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Publication numberUS3387710 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1968
Filing dateAug 16, 1965
Priority dateFeb 27, 1965
Also published asDE1926465U
Publication numberUS 3387710 A, US 3387710A, US-A-3387710, US3387710 A, US3387710A
InventorsPaul Pogacar Peter
Original AssigneePaul Pogacar Peter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Article for use in chromatographic and electrophoretic analysis, separation, and thelike
US 3387710 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3,387,710 ARTICLE FOR USE IN CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND ELECTROPHORETIC June 11, 1968 P. P. POGACAR ANALYSIS, SEPARATION, AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. 16, 1965 FEG.3.

PETer POuL OGACAR INVENTOR.

ATTORNE United States Patent Ofice 3,3817% Patented June 11, 1968 3,387,710 ARTICLE FOR USE IN CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND ELECTROPHORETIC ANALYSIS, SEPA- RATION, AND THE LEKE Peter Paul Pogacar, Philosophenweg la, Heidelberg, Germany Filed Aug. 16, 1965, Ser. No. 479,898 Claims priority, application Germany, Feb. 27, 1965, P 24,846 6 Claims. (Cl. 210-94) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The article of this invention includes a tubular carrier made of transparent material having a coating on its interior surface of an activated adsorbent. The tubular carrier is sealed to prevent deactivation of the adsorbent by moisture and the like. The air-tight seal at one end may be removable and replaceable to reseal the carrier. The sealed tubular carrier may be evacuated or filled with an inert gas.

Background of the invention This invention relates to a device for the chromatographic and electrophoretic separation of dissolved substances for analytical, preparative, and diagnostic purposes. In particular, this invention relates to a carrieradsorbent combination which is highly effective for thinlayer liquid chromatography and electrophoretic separations of substances.

ground glass plates which have been previously cleaned and dried.

The adsorbent layer is then air-dried and activated by heating at temperatures of about 110 C.

In the separation procedure employing this adsorbent layer, the solution containing the substances to be separated is applied with a pipette onto the lower portion of the adsorbent layer. The plate or plates are then placed into a separating chamber with the lower ends thereof immersed in a separation solvent such as butyl alcohol, acetic acid, or the like. The atmosphere in the separating chamber is saturated with the separation solvent. As the separation solvent travels upwardly in the adsorbent layer, the various substance components to be separated travel upward in the adsorbent layer at diiferent speeds. After the lapse of the normal transit time, the individual components arrive at different heights or levels of the plate due to their differing speeds of travel. The various components can then be made visible by spraying the adsorbent layer containing the components with corresponding reagents so that the components can be identified.

The test procedure and general system described above is very reliable, but involves serious complications. It has previously been found necessary to coat each plate with adsorbent individually, and the coated plates must be used for the separation immediately after activation of the adsorbent since the adsorbent becomes rapidly deactivated due to the action of humidity or moisture in the air. Furthermore, the adsorbent coatings are easily damaged, and the coated plates are not suitable for storage or shipment. It has also been noted that the finished chromatograms formed with the use of coated plates tend to fade due to the action of air, and special treatment is necessary to prevent this effect. Although storage of the unused coated plates in an atmosphere free of moisture is possible, such procedures require extensive precautionary measures and additional facilities.

Summary 0] the invention It is an object of this invention to provide a device for chromatographic and electrophoretic separations of dissolved substances which comprises a carrier and a coating of an adsorbent material which can be easily stored for long periods of time without deactivation of the adsorbent. The device can be readily shipped and stored without injury to the adsorbent layer. Furthermore, the device of this invention permits storage of chromatograms while protecting the adsorbent layer from air in a simple and highly effective manner.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the description and the embodiments thereof as shown in the accompanying drawing.

Brief description of the drawing FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a cylindrical embodiment of the device of this invention wherein the tubular carrier consists of glass.

FIG. 2 is a perspective of a longitudinal cross-sectional view of a cylindrical embodiment of the device of this invention.

FIG. 3 is a perspective of a sectional view of a cylindrical embodiment of the device of this invention wherein one end of the tube is closed and a cap is provided for sealing the other end thereof.

Description of the preferred embodiments The disadvantages and difficulties encountered with the prior art systems and devices for chromatographic and electrophoretic separations of dissolved substances have been eliminated in the device of this invention. In the device of this invention, the carrier is formed by a tubular body of transparent material, and the adsorbent is applied as a thin layer to the interior surface thereof. The tubular carrier can be sealed in an airtight manner after the adsorbent is activated. The tubular carrier can be sealed at both ends with suitable caps, or the tubular carrier can be closed at one end, and a cap can be applied at the other end to provide an airtight seal. The interior of the carrier tube can be evacuated or filled with an inert gas after activation of the adsorbent. By virtue of the unique structure of the device of this invention, suitable coated carriers for chromatographic separations may be kept on hand for use when desired, and the troublesome preparatory work in the investigation of mixtures of substances is eliminated. Preparation of highly uniform coated carriers on a factory scale is made possible. Moreover, since the tubular carrier can be tightly resealed after use, a reliable storage of thin-layer chromatograms can be attained. The chromatographic device of this invention eliminates the need for the previously employed separating chamber.

The end of the tubular carrier is merely inserted into the separating solvent to provide the desired separation and thus the carrier serves simultaneously as separating chamber. The interior of the carrier, the area of the adsorbent material surface, is rapidly saturated by the separating solvent. Furthermore, as compared with a conventional separating chamber which has a large volume, the degree of saturation of the atmosphere in contact with the adsorbent surface in the device of this invention can be more easily maintained. Also, the so-called marginal phenomena, an undesirable formation which occurs when fiat coated plates are employed, is prevented by the device of this invention.

Referring to the drawing, the hollow tubular body 1 can be made of a transparent material such as glass or transparent plastics such as polyesters, acrylate and methacrylate polymers, polystyrene, etc. The interior of the tubular carrier 1 is coated with an adsorbent layer 2. The tubular body is hollow and can have a cylindrical cross-section, as shown in the figures, or any other configuration desired such as triangular, square, and other polygonal shapes and oval, ellipsoidal, and other curved shapes or combinations thereof.

The adsorbent is applied to the inner wall of the carrier 1 in a conventional manner. For example, a paste of the adsorbent can be sprayed on the inner wall of the tube. The adsorbent coating is then dried and activated by heating. Since storage of the device without impairment of the activated adsorbent is possible with the device of this invention, the adsorbent coating can be applied on a commercial scale in a factory whereby extremely uniform adsorbent layers can be obtained in contrast to the layers previously applied by hand in the laboratories.

Sealing of the coated tubular carrier 1 can be provided by several methods. For example, as shown in FIG. 3, the tubular carrier can be closed at one end 3 thereof to form a structure similar to that of a conventional test tube. The other end of the tube can be sealed by means of a suitable cap 4. If a tube 1 is employed which is open at both ends as shown in FIG. 2, closing caps 4 can be applied to the ends of the tube to provide a seal in an air-tight manner as shown in FIG. 3. The interior 5 of the tubular carrier can be evacuated or filled with an inert gas after activation of the absorbent layer.

In use of the device of this invention for liquid chromatography, for example the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, the cap 4 is removed, and the solution containing the substances to be separated is applied pointwise or circumferentially to the adsorbent layer adjacent the end of the tube. The carrier tube 1 is then placed with the open end down into a flat container such as a bowl containing the separating solvent. If the embodiment shown in FIG. 2 is employed, either one or both of the sealing caps may be removed prior to use of the tube. The device of this invention is also suitable for carrying out electrophoretic separations. The embodiment shown in FIG. 2 is particularly suitable for this purpose. For such a procedure, the layer of adsorbent in the areas adjacent the ends of the carrier tube 1 can be merely connected in the electrical circuit, and the adsorbent layer can be impregnated with the electrolyte. Since the exterior of the carrier tube 1 is mechanically resistant, heat formed within the carrier tube during the electrophoresis can be easily removed. For example, a tube or hose can be wound around the exterior of the carrier tube, and cooling fluid can be circulated therethrough at a suitable rate to provide a constant temperature within the carrier tube.

Obviously, many modifications and variations of the invention as hereinabove set forth can be made without departing from the essence and scope thereof, and only such limitations should be applied as are indicated in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An article of manufacture for use in thin-layer liquid chromatography and thin-layer electrophoretic separations of dissolved substances, comprising; a tubular carrier made of transparent material, said tubular carrier having a coating on its interior surface consisting at least in part of an activated adsorbent and sealing means sealing the ends of said tubular carrier to maintain said adsorbent in its activated state.

2. The articles of claim 1 wherein the interior of the tubular carrier is evacuated.

3. The article of claim 1 wherein the interior of the tubular carrier is filled with an inert gas.

4. The article of claim 1 wherein at least one end of the tubular carrier is sealed with a removable cap.

5. The article of claim 4 wherein the sealing means at one end of said tubular carrier is formed from the material of the tubular carrier.

6. The article of claim 4 wherein said tubular carrier is resealable by replacing said removable cap.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS SAMIH N. ZAHARNA, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2920478 *Jun 24, 1957Jan 12, 1960Perkin Elmer CorpVapor fractometer column
US3307333 *Oct 31, 1963Mar 7, 1967Perkin Elmer CorpChromatographic columns
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3471261 *Nov 16, 1966Oct 7, 1969Patterson James AMethod and means of overcoming undesirable electrical forces in a chromatographic process
US3547684 *Oct 17, 1968Dec 15, 1970Dow Chemical CoProcess for making organic polymer filled gas chromatographic columns
US3663263 *Apr 3, 1969May 16, 1972Monsanto CoMethod of preparing chromatographic columns
US4382000 *Feb 26, 1982May 3, 1983Owens-Illinois, Inc.Concentric transparent tubes containing absorbent
US4384958 *Feb 26, 1982May 24, 1983Owens-Illinois, Inc.Thin layer chromatography device and method of making chromatography test
US4828704 *Dec 14, 1987May 9, 1989Cosmo Oil Company, Ltd.Thin-layer rod for chromatography
US5288310 *Sep 30, 1992Feb 22, 1994The Regents Of The University Of MichiganAdsorbent trap for gas chromatography
US5811665 *Sep 11, 1996Sep 22, 1998Alanex CorporationLarge scale sorption-driven solid state chromatography
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/94, 96/101, 210/198.3
International ClassificationG01N30/92, G01N30/56, G01N27/447
Cooperative ClassificationG01N27/44747, G01N30/56, G01N30/92
European ClassificationG01N30/92, G01N27/447B5, G01N30/56