space, corresponding to the diode matrix controlled sequence of symbol representative pulse units within a signal, until the symbol is reproduced on a record medium, symbols representative of successive signals being character spaced from preceding symbols and printed in a straight line on the record medium.

5. A telegraphic progressive printing system for transmitting data information symbol signals on communication channels, including voice frequency channels, comprising:

(a) means including a multiple segment rotary commutator device and a diode matrix with a plurality of output leads individually connected to individual segments of said com-mutator device in a predetermined order, and a plurality of actuable means, each representing a specific data communication symbol, for selectively energizing portions of said diode matrix to apply potential on specific ones of said output leads according to the specific grid blocks representing a symbol within a symbol rectangle space and operating said commutator device through a cycle during the energizing of said diode matrix;

(b) means connected to said commutator device for transmitting a signal with pulse units in accord with potentials on said segments during each cycling of said commutator device; and

(c) receiver means connected to the transmitted output means of said commutator device for receiving said signals and operable through a cycle for each received signal representing a symbol to print, by progressive transcription, portions of said symbol, in selected blocks of a grid block arrangement corresponding to the diode matrix controlled sequence of symbol representative pulse units within a signal, until the symbol is reproduced on a record medium, symbols representative of successive signals being character spaced from preceding symbols and printed in a straight line on the record medium.

6. A telegraphic progressive symbol printing system comprising: a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communication channel connecting the two units, said transmitter unit including means for transmitting, and said receiving recording unit including means for receiving, data information, including electrical signals, each signal comprising a multiplicity of selectively spaced sequential pulse units including an initiating start pulse unit and a multiplicity of other pulse units equal in number to a predetermined number of blocks in a grid block arrangement of a symbol rectangle, each specific symbol to be transmitted comprising a predetermined order of distinct symbol pulse units of said other pulse units for specific grid blocks in the symbol rectangle which, when visually reproduced in a symbol rectangle space on a record :medium, depict the specific symbol, said receiving recording unit comprising means operable through a cycle in response to each received signal to progressively print portions of said symbol in selected blocks of a grid block arrangement corresponding to the specific symbol pulse units within a signal, until the symbol is reproduced on a record medium, said means to progressively print portions of said symbol including means responsive to a start pulse unit for automatically initiating progressive printing of individual symbols representative of successive signals at positions which are character spaced from preceding symbols and printed in a straight line across the record medium relative to other symbols in the same line.

7. A telegraphic progressive symbol printing system comprising: a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communication channel connecting the two units, said transmitter unit including means for transmitting, and said receiving recording unit including means for receiving, data information, including electrical symbol signals, each signal comprising a multiplicity of selectively spaced sequential pulse units including an initiating start pulse unit and a multiplicity of other pulse units equal in number to a predetermined number of blocks in a grid block arrangement of a symbol rectangle, each specific symbol to be transmitted comprising a predetermined order of distinct symbol pulse units of said other pulse units for specific grid blocks in the symbol rectangle which, when visually reproduced in a symbol rectangle space on a record medium, depict the specific symbol, said receiving recording unit comprising; a rotatable, plural vaned platen drum, drive means including a motor and a start-stop means for selectively rotating said drum, an electro-magnetically operated print hammer assembly, means for feeding a sheet record medium between said drum and said hammer assembly, means responsive to receipt of a start-pulse unit for starting a cycle of operation of said start-stop means, means for accomplishing a coordinated sequence of relative movements between said hammer assembly and said drum to scribe a symbol representation on said record medium in accordance with the symbol pulse units, and means for stopping said drum rotation following scribing of the symbol representation, the record medium being retained stationary by said feed means, said print hammer assembly being continuously shifting toward the end-of-line position and said drum being continuously rotating during said scribing operation.

8. A telegraphic progressive symbol printing system comprising: a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communication channel connecting the two units, said transmitter unit including means for transmitting, and said receiving recording unit including means for receiving, data information, including electrical signals, each signal comprising a multiplicity of selectively spaced sequential pulse units including an initiating start pulse unit and a multiplicity of other pulse units equal in number to a predetermined number of blocks in a grid block arrangement of a symbol rectangle, each specific symbol to be transmitted comprising a predetermined order of distinct symbol pulse units of said other pulse units for specific grid blocks in the symbol rectangle which, when visually reproduced in a symbol rectangle space on a record medium, depict the specific symbol, said receiving recording unit comprising; a rotatable drum shaped device with elongate line platen means mounted exteriorly around the drum axis and extending from one end of the drum shaped device to its other end, movable print hammer means including a magnetically operable hammer device with a line shaped hammer head disposed transverse to the direction of extension of said platen means and adjacent the rotatable path of the platen means, an electro-magnet adapted to actuate said hammer device toward the peripheral platen means, means'mounting said print hammer means for shifting movement in a direction parallel to the axis of said drum, means including start-stop means responsive to a start pulse unit to initiate rotation of said drum shaped device and shifting of said print hammer means, and means repsonsive to the symbol pulse units to operate said electro-magnet at progressive predetermined successive ones of said platen means to thereby progressively scribe a symbol on a record medium, said start-stop means being effective to stop rotation of said drum and shifting of said print hammer means following completion of the scribing of each successive symbol.

9. A telegraphic progressive symbol printing system comprising: a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communication channel connecting the two units, said receiving recording unit having plural platen means, 'a driven printing mechanism to progressively scribe a symbol by a group of intra-signal pulse units, a point printing operating electromagnet device with a line-shaped electro-magnet operated printing hammer cooperable with said platen means, for receiving and accomplishing symbol printing responsive to sequential symbol pulse units of said signals, a start-stop device operable but once for each complete scribed symbol, and means for actuating said start-stop device upon receipt of a start pulse unit to enable operation of said point printing operating electromagnet device and of said plural platen means during receipt of symbol pulse units of said signal, said startstop device being effective to stop operation of said electro-magnet device only subsequent to a predetermined operating period of said driven printing mechanism.

10. A telegraphic progressive symbol printing system comprising: a transmitter unit for transmitting an initiating start pulse unit and a multiplicity of symbol pulse units for each symbol to be transmitted, a receiving recording unit, and a communication channel connecting the two units, said receiving recording unit including a rotatable drum having plural platen means, a travelling printing mechanism having a printing hammer cooperable with said platen means to progressively scribe a symbol on a record medium, means for driving said drum in synchronism With said travelling purinting mechanism, means responsive to the start pulse unit for initiating operation of said driving means to initiate rotation of said drum and travel of said printing mechanism, means for actuating said printing hammer while said printing mechanism is travelling to progressively scribe a symbol on the record medium in response to and in accordance with received symbol pulse units, and means for stopping rotation of said drum and travel of said printing mechanism following completion of the scribing of each successive symbol.

11. A telegraphic progressive symbol printing system comprising: a transmitter unit, a receiving recording unit and a communication channel connecting the two units, said receiving recording unit having plural platen means, a travelling point printing operating electro-magnet device with a line-shaped electro-magnet operated printing hammer responsive to sequential intra-signal symbol pulse units of said signals and cooperable with said platen means to progressively scribe a symbol, a start-stop device operable but once for each complete scribed symbol, and means for actuating said start-stop device upon receipt of a start pulse unit to enable operation of said plural platen means and to drive said electro-magnet device during device at the end of predetermined travel of said electromagnet device.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,656,240 10/1953 Hell 17830 2,658,106 11/1953 Hell 178-30 3,006,997 10/1961 Evensen 178l7 THOMAS A. ROBINSON, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2656240 *Jun 8, 1950Oct 20, 1953Siemens AgRecording apparatus for the reception of message characters
US2658106 *Jun 27, 1950Nov 3, 1953Siemens AgFacsimile printing telegraph system and apparatus
US3006997 *Oct 21, 1958Oct 31, 1961Internat AutomorseKeyboard transmitter for telegraph signs of the morse type
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3476877 *Nov 15, 1967Nov 4, 1969Ncr CoSpacecraft teleprinter using thermal printing techniques
US3924528 *Oct 3, 1973Dec 9, 1975Bauer Messinstrumente AgPrinter
US4030587 *Dec 8, 1975Jun 21, 1977Walker Alexander D RComputer terminal
US4053040 *Oct 20, 1975Oct 11, 1977Mcgourty Thomas KSerial wire matrix printer
US4244288 *Mar 27, 1978Jan 13, 1981Kyodo Insatsu Kabushiki KaishaFlying printer
US4376585 *Apr 2, 1981Mar 15, 1983Mannesmann AktiengesellschaftCombined paper advance and ink ribbon feed system
US4462705 *Jun 22, 1982Jul 31, 1984Seikosha Co., Ltd.Cross hammer dot printer
US4621933 *Sep 17, 1984Nov 11, 1986Ing. C. Olivetti & C., S.P.A.Line spacing mechanism for printing machines
Classifications
U.S. Classification178/4, 178/30, 400/155, 400/232, 400/568, 101/93.4
International ClassificationH04L21/00
Cooperative ClassificationH04L21/00
European ClassificationH04L21/00