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Publication numberUS3390549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1968
Filing dateJul 11, 1966
Priority dateJul 11, 1966
Publication numberUS 3390549 A, US 3390549A, US-A-3390549, US3390549 A, US3390549A
InventorsBrand Siegfried F
Original AssigneeMonsanto Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Warp knitted elastic fabric and method of manufacture
US 3390549 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. F. BRAND July 2, 1968 WARP KNITTED ELASTIC FABRIC AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed July 11. 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR- SIEGFRIED E BRAND "9 Pam 441,)

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s. RBRAND 7 July 2, 1968 I WARP nmwrzusms'nc rump AND METHOD OF muumc'nmm 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 11. 1966 kn, 5. v o m F m 6 IIIIIZZT.

FIG. 6.

v INVENTOR. SIEGFRIED F. BRAND BY 9 a ATTORNEY United States Patent Monsanto Company, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Delaware Filed July 11, 1966, Ser. No. 564,204 19 Claims. (CI. 66-86) This invention relates to knitted fabrics. More particularly, this invention relates to an improved fine-gauge warp knitted fabric into which elastomeric yarns have been introduced to obtain a two-way power stretch and to a method for the manufacture of such a fabric.

Warp knitted fabrics having elastomeric spandex type yarn have heretofore been used in limited quantities in the underwear and foundation field as well as swimwear and outerwear, but have failed to gain industry wide acceptance because of economic and technical problems. Generally, such fabrics are made on two-bar tricot knitting machines with a fully threaded back bar of spandex type yarn covered by a fully threaded front bar of a relatively non-elastic yarn, usually nylon. The stitch constructions used are mostly l0, 12 on the spandex bar, and either 1-2, l-O or 2-3, l-0 for the non-elastic yarn.

The disadvantage of such an arrangement is that the proportional spandex content of the resultant fa-bric must be relatively high (generally in excess of 20 percent) depending on stitch and denier of the component yarns. Since the spandex yarn is much more expensive than the non-elastic yarn, the fabrics thus produced are costly. To lower this cost, fine denier spandex yarns are used to reduce the spandex content relative to the non-elastic fiber, but the much greater cost and lower strength of the finer yarn has a tendency to diminish or eliminate this disadvantage. The high cost tends to confine the use of these fabrics to the luxury rather than the utility trade, and thus severely limits their employment in underwear and foundation garment end uses, while keeping them almost entirely out of other applications where garments are cut from larger panels of fabric.

In addition, there are technical problems which arise with the use of spandex type yarns. These yarns have a tendency to turn dark after exposure to light and chemicals, thereby discoloring the fabrics in which they are present. The larger the content of spandex in the fabric the less it is covered by the non-elastic yarns, and the more noticeable the discoloration. Conversely, spandex yarns are difiicult to dye to the same shade or intensity of the companion fiber, again causing a problem which can be alleviated by reducing the spandex content of such fabrics.

Another serious difficulty with two-bar elastic fabrics employing a full bar of spandex yarns is their tendency to edge-curling which is most apparent and awkward when the fabric has been cut into sections to be sewn into garments. These small pieces immediately tend to scroll up and have to be carefully unfurled just before they are fed into the sewing machine, causing a considerable loss in time, and an increase in waste and defective garments. Operators have to be specially trained for this; and, since sewing it is piece-rate operation, better paid to do it.

According to this invention a significant reduction in elastomeric yarn content without a proportional loss in modulus is accomplished by utilizing a four-bar tricot warp-knitting machine in which two bars, preferably those forming the face and back of the fabric and containing the yarns of the top beams, are made to knit a ground fabric using non-elastic yarns. Such constructions are generally knitted with fully threaded bars and may run l(),

Patented July 2, 1968 "ice 2-3 in front and 1-2, 10 in back, or any other basic, high-stretch stitch.

The two other bars contain the elastomer ends and should be threaded only partially. The fewer the number of ends used, the lower the elastomer content will be and the higher the potential modulus. Threadings of one in three out, one in four out, one in five out, one in six out, one in seven out, one in eight out, one in nine out, and one in ten out; or variations and combinations of the above may be used. These threadings are used in both back bars, and the bars are moved in opposite directions while knitting, so as to deposit loops on the same or adjacent needles. Since only a fraction of a possible total number of power ends are present these must be moved until they meet or overlap; and in this manner elastomer ends are stretched between points to form a power lace-work which is structurally reduced to a minimum while functioning with maximum efiiciency. Such efiiciency is inherent in the relationship between the threading and stitch construction. The fewer the elastomer ends in the bars, the further they must be moved to meet or overlap, thus building up increased tension in the power loop which will, when relaxed, tend to contract the resulting fabric investing it with maxi-mum modulus with a minimum of elastomer. Depending on threading and stitch relationship on one hand, and the relationship of deniers between stretch and non-elastic yarns on the other, the elastomer content of fabric-s manufacured in accordance with this invention can drop below 10 percent while at the same time contributing to keeping the fabric light and powerful.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to produce a two-Way stretch fabric having maximum power or modulus accomplished with a minimum utilization of elastomeric yarns.

Another object of this invention is to produce a stretch fabric having maximum power developed by overlapping elastomeric yarns in such a manner as to produce a plurality of opposite acting spring-like construction-s incorporated in the fabric to take maximum advantage of the power of the elastomeric yarns.

Still another object of this invention is to form a fabric on a four bar tricot knitting machine having a plurality of elastomeric yarns incorporated therein with a number of said yarns omitted from the guide bars which operate in opposite directions to accomplish a fabric having a maximum modulus or power with a minimum spandex content.

A still further object of this invention is to produce a two-way stretch fabric on a four bar tricot warp knitting machine having elastomeric yarns fed into two bars with certain of said elastomeric ends omitted from the guides thereofand operated so as to produce an overlapping lace-like structure to produce maximum modulus with minimum elastomer content.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will be more apparent upon reference to the following specification, appended claims and drawing wherein:

FIGURE 1 shows one example of a ground fabric which may be utilized in the instant invention;

FIGURE 2 shows a second example of a ground fabric which may be utilized with the instant invention;

FIGURE 3 illustrates one pattern of a pair of overlapping elastomeric yarns knit into the ground fabric;

FIGURE 4 illustrates a pattern in which the elastomeric yarns are laid into the ground fabric in overlapping relationship;

FIGURE 5 is a diagrammatic illustration showing the relationship between the bars and needles of a knitting machine in producing the fabric pattern illustrated in FIG- URE 1;

FIGURE 6 is a diagrammatic illustration similar to FIGURE 5 illustrating the relationships between the bars and needles in producing the pattern of FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 6 but showing the relationship required to produce the pattern illustrated in FIGURE 4.

The nomenclature, manner of designing tricot fabric, and methods of manufacturing them are well known to those skilled in the art. In this regard reference is made to the following books. Tricot Fabric Design by Thomas H. Johnson, first edition published in 1946 by McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.; Warp Knit Engineering by A. Reisfeld, published by National Knitted Outerwear Association, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y., 10010, May 1966; Warp Knitting Technology by D. F. Paling, published by Columbine Press, Old Colony House, South King Street, Manchester #2, England. It is, therefore, believed to be unnecessary to undertake a detailed explanation of the complicated subject of warp knitting tricot fabrics.

Examples of ground fabrics 10 and 10' formed of relatively non-elastic yarns or warps are shown in FIGURES 1 and 2. These fabrics are formed on two bars of a four bar machine, preferably forming the front and back faces of the fabric. For purposes of clarity the elastomeric ends have been omitted from these views. The pattern in FIGURE 1 is produced on fully threaded bars and is 2-3, 1-0, with non-elastic yarn 12; and 1-0, 1-2, with the non-elastic yarn 14. The pattern of FIGURE 2 is also produced on fully threaded bars with a pattern of 1-2, 1-0 with non-elastic yarn 12; a pattern of 1-0, 1-2 with non-elastic yarn 14'. Many variations and combinations of the above-described patterns and other patterns may be utilized to produce ground fabric. These variations will be obvious to one skilled in the art depending on such factors as fabric density desired, end use, denier of yarns, and so forth. The major factor to be considered in designing the ground fabric pattern is that it be capable of producing a high-stretch fabric.

Two examples of the manner in which the elastomeric yarns are incorporated into the ground fabric are shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. These elastomeric yarns are incorporated into the ground fabric between the front and back faces; but, for purposes of clarity, the ground fabric has been omitted from these views. As shown in FIG- URE 3, the elastomeric yarns 16 and 18 have been threaded into the other two bars of a four-bar knitting machine with both bars threaded one in and five out. The pattern of FIGURE 3 is 1-0, 4-5 on one end 16 and 4-5, 1-0 on the other end 18. FIGURE 4 shows an example of a power inlay, again with both bars threaded one in and five out and a pattern of -0, 4-4 on one end 20 and a pattern of 4-4, 0-0 on the other end 22.

As set forth above, an example of elastomeric yarns which are knitted into the fabric is shown in FIGURE 3. The pattern is arranged so that one of the elastomeric ends 16 is formed into what is generally termed a closed stitch 24 preferably corresponding to a stitch in the ground fabric while the other yarn 18 is formed into a stitch 26 preferably corresponding to an adjacent stitch in the ground fabric. The two bars containing the elastic ends are then moved in opposite directions behind and across the three needles before being formed into other stitches 28 and 30 on fourth needles. Thus, these particular ends each span wales total of the ground fabric shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 counting the stitches on which the elastomeric yarn stitches are formed and assuming that a ground fabric stitch is formed on each needle of the knitting machine. Thus, these two ends 16 and 18 overlap between stitches 24 and 26, and, as the pattern is repeated, a plurality of oppositely acting tension springs are formed in the fabric producing the requisite power or modulus as hereinbefore described.

Again many variations of the pattern shown in FIG- URE 3 may be utilized to produce the desired result.

For example, the bars may be threaded one in-four out, one in-five out, one in-six out, one in-seven out, one ineight-out, one in-nine out, one in-ten out with stitches such as 1-0, 3-4; 1-0, 4-5; 1-0, 5-6; 1-0, 6-7; l-O, 7-8; or other variations thereof such as 0-1, 4-3; 0-1, 5-4; 0-1, 6-5; 0-1, 7-6; 0-1, 8-7; and the like, in opposite directions. The preferred limits, for economic reasons and to produce the required modulus, appear to be a pattern which would have each elastic yarn spanning at least two but not more than six wales of a ground fabric. It is important that the elastomeric ends overlap either between adjacent stitches or somewhere between laterally spaced wale forming stitches.

The power inlay illustrated in FIGURE 4 is formed merely by incorporating both ends into the loop components of a ground fabric stitch. These ends, therefore, overlap on the same wale forming stitch of the ground fabric. This pattern is accomplished again, by threading two bars of a four bar knitting machine one in and five out. The pattern is 0-0, 4-4, on one end 20 and 4-4, 0-0 on the other end 22 is achieved by moving the bars in opposite directions before again feeding the ends into other stitches of the ground fabric. Overlapping loops 32 and 34 are formed in one stitch whereupon the bars are moved behind and across three needles in opposite directions before the ends are incorporated into other, spaced stitches. In this manner the yarn 20 forming loop 32 forms another loop 36, and the yarn 22 forms another loop 38, each yarn 20 and 22 spanning four total wales of the ground fabric shown in FIGURES 1 and 2. By repeating this pattern with other elastomeric yarns threaded in the above described manner to the two bars, a plurality of oppositely reacting tension springs are formed in the ground fabric.

Again, variations of this pattern may be utilized to accomplish the desired end result. The two bars may be threaded one in-four out, one in-five out, one in-six out, one in-seven out, one in-eight out, one in-nine out, one in-ten out, with inlays such as 0-0, 4-4; O-O, 5-5; 0-0, 6-6; O-O, 7-7; and so forth. The preferred practical range again appears to be a pattern such that not less than two wales nor more than six wales of the ground fabric are spanned by the elastomeric ends.

In no one illustration has the assembled fabric been represented. This is due to the fact that such would be more confusing than helpful. In each of the fabrics described above there are four distinct knitted layers. It would be extremely diflicult to follow the course of individual ends through such a fabric. It is believed that the four illustrations accompanying this description are sufficient to picture this invention to one conversant in the art.

The type of non-elastic yarn and elastomeric yarn utilized can vary widely depending on the results desired. This is also true of choice of deniers and other yarn properties. Satisfactory results have been obtained utilizing a ground fabric of 40 denier nylon and an elastomeric portion formed with 70 denier Blue C spandex, a segmented polyurethane fiber produced by the Chemstrand Division of the Monsanto Company Using the pattern shown in FIGURES 1 and 4, the fabric was found to have a spandex content of 10 percent. Knitting spandex yarns into the pattern show in FIGURE 1 with the two spandex bars threaded one infive out and a pattern of 1-0, 5-6 on one bar and 5-6, 1-0 on the other, the spandex content of the fabric was found to be 13 percent by weight.

While the elastic ends have been described as spanning five wales of the ground fabric utilizing the construction illustrated in FIGURE 3 and four Wales of the ground fabric construction illustrated in FIGURE 4, it is obvious that if the pattern of the ground fabric differs from those shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 it is possible that the span, although of the same length, may cross fewer wales. For example, if both bars producing the ground fabric are threaded so that one complete wale is omitted only four will be spanned by the construction shown in FIGURE 3 and only three by the construction illustrated in FIGURE 4. Thus, while the ground fabric pattern may vary considerably according to the desired end result, the modulus of power added by the elastic yarns will not be significantly affected.

The method by which the ground fabric of FIGURE 1 and the elastic structure of FIGURES 3 and 4 are produced is illustrated diagrammatically in FIGURES 5 through 7. In each of these figures two bars are shown as Well as two sets of needles, but in reality the needles are common to each of the figures since, generally speaking, in warp knitting there is only one row of needles regardless of the number of guide bars utilized.

The fabric pattern shown in FIGURE 2 is produced by moving the bars 40 and 42 relative to one another in the manner indicated by the broken lines and arrows which trace the movement of the bar guides 44 and 46 on bars 40 and 42 respectively. It is seen that beginning at the point shown in FIGURE 5 the guide 44 moves in front of a needle 48, between this needle and an adjacent needle, behind two needles, between adjacent pairs of needles, in front of another needle 48, between adjacent pairs of needles, and returns to the starting point by passing behind two needles and between another adjacent pair of needles to form the stitch pattern. While this is occurring bar guide 46 moves in front of a needle 48-, between adjacent pairs of needles, behind a needle 48, between adjacent pairs of needles, in front of a needle 48, and returns to the starting point by moving between adjacent pairs of needles, behind one needle, and again between adjacent pairs of needles. This movement produces the stitch pattern 1-0, 1-2. Thus, as bars 40 and 42 perform their movements simultaneously the stitch pattern illustrated in FIGURE 1 is produced. In a like manner, the stitch pattern illustrated in FIGURE 2 is achieved by moving bars 40 and 42 in a similar manner. As is known in the art, the bar movements shown in FIGURE 5 will produce what are generally termed as closed stitches. It will also be obvious to one skilled in the art that this is merely a diagram and movement of the bar 40, for example, will not produce stitches in the same course of the fabric but rather in adjacent courses. This latter statement is also true of FIGURE 6.

The manner in which the stitch pattern illustrated in FIGURE 3 is produced is indicated diagrammatically in FIGURE 6. There it is seen that guide 50 on one bar 52 participates in forming a stitch on one needle 48 whereupon it is moved behind three needles before forming a second stitch on another needle 48 before passing behind three needles to the starting point to enable a repetition of the pattern. While this is occurring bar guide 54 on bar 56 is participating in forming stitches adjacent to those formed by guide 50. The pattern produced by the movements of bar 56 and the bar guide 54 is similar to that produced by guide 50 and bar 52 but it is being moved in the opposite direction to form the overlapping effect clearly indicated in FIGURE 3.

In FIGURE 7 the manner in which elastomeric ends 20 and 22 are inlaid in the ground fabric is illustrated. As clearly shown in this illustration the ends are merely moved through the ground fabric and entrapped therein under the influence of the movements of bar guide 58 on bar 60 and bar guide 62 on bar 64. Again, bars 60 and 64 are moved in opposite directions and are arranged so that the elastic ends are incorporated into the same wale forming stitch. As explained before in conjunction with FIG- URES 5 and 6, FIGURE 7 is a diagrammatic view and the loops formed individually by bars 50 and 64 are in adjacent courses rather than in the same course.

It will be apparent that by following the teaching of this invention a warp knitted fabric having high modulus or power with a minimum elastomeric yarn content may be produced. This result is accomplished by knitting in or laying in the spandex or other elastomeric type yarns in a manner such that they overlap and cross and are formed into a plurality of oppositely reacting tension springs incorporated into the fabric. Thus, throughout the fabric the elastic properties of the elastomeric yarn are utilized to their fullest extent.

This invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiments are therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.

I claim:

1. A knitted fabric comprising:

(a) a warp knitted ground fabric formed of relatively non-elastic yarn;

(b) at least two elastomeric ends separately incorporated in said ground fabric;

(c) said elastomeric ends partly overlapping one another and each spanning at least two of spaced wales of the ground fabric forming oppositely reacting tension springs thereby resulting in an elastic fabric having high power produced with a minimum percentage of elastomeric yarn.

2. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 wherein said elastomeric ends are inlaid in said ground fabric and overlap on the same wale forming stitch of said ground fabric.

3. A knitted fabric according to claim 2 wherein each of said elastomeric ends spans at least four distinct wales of said ground fabric.

4. A knitted fabric according to claim 3 wherein said ground fabric is tricot and is knit in a two bar pattern with ends fed to every needle from every guide.

5. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 wherein said elastomeric ends are knitted into said ground fabric.

6. A knitted fabric according to claim 5 wherein said elastomeric ends overlap between and are knitted in adjacent wale forming stitches of said ground fabric.

7. A knitted fabric according to claim 5 wherein each of said elastomeric ends spans at least five distinct wales of said ground fabric.

8. A knitted fabric according to claim 7 wherein said ground fabric is tricot and is knit in a two bar pattern with ends fed to every needle from every guide.

9. A knitted fabric comprising:

(a) a tricot warp knitted fabric formed in a two bar pattern with relatively non-elastic ends fed to every needle and forming fabric front and back faces;

(b) at least two elastomeric ends separately laid into said ground fabric between said front and back faces in a two bar pattern with said bars threaded one in and five out;

(c) each of said elastomeric yarns spanning four wales of said ground fabrics and overlapping on the same stitch of said ground fabric thereby forming oppositely reacting tension springs and resulting in an elastic fabric having high power produced with a minimum percentage of elastomeric.

10. A knitted fabric comprising:

(a) a tricot warp knitted fabric formed in a two bar pattern with relatively non-elastic ends fed to every needle and forming fabric front and back faces;

(b) at least two elastomeric ends separately knitted into said ground fabric between said front and back faces in a two bar pattern with said ends threaded one in and five out on both of said bars;

(c) each of said elastomeric ends spanning five distinct wales of said ground fabric and overlapping between and knit in adjacent wale stitches of said ground fabric thereby forming oppositely reacting tension springs and resulting in an elastic fabric having high power produced with a minimum percentage of elastomeric yarn.

11. The method of manufacturing a knitted fabric comprising the steps of:

(a) feeding relatively non-elastic ends to a plurality of needles on a multi bar warp knitting machine.

(b) forming said non-elastic ends into a warp knitted ground fabric;

() feeding elastomeric ends to spaced guides of at least two bars of said multi-bar warp knitting machine;

(d) feeding said elastomeric ends from each of said bars to spaced needles of said knitting machine, and incorporating said ends into said ground fabric with ends from separate of said bar overlapping at a first point on said ground fabric;

(e) moving said bars to which said elastomeric ends are fed in opposite directions passing said ends across a plurality of said needles of said knitting machine to spaced, second points on said ground fabric; and

(f) incorporating said elastomeric ends into said ground fabric at said second points on said ground fabric thereby forming oppositely reacting tensioning springs in said ground fabric resulting in an elastic fabric having high power produced with a minimum percent by weight of elastomeric yarn.

12. The method of forming a knitted fabric according to claim 11 wherein said ground fabric is knit in a two bar pattern forming front and back faces and said elastomeric ends are incorporated into said ground fabric between said faces.

13. The method of manufacturing a knitted fabric com prising the steps of:

(a) feeding relatively non-elastic ends to a plurality of needles on a multi-bar Warp knitting machine;

(b) forming said non-elastic ends into a warp knitted ground fabric;

(0) feeding elastomeric ends to spaced guides of at least two bars of said multi-bar warp knitting machine;

(d) feeding said elastomeric ends from each of said bars to spaced needles of said knitting machine and knitting said elastomeric ends into said ground fabric with ends from separate bars overlapping at a first point on said ground fabric;

(e) moving said bars to which said elastomeric ends are fed in opposite directions passing said ends across a plurality of said needles of said knitting machine to spaced second points on said ground fabric; and

(f) knitting said eiastomeric ends into said ground fabric at said second points on said ground fabric thereby forming oppositely reacting tension springs in said ground fabric resulting in an elastic fabric having high power produced with a minimum percent by weight of elastomeric yarn.

14. The method of manufacturing a knitted fabric according to claim 13 wherein:

(a) said elastomeric ends are incorporated into said fabric by feeding said ends from separate bars to adjacent needles of said knitting machine and forming said ends into closed stitches;

(b) overlapping said eiastomeric ends between said closed stitches formed on said adjacent needles.

15. The method of manufacturing a knitted fabric according to claim 14 wherein:

(a) said non-elastic ends are fed to each of a plurality of immediately adjacent guides on two bars of said multi-bar warp knitting machine; and

(b) said non-elastic ends are fed from said guides of said bars to the needles of said knitting machine so that each of a plurality of immediately adjacent needles of said knitting machine is producing a Wale forming closed stitch with yarn fed from at least one of said bars thereby forming the front and back faces of said fabric.

16. The method of manufacturing a knitted fabric ac cording to claim 15 wherein:

(a) said elastomeric ends are knit into said fabric between said fabric front and back faces; and

(b) said elastomeric ends are fed to guides on each of said bar seperated from one another by a plurality of guides to which no ends are fed; arid (c) said ends from individual bars are fed to needles of said knitting machine separated from one another by a plurality of needles.

17. The method of manufacturing a knitted fabric comprising the steps of:

(a) feeding relatively non-elastic ends to a plurality of needles of a multi-bar warp knitting machine;

(b) fashioning said non-elastic ends into a plurality of stitches forming a Warp knitted ground fabric;

(0) feeding elastomeric ends to spaced guides of each of at least two bars of said multi-bar warp knitting machine;

((1) feeding said elastomeric ends from said bars into a first selected ground fabric stitch and incorporating said elastomeric ends into said fabric by entrapping them in said stitch in overlapping relationship;

(e) moving said bars to which said elastomeric yarns are fed in opposite directions to pass said yarns across a plurality of said knitting machine needles; andv (f) feeding said elastomeric ends into second, selected ground fabric stitches spaced from said first stitch by entrapping said ends therein resulting in oppositely reacting tension springs in said ground fabric and producing an elastomeric fabric having high power with a minimum percent by weight of elastomeric yarn.

18. The method of manufacturing knitted fabric according to claim 17 wherein:

(a) said non-elastic ends are fed to each of a plurality of immediately adjacent guides on two bars of said multi-bar Warp knitting machines; and

(b) said non-elastic ends are fed from said guides on said bars to the needles of said knitting machine to form the front and back faces of said fabric so that each of a plurality of immediately adjacent needles of said knitting machine is producing a wale forming glosed stitch with ends fed from at least one of said ars.

19. The method of manufacturing a knitted fabric according to claim 18 wherein:

(a) said elastomeric ends are inlaid into said fabric between said fabric front and back faces; and

(b) said elastomeric ends are fed to guides on each of said bars separated from one another by a plurality of guides to which no ends are fed; and

(c) said ends from individual bars are fed to needles of said knitting machine separated from one another by a plurality of needles.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,029,880 2/1936 Lindley 66192 2,149,031 2/1939 Schonfeld 66-l92 XR 2,149,032 2/1939 Schonfeld 66192 XR 2,153,645 4/1939 Schonfeld 66-192 2,652,705 9/1953 Weinberg 66-193 2,996,906 8/1961 Ichibe 65-195 3,069,885 12/1962 Cooper et al 66-195 MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner.

R. FELDBAUM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2029880 *Mar 31, 1933Feb 4, 1936George W LindleyElastic fabric
US2149031 *Oct 2, 1937Feb 28, 1939 Manufacture of warp goods provided
US2149032 *Apr 15, 1938Feb 28, 1939Paul SchonfeldProduction of plain warp goods
US2153645 *Oct 2, 1937Apr 11, 1939Paul SchonfeldWarp goods provided with rubber threads
US2652705 *Sep 11, 1950Sep 22, 1953Lastik Seam Sales CorpTape
US2996906 *May 31, 1960Aug 22, 1961Asajiro IchibeWarp fabric with elastic yarn knitted thereinto
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3845640 *Sep 4, 1973Nov 5, 1974Waller NMethod and apparatus for producing a knitted fabric with projecting barbs
US3845641 *Jul 1, 1971Nov 5, 1974Binder Fa GMethod and apparatus for producing a knitted fabric with projecting barbs
US4307587 *Nov 15, 1977Dec 29, 1981Bayer AktiengesellschaftKnitted fabric with a new pattern and a process for its production
US4638648 *May 1, 1986Jan 27, 1987E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyLayered warp knits
US4817400 *Aug 21, 1987Apr 4, 1989Bayer AktiengesellschaftBielastic, warp-knit fabric and its production
US6484325Dec 23, 1999Nov 26, 2002Liberty Fabrics, Inc.Athletic garment and equipment system
US6698252Aug 6, 2001Mar 2, 2004Guilford Mills, Inc.Snag-resistant matte-effect warp-knitted textile fabric for activewear apparel
US20150128653 *Nov 8, 2013May 14, 2015Pacific Textiles LimitedWarp knitted fabric and method of manufacturing the same
EP0119535A1 *Mar 5, 1984Sep 26, 1984Bayer AgTwo-way elastic warp knit article and method of manufacture
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/203, 66/192, 66/202
International ClassificationD04B21/18, D04B21/14
Cooperative ClassificationD04B21/18
European ClassificationD04B21/18