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Publication numberUS3388016 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1968
Filing dateAug 31, 1964
Priority dateAug 31, 1964
Publication numberUS 3388016 A, US 3388016A, US-A-3388016, US3388016 A, US3388016A
InventorsDouglas Q Mcmasters, Leslie D Murray
Original AssigneeDouglas Q. Mcmasters, Leslie D. Murray
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for patching articles
US 3388016 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1 1968 L. 0. MURRAY ETAL 3,388,016

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PATCHING ARTICLES 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I'iled Aug. 31, 1954 June 1 1968 L. D. MURRAY ETAL 3,388,016

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PATCHING ARTICLES Filed Aug. 31, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 4: F15 6o 5 fig a5 q INVENTORS. 9&06445 a. A/f/IMF/Zffi 4554/5 p. WVZZW/ United States Patent 3,388,016 MEETHQD AND APPARATUS FOR PATCHING ARTECLES Leslie l). Murray, 1347 N. Arrowhead, and Douglas Q. McMasters, 2594- 2nd Ave, both of San Bernardino, Calif. 92405 Filed Aug. 31, 1964, fier. No. 393,436 16 Claims. (Cl. 156-94) This invention relates to a repair patch, the packaging thereof, and a method of patching using the repair patch. The patch and method are intended for use in repairing and/or patching a wide variety of articles. By Way of example, it is highly adapted to repairing holes in boats such as for example, glass fiber boats. However, it to be understood that the patch and process may be used for patching many other articles made of different materials such as 'wood, plastic, etc.

A primary object of the invention is to provide a patch or patching outfit which can be easily assembled and contained in a small easy to use package or unit which is inexpensive and easily transportable. Another primary object is to provide an improved patching method using the components of the outfit and in some cases the package itself. Various exemplary forms of the patch or patch outfit and methods of application are disclosed herein.

Briefly, in a simplified form of the invention the components of the patch outfit include a primary element which may preferably be glass fiber, cloth, or comparable material in a size sufiicient to cover the area intended to be patched. In this form of the invention the outfit contains in the same package resin of a type suitable to the application to which the patch is to be put and enough catalyst to activate and harden the resin in a predetermined time and under predetermined temperature conditions. Preferably the package consists of basic parts including a box or carton of suitable construction and material to contain the other components. The box is lined on one side with 'a layer of Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) or comparable material. The glass fiber or other comparable material referred to is placed over the Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) lining in the box or carton. In one form of the invention a two compartment bag is provided containing a suitable resin and catalyst and this is included in the package between the glass fiber and the top 0 fthe box. The bag is of a construction and material that will allow the separation of the partition or Wall between its two compartments. Upon separation of the division between the compartments, the contents of the bag are mixed together. One end of the bag is constructed to be easily opened for the purpose of applying the contents to the affected area. The catalyst may be colored to provide a visible indication of the completion of mixing. It is to be understood that whereas the invention is described herein with respect to an exemplary form thereof as applied to patching a glass fiber boat and having reference to preferred material such as glass fiber and resin, that other materials may be used in making up the outfit and utilizing the process. The size of the patch and package is limited only by the needs dictated by the particular utilization to be made thereof.

The invention provides a simplified technique or method for completing the patch using the components named and in some cases the box or carton itself. The details of the application of the method are described in the specification hereinafter. In the referred to simplified form of practising the method however, the resin and catalyst are mixed to activate the resin and these materials are spread over the patching material, i.e., the glass fiber, while it is in the lower half of the box on the Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) lining. The

3,388,0lfi Patented June 11, 1968 'ice bottom half of the box with the saturated glass fiber and Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) lining is then placed over the area to be patched so that that area is completely covered. The bottom of the box is then lifted away and the edges of the patch are smoothed by pressing against the plastic lining of the box. The material is allowed to harden and the Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) box lining may be stripped away.

In a further form of the invention it is modified to be adaptable as an underwater or cold weather patch. In this form of the invention a thermosetting resin is used which requires the application of heat to cause the resin to set and to complete the patch. The components of the outfit in this case additionally include a self-oxidizing material for generating the heat to harden the thermosetting resin. Additionally, a flexible plastic sheet is provided to be placed over the patch components for excluding water therefrom when the patch is used to effect repairs such as for example, below the water line of a boat.

Further objects of the invention reside in the providing of patching outfits in the form and having the components as referred to in the foregoing.

Further objects of the invention lie in the realization of a simplified combination of steps in carrying out the technique as described for effecting the patch utilizing the packaged materials. Further objects lie in the realization of the specific results referred to which derive from usage of the modified form of the innvention as described.

In addition to the foregoing, the components of the patching outfit may be packaged or assembled in a variety of diiferent ways and also there may be some variations in the method of applying the patch all coming within the scope of the invention. In a preferred commercial form of the invention the components thereof are packaged by being applied or held onto a display board by a sheet of flexible material such as polyethylene as described in detail hereinafter. A second polyethylene backing sheet is adjacent to the gass fiber reinforcing or patching material so that it is in an envelope formed between the two sheets. The glass fiber may be pre-impregnated With resin or as described hereinafter, the resin and catalyst may be forced into the envelope at the time that the patch is to be used.

In another modified form of the invention, the components are forced against the area to be patched from a container or housing taking the form of a patching gun. In this form of the invention, the components are caused to be intermixed and impregnated into the patch ing material which is forced against the area to be patched all in one action by means of compressed gas or air. In other words, this form of the invention illustrates that the patching may be accomplished by pneumatic, hydraulic or mechanical or other forces.

In still another form of the invention, the reinforcing material is in chopped or in loose comminuted form and it along with the resin and catalyst is blown against the patching area by the explosive force of a blank cartridge or comparable means. This form of the invention also is described in detail hereinafter.

Further objects of the invention reside in the alternative forms and means of packaging the components of the patch as referred to in the foregoing and in the alternative steps or variations in the steps of practising the process of applying the patch.

Further objects and additional advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description and annexed drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic sectional view of a patch assembly or package of one form of the invention.

FIGURE 2 is a partly schematic view illustrating a step in the patching process.

FIGURE 3 is a schematic view illustrating a further step in the process.

FIGURE 4 is a schematic view illustrating a further step in the process.

FIGURE 5 is a schematic view of a finished patch.

FIGURE 6 is a schematic view of a further form of the invention.

FIGURE 7 is a schematic view of a modification.

FIGURE 8 shows a modified form of the invention in which the repair kit is mounted for display on a cardboard backer.

FIGURE 9 is a side view of the form of the invention shown in FIGURE 8.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional view of another modified form of the invention.

FIGURE 11 is another view of the form of the invention shown in FIGURE 10.

FIGURE 12 is a sectional view of another modified form of the invention.

FIGURE 13 is a view of the form of the invention shown in FIGURE 12 showing application of the patch.

Referring now more in detail to the form of the invention shown in FIGURE 1, numeral 10 designates a relatively shallow box or carton which may be made of cardboard and which constitutes the package or container for the outfit. The carton has a top 11 and a bottom part 12. At the corners the sides of the bottom part 12 are jointed in such a way that they will easily come apart or rupture so that the bottom including the sides can be pressed flat against an area to be patched.

The numeral 15 designates a lining or liner in the bottom part 12 of the box, this material preferably being a sheet of Mylar or similar material having comparable characteristics. This material is a thin, protective material which serves a purpose as will be referred to more in detail presently.

Placed over the Mylar (polyethylene terephthaiate) lining 15 is a layer or sheet of glass fiber or other comparable material which is designated by the numeral 17. The size of the box or package and the components therein may vary widely and is determined only by the size of the area to be patched or repaired. The glass fiber material is a known type of material which is adapted to become saturated with the resin and catalyst components, as will be described hereinafter.

Numeral 19 designates a two part bag or container made of a suitable, flexible material such as plastic. The two compartments in the bag contain a suitable resin and catalyst. This bag and its contents may be of a known type, the resin being one that becomes activated when mixed with the catalyst to be then applied and allowed to set, that is to harden. The top 11 of the box fits over the bottom in the usual manner to provide a kit or package of relatively shallow depth which is inexpensive, easy to carry and easy to work with for many and varied pur poses as will be described hereafter. The container 19 may be similar to that of United States Patent No. 3,077,262.

One of the purposes of the invention is to provide an outfit or assembly comprising ingredients or components so packaged that the process or method may be carried out without the necessity of the user touching any of the patching materials. The following is a description of a preferred manner of carrying out the technique or method of the invention.

The wall or separation between the two compartments of the two-part bag 19 is broken or separated in any suitable manner. It will be understood, as referred to above, that this bag and the contents may be of a known type. The contents of the bag, that is the resin and catalyst are mixed by kneading the flexible bag or in any other suitable manner. The two-part bag 19 is opened at one end which is designated thereon and the contents, that is the mixed resin and catalyst, are spread evenly over the patching material, that is the glass fiber, which is stiil in the bottom 12 of the box. These mixed materials are allowed to thoroughly saturate the glass fiber 17. The user then places the bottom half of the box with the Mylar lining 15 and the saturated glass fiber 17 in it over the area to be patched in such a manner that the patching material will completely cover the effected area, that is the area to be patched or repaired. That is, the size of the patch or repair to be eiiected will determine the size of the patching outfit to be used; the patching outfit and package may be, of course, provided in any of various sizes as explained above. FIGURES 2 and 3 illustrate schematically the steps described above.

As explained in the foregoing, the sides of the bottom 12 of the box or carton at the corners are made so that they will come apart or rupture relatively easily so that the bottom of the box with the sides may be pressed flat against the area to be patched with the glass fiber 17 over the said area. FIGURE 3 shows the sides 21, 22, 23, and 24. The bottom 12 of the box is then lifted away leaving the glass fiber material over the area to be patched with the Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) lining adjacent and against the saturated glass fiber material 17. The edges of the patch are then pressed against the surfaces adjacent the area being repaired by pressing against the Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) lining 15 and in this way a firm, secure patch is realized. This step is carried out while the resin and catalyst are being allowed to harden in the glass fiber material to complete the patch. FIGURE 4 illustrates this step. A predetermined number of minutes may be allowed to realize this purpose depending upon the exact characteristics of the resin and catalyst used. When the resin has set or hardened the Mylar (polyethylene tcrephthalate) box liner may be stripped off and the patch is completed, as illustrated in FIGURE 5. It will be observed that the user has not had to touch the patching materials themselves in any way, since the resin and catalyst are applied to the glass fiber while it is in the box and the glass fiber patch is pressed into patching position with the pressure being applied to the Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) liner.

FIGURE 2 shows a modified form of the invention which is useful as anunderwater or cold weather patch. In this form of the invention the components may be packaged in a similar way, that is in a box or carton; however, the technique or method in this form of the invention is slightly different since it is intended for different applications. FIGURE 6 shows diagrammatically the relationship of the ingredients or components in the relative positions they occupy when the patch is about to be applied. This form of the invention is very well suited to making repairs or patches to a boat such as a glass fiber boat below the water line and without taking the boat out of the water, by way of example. In FIG- URE 6 of the drawings numeral 30 designates a flexible plastic sheet which is placed over the patch, that is the components of the patch and the area to be patched to hold the patch. in position during the hardening period and for excluding water from that area. Numeral 35 des ignates a container filled with a self-oxidizing heat generating material capable of generating sutiicient heat to harden the thermosetting resin which is used in this form of the invention. The container 35 may be in the form of a relatively flat envelope as shown, made of a flexible plastic or other similar material. The self-oxidizing material may be any one of a number of commercially known materials of this type which when activated will generate heat at for example, 200 F. These materials may be ignited in any of various known ways such as by an electric are; a mechanically generated spark or by contact with the water itself.

Numeral 37 designates a layer of flexible material such as Mylar which is positioned between the self-oxidizing material and the patching material, i.e., the glass fiber material 39 to keep the patch from sticking to the rest of the components in the patch. This material may constitute the container for the self-oxidizing material. That is, the self-oxidizing material may be in the form of a flat envelope made of Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) so that one side of the envelope is between the self oxidizing material and the patching material itself. Numeral 39 designates the glass fiber mat or cloth or combination of both and in this form of the invention the mat is pre-impregnated with a suitable thermosetting resin. This resin again may be of a type well known commercially being any one that can be used to preimpregnate the glass fiber mat and then caused to set later when desired by the application of heat at a suitable temperature. Numeral 41 designates a thin membrane placed in a position as shown in FIGURE 6 over the glass fiber material 39 to prevent the water from contaminating the resin while the patch is being placed over the hole. During execution of the method, this membrane is burned, oxidized or otherwise removed by the heat or reaction of the self-oxidizing chemicals.

The following is a description of the technique or method of utilization or application of the patch of this form of the invention. The patch, that is the components thereof as described in the foregoing is placed over the hole or area to be patched from the outside, which in the case of a boat or ship where the hole is under water the patch is made from the outside of the hull. In other words, in the assembly of components as shown in FIG- URE 6, the thin membrane 41 is against the area to be patched and the plastic sheet 30 is over the entire patch with the water pressing against it. The pressure of the water against the patch, that is against the plastic sheet 30 holds the patch in position and prevents it from being pushed through the hole by the water pressure.

The self-oxidizing chemicals in container 35 are ignited by any of the several methods referred to above. In a preferred form of doing this, ignition is merely by contact with the water and this is accomplished simply by cutting an opening in the envelope or container 35. The plastic backing sheet 35 is provided with perforations to allow the gases created by oxidi-zation to escape. The means for opening the envelope or container 35 can be inserted through one of the perforations for opening this container. Ignition can also be by way of a mechanically generated spark or electric arc simply by inserting the electrodes into the container or envelope 35 and then energizing the circuit from a local or remote point. The quantity of self-oxidizing chemicals in container 35 is not critical, but in general is simply governed by the time and heat required to harden the patch, that is to set the thermosetting resin. The resin materials are commercially available and depending upon their particular characteristics as commercially available, the character and quantity of the oxidizing chemicals in container 35 is adjusted to provide the necessary degree of heat and time of heating for setting the thermosetting resin.

Upon the completion of oxidization of the chemicals the glass fiber mat 39 reinforced with the resin will have adhered to the area around the hole and will have become rigid enough to support itself. At this time the backing sheet 30, the envelope or container 35 for the oxidizing chemicals and the membrane 39 may be removed exposing the patch.

The form of the invention as just described may be used in the manner set forth in the specific example as for example in patching a boat. Although this form of the invention is primarily intended for underwater uses, it may have various other applications in the atmosphere or it may be employed in a vacuum or in outer space. It may with facility be utilized in any application where there are unequal pressures opposing sides of the article or object to be patched. In other words, the higher pressure may be either on the inside or the outside; the patch may be applied either on the outside of the article or the inside. An additional advantage of this form of the invention is that it may be employed where temperature conditions preclude the hardening of normally catalyzed resin systems.

As an example of other materials that may constitute the patching material or component itself, this may be nylon, rayon, metallic thread, etc.

Various alternative equivalent ways may be used to apply the required heat for the thermosetting resin such as used in FIGURE 6. A preferred alternative is an electrical system using a coil heater of a size to produce the necessary heat. This may be powered from the power system of a ship or boat or from batteries. Or the heat source may be a commercially available chemical fuel cell or cells.

FIGURE 7 illustrates diagrammatically a modified container 35' having in it a coil heater 43.

Referring to FIGURES 8 and 9 of the drawings, these figures show a preferred form of the invention in which the components of the patch are packaged in slightly different ways. In this form of the invention the patch outfit may be packaged for commercial display on a cardboard backer or sheet 50 having a tab 51 having a hole 52 in it. The package consists of a flexible plastic layer such as polyethylene 55 which is somewhat larger than the reinforcement or glass fiber mat 56 which is in the position as shown. The backing 55 has an application of a pressure sensitive adhesive on the outer border 59 which is on the side adjacent fiber mat 56. The side with the ad hesive on it is referred to as the front of the patch. To the front of the backing 55 is attached a smaller flexible sheet such as polyethylene 61, this attachment being by way of double backed tape, that is tape having adhesive on both sides as indicated at 62. A space is formed between the two backings and before this space is sealed off, the fiberglass mat 56 is placed in the envelope formed. There are two prefered procedures to be followed in assembling these components.

First the resin may be added at this time (assembly on member 50) to the glass fiber mat to form a packet containing the resin and reinforcement. The resin may be of liquid form and may be poured into the package through a neck 65 as shown, formed between the two backings 55 and 61. When using this system a tube 66 with a container 67 for the catalyst is inserted under the edge of the front backing 55 before it is sealed at the neck part 65 to the lower backing. In this system the catalyst is inserted into the resin and the container or envelope containing the reinforcement, that is the glass fiber mat. The mixture is then kneaded to mix the resin and catalyst together to activate them. The face or backing 55 is then pulled off leaving the resin saturated reinforcing material, that is the glass fiber mat, to be placed directly over the area to be patched. The adhesive 62 around the periphery of the backing is then pressed down to prevent the resin from escaping the patching area.

The second method or procedure is that the resin and catalyst are placed in separate bags connected by a tube. A second tube extends from the resin bag to the cavity containing the reinforcing or glass fiber mat 56. In this arrangement the catalyst is injected into the resin bag. The two are then kneaded together. After the two are mixed they are injected into the cavity containing the reinforcement, that is the glass fiber mat. After the reinforcement or mat has been thoroughly saturated the procedure is then the same as the first procedure described above.

Referring to FIGURES l0 and 11 of the drawings, these figures show a modified form of the invention wherein a pneumatic or gas pressure means is provided for applying the patch. In this form of the invention the reinforcing material or glass fiber mat is shown at 70. Over this material is a covering end membrane 69 of any suitable material. Numeral 71 designates the resin which is in liquid form positioned between membranes as designated at 73' and 74. Numeral 76 designates the catalyst which is also in liquid form positioned between membranes 74 and 78 I which may be of any suitable material and are rupturable. Numeral S designates a flexible rubber bag below the other components all of which are housed in a housing which may be of the shape shown and made of styrene as designated at 82. This housing has a neck 83 threaded to a unit 81 with a pistol grip handle 84. Within the unit 81 is a C0 cartridge 85 which is adjacent to a puncturing needle or pin 86 operable by the trigger 87 of the pistol grip mechanism for puncturing the cartridge and releasing C0; to inflate the flexible rubber bag 80 through an orifice S8 in unit 81 communicating with the neck of bag 80.

To operate this device the housing 81 is placed adjacent the area to be patched as shown at 90 in FIGURE 11. When the trigger is pulled the inflatable bag is inflated. This ruptures the rupturable membranes causing the resin and catalyst to mix and to be activated and they thereby saturate the fiberglass mat or comparable reinforcing material as it is forced at the same time against the hole or area to be patched and around the adjacent surfaces. In this manner the components of the patching kit are activated and the patch is firmly applied all in one operation.

After the bag has expanded to its fullest extent the apparatus may be removed. This leaves the repair patch covering the hole and the reinforcement or glass fiber mat covering the hole. When the resin becomes hard the polyethylene may be removed and the repair is complete. This is shown in FIGURE 11.

Referring to FIGURES 12 and 13, these figures show a modified form of the invention in which the patch is applied in a slightly different way. In FIGURE 11, numeral 160 represents chopped, loose or comminuted reinforcing material, that is glass fiber material. Number 101 designates the liquid resin which is in the container 102 for the components. Numerals 193 and 104 represent rupturable membranes on opposite sides of the resin 101. Adjacent to the resin is the catalyst 108 also in liquid form adjacent to one of the membranes 104. Below the catalyst 168 is a paper or cardboard wad 110 similar to that used in shot gun shells. The housing or container 102 has a pistol unit 111 with a pistol grip handle or lower part 112 embodying in it a trigger and hammer of known construction adapted to fire an explosive blank cartridge 113. The barrell 114 of unit 111 fits into a tubular fitting 115 on unit 102.

To operate this system a cardboard retainer 120 is affixed to the inside of the hole to be patched, as shown in FIGURE 13. The device as shown in the figures is held at an appropriate distance from, and pointing at the hole. The trigger 121 is pulled thereby detonating the blank cartridge. When the cartridge is fired various things happen. The components within the housing 102 are mixed when the membranes rupture and the mixture is forced out of the end of the housing 102 by the shot. This is illustrated in FIGURE 13. The combination of the components is deposited over the repair site 123 or area in a random manner, but mixed. When the resin becomes hard the repair is complete. The surface of the repair made by this form of the invention would be of a coarse texture, but this coarseness would in no way affect the strength of the repair.

From the foregoing it is apparent that pneumatic, hydraulic or explosive means may be used for applying the patch. The forms of the invention as shown herein, are exemplary and illustrative of the methods of application that may be utilized all within the scope and purviewof the invention and the manner in which the components may be packaged or assembled in kit form. There are many other modifications and variations that may be made in the method and exact manner of packaging the components or assembling them in a package or unit all coming within the scope and purview of the invention. The forms of the invention shown herein are considered to be equivalent to each other and to other similar forms of practicing the invention.

The foregoing disclosure represents preferred forms of the invention and is to be interpreted in an illustrative rather than a limiting sense, the invention to be accorded the full scope of the claims appended hereto.

We claim:

1. A method of patching articles comprising the steps of impregnating a fabric patching material while in contact with a sheet of backing material with a resin which is capable of setting to a hard condition, placing the impregnated fabric patching material over the area to be patched with the backing sheet outermost, applying force to the fabric patching material through the backing material over the said area, allowing the resinous material to set and harden in the fabric to complete the patch, and then removing the backing material.

2. A method as in claim 1 including the step of forcing the said patching materials against the area to be patched by applying gaseous pressure to the outer face of said backing material.

3. A method as in claim 2 including the step of assembling the patching materials in a container and applying a sudden gaseous pressure within the container to eject the patching material therefrom.

4. A patching apparatus comprising a container, a reinforcing material in said container and capable of being impregnated with a resin which can harden, means including a resinous material in said container in a position adjacent to the said reinforcing material, but separated therefrom, said means comprising an enclosing device to hold the ingredients while impregnating the reinforcing material, while in said container, and a removable backing engaging the reinforcing material.

5. A patching apparatus as in claim 4 comprising means for releasing force to be applied against said materials to force them out of said enclosing device and simultaneously mix them and force them against an area to be patched.

6. A patching apparatus as in claim 5 wherein said force applying means comprises a container for gaseous pressure and means for suddenly releasing said pressure to be applied against said assembled materials for forcing them out of the enclosing device.

7. Apparatus as in claim 6 wherein said enclosing device includes therein a flexible bag adapted to be inflated by said gaseous pressure in a manner to force said patching materials therefrom.

8. Apparatus as in claim 5 wherein said force releasing means comprises a chamber for holding a blank cartridge and means for firing said cartridge to provide force for expelling said patching materials from said enclosing device, mixing them, and forcing them against the area to be patched.

9. .A patching apparatus containing ingredients for effecting a repair patch comprising a relatively shallow carton, a relatively thin layer of lining material in the bottom of the carton, a layer of fabric patching material capable of being impregnated with resinous material overlying the liner, a flexible compartmented bag containing the resin and catalyst overlying the fabric patching material in the carton whereby the resin and catalyst can be mixed and impregnated into the fabric patching material while in the carton and the fabric patching material and liner while in the bottom of the carton can be placed over an area to be patched, the bottom of the carton being flattenable by pressure and removable from the patch.

10. A patching apparatus as in claim 9 wherein the sides of the bottom of the box at the corner are made to come apart when the bottom of the box with the fabric patching material and liner in it are applied over the area to be patched, said bottom being removable from the patch.

11. A patching apparatus comprising an assembly of materials for effecting a repair patch, a housing having an open top and bottom wall for holding said materials therein in adjacent relationship to each other, said applicator having means for applying force to said materials between said materials and said bottom wall to be applied against the said materials to eject them from the housing through said open top and against an area to be patched.

12. Apparatus as in claim 11 wherein said force releasing means comprises a container for gaseous pressure and means for suddenly releasing said pressure to be applied against said assembled materials for forcing them out of the applicator.

13. Apparatus as in claim 12 wherein said force applying means includes a flexible bag adapted to be inflated by said gaseous pressure in a manner to force the attaching materials out of the applicator.

14. A patching apparatus as in claim 12 wherein said force applying means comprises a chamber for holding a blank cartridge and a means for firing said cartridge to provide force for expelling said patching materials from said applicator, mixing them, and forcing them against the area to be patched by them.

15. A patching apparatus as in claim 11 wherein the said materials comprise a reinforcing patching material capable of being impregnated with a resin which can harden therein, and a resinous material assembled in a position adjacent to the said reinforcing material but separated therefrom.

16. A patching apparatus as in claim 15 wherein the reinforcing material comprises comminuated fibrous material adapted to form into a solid mass when the resin sets.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,577,205 12/1951 Meyer et a1 156280 X 2,689,801 9/1954 DAlelio 1179 2,698,558 1/1955 Hawley et al 162145 2,795,523 6/1957 Cobb et al 156-94 2,924,546 2/1960 Shaw 15694 3,049,836 8/ 1962 Weissman 156-94 3,077,262 2/1963 Gaste 20647 3,087,606 4/1963 Bollmeier et al. 206-47 3,198,686 8/1965 Caligari 1616 OTHER REFERENCES Twin-Tube Adhesive, an article in Modern Packaging, July 1956, pp. 82 and 83.

EARL M. BERGERT, Primary Examiner.

H. F. EPSTEIN, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3480495 *Jul 11, 1966Nov 25, 1969IonicsProcess for cementing ion-exchange material
US4519856 *Jun 9, 1983May 28, 1985Neptune Research, Inc.Resin-cloth structural system
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US8912975Sep 20, 2012Dec 16, 2014The Boeing CompanyReworking array structures
US9242440May 16, 2013Jan 26, 2016The Boeing CompanyThermal curing of cell-based structural arrays
US20020043732 *Aug 9, 2001Apr 18, 2002Gerald JacinoApparatus, kit and method for repairing a surface break in selected surfaces of an transparent object
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Classifications
U.S. Classification156/94, 156/278, 156/285, 156/500
International ClassificationB29C67/00, B63B9/00, B29C73/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B9/00, B29C67/0037, B29C70/12, B29C73/00
European ClassificationB29C73/00, B29C70/12, B63B9/00, B29C67/00H