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Publication numberUS3390488 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1968
Filing dateNov 30, 1965
Priority dateNov 30, 1965
Publication numberUS 3390488 A, US 3390488A, US-A-3390488, US3390488 A, US3390488A
InventorsBottorf Jr Harry F, Bowling Jr Joseph E, Carpenter Jr James H
Original AssigneePangborn Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Assembly for transferring articles to a treating area
US 3390488 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 2, 1968 J. H. CARPENTER, JR.. ETAL 3,

ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRING ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA Filed NOV. 30; 1965 9 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR James H C aw'pezz 561 f ATTORNEYS y 1963 J. H/CAR-PENTER, JR.. ETAL 3,390,488

ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRING ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA Filed NOV. :50, 1965 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS James II. Cmpczz fem/1'.

J y 1968 J. H. CARPENTER, JR.. ETAL 3,390,488

ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRING ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA Filed Nov. 30, 1965 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTO S James H Carpelri'en 1': Harry]? 50 E017 ,Jzc

E; tbsaplz BY J @3 frrom s y 2, 1968 I J. H. CARPENTER, JR.. ETAL 3,390,488

ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRING ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA Filed Nov. 30, 1965 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 1 \lLf INVENTORS James]? Ca?" 613%: Early F30 ZZOJ'fi J12 ATTORNEYS y 2, 1963 J. H. CARPENTER, JR.. ETAL 3,390,488

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ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRINC' ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA Filed Nov. 30, 1965 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTORS James H Calyvani'al; J1:

ATTORNEY 5 y 2, 1963 J. H. CARPENTER, JR.. ETAL 3,390,488

ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRING ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA 9 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed Nov. 30, 1965 INVENTORS James HCalgvcnicnJn Harr yEBo ttorfifi Joscph'E Bowlir ggf.

Mfi ATTORNEYS y 2, 1968 J. H. CARPENTER, JR.. ETAL 3,390,488

ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRING ARTICLES TO TREATING AREA Filed NOV. 30, 1965 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 2o jflr. 124

'fi J HT EZ E arms amen 1; 30 Hal?" FBohorfJz:

E Josep 530w n July 2, 1968 J. H. CARPENTER, JR.. ETAL 3, 0,

ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRINC- ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA Filed NOV. 30, 1965 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 James H- Gmpaniarm Ha United States Patent 3,390,488 ASSEMBLY FOR TRANSFERRING ARTICLES TO A TREATING AREA Bottorf, Jr., Hagers- Jr., Waynesboro,

Hagers- James H. Carpenter, In, and Harry F.

town, Md., and Joseph E. Bowling,

Pa., assignors to The Pangborn Corporation, town, Md., a corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 30, 1965, Ser. No. 510,516 12 Claims. (Cl. 5114) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This application relates to a work transfer assembly for conveying work pieces such as steel bars to a situs of further treatment such as a blast cleaning operation, and more particularly to such an assembly which is particularly adapted for continuous operation.

Work pieces such as steel bars must be cleaned or otherwise treated before being utilized in their intended manner. It is essential for the sake of economy that the pieces be effectively transferred to their situs of cleaning treatment. It is also desirable that the transfer be carried out continuously with a minimum gap between batches of pieces.

An object of this invention is to provide a work transfer assembly which efficiently transfers a plurality of work pieces in a relatively short amount of time. p

Another object of this invention is to provide such an assembly which effectively transfers a large number or even a continuous supply of such work pieces.

A further object of this invention is to provide such an assembly which is adaptable for a substantially continuous feed with a minimum gap between batches of work pieces.

Other objects of the present invention will become apparent from the study of the following description and drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side view of one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1 in one phase of operation with the feed table horizontal;

FIG. 3 is a side view similar to FIG. 1 in a later phase of operation with the feed table inclined and the first batch of articles being discharged;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 in a later phase of operation with the load rack completely advanced;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 in a later phase of operation with the transfer rack about to remove articles from the load rack;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 in a later phase of operation with the load rack returned to its starting position and the first batch of articles disposed above the conveyor;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6 in a later phase of operation with the first batch of articles on the conveyor and with the load rack about to receive a second batch of articles;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 in a later phase of operation with the second batch of articles upon the 3,390,488 Patented July 2, 1968 2 load rack and with the transfer rack in its starting pos i tion;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 in a later phase of operation with the transfer rack about to receivethe second batch of articles from the load rack; I

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. '9 in a later phase of operation with the load rack returnedto its starting position; p

FIG. 11 is a view similar to FIG. 10 in a later phase of operation with the first batch of articles on the' conveyor, the second batch of articles on the transfer rack, and a third batch of articles on the load rack;

FIG. 12 is a view similar to FIG. 11 in a l'ater phase of operation with the transfer rack about to deposit the second'batch of articles onto the conveyor; i

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. 12 "n a later'phase of operation with the transfer rack returning'to its starting position for receiving the third batch of articles from the load rack;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary view of another embodiment of this invention showing the adjustable stop mechanism and the holdback bar;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary view of still another embodiment of this invention showing the initial stop mechanism;

FIG. 16- is a fragmentary view of still another embodiment of this invention showing the shape of the rack teeth;

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary view of still another embodiment of this invention showing the pinch roller with flat articles;

FIG. 18 is a fragmentary view similar to FIG. 17 showing the pinch roller with round articles;

FIG. 19 is a fragmentary view of another embodiment of this invention showing the pinch roller assembly;

FIG. 20 is a fragmentary view of still another embodiment of this invention showing one phase of operation of article transfer from the table to the load rack; I

FIG. 21 is a view similar to FIG. 20 showing the subsequent phase of articles transfer operation;

FIG. 22 is a view similar to FIG. 21 showing a still further phase of article transfer operation; and

FIG. 23 is a view similar to FIG. 22 showing a still further phase of article transfer operation.

Referring now to the drawings as shown in FIG. 1 the work 'piece assembly 10 includes a load'table 12 which is pivotably secured to lift rod 14 of screw jack assembly 16. The work pieces such as steel bars (FIGS. 2-13) are disposed on table 12 until it is time for the bars to be, for example, cleaned. Screw jack 14 is then actuated to'raise the table and the table which rotates on shaft 54 is tilted to permit the bars to slide down inclined portion 20. The bars are prevented from sliding off table 12 first by the initial stop (FIG. 15) and then by adjustable stop 102 (FIG. 14) after stop 100 has been permanently retracted out of stop position. The bars are then picked up by the star wheel 24 and delivered to transfer rack 22 at predetermined intervals. The spacing of the bars is determined by the relative speed of the rotating star wheel 24 and the advancing load rack 22. The speed of load rack 22, for example, is constant, while the rotational speed of star wheel 24 is'variable. As a result by proper adjustment of the star wheel speed 'with respect to the rack'22 it'is possible to accumulate the bars in some oriented pro-determined multiple. Accordingly, the bars are deposited in every groove, every second groove, every fourth groove, or any other desirable spacing on load rack 22.

After rack 22 is completely loaded it is positioned above a transfer rack 26 rotatably mounted upon a horizontally disposed shaft which is disposed on work car 28. Rack 26 is then rotated through an arc upwardly lice to lift the bars from load rack 22 While maintaining the same spacing between the bars. Work car 28 then transports the spaced bars to a conveyor 30 after which rack 26 is rotated downwardly, to deposit the bars on the conveyor 30 which, in turn, conducts the bars through abrasive blasting cabinet 32 wherein the bars are cleaned.

FIGS. 213 show the sequence of operation of work transfer assembly 10. As shown in FIG. 2, work piece or bars 18 are disposed on the horizontal portion of load table 12. Load rack 22 is in its starting position where its lead notch is disposed adjacent the end of inclined portion 20 of load table 12. As later described, the exact initial starting position can be controlled by cam 34 which abuts against stop member 36 secured to the back of load rack 22. This adjustment of the lead notches or teeth of load rack 22 in relation to the star wheel discharge is particularly important to compensate for movement characteristics of different shaped work pieces and for different loading speeds.

In this starting position shown in FIG. 2, transfer rack 26 is lowered. The wheels 38 on transfer car 28 may be disposed to ride on rails 40 to accurately guide the transfer rack adjacent roller conveyor 30-.

FIG. 3 shows the various elements of assembly 10 immediately after the operation has begun. As indicated therein table 12 is tilted so that the work pieces slide down inclined end 20. Load rack 22 is driven by, for example, rack and pinion drive 42, in the forward direction. The speed of star wheel 24 is adjusted with respect to the speed of advancing load rack 22 so that the bars are lifted from load table 12 and deposited in, for example alternate notches in load rack 22. In this position transfer rack 26 is still lowered.

As shown in FIG. 4 load rack 22 has advanced to its extreme forward position and its movement is stopped. The star wheel 24 is disengaged and braked. As later described stop 102 of FIG. 14 abuts against the work pieces 18 to prevent further work pieces from sliding otf table 12. Transfer rack 26 has begun to rotate upwardly with work or transfer car 28 remaining station ary. FIG. 5 shows the sequence of operation in which the transfer rack has risen above load rack 22 so that the articles are transferred from rack 22 to rack 26 while maintaining the bars in their proper position. The remaining elements of assembly are otherwise the same as in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 shows the next sequence of operation wherein load rack 22 is returned to its starting position. Work car 28 is moved toward roller conveyor 30 with the transfer rack 26 remaining elevated and being disposed directly above roller conveyor 30.

FIG. 7 shows the next sequence of operation wherein load rack 22 is advancing with star wheel 24 depositing articles thereon at the properly spaced intervals as previously described. As shown in FIG. 7 transfer rack 26 is rotated below roller conveyor 30 so that the accumulated bars are disposed in the same predetermined multiples and spacing on roller conveyor 30 where they are then conveyed into the blast cabinet 32 shown in FIG. 1. As later described with respect to FIGS. 17-19 the workpieces are maintained at their proper spacing by pinch roller 104 which has now lowered into contact with the workpieces.

As shown in FIG. 8 the retracted transfer rack 26 is then returned by transfer or work car 28 to its initial position as shown in FIG. 2. At this time rack 22 has been completely loaded and its forward movement is halted as well as the rotational movement of star wheel 24. Transfer rack 26 is again rotated upwardly as indicated in FIG. 9 to remove the spaced work pieces 18 from load rack 22. FIG. 10 shows the next sequence of operations wherein the original work pieces which were deposited on roller conveyor 30 are being advanced through to the blast cabinet with the second batch of work pieces being held by transfer rack 26 above the roller conveyor as 4 disposed with regard to FIG. 6. Load rack 22 has also returned to its initial or index position.

FIG. 11 shows the relative positioning of the parts at the next sequence of operation when transfer rack 26 is holding a batch of pieces to deposit them upon roller 30. A prior load on conveyor 30 is moving into the blast cabinet, and a subsequent load is held on rack 22.

FIG. 12 shows the next sequence of operation wherein bars 18 are disposed on load rack 22 ready for transfer. Transfer rack 26 is simultaneously being lowered toward conveyor 30 while the previous batch of bars on the conveyor has been advanced into the blast cabinet.

The next sequence of operations is shown in FIG. 13 wherein retracted transfer rack 26 is being returned to its original position to remove bars 18 from load rack 22.

The various moving elements of assembly 10 may be electrically or mechanically connected so that the disposing of a particular element in a certain position controls the movement of another element. For example, when a previous load of bars has advanced clear of the unit, an electromechanical signalling device is actuated to cause transfer rack 26 to be lowered to deposit the bars on the grooved conveyor rolls 30. The use of appropriately placed micro-switches facilitates the automatic operation of assembly 10.

Assembly 10 is particularly advantageous for handling a very large amount of work pieces because its elements are simultaneously going through their various phases of operation. Thus transfer rack 26 hovers the bars from one load over a previous load on work conveyor 30. This makes it possible to arrange sequential loads upon conveyor 30 with a minimum gap between the loads on the conveyor.

Additionally, the particular contour for the star wheel, rack teeth and load table is such that it will handle many different shapes and sizes of work pieces. For example, work pieces from /2 inch to 4 inches square, from /2 inch to 4 inches round, or /2 inch wide to 4 inches wide flats can be effectively conveyed by assembly.

Assembly 10 contains a number of important ramifications which particularly enhances its high speed opera tion. Many of these ramifications have been omitted from FIGS. 2-13, which show the sequence of operation, for the sake of clarity.

One important feature of assembly 10 is the provision of index cam 34 shown in FIG. 1. As indicated therein this cam is notched so that it can be properly and positively indexed when abutting against stop member 36. The cam is utilized before the transferring operation has begun to properly orient load rack 22. By the positioning of cam 34 it is possible to accurately index load rack 22 so that a predetermined notch will be disposed for receiving the first work piece from table 12. This is important when determining which notches are to be filled in accordance with the number of articles which are to be deposited and their spacing on the load rack 22. Additionally, not only is the particular notch of load rack 22 selected by cam 34, but also the cam 34 determines the exact portion of the notch which will initially receive the deposited work piece to thereby best take into account the shape and other characteristics of the work piece and thus assure that each work piece will remain in its predetermined notch with the work pieces being properly spaced from each other. Once this initial setting of cam 34 has been made, the setting is maintained throughout the operation for the same type of workpieces being transferred.

The importance of cam 34 might best be appreciated from the following examples.

In loading four bars on rack 22 which has 16 notches, the bars are disposed in every fourth notch. It is desirable however that the last notch be vacant since pieces in this notch might not be blasted as effectively. By proper manipulation of cam 34 racks 22 can be indexed to receive an article in the third, rather than fourth, notch. Thus articles would be deposited in the third, seventh, eleventh,

and fifteenth notches. Accordingly cam 34 permits rack 22 to be indexed for symmetrical work positioning on conveyor 30 for the most effective blasting operation.

This indexing can be accomplished with such accuracy that the shape and movement characteristics can be taken into account in determining which part of the notch initially receives the articles. Accordingly rounds (bars of circular cross-section) can be prevented from rolling into the wrong notch by using the point of a previous notch as a brake to slow down the rounds for proper registry. Additionally rack 22 could be indexed so that each article receiving notch has enough of a lead for receiving wide flats to permit the star wheel 24 to clear the flat when rotating past it.

Another important feature of assembly is the adjustable stop mechanism 102 shown in FIG. 14. As indicated therein stop mechanism 102 includes a stop arm 106 which is secured at one end to screw jack assembly 108. Arm 106 pivots about shaft 110 and terminates in an appropriately shaped slanted end 112 which contacts the workpieces. Before the transfer operation is begun screw jack mechanism 108 is manipulated to properly orient slanted end 112 of arm 106 so that the workpieces on inclined portion 20 of table 12 will abut against but not ride over end 112 and (as later described) to assure that only one work piece at a time will be transferred. The orientation of arm 106 is made to take into account the particular shape and other characteristics of the workpieces being transferred. Once the orientation has been made, it is left unchanged throughout the transferring operations. During the inactive stages of the transferring operation, as shown for example in FIG. 4, when star wheel 24 is disengaged, stop member 112 abuts against the workpieces to prevent them from sliding off inclined portion 20. During the other phases of operation however star wheel 24 lifts the workpieces over inclined end 112 to properly position the work pieces on load rack 22.

Although adjustable stop 102 is effective to prevent the workpieces from sliding off table 12 at various stages after the operation has begun, the low inclination of end 112 which facilitates the transfer operation would not be sufiicient to act as a stop member when table 12 is initially raised and the workpieces slide down inclined port on 20 at a relatively high rate of speed. During this initial phase of operation it is therefore important to provide some means such as initial stop mechanism 100 which is shown in FIG. 15. As indicated therein the initial stop arm 114 rotates about shaft 116 under the influence of pistoncylinder assembly 118. As shown in FIG. 15 the arm 114 is substantially vertical with the piston-cylinder assembly 118 being extended. Upon raising the table 12 the articles slide or roll down inclined portion and are prevented from rolling off the table by contacting arm 114 which acts as a shock absorber. (When rounds are being transferred it is not necessary to raise table 12, since the rounds can roll down inclined portion 20.) The workpieces in this halted position would also be in contact with adjustable arm 112 shown in FIG. 14. After the pieces have been initially halted, piston-cylinder assembly 118 retract-s arm 114 so that the transferring operation can take place.

The actual transferring operation from table 12 to rack 22 can best be understood by reference to FIGS. 14 and 20-23. In the position shown in FIG. 14 a workpiece 121 having a circular cross-section abuts against the end 112 of stop 106. A ramp 122 is arranged adjacent end 112 with hold back bar 120 resting against the ramp.

FIG. 20 shows how star wheel 24 lifts workpiece 121 up inclined end 112. Advantageously, teeth 25 of star wheel 24 are pointed to assure lifting only one workpiece at a time. In this respect, if the star wheel teeth were blunt, as the tooth rotated to transfer one workpiece the blunt tooth would move the next workpiece partially up inclined end 112. Thus two workpieces would be transferred by the next tooth. This danger is prevented by pointing teeth 25.

As indicated in FIG. 21 workpiece 121 rolls down tooth 25 on to ramp 122. Flat workpieces are then pushed across ramp 122 'by the rotating tooth 25. Round workpieces, however, usually roll ahead of tooth 25. To prevent the round-s from rolling olf ramp 25 into the wrong notch of rack 22, hold back bar 120 is provided. As shown in FIG. 1 bar 120 is pivotally suspended at one end, with its other end resting upon ramp 122. Bar 120 is in the form of an open channel (FIG. 14) closed at one end so that weights 124 could be placed therein. The specific weights are determined by the rounds being transferred. The weights must be heavy enough to prevent the rounds from pushing through, while light enough to permit the star wheel to force the rounds .past bar 120. It is also important that the bar 120 contact lamp 122 on its fiat portion or at the junction of the flat and inclined portions. If the contact were made at the incline, small diameter rounds might be pinched between the ramp and bar, and the star wheel might slide under the rounds without transferring it to rack 22.

As shown in FIG. 22 as the correct notch of rack 22 approaches the end of ramp 122, tooth 25 pushes against piece 121 to raise bar 120. Piece 121 then rolls or slides down ramp 122 into rack 22 as indicated in FIG. 23.

The shape of the various elements of assembly 10 have been carefully selected to facilitate high speed accurate operation with a minimum gap between batches of workpieces. For example as previously noted cam 34 accurately indexes rack 22 while the pointed teeth 25 of star wheel 24 and the inclined stop arm 106 assure that only one workpiece will be transferred at a time. In this respect the shape of the notches in load rack 22 and transfer rack 26 is also important.

As indicated in FIG. 16 load rack 22 includes a plurality of notches or teeth which have a sloping support surface 23 at a 60 angle to a somewhat vertical locking side 27, which in turn is at an angle to blunt cushion side 29. The selection of the acute angle (in particular 60) between work contacting surfaces 23 and 27 is particularly impor- -tant for very wide work pieces 19. In this respect if work contacting surfaces 23 and 27 were at right angles to each other or at an obtuse angle to each other, extra wide work piece 19 would topple over by pivoting on the point 31 of the rack teeth. By selecting an acute angle of, for example, 60 the work piece 19 is supported by inclined surface 23 with its upper corner wedged against surface 27 to effectively lock the work pieces 19 in place and thus overcome any tendency for the work piece to fall into the next rack notch. The selection of a 60 angle results from the consideration that a larger acute angle permits a larger support surface, while a smaller angle provides better locking action.

Flat surface 29 is provided for larger diameter rounds. If the notches terminated in points by having side 27 extend upwardly until it joined with inclined side 23, large rounds might strike the points and roll into the wrong notch. With the configuration shown in FIG. 16, however, this danger is eliminated. In this respect the rounds strike the blunt side 29 which acts as a cushion to prevent incorrect placement of the rounds.

It is to be understood of course that the teeth of transfer rack 26 may have the same shape as those of load rack 22.

Another feature of assembly 10 is shown in FIGS. 17- 19. This feature is pinch roller 104 which maintains the pieces in their proper orientation on conveyor 30. As indicated in FIGS. 17-18 pinch roller 104 freely rotates on its shaft and is so shaped as to maintain both flat and round workpieces in their proper notches in conveyor 30. After the workpieces are deposited in conveyor 30 pinch roller 104 is lowered until it pinches or presses against the workpieces. As indicated in FIG. 17 the inclined surface of the pinch roller rests on flat workpieces, while the horizontal surfaces seats on the rounds shown in FIG. 18.

Since rollers 104 are freely mounted on shaft 105, the rollers are rotated by the moving workpieces.

As indicated in FIG. 19 at least one pinch roller 104i is provided on the feed side of blast housing 32. These external rollers are raised and lowered by the positive action of piston-cylinder assembly 107. Within blast housing 32 are a number of free swinging pendulum type mounted pinch rollers 104a. Internal pinch rollers 104a are for the purpose of preventing the workpieces from being dislodged by blast streams directed from below the workpieces. A pair of the many variously located blast wheels 109 are schematically shown in FIG. 19.

The above described assembly 10 is particularly suitable for high speed operation with a minimum gap between each batch. In actual practice a plurality of the various components (ramps, star wheels, racks, etc.) are arranged side-by-side for simultaneous operation. Thus work pieces as long as 40 feet, for example, could be carried by these side-by-side assemblies.

Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is, therefore, to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. An assembly comprising article feed means, a load rack for receiving the transferred articles from said feed means, said load rack reciprocating back and forth adjacent said feed means, said rack having article receiving teeth thereon, spacing means for depositing the articles upon said load rack at predetermined spaced intervals, a *work piece conveyor for moving the articles to an area of treatment, and a transfer rack for moving the articles from said load rack to said conveyor while maintaining the articles at said predetermined spacing.

2. An assembly as set forth in claim 1 including adjustable indexing means for controlling the initial position of said load rack with respect to said feed means and said spacing means, said indexing means including a stop member on said load rack and a notched cam disposed in the path of motion of said stop member.

3. An assembly as set forth in claim 1 including initial stop means disposed adjacent said feed means for acting as a shock absorber to prevent articles from being prematurely discharged from said feed means, the delivery portion of said feed means being inclinable, said initial stop means including a substantially vertical arm disposed at said delivery portion of said feed means when said feed means is inclined, and means for retracting said arm.

4. An assembly as set forth in claim 1 including stop means disposed adjacent said feed means to position the articles to be transferred one at a time from said feed means by said spacing means, the delivery portion of said feed means being inclinable, said stop means including a stop arm disposed at said delivery portion and sloping away therefrom.

5. An assembly as set forth in claim 1 wherein said spacing means includes a variable speed star wheel having pointed teeth.

6. An assembly as set forth in claim 5 wherein adjustable stop means is disposed adjacent said feed means for positioning the articles to be taken one at a time from said feed means by said star wheel, a ramp being disposed between said adjustable stop means and said load rack whereby the articles may be transferred by said star wheel from said adjustable means upon said ramp and to said load rack, and said load rack being reciprocatable adjacent said ramp.

7. A work transfer assembly comprising article feed means, a load rack for receiving the transferred articles from said feed means, spacing means for depositing the articles upon said load rack at predetermined spaced intervals, a workpiece conveyor for moving the articles to an area of treatment, a transfer rack for moving the articles from said load rack to said conveyor while maintaining the articles at said predetermined spacing, said load rack including a plurality of article receiving teeth, each of said teeth including an inclined support surface and a locking surface disposed at an acute angle to said support surface.

8. An assembly as set forth in claim 7 wherein said acute angle is approximately and each of said teeth terminating in a fiat surface inclined away from said locking surface.

9. An assembly as set forth in claim 1 including pinch roll means disposed adjacent said conveyor for maintaining the articles at said predetermined spacing on said conveyor, said pinch. roll means is a freely rotatable upper roller having an inclined surface terminating in a substantially horizontal surface, and means for raising and lowering said roller.

10. An assembly as set forth in claim 9 being in combination with blasting means, said conveyor moving said articles through said blasting means, and at least one of said pinch roll means being disposed externally of said blasting means, and at least one of said pinch roll means being disposed within said blasting means and being of the pendulum type.

.11. An assembly as set forth in claim 1 including holdback means disposed between said feed means and said load rack for preventing the premature transfer of round articles, said holdback means including a weighted movable bar disposed in the path of travel of articles being discharged from said feed means.

12. An assembly comprising article feed means, a load rack for receiving the transferred articles from said feed means, spacing means for depositing the articles upon said load rack at predetermined spaced intervals, a work piece conveyor for moving the articles to an area of treatment, and a transfer rack for moving the articles from said load rack to said conveyor while maintaining the articles at said predetermined spacing, said feed means including a pivotable load table, the discharge end of said load table being inclined, and elevating means for raising and lowering said table, initial stop means disposed adjacent the inclined end of said table, said initial stop means including a hydraulically operated shock absorbing arm disposed to move toward and away from said inclined end of said table, adjustable stop means being disposed ad acent said inclined end of said table, said adjustable stop means including a pivotable arm, said pivotable arm terminating in an inclined end whereby an article to be transferred is disposed on said table abutting against said inclined end, a ramp being disposed adjacent said adjustable stop means, said ramp having a flat support surface and terminating in an inclined surface, said spacing means including a variable speed rotatable star wheel adacent said ramp, said star Wheel having pointed teeth for lifting each article over said adjustable stop means and across said ramp, a weighted holdback bar pivotably mounted at one end above said ramp with its other end resting upon said fiat surface of said ramp, said holdback bar having an open channel cross section and being closed at its lower end, removable weights mounted in said channel shaped holdback bar, said load rack including rec procal drive means for advancing said rack adjacent said ramp, a plurality of teeth being in said rack, each of said teeth including an inclined support surface, a locking surface disposed approximately 60 to said inclined support surface, and each tooth terminating in a flat surface inclined away from said locking surface, said transfer rack including rotatable drive means whereby sa d rack may be rotated upwardly to lift the pieces off sald load rack, said transfer rack having a plurality of teeth WhlCh correspond in shape to said load rack teeth, said transfer rack being mounted upon a movable car to facilitate its movement from said load rack to said conveyor, guide rails disposed under said car for assuring the accurate movement of said transfer rack to said conveyor,

said conveyor being in the form of a plurality of roller conveyor means with rolls corresponding to said teeth on said load rack and transfer rack, blast means for cleaning the articles, said roller conveyor means extending into said blast means, pinch roll means disposed above said roller conveyor means externally of said blast means, said pinch roll means including freely mounted rollers having an inclined surface and a horizontal surface, a piston assembly for raising and lowering said externally mounted pinch roll means, further pinch roll means being disposed internally of said blast means, and said 10 internally disposed pinch roll means having a pendulum type mounting.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,210,531 8/1940 Engelbaugh et a1, 51 215 X 2,837,200 6/1958 Evans l98-33 3,036,413 5/1962 Schulte 51-215 3,214,001 10/1965 Callaghan 214-1 LESTER M. SWINGLE, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2210531 *Feb 29, 1940Aug 6, 1940Youngstown Sheet And Tube CoAutomatic control system for pipe threading machines and the like
US2837200 *Jul 16, 1956Jun 3, 1958Evans Entpr IncBar and billet turning apparatus
US3036413 *Jan 29, 1960May 29, 1962Bell Intercontinental CorpBlasting machine loader
US3214001 *Oct 9, 1962Oct 26, 1965Production Machinery CorpUnscrambler
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4718531 *Feb 24, 1986Jan 12, 1988Amp IncorporatedElectrical connector pick-up station
US5083897 *Jun 21, 1990Jan 28, 1992Fmp/Rauma CompanyDeck for metering logs to debarking drum infeed chute
EP0201120A1 *Apr 16, 1986Nov 12, 1986DANIELI & C. OFFICINE MECCANICHE S.p.A.Device to feed a multiple-feed straightening machine automatically downstream of a cooling plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/80, 451/335, 414/746.4, 414/224.1
International ClassificationB23Q7/10, B65G47/52
Cooperative ClassificationB23Q7/10, B65G47/52
European ClassificationB65G47/52, B23Q7/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 1, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: KENNECOTT CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:BEAR CREEK MINING COMPANY;BEAR TOOTH MINING COMPANY;CARBORUNDUM COMPANY THE;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:003961/0672
Effective date: 19801230