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Publication numberUS3387791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1968
Filing dateOct 14, 1965
Priority dateOct 14, 1965
Publication numberUS 3387791 A, US 3387791A, US-A-3387791, US3387791 A, US3387791A
InventorsAllenbaugh Jr George G
Original AssigneeAkron Brass Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nozzle
US 3387791 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 11, 1968 G. G. ALLENBAUGH, JR 3,337,791

NOZZLE Filed Oct. 14, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 was q' 20E; 42 38 Fig. i 5

INVENTOR. GEORGE G. ALLENBAUGH JR BY M27477 ATTORNEYS June 11, 1968 G. G. ALLENBAUGH, JR 3,337,791

NOZZLE Filed Oct. 14, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. GEORGE G. ALLENBAUGH JR.

A RN YS June 11, 1968 G. e. ALLENBAUGH, JR

NOZZLE 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 14, 1965 INVENTOR. GEORGE GALLENBAUGH JR.

ATTQQNE YS 3,387,791 NOZZLE George G. Alienbaugh, Ilia, Rittinan, Ohio, assignor to Akron Brass (Zompany Filed Oct. 14, 1965, Ser. No. 495,968 in Claims. (Cl. 259-458) ABSTRACT OF THE DESCLOSURE A constant gallonage fire-fighting nozzle in which either the gallonage or the stream pattern can be adjusted without changing the other. The nozzle can be shut oil? at its outlet, and can be flushed without shutdown. In a fog adjustment a freely rotating annular turbine at the outlet disperses water.

This invention relates to fire-fighting nozzles and more particularly to fire-fighting nozzles of the constant gallonage type.

On May 30, 1960, United States Patent 2,938,673 was issued to George G. Allenbaugh, Jr., under the title, Nozzle. This patent is directed to a nozzle of the constant gallonage type; i.e., it is a nozzle which can be set in a given volume setting and the stream pattern can be adjusted independently without affecting the rate of flow of fluid through the nozzle. With the nozzle of this referenced patent, one could, for the first time, preselect any one of a plurality of known gallonage positions, set the nozzle in that selected position, and thereafter adjust the stream pattern without effect on the volume of water flowing through the nozzle.

Subsequently, on July 4, 1961, United States Patent No. 2,991,016 was issued to George G. Allenbaugh, lr., under the title, Nozzle. In this second Allenbaugh patent, a movable collar is provided near the outlet end of the nozzle. The collar is movable selectively forwardly to coact with a bafiiehead to provide a shut-off at the outlet end of the nozzle. The principal advantage of this type of shut-oil at the outlet end is that it is possible to quickly open and close the nozzle to provide a sharp, accurate burst of water in a straight stream. These sharp bursts can be used effectively in so-called mop-up operations where residual pockets of fire exist in a structure where the fire has been brought under control and substantially extinguished.

Subsequent to both of these nozzles, other constant gallonage nozzles in which one can preselect the volume have been produced. These other nozzles have a capability of infinite volume adjustment between the preselectable volume positions.

In United States Patent 3,012,733, issued December 12, 1961, to George G. Allenbaugh, lr., under the title Nozzle, a third constant gallonage nozzle is disclosed. In the nozzle of this latter patent, a provision is made for moving the nozzle parts out of a preselected constant gallonage position to a so-called flush position where the bafilehead and outlet surface on the nozzle body no longer eoact to control the flow of water through the nozzle. This permits any foreign particle large enough to pass through the nozzle body to the outlet end to be purged from the nozzle. The present nozzle has such a flush capability and with it an ability to return to a preselected volume setting, or any other volume setting, without shutting down the nozzle as has been required in this latter referenced Allenbaugh patent.

The nozzle of the present invention combines all of the attributes of all of these prior nozz es and has, in addition, certain new and novel features not heretofore available, especially in a nozzle of the constant gallonage type.

With constant gallonage and other nozzles, manufacturers usually will provide indicia on a stream pattern member to identify pattern adjustment positions. Thus, on the stream pattern sleeve there will usually be indicia to identify straight stream, narrow angle fog, and wide angle fog positions. Frequently, as in the case of the Allenbaugh 2,938,673 patent, referenced above, a locating means will be provided to locate the pattern adjustment sleeve in these indicated pattern positions.

In all prior constant gallonage nozzles, an adjustment of the volume setting without an attendant adjustment of the pattern sleeve has resulted in a change in the stream pattern emitted. For example, in the 2,938,673 patent, a nozzle of the 1 /2 size will have 60 and gallon a minute positions. If the nozzle is in the 60 gallon a minute narrow angle fog position and then adjusted to the 95 gallon a minute position, the result is to provide a fog pattern of a wider angle. This is true because the batfiehead is moved relative to the body of the nozzle and relative to the stream pattern adjustment sleeve while the adjustment sleeve and body remain fixed relatively. One of the principal features of the present nozzle is that, for the first time, a nozzle is provided in which volume adjustments may be made throughout the range of the nozzle without affecting the stream pattern. Thus, a 69 degree fog angle, for example, will be substantially 60 degrees whether the nozzle is set in 60 or 95 gallon a minute volume adjustment positions.

In the fire-fighting industry, nozzles which have a capability of selectively emitting water in a so-called fog pattern or straight stream are known as combination nozzles. With prior combination nozzles, fog patterns have been obtained by providing a plurality of spaced teeth around the perimeter of the nozzle outlet. The stream pattern sleeve is retracted to allow water to be emitted laterally from the nozzle. Some of this water will pass between the teeth and other water will hit the teeth. The result is to break up the water into fine drops and produce what is known as fog. One of the principal advantages and attributes of the fog is that with the water widely dispersed, the surface area exposed to the ambient atmosphere is greatly increased. The result is that the rate at which the water can absorb heat is greatly increased. Accordingly, a fog pattern is commonly used to provide a heat shield in front of the fireman.

It will be recognized that the etliciency with which the water is broken up and the finer the particles it is broken into will have a direct effect on the heat shielding capability of the resultant fog pattern. In the past, many expediencies have been resorted to to provide a fuller fog shield and more complete dispersion. For example, some nozzles have been equipped with holes in the bafilehead designed to emit small jets of water that impinge upon one another.

The nozzle of the present invention provides improved brealoup of the water and a fuller Water pattern than has been obtainable in the past, especially in nozzles where shut-off at the outlet is provided and it is impossible to have holes in the bafllehead. This feature of the invention is accomplished by providing a rotatable ring adjacent the outlet of the nozzle. The ring is equipped with a series of turbine-like blades so that the laterally emitted water strikes the blades and causes the ring to rotate. This results in very etiective break-up of the water. The water is broken up effectively for a number of reasons which include:

(1) The rotating blades provide a constant variation of a deflecting surface along any given radius of the nozzle; and

(2) The rotating action tends to impart some rotation to the droplets as they come oil the turbine blade.

It is important that a constant gallonage nozzle pro u vide a means to preselect a given volume setting. It is also important that any adjustment on the nozzle be one which can be effected with one hand so that the operator can maintain his grasp on the nozzle and the hose as any adjustment is made. With prior constant gallonage nozzles that provided infinite volume adjustment, the stream pattern setting has been affected by the volume setting. As noted above, this is not the case with the present nozzle. Additionally, With prior nozzles in which one could preselect a given volume setting and have infinite adjustment between the preselectable positions, it has been necessary to release a lock with one hand and move the volume adjustment with another. The present invention overcomes this difiiculty through the provision of a construction wherein the volume setting may override the preselection locator so that infinite adjustment can be had with one hand even though there is a preselectability of known positions.

Another feature of the present invention is that the operator can dial a given preselected quantity and an adjustable locator is provided which will index the volume setting into the selected position that has been dialed. Thus, it is possible, for example, for an operator to preset in the 60 gallon a minute position knowing that he will be using :his nozzle in conjunction with a 60 g.p.m. eductor at the time when he wishes to put a wetting agent into the water line. He may operate the nozzle in any volume setting he chooses up until the time when he elects to add the wetting agent and then he may dial the volume to the 60 gallon a minute position and locate it by feel without removing his eyes from the fire he is fighting.

Accordingly, in summary, the present invention provides a nozzle in which (1) the volume flow of water can be adjusted without shutting off the supply line, (2) the adjustment of the gallona-ge does not change the stream pattern or its control, (3) the stream pattern can be readily changed without risk of inadvertently changing the flow rate (4) the nozzle can be shut olf at its outlet, (5) improved water dispersion is obtained in the fog position; and, (6) the nozzle can be flushed without shutdown. In addition, a volume flow control arrangement is provided that causes different amounts of volume change for a given amount of rotation of a flow adjustment ring, particularly where changing to flush or shut off as compared with volume adjustments. Thus, not only can equal changes in flow rate be accomplished through equal increments of rotation of the control ring, but also the system may be flushed without a disportionately great and awkward rotation of the flow adjustment ring.

Briefly, the nozzle of the present invention is constructed of a tubular body with a central baffle adjacent the discharge end of the nozzle. An annular flow control surface cooperates with the bafiie to control the volume flow through the nozzle. The flow control surface is axially adjustable relative to the tubular body of the nozzle and with respect to the baflie, to permit the volume fiow to be changed. A stream control sleeve encircles the baffle and the flow control surface. Rotation of the stream control sleeve relative to the tubular body of the nozzle adjusts the sleeve axially with respect to the baiile to change the stream pattern of the discharge fiow from the nozzle. The flow control surface and the stream control sleeve are each arranged with respect to the tubular body of the nozzle so that an adjustment of either one relative to the bafile does not change the position of the other relative to the bafiie.

The flow control surface of the nozzle is constructed and arranged to move only axially relative to the body of the nozzle in order to control the volume flow. With this arrangement, there is no danger of changing the volume flow of the nozzle when the stream control sleeve is rotated to change the stream pattern. There-fore, the flow control surface need not be locked in position with respect to the battle in order to facilitate adjustment of the flow control sleeve. This arrangement, therefore, provides the ultimate in flexible'operation.

The volume flow through the nozzle of the present invention is changed by rotating an external operational ring of the nozzle. In one embodiment, a cam track that encircles the body of the nozzle is rotated with the operational ring. Movement of the cam track. relative to an axially movable cam follower associated with the flow control surface adjusts the flow control surface relative to the bafiie. In another embodiment, the cam track is provided around a discharge tube within the nozzle body, which tube carries the flow control surface. Rotation of a surrounding control ring cams the tube and the flow control surface axially with respect to the battle, to change the flow rate.

In accordance with this invention, the cam track of the nozzles is constructed and arranged to provide varying degrees of axial movement of the flow control surface for a given degree of rotation of the operational ring. With this arrangement, a relatively short turn of the operational ring will withdraw the flow control surface from an operational position with respect to the battle head to a fully withdrawn, flush, position. Furthermore, because the flow through of the nozzle does not vary in direct relationship with axial movement of the flow control surface relative to the baffle, the cam track. permits substantially equal increments of rotation of the operational ring to change the flow rate by equal increments within any desired operating range. In a 1 /2 inch nozzle, for example, the operational range will be from 30 to 125 gallons with intermediate indicated positions at '60 and 95. Obviously the change from 60 to requires more relative axial movement than the change from 30 to 60. The nozzle of this invention none the less has the same amount of rotation to effect the two illustrative adjustments.

In one embodiment of this invention a selector ring and an associated indicating ring encircle the nozzle and cooperate with the operational ring to aid the fireman in controlling the flow rate through the nozzle. The selector ring may be preset to a desired volume flow. This extends one of a plurality of detents contained in the associated indicating ring. The extended detent cooperates with the rotatable operational ring to provide an indication to the operator whenever the flow control surface of the nozzle has been positioned to supply the preselected volume flow. With this arrangement, the operator is able to feel the detent cooperate with an aperture associated with the rotatable operational ring any time a change in adjustment passes through the preselected volume flow.

Other attendant advantages and features of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same become better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is longitudinal sectional view of a nozzle constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side clevational view of the nozzle of FIGURE 1, partly in section along a longitudinal plane angularly displaced in the drawing for purposes of illustr-ation, showing the nozzle adjusted to a lower flow rate and wider stream contour than the adjustment shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view of the nozzle taken along the line 3-3 of FIGURE 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view of the nozzle taken along the lines 44 of FIGURE 1 and looking .in the direction of the arrows, and showing a detent spring for retaining the stream adjustment sleeve in one of the three positions;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view of the nozzle taken along the lines 55 of FIGURE 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows and showing the cam track of the discharge control ring and the cam screw and cam follower of the discharged tube, which carries the flow control surface;

FIGURE 6 is an end elevational view of the inlet end of the nozzle of FIGURE 1 taken along the lines 6-6 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 7 is an end elevation view of the discharge end of the nozzle of FIGURE 1, taken along the lines 77 and looking in the direction of the arrows, showing the turbine associated with the stream adjustment sleeve for scattering or dispersing the flow of water issued by the nozzle;

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of the discharge control ring of the nozzle of FIGURE 1, showing the cam track for controlling the axial movement of the flow control surface of the nozzle;

FIGURE 9 is an elevational view of the body of the nozzle of FIGURE 1, showing the opening for the cam screw and cam roller of the discharge tube and showing the spiral track for providing axial movement of the stream adjustment sleeve in response to rotational movement thereof;

FIGURE 10 is a perspective view of the selector ring of the nozzle of FIGURE 1 showing the detent pin actuator for extending a selected detent pin from the discharge indicating ring;

FIGURE 11 is a perspective view of the discharge indicating ring of the nozzle of FIGURE 1 showing a plurality of openings for housing detent pins to be extended to indicate a preselected volume flow of the nozzle;

FIGURE 12 is a diagrammatic representation of the discharge control ring of FIGURE 8, opened and shown fiat, revealing the contour of the cam track, indicating the portion of the cam track that establishes the different nozzle flow rates and indicating the magnitude of rotation of the ring to change from one setting to the next;

FIGURE 13 is a longitudinal sectional view of another embodiment of a nozzle constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 14 is a top plan view of the nozzle stem shown in cross section in FIGURE 13;

FIGURE 15 is a sectional view of the nozzle of FIG- URE 13 taken along the line 1515 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 16 is a sectional view of the nozzle of FIG- URE 13 taken along the line 16-16 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 17 is a sectional view of the nozzle of FIG- URE l3 taken along the lines 17-17 and looking in the direction of the arrows, showing the discharge control ring, a control segment carried by the ring, and a cooperating cam track of the discharge control tube, as well as other constructional details; and

FIGURE 18 is a diagrammatic representation of the rear portion of the discharge control tube, shown fiat, revealing the contour of the cam track, indicating the portions of the cam track that establish the different nozzle flow rates and indicating the magnitude of rotation of the discharge control ring to provide the indicated change in flow rate.

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown in FIG- URES 1 and 2 a nozzle indicated generally by the reference numeral 15 having an inlet end 16 and a discharge end 17.

The basic element of the nozzle 15 is a tubular body 20. See FIGURES 1, 2 and 9. The tubular body 20 includes an annular flange 22 at a generally central location. An opening 23 is provided in the wall of the tubular body 20 between the inlet end of the nozzle and the annular flange 22. The opening 23 facilitates axial movement of a cam screw and cam roller to be described below. A spiral track or screw thread 24- is provided on the outer surface of the tubular body 20 adjacent the discharge end. An adapter 26 is fastened, as by machine screws 27 to the inlet end of the tubular body 20. The adapter 26 includes an internal thread 28 for receiving a hose connection and is provided with a rubber washer 29 to provide a fluid-tight connection.

A baffie, indicated generally by the reference numeral 6 30, and a discharge tube 32 are located within and concentric with the tubular body 20. The discharge tube 32 is telescoped in sliding contact within the tubular body 20. A cam screw 33 attaches a cam roller 34 to the discharge tube 32 and extends outwardly from the tube through the opening 23 in the tubular body 20 and beyond the outer surface thereof. The opening 23 permits movement of the cam roller, cam screw "and discharge tube axially of the tubular body 26, while restraining relative rotational movement. A packing ring 36 in the outer surface of the discharge tube 32 adjacent the inlet end provides a fluid seal between the discharge tube and the tubular body 20 while permitting relative sliding motion. An annular throat 38 is attached by threads to the outlet end of the discharge tube 32, adjacent the discharge end 17 of the nozzle 15. The annular throat 38 includes a beveled flow control surface 39, which cooperates with the baffle 30 to control the volume of fluid that flows through the nozzle. A packing ring 4% is provided in the outer surface of the throat 38 to facilitate relative sliding motion while providing a fluid-tight seal between the annular throat 38 and an encircling stream adjustment sleeve 42, to be described in more detail below.

The bafile 30 is centrally located within the discharge tube 32. It is comprised of a narrow, elongated, stern portion 45, a bafile head 46, radially extending cars 47 at the end of the stem adjacent the inlet end 16 of the nozzle 15, radially projecting fins or spider elements 48 along the stem, a rubber bafile seat 49 between the baflle head 46 and the stem 45, and a cap screw 50 fastening the balfle head 46 and bafi le seat 4-9 to the stem 45. The cars 47 are held in position relative to the tubular body 20 by the adapter 26 and the spider elements 48 maintain the baffie head 46 centrally located within the nozzle 15.

A discharge control ring closely encircles the tubular body 20 adjacent the inlet end 16 of the nozzle 15. The discharge control ring 55 is rotatable with respect to the tubular body 20, but is restrained against axial movement by the adapter 26 at the discharge end and by a discharge indicating ring 58 adjacent the annular flange 22. An operational ring 56 of hard rubber surrounds the control ring 55 to facilitate turning the control ring. Relative movement between the operational ring 56 and the discharge control ring 55 is prevented by splines 59 FIG- URE 5 on operational ring 56 that engage with spline fittings 60 (see FIGURE 8) of the discharge control ring.

A cam track 62, shown in phantom in FIGURE 1 and shown in more detail in FIGURES 8 and 12, is formed in the discharge control ring 55. The cam track 62 partially encircles the tubular body 20 and cooperates with the cam roller 34. Rotation of control ring 55 and cam track 62 moves the discharge tube 32 axially of the tubular body 20.

As shown in more detail in FIGURE 12, the cam track 62 provides for non-uniform axial movement of the cam roller 34 in response to a given increment of rotation of the discharge control ring 55. The cam track 62 provides for six operating positions of the tlow control surface 39 of the throat 38. The six positions include an off position at one extreme and a flush position at the other extreme. Flow rates of 30, 60, and gallons per minute may be selected between the two extremes. The corresponding position on the cam track 62 for each of these flow rates is spaced from the next by 30 degrees of rotation of the discharge control ring 55. It will be seen, however, that to obtain these substantially equal incremental changes in the volume flow, the cam track 62 has provided a greater degree of axial movement of the cam roller 34 for each successive increment. Thus, equal increments of rotation of the operational ring 56 will result in equal incremental increases in the volume flow through the nozzle. This result is accomplished by providing unequal increments of axial movement of the flow control surface 39 relative to the bafile 3'9. In particular, a relatively large axial movement of the flow control surface 39 is provided for a relatively small incremental rotation of the operational ring 56 when the flow rate is changed from 123' gallons per minute to flush. Furthermore, this nozzle may be shut off by merely turning the discharge control ring.

The discharge indicating ring '58 and an associated selector ring 65 encircle the tubular body 20 between the flange 22 and the operational ring 56. An inner surface 66 (FIGURE 11) of the discharge indicating ring 58 in cludes a spline 67 for engaging a spline fitting 68 (FIG- URE 9) in a shoulder portion 69 of the tubular body 20. A scale 70 is provided on a portion of the discharge indicating ring 58 setting forth volume flow rates of the nozzle. In the embodiment shown, four flow rates are included. Diametrically opposite from the scale on the discharge indicating ring 58 are four apertures 71 extend-- ing axially through the ring. A detent pin 72 (See FIG- URES l and 2) is located within each aperture 71.

The selector ring 65 includes a flange '75 and a pointer 76 extending from the flange 75 adjacent the annular body of the ring 65. The annular body of the selector ring 65 rides within an annular recess 78 in the discharge indicating ring 58. A cut-out portion 79 of the discharge indicating ring 58 receives the pointer 76 of the selector ring 65. The flange portion 75 of the selector ring 65 is positioned adjacent the end surface 80 of the discharge indicating ring 58. The selector ring 65 is rotatable with respect to the indicating ring 53 and the tubular nozzle body 29.

A portion of the selector ring 65 is constructed to form a cantilever spring arm 82 (FIGURE having a detent pin actuator 83 protruding outwardly to be in contact with the shoulder of discharge indicating ring 58 formed by the recess 78. The detent pin actuator 83 is diametrically opposite from the pointer 76. Thus, when the selector ring is placed within the discharge indicating ring, the detent pin actuator 83 applies a force to a detent pin 72 in one of the apertures 71 diametrically opposite from the flow rate on scale 70 to which the pointer 76 has been set.

A discharge detent ring 85 is carried by the operational ring 56 in the end thereof directly adjacent the discharge indicating ring 58. The discharge detent ring 85 includes one aperture 86 adapted to receive one of the detent pins 72 that is extended from a detent aperture 71 by the detent pin actuator 83. For the purpose of illustrating the aperture 86, the pin 72 is not shown in full engagement with the aperture 86 in FIGURE 1. The aperture 86 is located in a fixed position with respect to the operational ring 56. This position is correlated with the discharge indicating ring so that it lies diametrically opposite the indicated gallonage on the scale 79 corresponding to the flow through the nozzle as determined by the position of the operational ring. Thus, when the gallonage flowing through the nozzle corresponds to the volume flow rate preselected by the pointer 76 of the selector ring 65, the detent pin 72 extended by the actuator 83 will enter the aperture 86. This is illustrated in FIGURE 2 in which a portion of the nozzle in a plane diametrically opposite the pointer 76 has been. shown in section. Nominal rotational force on the operational ring 56 will cause the discharge detent ring 85 to force the detent pin 72 out of the aperture 86 against the spring action of cantilever spring arm 82. In this manner, a volume flow rate different from that preselected may be readily obtained without changing the selector ring 65. Furthermore, the detent pin 72 will snap back into the aperture 86 upon the return of operation-a1 ring 56, thereby giving an indication to the operator that the nozzle is again supplying the preselected gallonage.

The discharge end of the tubular body Zil and the discharge tube 32 are encircled by a stream adjustment sleeve 42 and a covering rubber bumper 90. The stream adjustment sleeve 42 carries a thread insert 92 that engages the spiral track 24 in the outer surface of the discharge end of the tubular body 20. The stream adjustment sleeve 42 encircles the throat 38- of the discharge tube 32 and is coaxial with the baflie 30. The inner surface of the stream adjustment sleeve 42 cooperates with the batiie read 46 to control the contour of the stream of fluid emitted by the nozzle 15. Rotational movement of the bumper 9t and associated stream adjustment sleeve 42 causes, by virtue of the thread insert 92 and the thread 24-, an axial movement of the stream adjustment sleeve 42 relative to the battle 30 and the throat 38. By extending the sleeve 42 relative to the baflie 30, as shown in FIG- URE 1, a relatively narrow or straight stream is emitted by the nozzle. By retracting the stream adjustment sleeve 42 relative to the bafiie 30, as shown in FIGURE 2 of the drawings, a relatively Wide and finely dispersed stream, Le, a fog, is produced. It will be understood that the change in relative position of the flow control surface 39 with respect to the bailie head 46 in FIGURES l and 2 is to illustrate two different volume flow adjustments and should be considered independent from the stream contour adjustment described above. The packing ring 40 contained in a groove in the outer surface of the throat 38 facilitates relative sliding movement between the throat 3 and the stream adjustment sleeve 42 while maintaining a fluid-tight seal therebetween.

A sleeve detent spring 95 (FIGURES l and 4) is carried adjacent a rear shoulder 96 of the stream adjustment sleeve 42, and held in place by a retaining ring 9-7. As best shown in FIGURE 4, the sleeve detent spring 95 partially encircles the tubular body 20. The spring 95 includes three spaced, curved, detent portions 98. A detent-receiving groove 99 is formed in the outer surface of the tubular body 20, extending axially thereof between the annular flange 22 and the end of the tubular body 29 adjacent the discharge end 17 of the nozzle. Rotation of the stream adjustment sleeve 42 and the accompanying axial movement thereof relative to the tubular body 20 results in relative rotational and axial movement between the detent spring 95 and the detent groove 99. The detent portions 8 of the sleeve detent spring 95 indicate three predetermined rotational positions of the stream adjustment sleeve 42 relative to the body 20. Hence, they indicate 3 predetermined axial positions of the sleeve 42 with respect to the bafile 30. An indicating band 109 encircling the stream adjustment sleeve &2 visually indicates these positions.

A turbine 1G4 (See FIGURES l, 2 and 7) in the form of a ring having turbine blades 106 is carried for rotation at the outer end of the stream adjustment sleeve 42. A retaining ring 107 fastened by machine screws 1053 provides a bearing surface for the turbine 16 4 against which the turbine rotates with sliding contact. The flow of fluid, directed by the flow control surface 39, the baffle 30 and the stream adjustment sleeve 42, is in part directed against the turbine blades 106 as it leaves the discharge end 17 of the nozzle 15. Because of the angle at which the turbine blades .106 are set, the flow of fluid from the nozzle 15 causes the turbine 104- to rotate and deflect or disperse a portion of the fluid stream. This arrangement effectively overcomes the tendency of the nozzle to emit a cone of fluid as is generally the case due to the central location of the bafiie head and the peripheral location of the stream adjustment sleeve 42. The turbine particularly enhances the stream contour at intermediate and wide angle settings. By comparison, it has been found that the conventional, fixed, spaced deflectors arranged in an annular ring about the discharge end of known nozzles in fact merely create two separate cones of fluid and, hence, do not effectively disperse the stream.

In Operation, rotation of the operational ring 56 with respect to the nozzle 15 causes only axial movement of the discharge tube 32 relative to the tubular body 20 of the nozzle. Because the discharge tube 32 is telescoped within the tubular body 20 and the stream adjustment sleeve 42 is carried by the outer surface of the tubular body 26 the axial movement of the discharge tube 32 is entirely independent of the stream adjustment sleeve 42. Axial movement of the discharge tube 32 relative to the fixed baflle 30 changes the relationship between the 9 flow control surface 39 and the baffle 30, particularly the bafile seat 49. This changes the effective orifice of the nozzle 15 and thereby controls the volume flow rate of the nozzle.

As an aid to controlling the volume flow of the nozzle 15, the pointer 76 of the selector ring 65 may be positioned adjacent the desired flow rate indicated on the scale 7t on the discharge indicating ring 58. When the operational ring 56 is rotated to the position where the flow control surface 3-9 cooperating with the baffle 3t) permits the indicated gallonage to be emitted from the nozzle 15, the detent pin 72 will be opposite the aperture 86 in the discharge detent ring 65. The detent pin will snap into position, indicating to the operator that the operational ring and associated flow control surface 39 are in proper position to obtain the preselected gallonage.

The contour of the stream of fluid emitted by the nozzle 15 is changed by rotating the bumper 9t and associated stream adjustment sleeve 42 with respect to the tubular body 20 of the nozzle. This causes the stream adjustment sleeve 42 to move axially with respect to the baffle 39*, independently of the position of the throat 33 and flow control surface 32. The axial position and, hence, the stream contour is indicated by the detent portions 98 of the sleeve detent spring 95 carried by the stream adjust ment sleeve 42. Furthermore, the detent spring 95 maintains the stream adjustment sleeve 42 in one of three selected positions. Because the stream adjustment sleeve 42 is carried on the tubular body 20 independently of the discharge tube 32 and the associated flow control surface 39, rotation of the stream adjustment sleeve cannot cause a change in the volume flow adjustment of the nozzle. Thus, the volume flow adjustment need not be locked in a preselected position in order to prevent adjustment of the stream contour from inadvertently changing the gallonage setting.

A second embodiment of a nozzle 290 constructed in accordance with the present invention is shown in FIG- URES 13 to 18 of the drawings. This embodiment of the nozzle is shown in conjunction with a conventional shutoff body 202. In this embodiment, therefore, the baffle is used without a washer and the discharge control ring provides no shut-off position. It will be understood, however, that this embodiment of the nozzle may be constructed with a shut-off position and used without a shutoff body in the same manner as the nozzle of the previous embodiment.

The nozzle 2% includes a fluid conduit in the form of a tubular body 204. An inlet end 206 is received by a surrounding flange 208 and an annular seat 210 of the outlet end of the shut-off body 202. A gasket 212 is provided in a peripheral recess at the inlet end 206 of the tubular body 264 to provide a fluid-tight seal between the tubular body and the shut-off body. Balls 214 contained in companion annular grooves in the external surface of the tubular body 2M- and the internal surface of the flange 268 retain the shut-off 202 and the nozzle 20% together in any desired rotational relationship. A plug 216 maintains the balls 214 in the two companion annular grooves.

An inlet end 218 of the shut-off 202 is threaded to receive an annular adaptor 219. The adaptor 219 is a body extension which carries an annular swivel 220. The swivel 229 has internal threads 221 for connecting the shut-off and nozzle to a male fire hose connector. A plurality of balls 222 are provided to faciltiate relative rotation of the.

swivel 220 about the adaptor 219. A gasket 224 is provided to form a fluid-tight connection between a fire hose coupling element and the adaptor 219.

A ball-type shut-off valve 226 is located in the shut-off body 262 between the inlet 218 and an outlet 228. The shut-elf valve has a handle 230 connected to a trunnion 231. A ball 232 is rotated approximately 90 degrees by movement of the handle 230 and the connected trunnion 231. In FIGURE 13, the valve is shown in a shut-off position with a ball passage 234 disposed with its axis normal 10 to the axis of the nozzle. The ball 232 may be rotated degrees to align the passage 234 with the tubular body 204 of the nozzle and thereby permit fluid to pass through the shut-off body and nozzle.

The tubular body 264 includes an external annular flange 236 adjacent the mid-point of the body, somewhat close-r to the inlet end 206. An arcuate opening 238 extends through a major portion of the circumference of the body 264, in a radial plane just to the inlet side of the annular flange 236. The outer portion of the body 204 adjacent the outlet end 245 of the nozzle 200 contains a spiral groove 242, to receive a stream control sleeve, described below.

A discharge control tube 244 and a bafiie, indicated generally by the reference numeral 246, are located within and concentric with the tubublar body 204. The discharge tube 244 is telescoped in sliding contact within the tubular body 204. A packing ring 245 in the outer surface of the discharge control tube 244 adjacent the inlet end provides a fluid seal between the discharge tube and the tubular body 264, while permitting relative sliding motion. An axial groove 247 is formed in the outer surface of the discharge control tube 244 in a position generally across from the arcuate opening 238 of the tubular body 204. A key 248 extends through the tubular body 204 into the space provided by the axial groove 247. This key prevents relative rotation between the discharge control tube 244 and the body 294, while permitting relative axial movement. As best shown in FIGURES 17 and 18, the discharge control tube 244 contains a cam groove 256 encircling a portion of the tube adjacent the inlet end, adapted to lie in part, directly opposite the arcuate opening 238 of the tubular body.

An annular throat 252 is threaded to the outlet end of the discharge control tube 244. The annular throat 252 includes a beveled flow control surface 253, which cooperatcs with the baflle 246 to control the volume of fluid that flows through the nozzle. A packing ring 254 is provided in the outer surface of the throat 252 to facilitate relative sliding motion while providing a fluid-tight seal between the annular throat 252 and an encircling stream adjustment sleeve 256.

The baffle 246 is centrally located with respect to the discharge tube 32 and the stream adjustment sleeve 256. It is comprised of a narrow, elongated, blade-like stern portion 258 with a circular baflie head 259 at the outlet end of the nozzle. Radially extending ears 260 are provided at the base of the stem, adjacent the inlet end of the nozzle. A roll pin 261 extends through the stem portion 258 at right angles to the plane of the blade-like stem portion. The blade of the stem 258 is as wide as the internal diameter of the discharge control tube 244. The length of the roll pin 261 is also equal to the internal diameter of the discharge control tube 244. The pin and blade therefore locate the baffle head 259 in the center of the discharge control tube. The blade portion of the stem 258 also divides the central passageway of the nozzle into two equal channels along the major portion of the length of the nozzle, thereby serving as a stream straightener for the fluid flowing through the nozzle. The ears 260 are located behind and in abutment with the inlet end of the tubular nozzle body 204, thereby maintaining the baflle head 259 in a fixed axial position.

A discharge control ring 264 encircles the tubular body 284 just behind the annular flange 236. The ring carries a control segment 266 having a radial projections 267. The radial projection 267 extends inwardly of the tubular body 204 through the arcuate opening 238. A cam roller 268 is carried by the projection 267 and cooperates with the cam track 250 of the discharge control tube 244. With this arrangement, rotation of the discharge control ring 264 rotates the control segment 266, moving the radial projection 267 and cam roller 268 circumferentially about the body 204. Because the discharge control tube 244 is prevented from rotating by the key 248, the tube is cammed axially of the nozzle by the circumferential movement of the cam roller 268 in the cam groove 250.

An axially extending bore 270 is formed in the discharge control ring 264 diametrically opposite from the groove containing the control segment 266. The bore 270 opens adjacent the annular flange 236. A detent spring 272 biases a spring button 273 and ball detent 274 toward the rearwardly facing radial surface of the flange 236. The ball detent 274 cooperates with detent receiving apertures 276 in the adjacent surface of the annular flange 236 to indicate selected positions of the control ring 264.

As shown in more detail in FIGURE 18, the cam track 250 provides for non-uniform axial movement of the discharge control tube 244 in response to a given increment of rotation of the discharge control ring 264. The cam track 256 provides for five operating positions of the How control surface 253 of the throat 252. The five positions include flow rates of 30, 60, 95 and 125 gallons per minute, as well as a flush position. The corresponding position on the cam track 250 for each of the flow rates is spaced from the next by 30 degrees of rotation of the discharge control ring 264. As in the previous embodiment, the greater degree of axial movement of the dis charge control tube necessary to adjust for the higher flow rates can be accomplished with a uniform degree of rotational movement of the control ring. In addition, a relatively large axial movement of the how control surface 253 is provided by a relatively small incremental rotation of the control ring 264 when the flow rate is changed from 125 gallons per minute to flush.

The discharge end of the tubular body 204 and the discharge control tube 244 are encircled by the stream adjustment sleeve 256, which is covered by a rubber bumper 280. A thread insert 282 is carried by the sleeve 256 and cooperates with the spiral groove 242 at the discharge end of the tubular body 204. Thus, rotation of the stream adjustment sleeve 256 moves the sleeve axially with respect to the tubular body 204, the discharge tube 24-4 and the bathe 246, in the same manner as described in the previous embodiment. A sleeve detent spring 284 (FIGURE 16), secured to the stream adjustment sleeve by pins 285, cooperates with detent receiving apertures 286 to retain the stream adjustment sleeve in one of three selected positions.

A turbine 290 in the form of a ring having turbine blades, is carried for rotation at the outer end of the stream adjustment sleeve 256. The cturbine 290 is constructed in the same manner as the turbine 104 of the first embodiment.

In operation, rotation of the discharge control ring 264 with respect to the nozzle body 204 causes only axial movement of the discharge control tube 244 relative to the tubular body 2%. Axial movement of the discharge control tube 244 within the tubular body 204 changes the size of the opening defined by the flow control surface 253 and the bafile head 259. This movement, however, has no effect upon the relative location of the stream adjustment sleeve 256 with respect to the baffle head 259. Likewise, rotation of the stream adjustment sleeve 255 with respect to the tubular body 204 of the nozzle causes axial movement of the stream adjustment sleeve that is independent of the position of the flow control surface 253. Therefore, the volume flow adjustment need not be locked in a pre-selected position in order to prevent adjustment of the stream contour from inadvertently changing the gallonage settin".

While in the foregoing disclosure preferred embodiments of the invention have been disclosed, numerous modifications or alterations may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and 12. axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a bafiie centrally located within the discharge tube, and havin" a stem and an enlarged head at one end of the stem adjacent the discharge end of the dis charge tube;

means to secure the bafile in the discharge tube in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular fiow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the bafile head to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the dischargetube;

a cam follower fixed to the discharge tube and external thereto;

a ring encircling the discharge tube, coaxial therewith and rotatable with respect thereto;

a cam track in the ring, in engagement with the cam follower and adapted to move the cam follower and discharge tube axially of the tubular body upon rotation of the ring relative to the discharge tube; and thereby move the flow control surface relative to the baffle head;

means operably associated with the ring to indicate a preselected, rotated, position of the ring and cam track;

means encircling the tubular body and operably associated with the means to indicate a preselected position, to preselect the position to be indicated;

a stream adjustment sleeve surrounding and supported by a portion of said tubular body and concentric with and surrounding the annular flow control surface and movable axially with respect to the flow control surface, annular body and the bafile head;

means, including a detent, operably associated with the stream adjustment sleeve to indicate a plurality of positions of the stream adjustment sleeve relative to the baflle head; and

means, including a rotating stream deflector located at a discharge end of the nozzle, for dispersing an emitted stream of water.

2. A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a bafile centrally located within the discharge tube;

means to secure the bathe in the discharge tube in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to 'coact with the baffle to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

a stream adjustment sleeve, concentric with and surrounding the annular fiow control surface and movable axially with respect to the flow control surface and the baffle head; and

means to move the discharge tube and annular flow control surface axially of the tubular body relative to the battle head and stream adjustment sleeve.

3. A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a battle centrally located within the discharge tube, and having a stem and an enlarged head at one end of the stem adjacent the discharge end of the discharge tube;

means to secure the battle in the discharge tube and in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coast with the 13 baffie head to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

a cam follower fixed to the discharge tube and external thereto;

a ring encircling the discharge tube, coaxial therewith and rotatable with respect thereto; and

a cam track in the ring, an engagement with the cam follower and adapted to move the cam follower and discharge tube axially of the tubular body upon rotation of the ring relative to the discharge tube.

4. -A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a bafile centrally located Within the discharge tube, and having a stem and an enlarged head at one end of the stem adjacent the discharge end of the discharge tube;

means to secure the baffle in the discharge tube and in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular fiow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the bafile head to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

a stream adjustment sleeve surrounded and supported by a portion of said tubular body and concentric with and surrounding the annular flow control surface and movable axially with respect to the flow control surface and the baffle head;

a cam follower fixed to the discharge tube and external thereto;

a ring encircling the discharge tube, coaxial therewith and rotatable with respect thereto;

a cam means associated with the ring, to engage the cam follower and move the cam follower and discharge tube axially of the tubular body upon rotation of the ring relative to the discharge tube and also move the annular flow control surface relative to both the baffie head and the stream adjustment sleeve.

5. A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a battle centrally locate-d within the discharge tube, and having a stem and an enlarged head at one end of the stem adjacent the discharge end of the discharge tube;

means to secure the bafiie in the discharge tube and in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the baffle head to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

a cam follower fixed to the discharge tube and external thereto;

a ring encircling the discharge tube, coaxial therewith and rotatable with respect thereto; and

a cam track in the ring, in engagement with the cam follower and adapted to move the cam follower and discharge tube axially of the tubular body upon rotation of the ring relative to the discharge tube, said cam track being constructed and arranged to provide varying degrees of movement of the discharge tube axially of the tubular body in response to equal increments of rotary movement of said ring.

6. A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance and a discharge end;

a bafide centrally located within the discharge tube, and having a stem and an enlarged head at one end of the stem adjacent the discharge end of the discharge tube;

means to secure the baffle in the discharge tube and in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the baffle head to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

means to move the annular flow control surface axially of the tubular body relative to the baffle head;

means operably associated with the means to move the annular flow control surface to indicate a preselected position of the w control surface; and

means encircling the tubular body and operably associated with the means to indicate a preselected position to preselect the position to be indicated.

7. A fire fighting nozzle, compirsing:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a baffie centrally located within the discharge tube,

means to secure the baffle in the discharge tube in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the bafiie to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

a stream adjustment sleeve, concentric with and surrounding the annular flow control surface and movable axially with respect to the flow control surface and the bafii'e head; and

means, including a detent, operably associated with the stream adjustment sleeve to indicate a plurality of positions of the stream adjustment sleeve relative to the baffle head.

8. A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubulm body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a baffle centrally located within the discharge tube;

means to secure the bafiie in the discharge tube and in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the baffie head to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube; and

means, including a rotating stream deflector located at a discharge end of the nozzle, for dispersing an emitted stream of water.

9. A fire fighting nozzle, comprising:

a tubular body;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an en trance end and a discharge end;

:a baffle centrally located within the discharge tube;

means to secure the bafile in the discharge tube and in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the bafilehead to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

a stream adjustment sleeve, concentric with and surrounding the annular flow control surface and movable axially with respect to the flow control surface and the bafiiehead; and

means, including a rotating stream deflector located 15 at a discharge end of the nozzle, for dispersing an emitted stream of water.

10. In a nozzle assembly having a tubular body, a baflie associated with the body and stream adjustment sleeve carried by the nozzle assembly, surrounding the bafile and tubular body and axially adjustable relative to the tubular body through relative rotation, the improvement which comprises a curved detent spring partially encircling the tubular .body of the nozzle assembly and carried by the stream adjustment sleeve, a plurality of detents on the spring in contact with the surface of the tubular body, and a detent receiving aperture in the surface of the tubular body for receiving a detent to resist yet permit relative rotational and hence axial movement between the stream adjustment sleeve and the tubular body when one of the plurality of detents on the spring is located in the aperture.

11. A fire fighting nozzle comprising:

a tubular body having a circumferential slot through a portion thereof;

a discharge tube telescoped within the tubular body and axially movable therewith, adapted to provide a water conducting passageway and having an entrance end and a discharge end;

a baffle centrally located within the discharge tube, and having a stem and an enlarged head at one end of the stem adjacent the discharge end of the dis charge tube;

means to secure the bafile in the discharge tube in fixed relationship with the tubular body;

an annular flow control surface at the discharge end of the discharge tube, adapted to coact with the bal'llehead to provide a discharge opening at the discharge end of the discharge tube;

a cam track operatively associated in fixed relationship with the discharge tube;

a rotatable control ring encircling the tubular body;

means to prevent relative rotation between the discharge tube and the tubular body;

16 means carried by the control ring and extending inwardly through the circumferential slot of the tubular body and into engagement with the cam track and adapted to move the cam track and discharge tube axially of the tubular body upon rotation of the control ring relative to the tubular body.

12. The nozzle of claim 11 including a stream adjustment sleeve surrounding and supported by a portion of said tubular body and concentric with and surrounding the annular flow control surface and movable axially with respect to the flow control surface, annular body and the bafilehead.

13. The nozzle of claim 11 wherein the baffle stem is in the form of a blade, which. divides the discharge tube into two separate channels along a major portion of the tube.

14. The nozzle of claim 11 wherein the cam track provides unequal axial movement of the discharge tube for equal degrees of rotation of the control ring.

15. The nozzle of claim 11 including a detent carried by the control ring which cooperates with the tubular body to indicate rotational positions of the control ring,

16. The nozzle of claim 11 further including a shutoff body attached to an inlet end of the tubular body, said shut-off body having a surrounding flange for receiving and a seal for locating the end of the tubular body, said flange and tubular body having complementary, aligned, circumferential ball grooves containing balls which hold the shut-otf body and tubular body together in any de sired rotational relationship.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 600,193 3/1898 Dolley et a1. 239383 2,552,444 5/1951 Nielsen 239--458 3,150,829 9/1964 Specht et a1. 239-458 3,244,376 4/1966 Thompson 239-458 EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3580513 *Jan 31, 1969May 25, 1971American Standard IncShower head
US3998051 *Jan 2, 1975Dec 21, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmySustainer-injector slot-alignment
US4342426 *Sep 24, 1980Aug 3, 1982Feecon CorporationNozzle
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US5676313 *Jul 12, 1995Oct 14, 1997Yuan Mei Corp.Regulating cap with protection covers
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US5862996 *Jan 10, 1997Jan 26, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyLaminar flow nozzle
US6007001 *Mar 27, 1998Dec 28, 1999Amhi CorporationAutofog nozzle
US6102308 *Apr 2, 1998Aug 15, 2000Task Force Tips, Inc.Self-educing nozzle
US6142388 *Dec 14, 1998Nov 7, 2000Envirocare International, Inc.Atomizing nozzle
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USD736349 *May 2, 2014Aug 11, 2015Professional Tool Products, LlcHose nozzle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/458, 239/460, 239/459
International ClassificationB05B1/30, A62C31/02, B05B3/02, B05B15/02, B05B3/04, B05B1/12, B05B1/00, A62C31/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B15/02, B05B1/12, A62C31/02, B05B1/3073, B05B3/0486
European ClassificationA62C31/02, B05B1/12, B05B15/02, B05B3/04P, B05B1/30D2