Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3392719 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1968
Filing dateJun 3, 1965
Priority dateJun 3, 1965
Publication numberUS 3392719 A, US 3392719A, US-A-3392719, US3392719 A, US3392719A
InventorsClanton Raymond W, Howe Charles W
Original AssigneeClanton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for splitting concrete blocks
US 3392719 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 16, 1968 R w, CLANTON ETAL 3,392,719

MACHINE FOR SPLITTING CONCRETE BLOCKS Filed June 5, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Hip.

Raw mum W- CLAAJTOM (114424.155 I4?- HOWE INVENTORS ATTOQMEYS July 16, 1968 R. w. CLANTON ET AL 3,392,719

MACHINE FOR SPLITTING CONCRETE BLOCKS Filed June 5, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet Z H HHEFJ Rnv/vw/uo I41... CLfl/UTO/U CHAELES Ml. HOWE INVENTORS W/W" wQ/M ATTO QME Y'S y 1963 R. w. CLANTON ET Al. 3,392,719

MACHINE FOR SPLITTING CONCRETE BLOCKS 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 5, 1965 Lil 524 2e. 28

-.ZZ4vMa-. W. cLA/UTOM CHAQLES W. HOWE INVENTORS BY /24 VQA/M A'rrorzmgys July 16, 1968 R. w. CLANTON ET AL MACHINE FOR SPLITTING CONCRETE BLOCKS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 5, 1965 i w WWW W v D m g M Z 4 i V Re a 3 u nu ATTORNEY S United States Patent "ice 3,392,719 MACHINE FOR SPLITTING CONCRETE BLOCKS Raymond W. Clanton, 9735 Orcas Ave., Sunland, Calif. 91040, and Charles W. Howe, Saugus, Calif.; said Howe assignor to said Clanton Filed June 3, 1965, Ser. No. 461,206 6 Claims. (Cl. 125-23) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The application discloses a machine with four powered knives disposed in a common vertical plane for contacting a concrete block on four sides and splitting it togther with means correlating the action of and the force applied by the knives and means limiting the penetration of the knives. The machine also includes powered means for feeding blocks over a supporting surface to the knives and means for automatically indexing and controlling the feed mechanism.

This invention relates generally to machines for splitting stones and more particularly to machines designed to split concrete building blocks.

In recent years, with the greatly increased use of concrete blocks in building, there has been a demand for facing blocks having a rough-hewn type of face. In order to produce such blocks, it has been the practice to split concrete blocks longitudinally along one or more planes to provide at least one rough face for each block. However, considerable difficulty has been experienced since, in order to secure a desired face texture, the blocks must be substantially cured before being split, and the apparatus used has resulted in a high percentage of damaged and unusable blocks.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved block splitting machine or apparatus designed especially for use in splitting substantially cured, hard concrete blocks with a minimum of waste, but useful also for splitting stone, bricks or the like.

Another object is to provide such a machine having a novel and improved means for supporting and guiding the block-splitting knives. In this connection it is an object to provide self-equalizing knife assemblies.

A further object is to provide a machine embodying a novel construction which enables it to be readily adjusted for blocks of various heights and which includes a novel feed indexing means.

Still another object is to provide a machine of the type indicated which can be economically manufactured and operated.

A further object is to provide a machine having novel means for prevening undue penetration of the blocks by the knives, thereby greatly reducing breakage.

These and other objects will be apparent from the drawings and the following description. Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of apparatus embodyin g the invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the apparatus of FIG. 1, partially broken away;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view on line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view on line 4--4 of FIG. 3 but on a larger scale;

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view on line 55 of FIG. 3, on the same scale as FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view on line 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view on line 77 of FIG. 2, but on a larger scale;

3,392,719 Patented July 16, 1968 FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional plan view on line 38 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view on line 9-9 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is an isometric view of a. typical concrete block.

FIG. 11 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 7, but showing a modified construction;

FlG. 12 is a sectional view on line 12-12 of FIG. 11, but on a larger scale;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary sectional view on line Iii-13 of FIG. 12;

FlG. 14 is a fragmentary sectional view on line 1414 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view on line 15-15 of FIG. 11; and

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary sectional view on line 16--16 of FIG. 11.

More particularly describing the invention, numeral 11 generally designates a main frame which includes a bed 12 supported upon four legs 13 which in turn stand upon a suitable foundation 14. The frame bed includes a pair of parallel side channel members 15 and a pair of parallel end channel members 16, all of which are welded or otherwise rigidly secured together and to the legs 13. An upright frame, designated generally 18, rises from the bed 12 intermediate its ends. The upright frame includes a pair of parallel and laterally spaced tubular posts 19 at each side, the posts being welded or othelwise rigidly secured at their lower end portions to the side channels 15 of the bed. A head plate 2.0 is fixed to the upper ends of the post.

In the region of the upright frame we provide a pair of horizontally disposed plates 26 rigidly mounted on the side channels 15 by means of members 24, the parts preferably being welded. The plates are slightly spaced to define a slot 25 which, as will later appear, accommodates a lower knife member used in the splitting of the blocks. Plates 26 thus provide a rigid horizontal upper surface to support the blocks during the splitting operation.

On the right-hand side of the upright frame as the apparatus as viewed in FIG. 1, we provide a table 28 which is supported on the bed of the main frame by means of studs 29 thereon which pass through ears 30 on the table and by nuts 31 on the studs. After the blocks are split, they are advanced onto this table as shown in FIG. 1.

On the other or rear side of the upright frame we provide a block supporting framework 34 over which the blocks are advanced to the region where they are split. This structure includes a frame 35' with legs 36 to receive studs 37 on the main frame bed 12. Nuts 38 secure the parts. Framework 34 includes a rectangular frame 40 provided with a plurality of runner strips 41 which are disposed at the same level as the plates 26 to which the unsplit blocks B are delivered. A typical block is shown in FIG. 10 wherein lines of split are designated 42.

A feed mechanism is provided to the rear of the frame work 34. This includes a fluid-operated piston-cylinder unit assembly 4-3 which operates a channel-shaped carriage 44. The latter is mounted for limited movement in a guide frame 45 carried on cross members 46 fixed to the bed of the main frame. The guide frame includes ledges 48 on which the carriage is supported. The carriage has guide wheels 49 which engage the underside of the ledges. The piston rod 50 of the unit 43 is attached to an upright wall 51 of the carriage. The forward end of the carriage is provided with a cross member 52 adapted to engage the rear edges of the blocks which are advanced over the runners 39 thereby. The carriage is provided with an indexing plate 54 (FIG. 6) having projections 55 along its upper surface for use in conjunction with a feeler 56 for controlling the movement of the hydraulic jack through suitable control means. The plate 54 is removably munt ed in supports 57 so as to enable the use of other indexing plates as required.

The upright frame 18 acts as a support and guide for a knife assembly frame oil. This includes an upper cross member 61, two laterally spaced vertical members 62 at each side, and a lower cross member 63. The vertical members 62 are each of right angle cross section and these members slidably engage the inner sides of the tubular posts 19 (FG. 3). The upper cross member is resiliently suspended from the top plate 2t? of frame by a bolt 65 and a suitable compression coil spring 66 between a washer 67 on the bolt and plate The upper cross member supports a hydraulic jack 68, this being suspended from a crosspin The piston rod 63' of the jack is secured as by a clevis-type joint 7% to an upper knife bar 71. The ends of this latter bar lie between and are guided by the vertical members 62 at each side of the knife-supporting frame. The bar 71 is made up of two side plates 73 between which a knife 74 is mounted upon pins 75. A slotted bottom plate 76, which is preferably detachably mounted, passes the knife and serves to limit penetration thereof into the concrete block.

The lower cross member, which is a rigid part of knife supporting frame of}, includes two members 78, the ends of which are secured to the vertical members 62. A knife blade St} is mounted between members 62 and is adapted to be received in and pass partially through the slot 25 defined by the plates 26.

With the construction thus far described, it will be apparent that when a concrete block B is in place over the slot 25 on the plates 26 and jack 68 is actuated to move the upper knife downwardly into contact with the block, upon either of the knives first striking the block, the knife-supporting frame of will move in the frame 18 until the other knife strikes the block, and as pressure is applied by the jack, the pressure is automatically equalized between the two knives.

In addition to the aforementioned upper and lower knives which are in register in a common plane, we also provide a pair of side knives which strike and exert pressure against a block in the same plane as the upper and lower knives. The side knives, designated 82, are mounted in levers 83, respectively. Each lever is pivotally mounted at 84 upon a bracket 85 rigidly attached to the posts 19 of frame 18. The knives are shown as pivotally mounted at 85'. The lower ends of the two levers are connected by a hydraulic jack 87 and this in turn preferably is operably connected to the aforementioned jack 68 so that the knives are simultaneously operated. Jack 8'7 preferably is smaller in diameter than jack 63 and connected to the same source of pressure fluid so that greater pressure is exerted by the upper and lower knives than by the side knives; however, in some cases, equal or greater pressure might be desirable on the side knives, depending upon the dimensions of the block.

We prefer to limit the penetration of the block by the knives to a relatively small amount, such as from about & to /s of an inch. although it may be greater, and this is accomplished in the case of the side knives by the hard facing material 90 of levers 83, by the bottom plate 76 on the upper knife bar, and by stop screws 92 which limit upward movement of the frame an.

It is to be understood that any suitable hydraulic system and controls may be used in conjunction with the readily adjustable (by substitution of indexing plate indexing means previously described to operate the various cylinders and coordinate the operation of the feed cylinder with the knife operating cylinders, and since this is well within the skill of those familiar with the art, such means is not shown.

Referring now to FlGS. lll6 wherein we show a modified construction, elements thereof which are the same as elements of the apparatus previously described are designated by corresponding numerals plus the suflix A. The upright frame 18A acts as a support for the knife assembly frame GA as previously described, but the construction and arrangement of the knives are different, and this form of the invention involves a special height adjustment feature. Here the main or upper knife bar 109 extends laterally beyond the posts 19A and frame A and is connected to the head plate 20A for limited downward movement by means of two tie rods 102. These are connected at their lower ends at 103 to the ends of the upper knife bar and extend upwardly therefrom passing through holes 104 in the head plate. A selected number of collars 195 are placed on each rod above the plate. Each rod has a nut 1% and washer 197 at its upper end. The collars have interfitting ends, each one having an axial flange 169 at one end and a flangereceiving recess at the other. Also each collar is interrupted by an axialradial slot 111 so that it can be placed on and removed from the rod without passing it axially over the end.

The tie rods serve to locate and to limit the downward movement of the upper knife bar and the collars 105 .provides an easy means for vertically adjusting the bar to take care of concrete blocks of different heights. An adjustable stop screw 113 is provided in the head plate for limiting upward movement of the frame 60A, and hence penetration by the lower knife.

The upper knife bar 100 is formed of two side plates 115, and a top plate 116, and a slotted bottom plate 117. Two knives 118 are mounted on pins 119 which are re ceived in the side plates 115. The angle of each knife can be adjusted by setscrews 120 in the top plate.

The lower bar 63A is fitted with two knives 122 mounted on pins 123, thus allowing them limited pivotal movement.

In this form of the invention we provide a side knife 125 at each side operated by a fluid ram or jack 126 immediately behind it. Each knife is mounted between flanged plates 128 connected to a head 129. The latter is mounted on a piston rod 130 of the fluid ram 126. Clamps 132 serve to mount the ram on posts 19A.

The fluid rams 126 and fluid jack 86A should preferably be connected into the same fluid system for simultaneously operation, but since such systems are well known, no showing has been made thereof.

The operation of the modification shown in FIGS. lll6 is substantially the same as the machine previously described.

Although we have illustrated and described a preferred form of my invention, we contemplate that various changes and modifications can be made therein without departing from the invention, the scope of which is indi cated by the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a device for splitting substantially cured concrete blocks or the like, a main frame, means mounted on said frame and providing a block-supporting surface, said surface being interrupted by a knife-passing slot, an upright frame mounted on said main frame and extending upwardly therefrom in the region of said slot, at knife-supporting frame mounted on said upright frame and guided thereby for limited vertical movement, said knife-supporting frame extending above and below said block-supporting surface, a lower knife carried by said knife-supporting frame beneath said surface and in register with the slot therein, a main jack mounted on said knife-supporting frame above said lower knife for expansion toward and contraction away from said lower knife, and an upper knife carried by said jack between said jack and said lower knife, said upper and lower knives being in register and opposed, a pair of opposed knives carried by said frame above said block-supporting surface and mounted for movement toward each other in the same plane as that of said upper and lower knives, jack means operably connected to move said pair of opposed knives toward and away from each other, and means operably associated with each said knife for limiting penetration of a block to a small fraction of an inch.

2. In a device for splitting hard concrete blocks or the like, a main frame, means mounted on said frame and providing a block-supporting surface, said surface being interrupted by a knife-passing slot, an upright frame mounted on said main frame and extending upwardly therefrom in the region of said slot, a knife-supporting frame mounted on said upright frame and guided thereby for limited vertical movement, said knife-supporting frame extending above and below said block-supporting surface, a lower knife carried by said knife-supporting frame beneath said surface and in register with the slot therein, a main jack mounted on said knifesupporting frame above said lower knife for expansion toward and contraction away from said lower knife, an upper knife bar carried by said jack between said jack and said lower knife, an upper knife mounted in said bar, said upper and lower knives being in register and opposed, a pair of tie rods depending from the upright frame and attached at their lower ends to said knife bar, and stop means on said upright frame limiting upward movement of said knifesupporting frame.

3. The device set forth in claim 2 in which removable collars are provided on each rod above a supporting portion of the frame for adjusting the effective length of the rods.

4. In a device for splitting substantially cured concrete blocks or the like, a main frame, means mounted on said frame and providing a block-supporting surface, said surface being interrupted by a knife-passing slot, an upright frame mounted on said main frame and extending upwardly therefrom in the region of said slot, at knife-sup porting frame mounted on said upright frame and guided thereby for limited vertical movement, said knife-supporting frame extending above and below said block-supporting surface, a lower knife carried by said knife-supporting frame beneath said surface and in register with the slot therein, a main jack mounted on said knife-supporting frame above said lower knife for expansion toward and contraction away from said lower knife, an upper knife carried by said jack between said jack and said lovEr knife, said upper and lower knives being in register and opposed, a pair of levers mounted at opposite sides, respectively, of said main frame for pivotal movement about horizontal axes, a pair of opposed side knives above said block-supporting surface mounted on said levers, respectively, above the pivotal axes thereof, said side knives being in the :same plane as that of said upper and lower knives, and jack means operably connected between said levers to move said pair of opposed knives toward and away from each other.

5. In a device for splitting substantially cured concrete blocks or the like, a main frame, means mounted on said frame and providing a block-supporting surface, said surface being interrupted by a knife-passing :slot, an upright frame mounted on said main frame and extending upwardly therefrom in the region of said slot, a knifesupporting frame mounted on said upright frame and guided thereby for limited vertical movement, said knifesupporting frame extending above and below said blocksupporting surface, a lower knife carried by said knifesupporting surface, a lower knife carried by said knifesupporting frame beneath said surface and in register with the slot therein, a main jack mounted on said knife'sup porting frame above said lower knife for expansion toward and contraction away from said lower knife, an upper knife carried by said jack and said lower knife, said upper and lower knives being in register and opposed, a pair of opposed side knives carried by said frame above said block-supporting surface and mounted for movement toward each other in the same plane as that of said upper and lower knives, jack means operably connected to move said pair of opposed side knives toward. and away from each other, and means operably effective to limit penetration of a block by said upper, lower and side knives to a fraction of an inch of the order of less than one-fourth inch, said means including an adjustable stop on said upright frame to limit movement of said knife-supporting frame.

6. The device set forth in claim 5 in which the means for limiting penetration of the block by the knives limits said penetration to approximately one-eighth of an inch.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 749,937 1/1904 Lanigan -23 2,107,134 2/1938 Weinlich 26968 2,582,694 1/1952 Gundlach 125-23 2,657,681 11/1953 Gatzke 125- 23 2,746,447 5/1956 Petch 125-23 2,912,969 11/1959 Masson 12523 1,919,800 7/1933 Newsom 125-23 FOREIGN PATENTS 215,878 6/1961 Austria. 114,892 11/1900 Denmark.

HAROLD D. WHITEHEAD, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US749937 *Nov 3, 1902Jan 19, 1904 Pierce lanigan
US1919800 *Feb 9, 1929Jul 25, 1933Newsom John BProcess of cutting blocks of stone
US2107134 *Nov 15, 1933Feb 1, 1938IbmCard punch feed mechanism
US2582694 *Feb 10, 1949Jan 15, 1952Gundlach Theodore FDevice for severance of rigid materials
US2657681 *Jan 3, 1952Nov 3, 1953Charles GatzkeMachine for splitting concrete blocks, building stones, and the like
US2746447 *Dec 28, 1953May 22, 1956Petch Mfg CompanyBlock splitting machine
US2912969 *Oct 1, 1957Nov 17, 1959Auguste MassonStone dressing and planing machines
AT215878B * Title not available
DK114892A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3817236 *May 26, 1972Jun 18, 1974Schlough TBlock splitter
US3978842 *Feb 27, 1975Sep 7, 1976Coffman Leon MMasonry block cutter
US3998201 *Nov 23, 1973Dec 21, 1976Takenaka Komuten Company, Ltd.Concrete breaker
US4124015 *Mar 30, 1977Nov 7, 1978Ab Skanska CementgjuterietDevice for cutting in particular reinforced concrete piles
US4250863 *Nov 26, 1979Feb 17, 1981Pierre GagnonCement block splitter
US5007593 *Jul 10, 1990Apr 16, 1991Diaber AgApparatus for exposing the reinforcing bars of reinforced concrete pillars
US5139006 *Jul 17, 1990Aug 18, 1992Trudeau Leon BHydraulic concrete pile cutter
US5413086 *Jul 17, 1991May 9, 1995Trudeau; Leon B.Concrete pile cutter
US5638805 *Jan 30, 1995Jun 17, 1997Li; Kwok-KuengManually-operated hydraulic rock trimmer
US5762061 *Jun 15, 1994Jun 9, 1998Bevan; David MauriceSplitting apparatus
US5827015 *Sep 2, 1997Oct 27, 1998Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US5879603 *Nov 8, 1996Mar 9, 1999Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Process for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US5947104 *Jun 16, 1997Sep 7, 1999Li; Kwok-KuengManually-operated hydraulic linear actuators
US6050255 *Jan 30, 1998Apr 18, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitter blade assembly and station
US6142713 *Sep 25, 1998Nov 7, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6178704Jul 1, 1999Jan 30, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitting technique
US6183168Feb 3, 2000Feb 6, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6312197Sep 18, 2000Nov 6, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6616382Sep 17, 2001Sep 9, 2003Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6827073 *Feb 20, 2003Dec 7, 2004Kelly J. MorrellBlock splitting tool
US6874494Mar 20, 2002Apr 5, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US6886551Apr 10, 2003May 3, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US6918715Jun 19, 2001Jul 19, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US6964272Apr 2, 2004Nov 15, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7004158Feb 14, 2005Feb 28, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7048472Jun 11, 2003May 23, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US7066167Jan 6, 2005Jun 27, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7146974Sep 13, 2004Dec 12, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7243646Mar 4, 2005Jul 17, 2007Todack James JApparatus and method for shearing reinforced concrete piles and metal piles and crushing reinforced concrete piles
US7360970Dec 8, 2005Apr 22, 2008Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US7428900Jul 28, 2005Sep 30, 2008Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7870853Feb 13, 2008Jan 18, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US7967001Nov 23, 2010Jun 28, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8006683Oct 29, 2007Aug 30, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8028688Oct 18, 2006Oct 4, 2011Pavestone Company, LlcConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US8136516Aug 2, 2010Mar 20, 2012Pavestone, LLCConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus
US8251053Dec 14, 2010Aug 28, 2012Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8302591Jun 5, 2008Nov 6, 2012Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcBlock splitter assembly and method of producing wall blocks
US8327833Mar 25, 2011Dec 11, 2012Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US8448634Jul 19, 2011May 28, 2013Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcBlock splitter assembly and method of producing wall blocks
US8701647May 6, 2013Apr 22, 2014Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcBlock splitter assembly and method of producing wall blocks
US8701648Jul 31, 2013Apr 22, 2014Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcBlock splitter assembly and method of producing wall blocks
US9102079Aug 29, 2013Aug 11, 2015Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US9573293Sep 14, 2012Feb 21, 2017Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US9643337Nov 20, 2013May 9, 2017Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcBlock splitter assembly and method of producing wall blocks
US9701046Jun 20, 2014Jul 11, 2017Pavestone, LLCMethod and apparatus for dry cast facing concrete deposition
US20040200468 *Apr 10, 2003Oct 14, 2004Scherer Ronald J.Block splitting assembly and method
US20040221545 *Apr 2, 2004Nov 11, 2004Scherer Ronald J.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050115555 *Jan 6, 2005Jun 2, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050145300 *Feb 14, 2005Jul 7, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20050194000 *Mar 4, 2005Sep 8, 2005Todack James J.Apparatus and method for shearing reinforced concrete piles and metal piles and crushing reinforced concrete piles
US20050200116 *Mar 4, 2005Sep 15, 2005Ngai Keung Metal & Plastic Manufactory LimitedElectronic book reading apparatus
US20050268901 *Jul 28, 2005Dec 8, 2005Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20060054154 *Sep 13, 2004Mar 16, 2006Scherer Ronald JBlock splitting assembly and method
US20060062015 *Aug 12, 2005Mar 23, 2006Du-Hwan ChungRadiant pad for display device, backlight assembly and flat panel display device having the same
US20060169270 *Dec 7, 2005Aug 3, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20080092870 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 24, 2008Pavestone Company, L.P.Concrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20080096471 *Oct 18, 2006Apr 24, 2008Pavestone Company, L.P.Concrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20080302350 *Jun 5, 2008Dec 11, 2008Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitter assembly and method of producing wall blocks
US20100313868 *Aug 2, 2010Dec 16, 2010William Howard KarauConcrete block splitting and pitching apparatus and method
US20110061640 *Nov 23, 2010Mar 17, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20110083656 *Dec 14, 2010Apr 14, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20110168152 *Mar 25, 2011Jul 14, 2011Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Block splitting assembly and method
US20150136108 *Nov 18, 2014May 21, 2015Pavestone, LLCRock face splitting apparatus and method
USD445512Oct 27, 1997Jul 24, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Retaining wall block
USD458693Nov 8, 1996Jun 11, 2002Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Retaining wall block
USD773693Mar 23, 2015Dec 6, 2016Pavestone, LLCFront face of a retaining wall block
USD791346Oct 21, 2015Jul 4, 2017Pavestone, LLCInterlocking paver
DE2359313A1 *Nov 28, 1973Jun 20, 1974Takenaka Komuten CoBetonbrecher
Classifications
U.S. Classification125/23.1, 83/623
International ClassificationB28D1/22
Cooperative ClassificationB28D1/222
European ClassificationB28D1/22C